c# pdf to image ghostscript : Convert pdf fillable forms SDK application service wpf html windows dnn wbook16-part56

CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
150
gamma, prob
=
0.0467,
0.8289
# of iterations =
10
log-likelihood =
-138.64471
Nobs, Nvars
=
49,
3
central obs
=
20
***************************************************************
Base centroid estimates
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
const
62.323508
5.926825
0.000000
income
-0.889528
-0.925670
0.359448
hse value
-0.312813
-1.015500
0.315179
d-income
-0.004348
-0.790909
0.433056
d-hse value
0.000659
0.349488
0.728318
***************************************************************
Expansion estimates
Obs#
income
hse value
1
-0.4032
0.0055
2
-0.2644
0.0036
3
-0.1761
0.0024
4
-0.3070
0.0042
5
-0.4350
0.0060
6
-0.2311
0.0032
7
-0.0866
0.0012
8
-0.1552
0.0021
9
-0.0190
0.0003
10
-0.1837
0.0025
11
-0.1994
0.0027
12
-0.2513
0.0034
13
-0.3172
0.0043
14
-0.4554
0.0062
15
-0.5492
0.0075
16
-0.2807
0.0038
17
-0.1145
0.0016
18
-0.0455
0.0006
19
-0.0178
0.0002
20
-0.0000
0.0000
21
-0.0359
0.0005
22
-0.0569
0.0008
23
-0.0776
0.0011
24
-0.0662
0.0009
25
-0.1338
0.0018
26
-0.2413
0.0033
27
-0.1826
0.0025
28
-0.1965
0.0027
29
-0.1112
0.0015
30
-0.0925
0.0013
31
-0.0176
0.0002
32
-0.0111
0.0002
33
-0.0287
0.0004
Convert pdf fillable forms - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert word to pdf fillable form; convert excel spreadsheet to fillable pdf form
Convert pdf fillable forms - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
create a pdf form to fill out and save; converting pdf to fillable form
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
151
34
-0.0552
0.0008
35
-0.0753
0.0010
36
-0.0465
0.0006
37
-0.0867
0.0012
38
-0.0723
0.0010
39
-0.1305
0.0018
40
-0.1230
0.0017
41
-0.1085
0.0015
42
-0.0885
0.0012
43
-0.1989
0.0027
44
-0.4900
0.0067
45
-0.6437
0.0088
46
-0.7538
0.0103
47
-1.1374
0.0156
48
-1.0465
0.0143
49
-0.6607
0.0090
For the case of the distance expansion we nd a single γ parameter that
is negative but not signicant. This would be interpreted to mean that the
deterministic expansion relationship is performing adequately over space.
A comparison of the base model estimates from the x-y darp model
versus those from casetti show relatively similar coecient estimates as we
would expect. In the case of the x-y expansion all of the signs are the same
for spatial expansion and darp models. The distance expansion version of
the model exhibits a sign change for the coecient on income, which goes
from positive in the expansion model to negative in the darp model. Cor-
recting for the heteroscedastic character of the estimation problem produces
dramatic changes in the statistical signicance found for the base model
estimates. They all become insignicant, a nding consistent with results
reported by Anselin (1988) based on a jacknife approach to correcting for
heteroscedasticity in this model. (Anselin nds that the income coecient
is still marginally signicant after the correction.)
One approach to using this model is to expand around every point in
space andexamine the parameters γ for evidence indicating where the model
is suering from performance or parameter drift. Example 4.3 shows how
this might be accomplished using a `for loop' over all observations. For this
purpose, we wish only to recover the estimated values for the parameter γ
along with the marginal probability level.
% ----- example 4.3 Using darp() over space
% load Anselin (1988) Columbus neighborhood crime data
load anselin.dat; y = anselin(:,1); n = length(y);
x = [ones(n,1) anselin(:,2:3)];
xc = anselin(:,4); yc = anselin(:,5); % Anselin x-y coordinates
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Free PDF creator SDK for Visual Studio .NET. Batch create adobe PDF from multiple forms. Create fillable PDF document with fields.
convert pdf fillable form; create a pdf with fields to fill in
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in
create a fillable pdf form; form pdf fillable
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
152
vnames = strvcat('crime','const','income','hse value');
% do Casetti darp using distance expansion from all
% observations in the data sample
option.exp = 1;
output = zeros(n,2);
tic;
for i=1:n % loop over all observations
option.ctr = i;
res = darp(y,x,xc,yc,option);
output(i,1) = res.gamma(1);
output(i,2) = res.cprob(1);
end;
toc;
in.cnames = strvcat('gamma estimate','marginal probability');
in.rflag = 1;
mprint(output,in)
We use the MATLAB `tic' and `toc' commands to time the operation
of producing these maximum likelihood estimates across the entire sample.
The results are shown below, where we nd that it took around 70 seconds
to solve the maximum likelihood estimation problem, calculate expansion
estimates and produce all of the ancillary statistics 49 times, once for each
observation in the data set.
elapsed_time = 69.2673
Obs#
gamma estimate marginal probability
1
-0.2198
0.0714
2
-0.2718
0.0494
3
-0.3449
0.0255
4
-0.4091
0.0033
5
-0.2223
0.0532
6
-0.3040
0.0266
7
-0.4154
0.0126
8
-0.2071
0.1477
9
-0.5773
0.0030
10
0.1788
0.1843
11
0.1896
0.1526
12
0.1765
0.1621
13
0.1544
0.1999
14
0.1334
0.2214
15
0.1147
0.2708
16
0.1429
0.2615
17
0.1924
0.2023
18
-0.1720
0.3112
19
0.1589
0.3825
20
-0.3471
0.0810
21
0.2020
0.2546
22
0.1862
0.2809
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
provide best ways to create PDF forms and delete PDF forms in C#.NET framework project. A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in
attach file to pdf form; pdf form filler
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Convert OpenOffice Spreadsheet data to PDF. Export PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation. Turn ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
auto fill pdf form from excel; adding a signature to a pdf form
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
153
23
0.1645
0.3334
24
0.0904
0.6219
25
0.1341
0.4026
26
0.1142
0.4264
27
0.1150
0.4618
28
0.0925
0.5584
29
0.1070
0.5329
30
-0.2765
0.1349
31
0.0453
0.8168
32
-0.6580
0.0012
33
-0.3293
0.0987
34
-0.5949
0.0024
35
-0.8133
0.0000
36
-0.5931
0.0023
37
-0.4853
0.0066
38
-0.4523
0.0121
39
-0.5355
0.0016
40
-0.6050
0.0005
41
-0.6804
0.0001
42
-0.7257
0.0001
43
-0.7701
0.0000
44
-0.5150
0.0001
45
-0.3997
0.0005
46
-0.3923
0.0003
47
-0.3214
0.0004
48
-0.3586
0.0001
49
-0.4668
0.0000
From the estimated values of γ and the associated marginal probabili-
ties, we infer that the model suers from performance drift over the initial 9
observations and sample observations from 32 to 49. We draw this inference
from the negative γ estimates that are statistically signicant for these ob-
servations. (Note that observation #8 is only marginally signicant.) Over
the middle range of the sample, from observations 10 to 31 we nd that
the deterministic distance expansion relationship works well. This inference
arises from the fact that none of the estimatedγ parameters are signicantly
dierent from zero.
In Section4.4 we provide evidence that observations 2 and 4 represent
outliers that impact on estimates for neighboring observations 1 to 9. We
also show that this is true of observation 34, which influences observations
31 to 44. This suggests that the DARP model is working correctly to spot
places where the model encounters problems.
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word Create and save editable PDF with a blank page Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic
convert pdf to fillable pdf form; convert fillable pdf to word fillable form
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF Since RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK is based on .NET framework ASP.NET web service and Windows Forms for any
pdf add signature field; create fillable form from pdf
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
154
4.3 Non-parametric locally linear models
These models represent an attempt todraw onthe flexibility and tractability
of non-parametric estimators. Note that the use of the spatialexpansionand
DARP methods in theprevious sectiondid not involve matrix manipulations
or inversion of large sparse matrices. The models presented in this section
share that advantage over the spatial autoregressive models.
Locally linear regression methods introduced in McMillen (1996,1997)
andlabeled geographically weightedregressions (GWR) inBrunsdon, Fother-
ingham and Charlton (1996) (BFC hereafter) are discussed in this section.
The main contribution of the GWR methodology is the use of distance-
weighted sub-samples of the data to produce locally linear regression esti-
mates for every point in space. Each set of parameter estimates is based on
adistance-weighted sub-sample of \neighboring observations", which has a
great deal of intuitive appeal in spatial econometrics. While this approach
has a denite appeal, it also presents some problems that are discussed in
Section4.4, where a Bayesian approach is used to overcome the problems.
The distance-based weights used by BFC for data at observation i take
the form of a vector W
i
which can be determined based on a vector of
distances d
i
between observation i and all other observations in the sample.
This distance vector along with a distance decay parameter are used to
construct a weighting function that places relatively more weight on sample
observations from neighboring observations in the spatial data sample.
Ahost of alternative approach have been suggested for constructing the
weight function. One approach suggested by BFC is:
W
2
i
=exp(−d
i
=)
(4.19)
The parameter  is a decay parameter that BFC label \bandwidth".
Changing the bandwidth results in a dierent exponential decay prole,
which in turn produces estimates that vary more or less rapidly over space.
Another weighting scheme is the tri-cube function proposed by McMillen
(1998):
W
2
i
=(1− (=d
i
)
3
)
3
(4.20)
Still another approach is to rely on a Gaussian function :
W
2
i
=(d
i
=)
(4.21)
Where  denotes the standard normaldensity and  represents the standard
deviation of the distance vector d
i
.
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
155
The distance vector is calculated for observation i as:
d
i
=
q
(Z
xi
−Z
xj
)2 +(Z
yi
−Z
yj
)2
(4.22)
Where Z
xj
;Z
yj
denote the latitude-longitude coordinates of the obser-
vations j = 1;:::;n.
Note that the notation used here may be confusing as we usually rely on
subscripted variables to denote scalar elements of a vector. In the notation
used here, the subscripted variable d
i
represents a vector of distances be-
tween observation i and all other sample data observations. Similarly, the
W
i
is a vector of distance-based weights associated with observation i.
BFC use a single value of , the bandwidth parameter for all observations
determined using a cross-validation procedure that is often used in locally
linear regression methods. A score function taking the form:
n
X
i=1
[y
i
−^y
6=i
()]
2
(4.23)
is used, where ^y
6=i
() denotes the tted value of y
i
with the observations for
point i omitted from the calibration process. A value of  that minimizes
this score function is used as the distance-weighting bandwidth to produce
GWR estimates.
The non-parametric GWR model relies on a sequence of locally linear
regressions to produce estimates for every point in space by using a sub-
sample of data information from nearby observations. Let y denote an nx1
vector of dependent variable observations collected at n points in space, X
an nxk matrix of explanatory variables, and " an nx1 vector of normally
distributed, constant variance disturbances. Letting W
i
represent an nxn
diagonal matrix containing distance-based weights for observation i that
reflect the distance between observation i and all other observations, we can
write the GWR model as:
W
1=2
i
y= W
1=2
i
X
i
+"
i
(4.24)
The subscript i on 
i
indicates that this kx1 parameter vector is as-
sociated with observation i. The GWR model produces n such vectors of
parameter estimates, one for each observation. These estimates are pro-
duced using:
^
i
=(X
0
W
i
X)
−1
(X
0
W
i
y)
(4.25)
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
156
Keep in mind thenotation, W
i
ydenotes ann-vector ofdistance-weighted
observations used to produce estimates for observation i. Note also, that
W
i
X represents a distance-weighted data matrix, not a single observation
and "
i
represents an n-vector.
Note that these GWR estimates for 
i
are conditional on the parameter
. That is, changing , the distance decay parameter will produce a dierent
set of GWR estimates.
The best way to understand this approach to dealing with spatial het-
erogeneity is to apply the method, a subject to which we turn in the next
section.
4.3.1 Implementing GWR
We have an optimization problem to solve regarding minimizing the score
function to nd the cross-validation bandwidth parameter . We rst con-
struct a MATLAB function to compute the scores associated with dierent
bandwidths. This univariate function of the scalar bandwidth parameter
can then be minimized using the simplex algorithm fmin.
Given the optimal bandwidth, estimation of the GWR parameters 
and associated statistics can proceed via generalized least-squares. A func-
tion gwr whose documentation is shown below implements the estimation
procedure.
PURPOSE: compute geographically weighted regression
----------------------------------------------------
USAGE: results = gwr(y,x,east,north,info)
where:
y = dependent variable vector
x = explanatory variable matrix
east = x-coordinates in space
north = y-coordinates in space
info = a structure variable with fields:
info.bwidth = scalar bandwidth to use or zero
for cross-validation estimation (default)
info.dtype = 'gaussian'
for Gaussian weighting (default)
= 'exponential' for exponential weighting
NOTE: res = gwr(y,x,east,north) does CV estimation of bandwidth
---------------------------------------------------
RETURNS: a results structure
results.meth = 'gwr'
results.beta = bhat matrix
(nobs x nvar)
results.tstat = t-stats matrix (nobs x nvar)
results.yhat = yhat
results.resid = residuals
results.sige = e'e/(n-dof) (nobs x 1)
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
157
results.nobs = nobs
results.nvar = nvars
results.bwidth = bandwidth
results.dtype
= input string for Gaussian, exponential weights
results.iter
= # of simplex iterations for cv
results.north = north (y-coordinates)
results.east = east (x-coordinates)
results.y
= y data vector
---------------------------------------------------
NOTES: uses auxiliary function scoref for cross-validation
---------------------------------------------------
The following program illustrates using the gwr function on the Anselin
(1988) neighborhood crime data set to produce estimates based on both
Gaussian and exponential weighting functions. Figure4.5 shows a graph of
these two sets of estimates, indicating that they are not very dierent.
% ----- example 4.4 Using the gwr() function
% load the Anselin data set
load anselin.dat; y = anselin(:,1); nobs = length(y);
x = [ones(nobs,1) anselin(:,2:3)]; tt=1:nobs;
north = anselin(:,4); east = anselin(:,5);
info.dtype = `gaussian';
% Gaussian weighting function
res1 = gwr(y,x,east,north,info);
info.dtype = `exponential'; % Exponential weighting function
res2 = gwr(y,x,east,north,info);
subplot(3,1,1), plot(tt,res1.beta(:,1),tt,res2.beta(:,1),'--');
legend('Gaussian','Exponential'); ylabel('Constant term');
subplot(3,1,2), plot(tt,res1.beta(:,2),tt,res2.beta(:,2),'--');
legend('Gaussian','Exponential'); ylabel('Household income');
subplot(3,1,3), plot(tt,res1.beta(:,3),tt,res2.beta(:,3),'--');
legend('Gaussian','Exponential'); ylabel('House value');
The printed output for these models is voluminous as illustrated below,
where we only print estimates associated with two observations.
Geometrically weighted regression estimates
Dependent Variable =
crime
R-squared
=
0.9418
Rbar-squared
=
0.9393
Bandwidth
=
0.6518
Decay type
=
gaussian
# iterations
=
17
Nobs, Nvars
=
49,
3
***************************************
Obs =
1, x-coordinate= 42.3800, y-coordinate= 35.6200, sige= 1.1144
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
158
const
51.198618
16.121809
0.000000
income
-0.461074
-2.938009
0.005024
hse value
-0.434240
-6.463775
0.000000
Obs =
2, x-coordinate= 40.5200, y-coordinate= 36.5000, sige= 2.7690
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
const
63.563830
15.583144
0.000000
income
-0.369869
-1.551568
0.127201
hse value
-0.683562
-7.288304
0.000000
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
20
40
60
80
100
Constant term
Gaussian
Exponential
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
-6
-4
-2
0
2
Household income
Gaussian
Exponential
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
-2
-1
0
1
House value
Gaussian
Exponential
Figure 4.5: Comparison of GWR distance weighting schemes
4.4 A Bayesian Approach to GWR
ABayesian treatment of locally linear geographically weighted regressions
is set forth in this section. While the use of locally linear regression seems
appealing,it is plagued by some problems. A Bayesiantreatment can resolve
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
159
these problems and has some advantages over the non-parametric approach
discussed in Section4.3.
One problem with the non-parametric approach is that valid inferences
cannot be drawn for the GWR regression parameters. To see this, consider
that the locallylinear estimates use the same sampledataobservations (with
dierent weights) to produce a sequence of estimates for all points in space.
Given a lack of independence between estimates for each location, conven-
tional measures of dispersion for the estimates will likely be incorrect. These
(invalid) conventional measures are what we report in the results structure
from gwr, as this is the approach taken by Brunsdon, Fotheringham and
Charlton (1996).
Another problem is that non-constant variance over space, aberrant ob-
servations due to spatial enclave eects, or shifts in regime can exert undue
influence on locally linear estimates. Consider that all nearby observations
in a sub-sequence of the series of locally linear estimates may be \contam-
inated" by an outlier at a single point in space. The Bayesian approach
introduced here solves this problem by robustifying against aberrant ob-
servations. Aberrant observations are automatically detected and down-
weighted to lessen their influence on the estimates. The non-parametric
implementation of the GWR model assumed no outliers.
Athird problem is that the non-parametric estimates may suer from
\weak data" problems because they are based on a distance weighted sub-
sample of observations. The eective number of observations used to pro-
duce estimates for some points in space may be very small. This problem
can be solved with the Bayesian approach by incorporating subjective prior
information during estimation. Use of subjective prior information is a well-
known approach for overcoming \weak data" problems.
In addition to overcoming these problems, the Bayesian formulation in-
troduced here species the relationship that is used to smooth parameters
over space. This allows us to subsume the non-parametric GWR method as
part of a much broader class of spatial econometric models. For example,
the Bayesian GWR can be implemented with parameter smoothing rela-
tionships that result in: 1) a locally linear variant of the spatial expansion
methods discussed in section4.1, 2) a parameter smoothing relation appro-
priate for monocentric city models where parameters vary systematically
with distance from the center of the city, 3) a parameter smoothing scheme
based on contiguity relationships, and 4) a parameter smoothing scheme
based on distance decay.
The Bayesian approach, which we label BGWR is best described using
matrix expressions shown in (4.26) and (4.27). First, note that (4.26) is the
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested