c# pdf to image ghostscript : Change pdf to fillable form software control dll windows azure .net web forms Schlosser%20White%20Lloyd%20JM%2020060-part545

133
Journal of Marketing
Vol. 70 (April 2006),133–148
©2006, American Marketing Association
ISSN: 0022-2429 (print), 1547-7185 (electronic)
Ann E. Schlosser, Tiffany Barnett White, & Susan M. Lloyd
Converting Web Site Visitors into
Buyers: How Web Site Investment
Increases Consumer Trusting Beliefs
and Online Purchase Intentions
The authors investigate the impact of Web site design investments on consumers’ trusting beliefs and online pur-
chase intentions. Such investments signal the component of trusting beliefs that is most strongly related to online
purchase intentions: ability. These effects  were  strongest  when consumers’ goals  were  to search  rather  than to
browse and when purchases involved risk.
Ann E.Schlosser is Assistant Professor of Marketing, University of Wash-
ington Business School (e-mail: : aschloss@u.washington.edu). . Tiffany
Barnett White is Assistant Professor of Business Administration (Market-
ing Group), College of Business, University of Illinois (e-mail:
tbwhite@uiuc.edu).Susan M. Lloyd is Assistant Professor of Marketing
and Endowed Fellow, Kogod School of Business, American University
(e-mail:smlloyd@american.edu).The authors thank Ruth Bolton and the
two anonymous 
JM
reviewers, as well as Jim Bettman, Katherine Lemon,
Michael Mazis, and Kent Monroe, for their helpful comments on previous
versions of this article.The authors also thank Sandra M.Dahne and S.
Rand Fishkin for their technical assistance.Funding for Study 1 was pro-
vided by the Center for Information Technology and the Global Economy
at the Kogod School of Business, American University.
“I
n important ways, using the Internet involves a leap
of  faith.  We  type  in  our  credit card  numbers  and
other  personal  information  in  order  to  make  pur-
chases over the Internet and trust that this information will
not be used in unauthorized or fraudulent ways” (Bargh and
McKenna 2004, p. 585). Firms have responded to such con-
sumer concerns by investing in Web site security, which has
become a multibillion dollar industry (eMarketer 2005). Yet
even experienced online buyers view purchasing online as
risky  (eMarketer.com 2005;  Forrester 2005). Indeed, con-
sumers’ perceptions of the risks involved in providing per-
sonal information online often contrast the views of security
experts, causing these consumers to avoid online activities
that are actually safe (Dunn 2004). This avoidance has led
some  experts  to speculate  that the  immediate  threat  to  e-
commerce  is  consumers’ perceptions  (eMarketer  2005;
Hoffman, Novak, and Peralta 1999; Rust, Kannan, and Peng
2002). Thus, although it is necessary, investing in back-end
technology  to  protect  consumers’ information  and  ensure
that e-commerce transactions run smoothly is not sufficient.
Firms,  particularly those  attempting  to  convert  visitors  to
buyers, still face the challenge  of establishing  consumers’
trust online. Thus, it is important to understand how compa-
nies can communicate their trustworthiness to consumers.
Marketing managers face the challenge of establishing
consumers’ trust in a variety  of contexts, but doing so  in
computer-mediated environments such as the Internet may
be particularly difficult (Naquin and Paulson 2003). A com-
mon approach is to post explicit statements that assure cus-
tomers that personal data will be discreetly used  and pro-
tected  (i.e.,  privacy  and  security  statements).  However,
evidence on the effectiveness of such statements is contra-
dictory. Whereas some research has shown that such state-
ments help instill consumer confidence in e-commerce sites
(Palmer, Bailey, and Faraj 2000), others suggest that they
are not  necessarily the most important predictor of online
trust (Montoya-Weiss, Voss, and Grewal 2003; Sultan et al.
2002). Findings from a recent large-scale study suggest that
despite consumers’ claims that privacy policies are impor-
tant for establishing credibility, consumers refer instead to
“surface”  elements,  such  as Web  site  design  (Fogg  et  al.
2002).
In this article, we develop a conceptual framework for
understanding how marketing signals influence consumers’
trust in an e-commerce  setting. We clarify  important  dis-
tinctions related to trust that have been largely overlooked
in  the  literature  but are key  to  understanding how  online
firms can best convert  visitors to buyers. Specifically, we
argue that different Web site signals can influence different
beliefs about a firm’s trustworthiness,  which  in turn have
differential effects  on  online purchase intentions. Further-
more, these effects might vary according to the consumers’
purpose for visiting the site and the level of risk they per-
ceive in the purchase. Consistent with prior research (e.g.,
McKnight, Choudhury, and Kacmar 2002), we conceptual-
ize online purchase intentions in terms of customer acquisi-
tion—that  is,  consumers’ intentions  to  make  an  initial
online purchase from a firm, despite their online purchase
history with other firms. We begin with a review of the trust
literature. We then present  and test  our  conceptual frame-
work  and  conclude  with  a  discussion  of  the  theoretical,
managerial,  and  public  policy  implications  of  these
findings.
Change pdf to fillable form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
pdf form filler; create a fillable pdf form from a word document
Change pdf to fillable form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
create fillable pdf form; create fillable form pdf online
134/ Journal of Marketing,April 2006
Trust
Trust  has  been  defined  as  “a  willingness  to  rely  on  an
exchange partner in whom one has confidence” (Moorman,
Zaltman,  and  Deshpandé  1992,  p.  315);  “a  generalized
expectancy held  by  an  individual  that  the  word,  promise,
oral or written statement of another individual or group can
be relied upon” (Rotter 1980, p. 1); and “a belief in a per-
son’s competence to perform a specific task under specific
circumstances” (Sitkin and Roth 1993, p. 373). Reflected in
these and other definitions of trust is a cognitive aspect (i.e.,
trusting beliefs) and a behavioral aspect (i.e., trusting inten-
tions) (Kim et al. 2004; Moorman, Zaltman, and Deshpandé
1992).
Trusting beliefs represent a “sentiment, or  expectation
about  an  exchange  partner’s  trustworthiness”  (Moorman,
Deshpandé, and  Zaltman 1993,  p. 315). Although various
trusting  beliefs  have  been  studied  in  the  literature,  the
majority  can  be  conceptually  clustered  into  three  dimen-
sions:  ability,  benevolence,  and  integrity  (McKnight,
Choudhury,  and  Kacmar  2002).  “Ability  beliefs”  reflect
consumers’ confidence that the firm has the skills necessary
to  perform the  job (Mayer, Davis, and Schoorman  1995),
“benevolence beliefs” reflect confidence that the firm has a
positive orientation toward its consumers beyond an “ego-
centric profit motive” (Mayer, Davis, and Schoorman 1995,
p. 717), and “integrity beliefs”  reflect confidence that  the
firm  adheres  to  a  set  of  moral  principles  or  professional
standards that guide its interactions with customers. These
trusting beliefs are related, yet distinct. For example, con-
sumers may believe that the firm cares about its customers
and thus intends to deliver a smooth, error-free transaction
(i.e., the firm is benevolent), but they may also believe that
the  firm  lacks  the  ability  to  do  so.  Likewise,  although
integrity  and  benevolence  beliefs  are  similar,  the  former
focuses on meeting objective standards of corporate citizen-
ship, and the latter focuses  on customer welfare that goes
beyond normal business activity. For example, despite con-
sumers’ beliefs that the firm follows a professional code of
conduct  (i.e.,  has  integrity),  they  may  still  question  the
firm’s  genuine  concern  for  its  customers  (i.e.,  its
benevolence).
Although ability, benevolence, and integrity beliefs are
acknowledged as conceptually distinct (e.g., Kumar, Scheer,
and  Steenkamp  1995),  they  are  often  combined  into  a
global measure of trusting beliefs (e.g., Doney and Cannon
1997). Whereas combining these beliefs into a single varia-
ble  is  a  parsimonious  approach  to  studying  trust,  it  can
make it difficult to identify what action should be taken to
build  trust  (Smith  and  Barclay  1997).  Because  a  global
measure likely obscures the reason certain signals are more
effective than others in affecting online purchase intentions,
we treat each trusting belief separately.
Trusting  intentions  represent  “a  willingness  to  make
oneself vulnerable to another in the presence of risk” (Kim
et al. 2004, p. 105). What distinguishes trusting intentions
from  other  types  of  behavioral  intentions  is  that  they
involve risk (Moorman, Zaltman, and Deshpandé 1992). As
reflected  in  the  opening  quotation,  purchasing  online
involves  risk,  especially  when  a  person  lacks  experience
with  the  online  firm.  Specifically,  the  consumer  must  be
willing to transfer resources (e.g., credit card and other per-
sonal information) to the online firm, the consequences of
which  could  be  damaging.  For  example,  among  the  real
and/or perceived risks are that the firm may overcharge, fail
to deliver the product, deliver an inferior product, or fail to
protect personal information. To the extent that consumers
are  concerned  about  these  and  other  risks  of  purchasing
online, online purchase intentions reflect trusting intentions.
The  distinction  between  trusting  beliefs  and  trusting
intentions  has  been  acknowledged  by  some  researchers
(e.g.,  Moorman,  Zaltman,  and  Deshpandé  1992;  Sirdesh-
mukh, Singh, and Sabol 2002) but ignored by others who
have studied only trusting beliefs, implicitly assuming that
these  beliefs  imply  trust  (e.g.,  Doney  and  Cannon  1997;
Ganeson  1994;  Kumar,  Scheer,  and  Steenkamp  1995;
Mayer,  Davis,  and  Schoorman  1995;  Morgan  and  Hunt
1994).  For example, Morgan  and  Hunt  (1994)  argue  that
trusting  beliefs  are  sufficient  for  measuring  trust  because
such  beliefs  imply  that trusting  intentions  will  follow.  In
contrast, Moorman, Zaltman, and Deshpandé (1992) argue
that trust is limited when trusting beliefs do not accompany
a corresponding trusting intention or when  trusting  inten-
tions  occur  without  corresponding  trusting  beliefs  (e.g.,
under  conditions  of  coercion  or  limited  alternatives).  In
other  words,  these  researchers  argue  that  both  trusting
beliefs and trusting intentions must be present for trust to
exist. Likewise, we argue that trusting beliefs are a neces-
sary but not sufficient condition for trust to exist, because
increasing  trusting  beliefs  will  not  always  have  a  corre-
sponding positive effect on trusting intentions.
Conceptual Framework
Drawing from research on trust (Mayer, Davis, and Schoor-
man 1995; Moorman, Deshpandé, and Zaltman 1993), con-
sumer goals (e.g., Hoffman and Novak 1996), and market-
ing  signals  (e.g.,  Kirmani  and  Wright  1989;  Prabhu  and
Stewart  2001),  we  develop  a  conceptual  framework  for
understanding  how  different  signals  influence  ability,
benevolence, and integrity beliefs and thus influence online
purchase intentions (see Figure 1). Because our objective is
to  understand  how  to  increase  consumers’ willingness  to
buy online, we focus on those whose goal is most consistent
with  buying  online,  namely,  consumers  who  search  for
product  information  (or  searchers;  Hoffman  and  Novak
1996; Moe 2003; Schlosser 2003). Indeed, searchers think
about  and  are  persuaded  more  by  product  information
(Schlosser 2003) and have higher visitor-to-buyer conver-
sion  rates than those who do not search (Moe 2003). We
begin  by  examining  the  relationship  between  searchers’
trusting beliefs and intentions.
Searchers’Trusting Beliefs and Online Purchase
Intentions
Searching reflects purposive, task-specific  behaviors,  such
as  the  planned  acquisition  of  information  during  prepur-
chase deliberation (Hoffman and Novak 1996; Janiszewski
1998). Similar to those who read a text to find an answer to
a question (Rosenblatt 1978), searchers are likely motivated
to  find the  right answer efficiently. Such a fact-gathering,
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents. Ability to get word count of PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
convert word document to pdf fillable form; converting a word document to pdf fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file in Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
create a pdf with fields to fill in; convert word form to fillable pdf form
Converting Web Site Visitors into Buyers / 135
Ability
Online purchase intentions
Signals
Trusting Beliefs
Moderators
Trusting Intentions
Benevolence
Integrity
Searchers only
Browsers only
Strong privacy/security statement
(Study 2)
Web site investment
(Studies 1–4)
Perceived risk
(Study 4)
Goal: 
search or browse
(Study 3)
FIGURE 1
Conceptual Framework of the Effect of Online Signals on Trusting Beliefs and Intentions
knowledge-seeking  stance  is  typically  outcome  oriented,
concentrated, impersonal, and objective (Rosenblatt 1978).
Given  this  performance  orientation,  we  expect  that  when
considering  whether  to  purchase  online,  searchers  will
focus on the trusting belief that is most relevant to perfor-
mance: ability (Mayer, Davis, and Schoorman 1995). If this
is the case,  searchers’ ability beliefs should largely influ-
ence  their  online  purchase  intentions.  In  contrast,  their
beliefs  about  the  firm’s  trustworthiness  on  non-
performance-related  dimensions  (i.e.,  benevolence  and
integrity) should have relatively little effect on their online
purchase intentions.
H
1
: Searchers’ online  purchase  intentions  depend  on  their
beliefs about  the  firm’s  ability rather  than their  beliefs
about the firm’s benevolence or integrity.
Signaling Ability Through Web Site Investment
If trust in a firm’s abilities is  critical to  increasing  online
purchase  intentions,  a  fundamental  question  is,  How  can
firms use online cues to communicate that their abilities can
be trusted? To address this question, we draw from research
on marketing signals. Signals are the actions or announce-
ments that convey a firm’s abilities  and intentions (Porter
1980). Marketers often use observable signals (e.g., price,
warranties,  advertising  expenditures)  to  communicate  the
level  of  some unobservable  quality (e.g.,  product quality;
Kirmani  and  Rao  2000).  Signaling  may  be  especially
important in an  online purchasing  context because  of  the
inherent asymmetry of relevant information between buyers
and sellers. Specifically, information about the quality of a
given online transaction is generally unobservable by con-
sumers before purchase.
1
This  assumes  conditions  of  normality.  Because  a  poorly
designed Web site (e.g., one with hyperlinks  that do not work)
Investing in Web site design may be one observable sig-
nal  that  firms can  use  to  communicate  their  abilities  and
boost  searchers’ online  purchase  intentions.  Indeed,  con-
sumers can distinguish between expensive and inexpensive
marketing tactics, such as ad production elements (Kirmani
and Wright 1989). Moreover,  they make inferences about
companies  (e.g.,  the  company’s  ability  to  make  quality
products and its credibility) based on these perceived mar-
keting  expenditures  (for  a  review,  see  Kirmani  and  Rao
2000). The attribution literature provides insight into these
findings  (Kirmani  and  Wright  1989).  Specifically,  when
interpreting others’ performance, people infer that investing
time and energy promotes success (Weiner 1986). Likewise,
consumers will likely infer that a firm that has invested in
Web site design can successfully handle online transactions.
As in  prior research, we  consider investment in  broad
terms  (Kirmani  and  Wright  1989);  that  is,  investment
reflects expenditures of time, money, and effort to Web site
design. Importantly, it refers to investments in the front-end
(design) elements of a Web site (i.e., its observable charac-
teristics) and not back-end technologies, such as order ful-
fillment software, security encryption, and firewall capabil-
ities, which are typically unobservable before purchase. Yet
because  ability  is a  stable,  internal  characteristic (Weiner
1972),  people  will  likely generalize  their trust in a firm’s
ability in one area (design) to other related areas (e.g., order
fulfillment). Thus, instead  of being purely cosmetic, Web
site  design  likely  communicates  important  performance
information. However, it likely communicates less about the
firm’s goodwill, ethics, values, or intentions to mislead than
it  does about the  firm’s ability.1 Consequently, consumers
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C# Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C# Support to change font size in PDF form.
convert pdf fillable form to word; create a fillable pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents.
convert word to fillable pdf form; asp.net fill pdf form
136/ Journal of Marketing,April 2006
likely violates consumers’ expectations  about  norms of conduct
for e-commerce firms, it will likely raise concerns about the firm’s
benevolence and integrity.
will  likely  use  perceived  Web  site  investment  to  infer  a
firm’s ability more than its benevolence or integrity. If this
is the case and  ability beliefs largely influence searchers’
online purchase intentions (H
1
), it follows that
H
2
: Searchers’ online purchase intentions will be higher at a
high-investment Web site than at a low-investment Web
site.
H
3
: Beliefs about the firm’s ability will mediate the relation-
ship between site investment and searchers’ online pur-
chase intentions.
The first two studies test these hypotheses, and the last
two  studies  examine  two  potential  moderators  (goal  and
perceived risk). Furthermore, to test the generalizability of
these effects, we varied across studies the samples recruited
(students versus nonstudents), companies (a fictitious ver-
sus well-known firm), and products (home furnishings and
accessories versus cameras).
Study 1
Method
Sample  and design.  The  sample  consisted  of  111
respondents who participated in exchange for $10 and were
recruited through an electronic and a printed newsletter dis-
tributed  to  university  employees.  The  sample  was  68%
female, with  a  mean  age  of  37.5  and  a  mean  income  of
$35,000 to $49,999. Respondents had a median education
of four years of college and used the Internet an average of
four to six times per week. We randomly assigned respon-
dents to a high- or low-investment site.
Web site investment manipulation. We manipulated Web
site investment through the presence of sophisticated Web
site technology and visual design elements. Specifically, the
high-investment site had a white background, sophisticated
fonts (images for the navigation bar; Garamond font), and
an  enhanced  zoom  feature  created  with  Design  Within
Reach. This  enabled  users  to zoom  in  on  any  part of an
image and  to choose  among three preselected  zooms that
executed automatically with a single click. In contrast, the
low-investment site featured the default background  color
and font (gray; Times New Roman) and a limited zoom fea-
ture, which, when clicked, simply provided a larger view of
the focal product. The content and layout of both sites were
identical.
To test the effectiveness of this manipulation, 43 under-
graduates  viewed  screen  captures  of  the  homepage  (font
and background color were used to manipulate investment)
and  a  zoom  page  (technology  was  used  to  manipulate
investment). The  order  was  counterbalanced,  and  partici-
pants viewed only those pages specific to the high- or low-
investment  site.  After  viewing  each  page,  participants
reported  how much time, effort, and money they believed
the firm invested in each page on a scale from 1 (“very lit-
tle”) to  7  (“a  great deal”).  We  averaged  the  responses  to
these items (αs > .94) and analyzed them with a 2 (invest-
ment: high versus low) × 2 (page: zoom versus home) × 2
(order: viewed  home or zoom page first) analysis of vari-
ance (ANOVA). In support of the investment manipulation,
participants perceived the high-investment site as requiring
greater investment than the low-investment site (Ms = 4.09
versus  3.18;  F(1, 39)  =  9.02,  p <  .01).  Furthermore,  the
effectiveness of the investment manipulation was unaffected
by the type or order of page viewed (Fs(1, 39) < 3.35, not
significant  [n.s.]).  Thus,  it  appears  that  font,  background
color, and use of technology communicate investment. Par-
ticipants  also  reported  how  informative,  entertaining,  and
well  organized  they  found  the  pages  to  be  on  the  same
seven-point scale. As we expected, investment did not affect
these variables (Fs(1, 39) < 1.97, n.s.).
Procedure. Participants sat at a computer and received a
paper  booklet.  The  first  page  instructed  participants  that
they would be visiting a site for a new firm called Urban-
Furniture (UF) and to limit their visit to the homepage and
living-room sections of the site. All participants were told to
imagine that they wanted to purchase contemporary furni-
ture  and  were  considering  UF.  As  in  prior  research
(Schlosser  2003),  to  instill  a  searching  goal,  participants
were asked  to write  down two questions they had for UF
about its products before visiting the site.
Participants  then  visited  either  the  high-  or  the  low-
investment  site,  which  was  preloaded  on  their  computer.
Afterward,  they  completed  the  survey,  which  contained
three items that measured their  online purchase intentions
(α = .91) and a modification of Mayer and Davis’s (1999)
scale of trustworthiness (for the measures used in this and
the  other studies, see the Appendix). This scale measured
beliefs about UF’s ability (α = .90), benevolence (α = .88),
and integrity (α = .71). Then, to test the effectiveness of the
investment  manipulation  in  the  main  experiment,  partici-
pants  completed  the  three-item Web site investment scale
(see the Appendix; α = .95).
At the end of the survey, participants reported their edu-
cation and income levels as well as how often they used the
Internet to purchase goods in the last six months on a scale
ranging  from  1  (“not  at  all”)  to  7  (“quite  often”).  We
included  these  measures  to  control  for  individual  differ-
ences in Internet experience both directly (i.e., through self-
reported use of the Web) and indirectly (i.e., using demo-
graphic variables associated with Web use). To control for
variance due to mechanical error, we asked participants to
report the extent to which they encountered problems at the
UF site (e.g., error messages, server delays, crashing) on a
scale from 1 (“not at all”) to 7 (“quite often”).
Results
Manipulation  checks.  We  analyzed  the  investment
manipulation  with  a  one-way  analysis  of  covariance
(ANCOVA), controlling for reported problems with the site,
prior Web purchase history, education, and income. In sup-
port of the manipulation, perceived Web site investment was
higher among  those in the  high-investment  condition than
among  those  in the low-investment  condition  (Ms  =  3.46
versus 1.97; F(1, 108) = 32.45, p < .0001).
Trusting  beliefs  and  online  purchase  intentions.  We
used  hierarchical  regression  to  test  H
1
.  We  first  modeled
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
create a pdf form to fill out and save; convert word form to pdf with fillable
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
convert pdf into fillable form; pdf fill form
Converting Web Site Visitors into Buyers / 137
online purchase intentions as a function  of ability beliefs.
As  we  predicted,  ability  significantly  influenced  these
intentions  (β =  .27,  t(108)  =  2.88,  p <  .005;  R2 =  .07,
F(1, 108) = 8.31, p < .01; see  Table 1). Furthermore,  the
addition of benevolence and integrity beliefs to the model
did  not  contribute  significantly  to  explaining  searchers’
online purchase intentions (ΔR2 = .007, F(2, 106) < 1). We
replicated this pattern of results with a stepwise regression
analysis, which identifies the best subset of belief variables
that predict online purchase intentions. Thus, regardless of
the regression procedures we used, the results are consistent
with  H
1
 Furthermore,  given  the  inherent  correlation
between trusting beliefs, we tested for multicollinearity by
examining  the  maximum  variance  inflation  factor  (VIF).
Multicollinearity is problematic for interpreting regression
analyses when the maximum VIF is greater than 10 (Neter,
Wasserman,  and  Kutner  1990).  We  found  that  multi-
collinearity was not an issue in the preceding analysis (the
maximum VIF = 3.10).
Web  site  investment,  trusting  beliefs,  and  online  pur-
chase  intentions. We  analyzed  ability  beliefs  with  a  one-
way ANCOVA. As we expected, ability beliefs were higher
for those who visited the high-investment site than for those
who visited the low-investment site (Ms = 2.41 versus 1.80;
F(1, 109) = 13.27, p < .005). In contrast, Web site invest-
ment  did  not  affect  benevolence  or  integrity  beliefs
(Fs(1, 109) <
2.00, n.s.). Thus, Web site investment is more
effective in communicating the trustworthiness of a firm’s
ability than its benevolence and integrity.
In support of H
2
, online purchase intentions were higher
among  those  who  visited  the  high-investment  site  than
among  those  who  visited  the  low-investment  site  (Ms  =
–.13 versus –.78; F(1, 109) = 4.06, p < .05). To test whether
ability  beliefs  mediated  this  effect (H
3
),  we  added  ability
beliefs as a covariate to the ANCOVA. Consistent with the
requirements for mediation (Baron and Kenny 1986), abil-
ity  was  significant  (F(1, 108)  =  4.31,  p <  .05),  and  the
investment effect became nonsignificant (F(1, 108) = 1.48,
n.s.). We found further support for H
3
using the criteria that
Sobel  (1982) endorsed  for testing  mediation  (Goodman  I
test statistic  = 2.22; p < .05). Because investment did not
affect benevolence and integrity beliefs, these beliefs cannot
be considered mediators.
Conclusions
Study  1  provides  support  for  H
1
–H
3
 Specifically,
searchers’ online  purchase  intentions  were  influenced  by
their trust in the firm’s ability rather than their trust in its
benevolence and integrity. As a result, ability signals (i.e.,
Web site investment) influenced their online purchase inten-
tions. Furthermore, their trust in the firm’s ability mediated
this effect.
It is possible that searchers’ online purchase intentions
were influenced by their ability beliefs rather than by their
benevolence and integrity beliefs because there were no sig-
nals regarding the firm’s benevolence and integrity. In the
presence of such signals, ability beliefs may have less influ-
ence.  Indeed,  the  impact  of  a  given  signal  is  weakened
when other, more relevant signals are present (Kirmani and
Wright 1989). If benevolence and integrity signals are more
relevant, the effect of investment on searchers’ online pur-
chase intentions should  be  weaker  when  such signals  are
present.  However,  if  ability  is  more  relevant,  investment
should affect searchers’ online purchase intentions regard-
less of whether benevolence  and integrity signals are  pre-
sent. We directly test this in  Study 2 by manipulating the
presence and strength of a firm’s privacy and security state-
ment. Because benevolence represents the firm’s orientation
toward customers and integrity represents whether the firm
will  do  what  it  promises  (Mayer,  Davis,  and  Schoorman
1995),  one  method of  signaling  a firm’s benevolence  and
integrity may be through formal statements of its intentions
to  consumers, such as  through privacy and  security state-
ments.  If  so,  such  statements  should  affect  consumers’
beliefs about a firm’s benevolence and integrity rather than
its ability. Yet  if  ability  is  a  stronger  driver  of  searchers’
TABLE 1
Hierarchical Regression Analysis of Trusting Beliefs on Online Purchase Intentions
Model 1
Model 2
Study
Goal
Variable
ββ
R2
F for R2
ββ
ΔΔR2
F for ΔΔR2
1
Searchers
Ability
.27*
.07
08.31*
.19*
.01
.38*
Benevolence
.10*
Integrity
.02*
2
Searchers
Ability
.39*
.15
15.57*
.39*
.00
.08*
Benevolence
.06*
Integrity
–.06*
3
Searchers
Ability
.42*
.18
15.70*
.43*
.03
1.50*
Benevolence
.15*
Integrity
–.20*
Browsers
Ability
.15*
.02
01.62
.10*
.10
4.28*
Benevolence
.33*
Integrity
–.01*
*
p
<
.05.
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel.
auto fill pdf form fields; convert word document to pdf fillable form
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. Load PDF from stream programmatically.
convert word form to fillable pdf; convert pdf to fillable pdf form
138/ Journal of Marketing,April 2006
2Our analysis was limited to either strong or weak privacy and
security statements. Thus, for ease of exposition, we use the term
“privacy/security” to describe levels of privacy and security.
online  purchase  intentions  (H
1
),  investment  should  affect
searchers’ online purchase intentions regardless of whether
a privacy and security statement is present. That is, H
2
and
H
3
should  be  supported  even  when  such  a  statement  is
provided.
Study 2
Method
Sample and design. A total of 79 undergraduate students
participated  in  exchange  for  extra  course  credit. We  ran-
domly assigned participants to one of six conditions in a 2
(investment) × 3 (privacy/security statement: strong or weak
versus absent) design.2 We included the absent condition to
examine whether the presence of a strong statement is better
than having no statement. We included the weak condition
to examine whether merely having a privacy/security state-
ment might signal benevolence and integrity or whether the
contents of the statement influence such beliefs.
Privacy/security  statement  manipulation.  We  con-
structed the strong and weak privacy/security statements on
the basis of a content analysis of the privacy/security state-
ments  gathered  from  more  than  25  sites.  For  the  strong
statement, explicit information was available about how UF
collects and  uses customer information. There was also a
promise of confidentiality, a contact number, an opt-in fea-
ture, encryption information, and a 100% guarantee against
information theft. In contrast, the weak statement informed
the consumer that personal information would be collected
and made available to other vendors that “are offering prod-
ucts we feel are of interest to you.” There was no opportu-
nity to opt  in  or  out  of such correspondence.  Consumers
were also informed that UF  “tries to safely  transmit  your
account  information.”  No account protection  or guarantee
was offered.
To  pretest  this  manipulation,  37  undergraduates  read
either the strong or the weak statement and rated its strength
on  six  items.  Among  the  items  were  “I  believe  Urban-
Furniture  is  concerned  about  my  privacy”  and  “I  believe
that Urban-Furniture is concerned about the security of my
financial  information.”  Participants  responded  on  a  scale
ranging  from  1  (“disagree  strongly”)  to  7  (“agree
strongly”), and we averaged the responses (α = .94). In sup-
port  of  the  privacy/security  manipulation,  participants
agreed more that UF would preserve their privacy and secu-
rity when  they  read  the  strong  privacy/security  statement
than when they read the weak statement (Ms = 5.56 versus
2.61; F(1, 36) = 100.53, p < .01).
Procedure. The procedure and survey were the same as
in Study 1, with a few exceptions. To increase involvement,
participants were told to imagine that they accepted a job in
Manhattan after graduation and were searching for living-
room furniture for their apartment. After viewing the site,
participants in the strong and weak privacy/security condi-
tions read these statements before completing the survey. To
test  whether  reading  such  statements  might  artificially
increase participants’ risk  perceptions of shopping online,
we added seven items to the  end of the  survey that mea-
sured  such  concerns  (see  the  Appendix).  We  averaged
responses  to  provide  a  perceived  risk  score  (α =  .89).
Because the sample is homogeneous in terms of education
and  income,  we  deleted  these  demographic  questions.  In
addition, because we measured online purchase experience
in  Study  1  with  a  single  item  that  captures  only  recent
online  purchase  experience,  we  added  an  item  that  mea-
sures  general  online  purchase  experience  (i.e.,  how  often
participants shop online) on a scale from 1 (“not at all”) to 7
(“quite often”). We averaged these items to capture online
purchase experience (r = .78).
Results
Manipulation  checks.  In  support  of  the  investment
manipulation, a 2 (investment) × 3 (privacy/security state-
ment)  ANOVA  yielded  a  significant  investment  effect
(F(1, 73) = 6.84, p = .01): Participants perceived the high-
investment site as  requiring a  greater investment than  the
low-investment  site  (Ms  =  3.36  versus  2.48).  No  other
effects were significant (Fs(1, 73) < 1).
To  examine  whether  reading  a  privacy/security  state-
ment might increase participants’ perceived risks of shop-
ping online, we compared risk  perceptions  using a 2  × 3
ANOVA. None of the effects were significant  (the invest-
ment effect: F(1, 73) = 1.22, n.s.; the direct and interactive
effects of the privacy/security statement: Fs(2, 73) < 2.11,
n.s.).  On  average, participants perceived  buying online  as
risky (M = 5.71, which is significantly higher than the mid-
point  of  4;  higher  numbers reflect  greater  perceived  risk,
t(78) = 14.16, p < .01).
Trusting  beliefs and  online  purchase  intentions. As  in
Study 1, we tested H
1
using hierarchical regression. As we
predicted, ability  beliefs  influenced  searchers’ online  pur-
chase intentions (β = .39, t(77) = 3.73, p < .005; R
2
= .15,
F(1, 77) =  15.57, p <  .01, see Table 1). Furthermore,  the
addition of benevolence and integrity beliefs to the model
did  not  significantly  contribute  to  explaining  online  pur-
chase  intentions  (ΔR2 =  .002,  F(2, 75)  <  1).  A  stepwise
regression analysis yielded the same results. Multicollinear-
ity was not a problem (the maximum VIF = 2.58).
Web site investment and trusting beliefs. Here and else-
where,  we  analyzed  the  data  with  a  2  (investment)  × 3
(privacy/security  statement)  ANCOVA,  controlling  for
online  purchase  experience  and  problems  with  the  site.
Ability beliefs were higher for those who visited the high-
investment  site  than  for  those  who  visited  the  low-
investment site (Ms = 2.68 versus 2.13; F(1, 69) = 6.54, p <
.05), thus replicating the results of Study 1. No other effects
on  ability beliefs  were significant (Fs(1, 69) <
2.34,  n.s.).
Furthermore, as we expected, Web site investment did not
affect  benevolence  or  integrity  beliefs  (Fs(1, 68)  <  2.29,
n.s.).
Whereas investment  appears  to  communicate  a firm’s
ability  but  not  its  benevolence  and  integrity,  privacy/
security  statements  appear  to  communicate  benevolence
and integrity but not ability: The privacy/security effect was
significant for benevolence beliefs (F(2, 69) = 3.30, p < .05)
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual C# .NET. Online source code for C#.NET class.
pdf fill form; converting pdf to fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
attach file to pdf form; change font pdf fillable form
Converting Web Site Visitors into Buyers / 139
and integrity beliefs (F(2, 69) = 4.03, p < .05) but not for
ability  beliefs  (F(2, 69)  =  2.34,  n.s.).  Benevolence  and
integrity beliefs were significantly higher among those who
read a strong statement than among those who read a weak
statement (benevolence: Ms = 3.04 versus 2.65; F(2, 68) =
2.89, p < .05 [one-tailed test]; integrity: Ms = 3.19 versus
2.66;  F(2, 68)  =  7.12,  p <  .05).  These  beliefs  were  also
higher for those who received a strong statement than for
those who received no statement (benevolence: Ms = 3.04
versus 2.44; F(2, 68) = 6.55, p < .05; integrity: Ms = 3.19
versus 2.76; F(2, 68) = 5.02, p < .05). However, the mere
presence of a privacy/security statement does not appear to
signal  a  firm’s  benevolence  and  integrity;  the  difference
between a weak statement and no statement was not signifi-
cant at p < .05. It  appears  that both the presence and  the
strength of the statement signal the firm’s benevolence and
integrity.
Web site investment and online purchase intentions. We
analyzed online purchase intentions with a 2 × 3 ANCOVA.
In  support  of  H
2
, online  purchase  intentions  were  higher
among  those  who  visited  the  high-investment  site  than
among  those  who  visited  the  low-investment  site  (Ms  =
–.16 versus –.79; F(1, 69) = 3.06, p < .05 [one-tailed test]).
A  privacy/security statement did  not  moderate  this  effect
(F(2, 69) < 1). Thus, regardless of whether benevolence and
integrity signals (i.e., privacy/security statements) were pre-
sent, ability signals (i.e., Web site investment) significantly
influenced searchers’ online purchase intentions.
The only other significant effect was a privacy/security
effect (F(1, 69) = 4.95, p = .01). In support of the argument
that  benevolence  and  integrity  signals  (e.g.,  a  strong
privacy/security  statement)  should  have  little  effect  on
searchers’ online  purchase  intentions,  online  purchase
intentions  did  not  differ  between  those  who  received  the
strong privacy/security statement and those who received no
statement  (Ms  =  –.36  versus  .09;  F(1, 46)  =  1.10,  n.s.).
However,  online  purchase  intentions  were  lower  among
those who received a weak privacy/security statement than
among those who received a strong statement (Ms = –1.15
versus –.36; F(1, 41) = 3.82, p < .05 [one-tailed test]) or no
statement (Ms = –1.15 versus .09; F(1, 49) = 8.58, p < .01).
This finding is consistent with existing research that nega-
tive cues regarding a firm’s character tend to be unexpected,
violating  established  norms  about  “business  as  usual”
(Garfinkel 1963). In such situations, people appear unwill-
ing to buy online from the firm.
To test whether  ability  beliefs  mediate the investment
effect on online purchase intentions (H
3
), we added ability
beliefs as  a  covariate  to the  2  × 3 ANCOVA.  Consistent
with the requirements for mediation, ability was a signifi-
cant covariate (F(1, 68) = 8.47, p < .01), and the investment
effect became nonsignificant (F(1, 68) < 1). We replicated
this finding with the Sobel (1982) test (Goodman I test sta-
tistic  =  1.93;  p =  .05).  As  in  Study  1,  benevolence  and
integrity  beliefs  cannot  be  considered  mediators,  because
investment did not significantly  affect these beliefs. How-
ever,  it  is  possible  that  benevolence  and  integrity  beliefs
mediate  the  privacy/security  effect  on  online  purchase
intentions. To test this, we added these beliefs as covariates
to the 2 × 3 ANCOVA. Inconsistent with the requirements
for mediation but in support of the prediction that searchers’
online  purchase  intentions  are  influenced  by  their  ability
rather than by their benevolence and integrity beliefs (H
1
),
neither of these beliefs were significant (Fs(1, 67) < 2.02,
n.s.),  and  the  privacy/security  effect  on  online  purchase
intentions remained significant (F(2, 67) = 5.75, p < .01).
Conclusions
Replicating the results of Study 1, we found that searchers’
ability  beliefs,  rather than  their  benevolence and integrity
beliefs,  influenced  their  online  purchase  intentions.  As  a
result, ability signals (Web site investment) influenced their
online  purchase  intentions  more  than  did  signals  of  the
firm’s benevolence and integrity (the presence  of a strong
privacy/security statement).
Because  the  objective  of  this  research  is  to  predict
online purchase intentions, thus far our focus has been on
people whose  goals are most  consistent with  prepurchase
deliberation,  namely,  searchers.  For  those  with  this  goal,
ability beliefs are a stronger driver of online purchase inten-
tions than are benevolence and integrity beliefs. However,
there may be goals that highlight the importance of a differ-
ent component of trust than ability beliefs. Specifically, for
those whose goal for visiting the site is more personal and
less outcome oriented (i.e., browsers), a different pattern of
results  may  emerge.  Browsing  is  a  moment-by-moment
activity rather than a search process for a specific piece of
information (Janiszewski 1998). As such, it is exploratory
(Moe  2003)  and  reflects  recreational  behavior  (Hoffman
and Novak 1996). Similar to those who read a text for enter-
tainment (Rosenblatt 1978), browsers are likely focused on
what they are “living through” during their site visits. Thus,
whereas searchers tend to be more objective and outcome
oriented and thus are likely to disengage from having a per-
sonal  experience  with  the  site,  browsers’ experiences  are
likely more personal.
We  argue that  distinguishing  between these goals has
important implications for the relative impact of each trust-
ing belief on online purchase intentions. Whereas searchers
focus on performance and thus base their online purchase
intentions  on  their  ability  beliefs,  browsers  likely  have  a
more  personal  experience  with  the  site  and  thus  will  be
influenced  by  the  most  personal  aspect  of  trust:  benevo-
lence beliefs. Benevolence beliefs reflect consumers’beliefs
that the firm cares about their welfare and well-being (e.g.,
“I  trust  that  the  firm  is  concerned  about  my  wants  and
needs,  even  if  doing  so  results  in  profit  reductions”),
whereas  integrity  beliefs  reflect  beliefs  about  the  firm’s
moral standards, regardless of how it feels about the indi-
vidual (e.g., “I trust that the firm is guided by sound busi-
ness  principles  and  standards”).  Likewise,  ability  beliefs
reflect beliefs about the firm’s expertise, regardless of how
it feels about the individual (e.g., “I trust that the firm has
the  necessary  skills  to  be  successful”).  Thus,  because
browsers’ experiences are highly personal, their online pur-
chase  intentions  should  depend  on  the  most  personal
dimension of trust (benevolence) rather than on the less per-
sonal dimensions (i.e., ability and integrity).
140/ Journal of Marketing,April 2006
H
4
: Browsers’ online  purchase  intentions  depend  on  their
beliefs  about  the  firm’s  benevolence  rather  than  their
beliefs about the firm’s ability or integrity.
We also propose that the distinction between searching
and browsing has important implications for the influence
of  Web  site  investment  on  online  purchase  intentions.
Whereas prior research has demonstrated the importance of
separating signals from interpretation, because not everyone
interprets a signal in the same manner (Prabhu and Stewart
2001), it may be equally important to separate signal inter-
pretation from response because even similarly interpreted
signals  may  lead  to  meaningfully  different  responses.  In
particular,  we  argue  that  though  both  searchers  and
browsers  will  likely  interpret  investment  as  signaling  the
firm’s abilities, the impact of this belief on their online pur-
chase intentions will vary. Specifically, if searchers’ online
purchase intentions are affected by their ability beliefs, abil-
ity signals (or Web site investment) should influence their
online  purchase  intentions.  However,  if  browsers’ online
purchase  intentions  are unaffected by their  ability beliefs,
ability signals (even if interpreted as such) should have rel-
atively little influence on  their online  purchase intentions.
Consequently, we hypothesize the following:
H
5
: Web  site  investment  influences  searchers’ but  not
browsers’online purchase intentions.
Because the firm studied thus far was an unknown Internet-
only firm, an additional objective of Study 3 was to repli-
cate  the  results  for  searchers  with  a well-established firm
that sells a different set of products (electronics rather than
home furnishings and accessories).
Study 3
Method
Sample  and design. A  total  of 152  undergraduate stu-
dents participated in exchange for extra course credit. We
randomly assigned participants to one of four conditions in
 2  (investment)  × 2  (goal:  searching  versus  browsing)
experimental design.
Web site investment manipulation. In contrast to Studies
1 and 2, we manipulated investment using only technology.
Specifically, for  the high-investment site, we used Macro-
media’s  Shockwave  technology  to  allow  participants  to
experience  an  online  demonstration  and  to  roll  over  the
product  image  to  gather  additional  information  about  its
features. For the low-investment site, we conveyed the same
information  through  text  and  static  graphics  rather  than
through the use of this technology.
Procedure. The procedure was similar  to  that  used  in
Study 2, with a few exceptions. Each participant was seated
at a  computer  terminal,  which  contained the instructions,
the  site,  and  the  survey.  Participants  were  told  that  they
would be visiting a portion of Kodak’s site devoted to a spe-
cific  model  of  digital  camera.  Those  assigned  to  browse
were instructed to “have fun, looking at whatever you con-
sider  interesting  and/or  entertaining.”  Those  assigned  to
search  were  instructed  that  before  doing  so,  they  should
type two questions they have for Kodak about  this digital
camera. To ensure that both groups would be attending to
information  relevant to them,  we  did not specify what  to
look for. These  instructions are identical to those  used  in
prior  research  to  instill  a  searching versus  browsing  goal
(Schlosser 2003). Participants then visited the site. To con-
trol for the amount of time browsers versus searchers spent
at the site and any possible impact of this on the dependent
variables, all participants viewed the site for five minutes,
which is comparable to the time imposed in prior research
(Schlosser  2003).  We  did  not  investigate  privacy/security
statements in this study.
After visiting the site, participants completed the online
survey, which was identical to that used in Study 2, except
that the risk questions were replaced by the goal manipula-
tion check. Participants were asked the extent to which their
time at the site was spent looking for specific information (a
searching activity) or looking to be entertained (a browsing
activity) on a scale from 0 (“not at all”) to 5 (“a lot”). In
addition to the Web site investment items, participants rated
how informative they found the site to be on a scale from 1
(“very little”) to 7 (“a great deal”). We also made a slight
change to the trusting  beliefs  measure: We  asked  partici-
pants  to  focus on the trustworthiness of  Kodak’s  Internet
marketing department. We made this change to direct par-
ticipants’ attention toward the e-commerce side of the firm
rather than the firm in general or the brand. For example,
participants may trust the offline firm’s ability, benevolence,
and integrity, but they may not believe that its Internet mar-
keting managers share these same qualities.
Results
Manipulation  checks.  We  analyzed  the  manipulation
check items with a 2 (investment) × 2 (goal) ANOVA. In
support of the goal manipulation, searchers reported spend-
ing  more  time  searching  (Ms  =  2.52  versus  1.86;
F(1, 150) = 14.08, p < .01) and less time browsing (Ms =
1.31  versus  1.97;  F(1, 150)  =  13.80,  p <  .01)  than  did
browsers.  In  support  of  the  investment  manipulation,  the
high-investment site was perceived as a greater investment
than  the  low-investment  site  (Ms  =  4.51  versus  2.58;
F(1, 148) =  88.76, p < .01). This effect  emerged  for both
browsers (Ms = 4.15 versus 2.34; F(1, 74) = 20.19, p < .01)
and searchers (Ms = 4.86 versus 2.10; F(1, 74) = 85.14, p <
.01). No other effects were significant. The sites did not dif-
fer in perceived informativeness (F(1, 148) < 1).
Trusting beliefs and online purchase intentions. To test
whether  ability  beliefs  explain  searchers’ online  purchase
intentions  (H
1
 and  whether  benevolence  beliefs  explain
browsers’ online  purchase  intentions  (H
4
),  we  conducted
separate hierarchical regression analyses for searchers and
browsers; we modeled ability beliefs as a function of online
purchase  intentions (Model  1)  before adding  benevolence
and  integrity  beliefs  (Model  2).  As  we  predicted,  ability
beliefs were significantly  related to searchers’ online pur-
chase intentions (β = .42, t(74) = 3.96, p < .01; R2 = .18,
F(1, 74)  =  15.70,  p <  .01;  see  Table  2). The  addition  of
benevolence and integrity beliefs to the model did not sig-
nificantly  contribute  to  searchers’ online  purchase  inten-
tions (ΔR
2
= .03, F(2, 72) = 1.50, n.s.). For browsers, ability
Converting Web Site Visitors into Buyers / 141
TABLE 2
Study 4: Hierarchical Regression Analysis of Trusting Beliefs on Online Purchase Intentions When Risk Is
High Versus Low
A: Results from a Hierarchical Regression Analysis
Model 1
Model 2
Social Risk 
Variable
ββ
R2
F for R2
ββ
ΔΔR2
F for ΔΔR2
High
Product attitudes
.60**
.53
7.91**
.58**
.02
1.80
Autotelic NFT 
–.09**
–.14**
Instrumental NFT
–.03**
–.05**
Online buying 
.16**
.06**
Site problems
.10**
.17**
Ability
.29**
.24**
Integrity
.18**
Low
Product attitudes
.44**
.27
2.40**
.41**
.02
1.12
Autotelic NFT 
–.12**
–.10**
Instrumental NFT
.02**
.00**
Online buying
.05**
.14**
Site problems
.09**
.01**
Ability
.08**
.17**
Integrity
–.17**
B: Results from a Stepwise Regression Analysis
High
Product attitudes
.64**
.41
33.92**
.56**
.07
5.94**
Ability
.27**
Low
Product attitudes
.48**
.23
13.47**
*
p
< .10.
**
p
<
.05.
Notes: NFT = Need for touch.
beliefs alone did not significantly explain their online pur-
chase intentions (R2 = .02, F(1, 74) = 1.62, n.s.). However,
the  addition  of  benevolence  and  integrity  beliefs  to  the
model  significantly  contributed  to  browsers’ online  pur-
chase intentions (ΔR2 = .10, F(2, 72) = 4.28, p < .05). Con-
sistent with H
4
, browsers’ benevolence beliefs were signifi-
cantly related to their online purchase intentions (β = .33,
t(74) = 2.70, p < .01), whereas ability and integrity beliefs
were not (t(74) < 1). Multicollinearity was not a problem in
the analyses (maximum VIFs < 1.50).
Web  site  investment,  trusting  beliefs,  and  online  pur-
chase  intentions.  We  analyzed  each  belief  with  a  2  × 2
ANOVA.  As  we  expected,  ability  beliefs  were  higher
among  those  who  visited  the  high-investment  site  than
among  those  who  visited  the  low-investment  site  (Ms  =
3.51  versus 2.99; F(1, 148) = 21.74,  p <  .01). Investment
did  not  affect  benevolence  and  integrity  beliefs
(Fs(1, 148) < 1).  Furthermore, people’s  goals  for  visiting
the site neither directly affected nor interacted with invest-
ment  to  influence  their  ability,  benevolence,  or  integrity
beliefs (Fs(1, 148) < 2.27, n.s.). Thus, investment appears to
signal  a  specific  trusting  belief  (i.e.,  ability  rather  than
benevolence or integrity), replicating the results of Studies
1 and 2 with a different set of stimuli. Moreover, this find-
ing persisted despite differences in people’s goals.
In support of H
5
, searchers had higher online purchase
intentions after visiting the high-investment site than after
visiting  the  low-investment  site  (Ms  =  –.03  versus  –.76;
F(1, 74) = 4.92, p < .05), whereas browsers’ online purchase
intentions were unaffected by investment (Ms = –.48 versus
–.08 at the high- and low-investment sites; F(1, 74) = 1.26,
n.s.). This  investment  × goal  interaction  was  significant
(F(1, 148) = 5.56, p < .05).
In  addition  to  demonstrating  that  the  site  effect  on
online  purchase  intentions  varies  across  goals,  we  tested
whether the mediating effects of ability  vary across goals
using the procedure that Baron and Kenny (1986) outline.
Specifically,  we  regressed  online  purchase  intentions  on
goal, site, goal × ability, and site × ability, and we found a
significant goal × ability effect (t(146) = 1.82, p < .05 [one-
tailed test]). For searchers, mediation was supported: Abil-
ity  was  significant  (F(1, 73)  =  10.45,  p <  01),  and  the
investment effect became nonsignificant (F(1, 73)  < 1). A
Sobel (1982) test supports this finding (Goodman I test sta-
tistic  =  2.74,  p < .01). However,  for  browsers,  mediation
was not supported: Ability  had little effect on online pur-
chase  intentions  (F(1, 73)  =  2.64,  n.s.).  Furthermore,
because investment did not affect benevolence and integrity
beliefs, they cannot be considered mediators.
Conclusions
In Study 3, we examined a boundary condition for the effect
of Web site investment on online purchase intentions: con-
sumers’ goals for visiting sites. We found that the effects of
Web site investment and ability on online purchase inten-
tions  are  specific  to  searchers  and  do  not  generalize  to
browsers.  For  browsers,  the  most  personal  component  of
trust (i.e., benevolence rather than ability) influences their
142/ Journal of Marketing,April 2006
online  purchase  intentions.  Consequently,  although
browsers recognized that Web site investment signals abil-
ity, it had relatively little influence on their online purchase
intentions.
A remaining question is whether the findings are really
a matter of trust. Recall that trusting intentions involve risk
(Moorman,  Zaltman,  and Deshpandé  1992), which causes
people to consult their trusting beliefs to determine whether
to perform the trusting behavior. If the findings are driven
by trust, Web site investment should influence consumers’
online  purchase  intentions  under  conditions  of  risk.
Although buying online is typically risky, certain situational
factors  (e.g.,  buying  a  gift  for  a  significant  versus  an
insignificant  other)  can  make buying  online  more  or  less
risky.  When  there  is  relatively  little  risk,  buying  online
should involve relatively  little  trust. Consequently, people
are less likely to consult their trusting beliefs when deciding
how to act. Indeed, the degree of trust necessary to influ-
ence behavior has an approximate linear relationship to the
degree  of  risk  involved  (Corritore,  Kracher,  and  Wieden-
beck  2003;  Mayer,  Davis,  and  Schoorman  1995).  Thus,
when the purchasing scenario involves relatively little risk,
ability  beliefs  (and  signals  designed  to  influence  such
beliefs)  should  have  relatively  little  effect  on  searchers’
online purchase intentions.
H
6
: Ability beliefs affect searchers’ online purchase intentions
only when buying involves risk.
H
7
: Web  site  investment  affects  searchers’ online  purchase
intentions when buying involves risk.
Another objective for Study 4 was to test the importance
of  trust  in  determining  online  purchase  intentions  versus
online purchase experience and a desire to examine prod-
ucts physically before purchase. For people who are moti-
vated to touch products, barriers to touch can decrease con-
fidence  in  product  evaluation,  though  conveying  haptic
information through text and graphics can help (Peck and
Childers  2003b).  If  trust is  critical  in  determining  online
purchase  intentions,  ability  beliefs  should  be  related  to
online purchase intentions even when we account for these
other factors.
Study 4
Method
Sample and design. A total of 98 undergraduate students
participated  in  exchange  for  extra  course  credit. We  ran-
domly  assigned  them  to  one  of  four  conditions  in  a  2
(investment:  high-  versus  low-investment  site)  × 2  (risk:
high versus low) factorial design. They visited the UF site
used in Studies 1 and 2.
Risk  manipulation.  We  manipulated  risk  by  varying
social risk. Specifically, the high-risk scenario was as fol-
lows: “Imagine that you graduated and obtained your dream
job at a firm. You are invited to your boss’ house-warming
party, which takes place in a week.” The low-risk scenario
was as follows: “Imagine that you are invited to a former
roommate’s  house-warming  party,  which  takes  place  in  a
month.”  Participants in both  scenarios  were  told  that  this
person likes modern furniture and accessories, such as those
3
Moorman,  Deshpandé,  and  Zaltman (1993)  do  not  measure
benevolence beliefs; thus, we do not address them here.
offered  at UF’s  site,  and  that they  intend  to  buy  a home
accessory  (e.g.,  a  vase)  as  a  house-warming  gift  for  this
person.
To test the  effectiveness  of these scenarios, 41 under-
graduate students read either scenario and then  rated how
nervous  and  concerned they  would  be about  making  this
purchase and how risky they considered this purchase on a
scale from 1 to 7 (higher  numbers reflected greater risk).
We averaged these items to form a perceived risk score (α =
.76).  As  we  expected,  perceived  risk  was  higher  among
those  who  read  the  high-risk  scenario  than  among  those
who  read  the  low-risk  scenario  (Ms  =  4.22  versus  3.12;
F(1, 37) = 7.12, p = .01). Participants then looked at screen
captures of the high- or low-investment site and answered
the Web site investment items (α = .94; see the Appendix).
As we expected, perceived  investment was higher  for  the
high-investment site than for the low-investment site (Ms =
5.12 versus 3.81; F(1, 37) = 14.78, p < .01). Moreover, risk
did not directly affect or moderate these investment percep-
tions (Fs(1, 37) < 1.39, n.s.).
Procedure. The procedure and survey were the same as
that used in Study 2, with a few exceptions. At the begin-
ning of the experiment, participants read either the high- or
the  low-risk  scenario  before  receiving  the search  instruc-
tions.  Participants  did  not  receive  a  privacy/security
statement.
Unlike Study 2, online purchase intentions were specific
to home accessories (the gift they were to buy). Participants
also reported their attitudes toward UF’s home accessories
to  control  for  any individual differences in  their liking of
UF’s offerings (see the Appendix). In addition, to test the
robustness of our effects related to ability versus integrity
beliefs, we replaced Mayer and Davis’s (1995)  scale with
an  adaptation  of  Moorman,  Deshpandé,  and  Zaltman’s
(1993) ability  and integrity  items.3 Three  items  measured
ability beliefs (α = .93), and two items measured integrity
beliefs  (r  =  .31;  see  the  Appendix).  Finally,  to  test  the
impact of trust on online purchase intentions relative to con-
sumers’ desire  to  touch  products  before  purchase,  we
administered  Peck and  Childers’s  (2003a)  need  for touch
(NFT)  scale,  which  measures  the  need  for  autotelic  and
instrumental touch (see the Appendix).
Results
Trusting beliefs and online purchase intentions. To test
H
6
, we conducted a hierarchical  regression  analysis sepa-
rately for searchers in the high- and low-risk conditions; we
modeled ability beliefs and variables believed to influence
online  purchase  intentions  (attitudes  toward  home  acces-
sories, both types of NFT, online purchase experience, and
site problems) as a function of online purchase intentions
(Model 1) before adding integrity beliefs (Model 2). As we
predicted,  for  searchers  in  the  high-risk  condition,  ability
beliefs were significantly related to online purchase inten-
tions (β = .29, t(48) = 2.39, p < .05; R2 = .52, F(6, 43) =
7.91, p < .01; see Table 2). The only other significant varia-
ble was attitudes toward home accessories (β = .60, t(48) =
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested