c# pdf to image converter : Convert pdf fillable form software SDK dll windows winforms wpf web forms wbook0-part48

Spatial Econometrics
James P. LeSage
Department of Economics
University of Toledo
CIRCULATED FOR REVIEW
December, 1998
Convert pdf fillable form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
form pdf fillable; convert word doc to fillable pdf form
Convert pdf fillable form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
add signature field to pdf; add fillable fields to pdf online
Preface
Thistext providesanintroductionto spatialeconometricsaswellasaset of
MATLABfunctionsthatimplement ahostofspatialeconometricestimation
methods. The intended audience is faculty and students involved in mod-
eling spatial data sets using spatial econometric methods. The MATLAB
functionsdescribedinthisbook have been used in my ownresearchaswell
as teaching both undergraduate and graduate econometricscourses.
Toolboxesarethe namegivenbytheMathWorkstorelatedsetsof MAT-
LAB functions aimed at solving a particular class of problems. Toolboxes
of functions useful in signal processing, optimization, statistics, nance
and a host of other areas are available from the MathWorks as add-ons
to the standard MATLAB software distribution. I use the term Econo-
metrics Toolbox to refer to my collection of function libraries described
in a manual entitled Applied Econometrics using MATLAB available at
http://www.econ.utoledo.edu.
The MATLAB spatial econometrics functions used to apply the spatial
econometric models discussed in this text rely on many of the functions in
the Econometrics Toolbox. The spatial econometric functions constitute a
\library"withinthebroaderset ofeconometricfunctions. To use thespatial
econometrics functions library you need to install the entire set of Econo-
metrics Toolbox functions inMATLAB. The spatialeconometricsfunctions
library is part of the EconometricsToolbox and will be installed and avail-
able for use as wellasthe econometrics functions.
Researcherscurrently using Gauss, RATS, TSP, orSAS foreconometric
programming might nd switching to MATLAB advantageous. MATLAB
software has always had excellent numerical algorithms, and has recently
beenextendedtoinclude: sparse matrixalgorithmsandvery good graphical
capabilities. MATLAB software isavailable on a wide variety of computing
platforms including mainframe, Intel, Apple, and Linux or Unix worksta-
tions. A Student Version of MATLAB isavailable for less than $100. This
version is limited in the size of problems it can solve, but many of the ex-
i
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast. Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents.
convert word form to pdf with fillable; .net fill pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents.
convert excel spreadsheet to fillable pdf form; convert pdf file to fillable form
ii
amples in this text rely on a small data sample with 49 observations that
can be used with the Student Version of MATLAB.
The collectionof around 450 functions and demonstration programsare
organized intolibraries,withapproximately 30 spatial econometricslibrary
functions described in this text. For those interested in other econometric
functions orin adding programstothe spatial econometricslibrary,see the
manualfortheEconometricsToolbox. The350page manualprovidesmany
details regarding programming techniques used to construct the functions
and examples of adding new functions to the Econometrics Toolbox. This
text does not focus on programming methods. The emphasis here is on
applying the existing spatial econometric estimation functions to modeling
spatial data sets.
Aconsistent design wasimplemented that provides documentation, ex-
ample programs,and functionsto produce printed as well as graphical pre-
sentation of estimation results for all of the econometric functions. This
was accomplished using the \structure variables" introduced in MATLAB
Version 5. Information from econometric estimation is encapsulated into a
singlevariablethat contains\elds"forindividualparametersandstatistics
related to the econometric results. A thoughtful design by the MathWorks
allows these structure variables to contain scalar, vector, matrix, string,
and even multi-dimensional matricesas elds. Thisallows the econometric
functions to return a single structure that contains all estimation results.
These structurescan be passed to otherfunctions that can intelligentlyde-
cipher the information and provide a printed or graphical presentation of
the results.
The Econometrics Toolbox along with the spatial econometrics library
functionsshould allowfaculty touse MATLABin undergraduate and grad-
uate level courses with absolutely no programming on the part of students
or faculty.
Inadditionto providing aset of spatialeconometric estimationroutines
and documentation,the book hasanothergoal,applied modeling strategies
anddataanalysis. Giventheabilitytoeasilyimplementahost ofalternative
models and produce estimates rapidly, attention naturally turns to which
models and estimates work best to summary a spatial data sample. Much
of the discussioninthis text is on these issues.
This text isprovided in Adobe PDF format for online use. It attempts
to draw on the unique aspects of a computer presentation platform. The
abilitytopresent programcode,data setsand appliedexamplesinanonline
fashionisa relativelyrecent phenomena,soissuesof howtobest accomplish
auseful online presentationare numerous. For the online textthe following
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel in VB Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without
attach image to pdf form; create fillable pdf form from word
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in
pdf create fillable form; add attachment to pdf form
iii
featureswere included in the PDF document.
1. A detailed set of \bookmarks" that allow the reader to jump to any
section orsubsection in the text.
2. A detailed set of \bookmarks" that allow the reader to jump to an
examples orgures in the text.
3. Asetof\bookmarks"thatallowthereadertoviewthespatialdatasets
anddocumentation forthe datasetsusing a Web browser.
4. A set of \bookmarks"that allowthe readertoviewallofthe example
programsusing a Web browser.
Allof theexamplesinthe text aswellasthedatasetsareavailableoine
as well on my Web site: http://www.econ.utoledo.eduunderthe MATLAB
gallery icon.
Finally, there are obviously omissions, bugs and perhaps programming
errors in the Econometrics Toolbox and the spatial econometrics library
functions. Thiswouldlikelybe the case withany suchendeavor. Iwouldbe
grateful if users would notify me when they encounter problems. It would
also be helpful if users who produce generally useful functions that extend
the toolbox wouldsubmitthemforinclusion. Muchof theeconometriccode
Iencounterontheinternetissimplytoospecic to asingleresearchproblem
to be generally useful in other applications. If econometric researchers are
serious about their newly proposed estimation methods, they should take
the time to craft agenerallyusefulMATLABfunction thatotherscould use
in applied research. Inclusion in the spatial econometrics function library
wouldhavetheaddedbenetofintroducingnewresearchmethodstofaculty
and their students.
ThelatestversionoftheEconometricsToolboxfunctionscanbefoundon
the Internet at: http://www.econ.utoledo.edu under the MATLAB gallery
icon. Instructions for installing these functions are in an Appendix to this
textalongwithalistingofthefunctionsinthelibraryandabriefdescription
of each.
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#.NET. An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET.
create a fillable pdf form from a pdf; convert pdf form fillable
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel. Convert to PDF with
convert pdf file to fillable form online; create fillable form from pdf
Contents
1 Introduction
1
1.1 Spatialeconometrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
1.2 Spatialdependence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
1.3 Spatialheterogeneity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
1.4 Quantifyinglocation in our models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
1.4.1 Quantifying spatial contiguity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
1.4.2 Quantifying spatial position. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1.5 The MATLAB spatial econometricslibrary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
1.5.1 Estimationfunctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1.5.2 Using the results structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
1.6 Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
1.7 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
2 Spatial autoregressive models
30
2.1 The rst-order spatial ARmodel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
2.1.1 The far() function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2.1.2 Applied examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
2.2 The mixed autoregressive-regressive model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
2.2.1 The sar() function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
2.2.2 Applied examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
2.3 The spatial errorsmodel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
2.3.1 The sem() function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
2.3.2 Applied examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
2.4 The general spatial model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
2.4.1 The sac() function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
2.4.2 Applied examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
2.5 An applied exercise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
2.6 Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
2.7 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
iv
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files.
create a writable pdf form; convert word form to fillable pdf form
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
convert word form to fillable pdf; create fill pdf form
CONTENTS
v
3 Bayesian Spatial autoregressive models
84
3.1 The Bayesian regressionmodel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
3.2 The Bayesian FARmodel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
3.2.1 The far
g() function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
3.2.2 Applied examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
3.3 Other spatial autoregressive models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
3.4 Appliedexamples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
3.5 An applied exercise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
3.6 Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
3.7 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
4 Locally linear spatial models
127
4.1 Spatialexpansion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
4.1.1 Implementing spatial expansion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
4.1.2 Applied examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
4.2 DARP models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
4.3 Non-parametric locally linearmodels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
4.3.1 Implementing GWR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
4.4 A Bayesian Approach to GWR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
4.4.1 Estimationof the BGWRmodel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
4.4.2 Informative priors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
4.4.3 Implementation details. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
4.5 An applied exercise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
4.6 Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
4.7 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
5 Limited dependent variable models
187
5.1 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
5.2 The Gibbs sampler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
5.3 Heteroscedastic models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
5.4 Implementing these models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
5.5 An applied example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
5.6 Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
5.7 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
6 VAR and Error Correction Models
213
6.1 VAR models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
6.2 Errorcorrection models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
6.3 Bayesian variants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
6.4 Forecasting the models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. Load PDF from stream programmatically.
fillable pdf forms; pdf fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Convert OpenOffice Spreadsheet data to PDF. Export PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation. Turn ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
pdf fill form; acrobat fill in pdf forms
CONTENTS
vi
6.5 An applied exercise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
6.6 Chapter Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
6.7 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
Appendix
260
List of Examples
1.1 Demonstrate regressionusing the ols() function . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2.1 Using the fars() function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
2.2 Using sparse matrix functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
2.3 Solving forrho using the far() function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
2.4 Using the sar() function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
2.5 Using the xy2cont() function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
2.6 Least-squaresbias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
2.7 Testing forspatialcorrelation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
2.8 Using the sem() function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
2.9 Using the sac() function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
2.10 A largesample SAC model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
2.11 Least-squares on the Boston dataset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
2.12 Testing for spatial correlation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
2.13 Spatialmodel estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
3.1 Heteroscedastic Gibbs sampler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
3.2 Metropolis within Gibbssampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
3.3 Using the far
g() function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
3.4 Using far
g() with a largedata set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
3.5 Using sem
g() ina Monte Carlosetting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
3.6 Anoutlierexample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
3.7 Robust Boston model estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
3.8 Imposing restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
3.9 The probability of negative lambda. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
4.1 Using the casetti() function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
4.2 Using the darp() function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
4.3 Using darp() overspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
4.4 Using the gwr() function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
4.5 Using the bgwr() function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
4.6 Producing robust BGWRestimates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
4.7 Posteriorprobabilitiesformodels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
vii
LIST OF EXAMPLES
viii
5.1 Using the sarp
gfunction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
5.2 Using the sart
gfunction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
5.3 Right-censored Tobit Bostondata. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
6.1 Using the var() function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
6.2 Using the pgranger() function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
6.3 VAR withdeterministic variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
6.4 Using the lrratio()function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
6.5 Using the adf() and cadf() functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
6.6 Using the johansen() function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
6.7 Estimatingerrorcorrectionmodels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
6.8 EstimatingBVARmodels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
6.9 Using bvar() withgeneralweights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
6.10 Estimating RECM models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
6.11 Forecasting VAR models. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
6.12 Forecasting multiple related models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
6.13 A forecast accuracy experiment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
6.14 Linking national and regional models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
6.15 Sequential forecasting of regionalmodels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
List of Figures
1.1 Measurement errorand spatial dependence . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
1.2 Distributionsof house age versus distance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
1.3 An illustrationof contiguity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
1.4 Distance expansion estimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1.5 GWRestimates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.1 Spatialautoregressivet and residuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
2.2 Sparsity structure of W from Pace and Barry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
2.3 Generatedcontiguity structure results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
2.4 Spatialcontiguity structures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
2.5 Actual vs. Predicted housing values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
3.1 V
i
estimatesfromthe Gibbssampler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
3.2 Conditionaldistributionof   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
3.3 First 100 Gibbsdrawsfor and   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
3.4 Mean of the v
i
draws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
3.5 Mean of the v
i
draws forPace and Barry data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
3.6 Posteriordistribution for   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
3.7 V
i
estimatesforthe Boston data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
3.8 Posteriordistribution of   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
3.9 Truncated posteriordistributionof   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
4.1 Spatialx-y expansion estimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
4.2 Spatialx-y total impact estimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
4.3 Distance expansion estimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
4.4 Actual versusPredicted and residuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
4.5 Comparisonof GWR distance weighting schemes . . . . . . . . . . 158
4.6 GWRand BGWRdiuse prior estimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
4.7 GWRand Robust BGWR estimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
4.8 GWRand BGWRDistance-basedweightsadjusted by V
i
. . 174
ix
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested