c# pdf to image ghostscript : Create a pdf with fields to fill in Library application component .net windows asp.net mvc wbook15-part55

CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
140
0
10
20
30
40
50
-7
-6.5
-6
-5.5
-5
sorted by x-direction, left=smallest x
x-income
0
10
20
30
40
50
1
1.2
1.4
1.6
1.8
x-house value
sorted by x-direction, left=smallest x
0
10
20
30
40
50
-1.5
-1
-0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
sorted by y-direction, left=smallest x
y-income
0
10
20
30
40
50
-1.8
-1.6
-1.4
-1.2
-1
-0.8
y-house value
sorted by y-direction, left=smallest x
Figure 4.2: Spatial x-y total impact estimates
These estimates take on a value of zero for the central observation since
the distance is zero at that point. This makes them somewhat easier to
interpret than the estimates for the case of x-y coordinates. We know that
the expansion coecients take on values of zero at the central point, pro-
ducing estimates based on the non-spatial base coecients for this point.
As we move outward from the center, the expansion estimates take over
and adjust the constant coecients to account for variation over space. The
printed distance expansion estimates reported for the base model reflect val-
ues near the distance-weighted average of all points in space. Given this,
we would interpret the coecients for the model at the central point to be
(62.349, -0.855, -0.138 ) for the intercept, income and house value variables
respectively. In Figure4.3 we see the total impact of income and house val-
ues on neighborhood crime as we move away from the central point. Both
income and house values have a negative eect on neighborhood crime as
we move away from the central city. Note that this is quite dierent from
Create a pdf with fields to fill in - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert pdf forms to fillable; create a fillable pdf form online
Create a pdf with fields to fill in - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
convert word document to pdf fillable form; create a fillable pdf form in word
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
141
the pattern shown for the x-y expansion. Anselin (1988) in analyzing the
x-y model shows that heteroscedastic disturbances produce problems that
plague inferences for the model. Adjusting for the heteroscedastic distur-
bances dramatically alters the inferences. We turn attention to this issue
when we discuss the DARP version of this model in Section4.2.
The plots of the coecient estimates provide an important source of
information about the nature of coecient variation over space, but you
should keep in mind that they do not indicate levels of signicance, simply
point estimates.
Our plt wrapper function works to call the appropriate function plt
cas
that provides individual graphs of each coecient in the model as well as
atwo-part graph showing actual versus predicted and residuals. Figure4.4
shows the actual versus predicted and residuals from the distance expansion
model. This plot is produced by the plt function when given a results
structure from the casetti function.
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
-1.8
-1.6
-1.4
-1.2
-1
-0.8
distance from the center, left=center
d-income
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
-0.4
-0.35
-0.3
-0.25
-0.2
-0.15
-0.1
-0.05
d-house value
distance from the center, left=center
Figure 4.3: Distance expansion estimates
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Select the fill color when drawing oval, rectangle, polygon and irregular shape. Select the line color when drawing annotations on PDF document. Default create.
create fillable pdf form; convert pdf to pdf form fillable
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
pdf" ' Set PDF passwords. Dim userPassword As String = "you" Dim newUserPassword As String = "fill" Dim newOwnerPassword As String = "watch" ' Create setting
create fillable forms in pdf; acrobat fill in pdf forms
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
142
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
CASETTI   Actual vs. Predicted
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
-40
-30
-20
-10
0
10
20
30
Residuals
Figure 4.4: Actual versus Predicted and residuals
4.2 DARP models
Aproblem with the spatial expansion model is that heteroscedasticity is in-
herent in the way the model is constructed. To see this, consider the slightly
altered version of the distance expansion model shown in (4.10), where we
have added a stochastic term u to reflect some error in the expansion rela-
tionship.
y = X + e
 = DJ
0
+u
(4.10)
Now consider substituting the second equation from (4.10) into the rst,
producing:
y= XDJ
0
+Xu +e
(4.11)
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
1_with_pw.pdf"; // Set PDF passwords. String userPassword = "you"; String newUserPassword = "fill"; String newOwnerPassword = "watch"; // Create setting for
create a pdf with fields to fill in; change pdf to fillable form
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Select the fill color when drawing oval, rectangle, polygon and irregular shape. Select the line color when drawing annotations on PDF document. Default create.
create fillable form from pdf; convert an existing form into a fillable pdf
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
143
It should be clear thatthe new compositedisturbance term Xu+e willreflect
heteroscedasticity unless the expansion relationship is exact and u = 0.
Casetti (1982) and Casetti and Can (1998) propose a model they label
DARP,anacronymfor Drift Analysis of RegressionParameters,that aims at
solving this problem. This model case be viewed as an extended expansion
model taking the form:
y = X+ e
 = f(Z;) +u
(4.12)
Where f(Z;) represents the expansion relationship based on a function f,
variables Z and parameters . Estimation of this model attempts to take
into account that the expanded model will have a heteroscedastic error as
shown in (4.11).
To keep our discussion concrete, we will rely on f(Z;) = DJ
0
, the
distance expansion relationship in discussing this model. In order to take
account of the spatial heteroscedasticity an explicit model of the composite
disturbance term: " = Xu + e, is incorporated during estimation. This
disturbance is assumed to have a variance structure that can be represented
inalternative ways shown below. We willrely on these alternativescalar and
matrix representations in the mathematical development and explanation of
the model.
E(""
0
) =  = 
2
Ψ
Ψ = exp(diag(γd
1
;γd
2
;:::;γd
n
))
 = diag(
2
1
;
2
2
;:::;
2
n
)
2
i
= exp(γ
0
i
d
i
)
(4.13)
Where d
i
denotes the squared distance between the ith observation and the
central point, and 
2
0
1
are parameters to be estimated. Of course, a
more general statement of the model would be that 
2
i
=g(h
i
;γ), indicating
that any functional form g involving some known variable h
i
and associated
parameters γ could be employed to specify the non-constant variance over
space.
Note that the alternative specications in (4.13) imply: 
2
=exp(γ
0
),
the constant scalar component of the variance structure, and exp(γ
1
d
i
)re-
flects the non-constant component whichis modeled as afunction of distance
from the central point.
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
Dim inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1_AF.pdf" Dim fields As List(Of BaseFormField) = PDFFormHandler.GetFormFields(inputFilePath) Console
convert pdf to form fill; convert word to pdf fillable form online
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
Able to retrieve all form fields from adobe PDF file in C#.NET. C#.NET Demo Code: Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in C#.NET.
converting a word document to a fillable pdf form; create pdf fillable form
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
144
An intuitive motivation for this type of variance structure is based on
considering the nature of the composite disturbance: Xu+e. The constant
scalar 
2
reflects the constant component e, while the role of the scalar pa-
rameter γ
1
associated with distance is to measure the impact of Xu, the
non-constant variance component on average. Somewhat loosely, consider
alinear regression involving the residuals on a constant term plus a vector
of distances from the central place. The constant term estimate would re-
flect 
2
=exp(γ
0
), while the distance coecient is intended to capture the
influence of the non-constant Xu component: Ψ = exp(γ
1
d).
If γ
1
=0, we havethat Ψ = 
2
I
n
,a constant scalar value across all obser-
vations in space. This would be indicative of a situation where u, the error
made in the expansionspecication is small. This homoscedastic case would
be indicative that a simple deterministic spatial expansion specication for
spatial coecient variation is performing well.
On the other hand, if γ
1
>0, we nd that moving away from the central
point produces a positive increase in the variance. This is interpreted as
evidence that `parameter drift' is present in the relationship being modeled.
The motivation is that increasing variance would be indicative of larger
errors (u) in the expansion relationship as we move away from the central
point.
Note that one can assume a value for γ
1
rather than estimate this pa-
rameter. If you impose a positive value, you are assuming a DARP model
that will generate locally linear estimates since movement in the parameters
will increase with movement away from the central point. This is because
allowing increasing variance in the stochastic component of the expansion
relation brings about more rapid change or adjustment in the parameters.
Another way to view this is that the change in parameters need not adhere
as strictly to the deterministic expansion specication. We will argue in
Section4.4 that a Bayesian approach to this type of specication is more
intuitively appealing.
Negative values for γ
1
suggest that the errors made by the deterministic
expansion specication are smaller as we move away from the central point.
This indicates that the expansion relation works well for points farther from
the center, but not as well for the central area observations. Casetti and
Can (1998) interpret this as suggesting \dierential performance" of the
base model with movement over space, and they label this phenomena as
`performance drift'. The intuition here is most likely based on the fact that
the expansion relationship is of a locally linear nature. Given this, better
performance with distance is indicative of a need tochange the deterministic
expansion relationship to improve performance. Again, I will argue that a
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Click to create a note to replace selected text add a text box to specific location on PDF page Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all
asp.net fill pdf form; change font size in fillable pdf form
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
Click to create a note to replace selected text add a text box to specific location on PDF page Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all
pdf add signature field; convert pdf to fillable form online
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
145
Bayesian model represents a more intuitively appealing way to deal with
these issues in Section4.4.
Estimation of the parameters of the model require either feasible gener-
alized least squares (FGLS) or maximum likelihood (ML) methods. Feasible
generalized least squares obtains a consistent estimate of the unknown pa-
rameter γ
1
and then proceeds to estimate the remaining parameters in the
model conditional on this estimate.
As an example, consider using least-squares to estimate the expansion
model and associated residuals, ^e = y − XDJ
0
. We could then carry out
aregression of the form:
log(^e
2
)= γ
0
1
d+ 
(4.14)
Casetti and Can (1998) argue that the estimate ^γ
1
from this procedure
would be consistent. Giventhis estimate and our knowledge of the distances
in the vector d, we construct and estimate of Ψ that we label
^
Ψ. Using
^
Ψ,
generalized least-squares can produce:
^
FGLS
= (X
0
^
Ψ
1
X)
−1
X
0
^
Ψ
−1
y
^
2
FGLS
= (y − X
^
FGLS
)
^
Ψ
−1
(y −X
^
FGLS
)=(n− k)
Of course, the usual GLS variance-covariance matrix for the estimates
applies:
var −cov(
^
FGLS
)= ^
2
(X
0^
Ψ
−1
X)
−1
(4.15)
Casetti and Can (1998) also suggest using a statistic: ^γ
2
1
=4:9348
P
d
i
which is chi-squared distributed with one degree of freedom to test the null
hypothesis that γ
1
=0.
Maximum likelihood estimation involves using optimization routines to
solve for a minimum of the negative of the log-likelihood function. We have
already seen how to solve optimization problems in the context of spatial
autoregressive models in Chapter2. We will take the same approach for this
model. The log-likelihood is:
L(;γ
1
j:) = c −(1=2)lnj
2
Ψj −(1=2)(y −X)
0
Ψ
−1
(y −X)
(4.16)
As in Chapter2 we can construct a MATLAB function to evaluate the
negative of this log-likelihood function and rely on our function maxlik.
The asymptotic variance-covariance matrix for the estimates  is equal to
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
146
that for the FGLS estimates shown in (4.15). The asymptotic variance-
covariance matrix for the parameters (
2
1
)is given by:
var − cov(
2
1
) = 2(D
0
D)
−1
D
= (;d)
(4.17)
In the case of maximum likelihood estimates, a Wald statistic based on
2
1
=2
P
d
i
that has a chi-squared distributionwith one degree of freedom can
be used to test the null hypothesis that γ
1
=0. Note that the maximum
likelihood estimate of γ
1
is more ecient than the FGLS estimate. This can
be seen by comparing the ML estimate's asymptotic variance of 2
P
d
i
,to
that for the FGLS which equals 4:9348
P
d
i
. Bear in mind, tests regarding
the parameter γ
1
are quite oftenthe focus of this methodology as it provides
exploratory evidence regarding `performance drift' versus `parameter drift',
so increased precision regarding this parameter may be important.
The functiondarpimplements this estimationprocedure usingthe max-
lik function from the Econometrics Toolbox to nd estimates via maximum
likelihood. The documentation for darp is:
PURPOSE: computes Casetti's DARP model
---------------------------------------------------
USAGE: results = darp(y,x,xc,yc,option)
where:
y = dependent variable vector
x = independent variables matrix
xc = latitude (or longitude) coordinate
yc = longitude (or latitude) coordinate
option = a structure variable containing options
option.exp = 0 for x-y expansion (default)
= 1 for distance from ctr expansion
option.ctr = central point observation # for distance expansion
option.iter = # of iterations for maximum likelihood routine
option.norm = 1 for isotropic x-y normalization (default=0)
---------------------------------------------------
RETURNS:
results.meth
= 'darp'
results.b0
= bhat (underlying b0x, b0y)
results.t0
= t-stats (associated with b0x, b0y)
results.beta
= spatially expanded estimates (nobs x nvar)
results.yhat
= yhat
results.resid = residuals
results.sige
= e'*e/(n-k)
results.rsqr
= rsquared
results.rbar
= rbar-squared
results.nobs
= nobs
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
147
results.nvar
= # of variables in x
results.y
= y data vector
results.xc
= xc
results.yc
= yc
results.ctr
= ctr (if input)
results.dist
= distance vector
results.exp
= exp input option
results.norm
= norm input option
results.iter
= # of maximum likelihood iterations
--------------------------------------------------
NOTE: assumes x(:,1) contains a constant term
--------------------------------------------------
Because we are relying on maximum likelihood estimation which may
not converge, we provide FGLS estimates as output in the event of failure.
Amessage is printed to the MATLAB command window indicating that this
has occurred. We rely on the FGLS estimates to provide starting values for
the maxlik routine, which should speed up the optimization process.
The DARP model can be invoked with either the x-y or distance ex-
pansion as in the case of the spatial expansion model. Specically, for x-y
expansion the variance specication is based on:
log(^e
2
)= γ
0
1
xc +γ
2
yc+ 
(4.18)
This generalizes the distance expansion approach presented previously.
Of course, we have an accompanying prt and plt function to provide
printed and graphical presentation of the estimation results.
Example 4.2 shows how to use the function darp for both x-y and dis-
tance expansion using the Columbus neighborhood crime data set.
% ----- example 4.2 Using the darp() function
% load Anselin (1988) Columbus neighborhood crime data
load anselin.dat; y = anselin(:,1); n = length(y);
x = [ones(n,1) anselin(:,2:3)];
xc = anselin(:,4); yc = anselin(:,5); % Anselin x-y coordinates
vnames = strvcat('crime','const','income','hse value');
% do Casetti darp using x-y expansion
res1 = darp(y,x,xc,yc);
prt(res1,vnames); % print the output
plt(res1,vnames); % plot the output
pause;
% do Casetti darp using distance expansion from observation #20
option.exp = 1; option.ctr = 20;
res2 = darp(y,x,xc,yc,option);
prt(res2,vnames); % print the output
plt(res2,vnames); % plot the output
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
148
The printed results are shown below, where we report not only the esti-
mates for 
0
and the expansion estimates, but estimates for the parameters
γ as well. A chi-squared statistic to test the null hypothesis that γ
1
= 0
is provided as well as a marginal probability level. For the case of the x-y
expansion, we see that γ
1
parameter is negative and signicant by virtue
of the large chi-squared statistic and associated marginal probability level
of 0.0121. The inference we would draw is that performance drift occurs in
the south-north direction. For the γ
2
parameter, we nd a positive value
that is not signicantly dierent from zero because of the marginal proba-
bility level of 0.8974. This indicates that the simple deterministic expansion
relationship is working well in the west-east direction. Note that these re-
sults conform to those found with the spatial expansion model, where we
indicated that parameter variationin the west-east direction was signicant,
but not for the south-north.
DARP X-Y Spatial Expansion Estimates
Dependent Variable =
crime
R-squared
=
0.6180
Rbar-squared
=
0.5634
sige
= 122.2255
gamma1,gamma2
=
-0.0807,
0.0046
gamma1, prob
=
6.2924,
0.0121
gamma2, prob
=
0.0166,
0.8974
# of iterations =
16
log-likelihood =
-181.3901
Nobs, Nvars
=
49,
3
***************************************************************
Base x-y estimates
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
const
66.783527
6.024676
0.000000
income
-2.639184
-0.399136
0.691640
hse value
0.249214
0.095822
0.924078
x-income
-0.048337
-0.537889
0.593247
x-hse value
0.021506
0.640820
0.524819
y-income
0.084877
0.564810
0.574947
y-hse value
-0.037460
-0.619817
0.538436
***************************************************************
Expansion estimates
Obs#
x-income x-hse value
y-income y-hse value
1
-1.3454
0.6595
4.0747
-1.6828
2
-1.3786
0.6758
3.8959
-1.6089
3
-1.3865
0.6796
3.7218
-1.5370
4
-1.2600
0.6176
3.6930
-1.5251
5
-1.4655
0.7183
4.2372
-1.7499
6
-1.5040
0.7372
3.9593
-1.6351
7
-1.5112
0.7407
3.6536
-1.5088
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
149
8
-1.6524
0.8100
3.7766
-1.5597
9
-1.4961
0.7333
3.3565
-1.3862
10
-1.7982
0.8814
3.5017
-1.4461
11
-1.8349
0.8994
3.3132
-1.3683
12
-1.8738
0.9185
3.1392
-1.2964
13
-1.8926
0.9277
2.8757
-1.1876
14
-1.9353
0.9487
2.6729
-1.1038
15
-1.9221
0.9422
2.4267
-1.0022
16
-1.8296
0.8968
2.6854
-1.1090
17
-1.7650
0.8652
3.0680
-1.2670
18
-1.6407
0.8042
3.4536
-1.4263
19
-1.6381
0.8029
3.2171
-1.3286
20
-1.5535
0.7615
3.1863
-1.3159
21
-1.6600
0.8137
3.0392
-1.2551
22
-1.6657
0.8165
2.9229
-1.2071
23
-1.6505
0.8091
2.8056
-1.1586
24
-1.5501
0.7598
2.7671
-1.1428
25
-1.6328
0.8004
2.6258
-1.0844
26
-1.6116
0.7900
2.3998
-0.9911
27
-1.5565
0.7630
2.4902
-1.0284
28
-1.4851
0.7280
2.4854
-1.0264
29
-1.5520
0.7607
2.6431
-1.0915
30
-1.4473
0.7095
2.7709
-1.1443
31
-1.5603
0.7648
2.9709
-1.2269
32
-1.4866
0.7287
3.1613
-1.3055
33
-1.5002
0.7354
2.9459
-1.2166
34
-1.4462
0.7089
2.9181
-1.2051
35
-1.3824
0.6776
3.0853
-1.2742
36
-1.4201
0.6961
3.2767
-1.3532
37
-1.4024
0.6874
3.4728
-1.4342
38
-1.4296
0.7008
3.4901
-1.4413
39
-1.3578
0.6656
3.4997
-1.4453
40
-1.3491
0.6613
3.4228
-1.4136
41
-1.3507
0.6621
3.3324
-1.3762
42
-1.3654
0.6693
3.2613
-1.3468
43
-1.2872
0.6310
2.9248
-1.2079
44
-1.1452
0.5613
2.7171
-1.1221
45
-1.0553
0.5173
2.8700
-1.1852
46
-1.0300
0.5049
2.7123
-1.1201
47
-0.9159
0.4490
2.5662
-1.0598
48
-0.9620
0.4715
2.4719
-1.0209
49
-1.0961
0.5373
2.5556
-1.0554
DARP Distance Expansion Estimates
Dependent Variable =
crime
R-squared
=
0.6083
Rbar-squared =
0.5628
sige
= 119.6188
gamma
=
-0.0053
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested