c# pdf to image ghostscript : Converting a word document to pdf fillable form software Library project winforms .net windows UWP wbook17-part57

CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
160
same as the non-parametric GWR relationship, but the addition of (4.27)
provides an explicit statement of the parameter smoothing that takes place
across space. The parameter smoothinginvolves alocally linear combination
of neighboring areas, where neighbors are dened in terms of the distance
weighting function that decays over space.
W
1=2
i
y = W
1=2
i
X
i
+"
i
(4.26)
i
=
w
i1
⊗I
k
::: w
in
⊗I
k
0
B
@
1
.
.
.
n
1
C
A
+u
i
(4.27)
The terms w
ij
represent a normalized distance-based weight so the row-
vector (w
i1
;:::;w
in
) sums to unity, and we set w
ii
= 0. That is, w
ij
=
exp(−d
ij
=)=
P
n
j=1
exp(−d
ij
=).
To complete our model specication, we add distributions for the terms
"
i
and u
i
:
"
i
 N[0;
2
V
i
];
V
i
=diag(v
1
;v
2
;:::;v
n
)
(4.28)
u
i
 N[0;
2
2
(X
0
W
i
X)
−1
)]
(4.29)
The V
i
=diag(v
1
;v
2
;:::;v
n
), represent our n variance scaling param-
eters from Chapter3. These allow for non-constant variance as we move
across space. One point to keep in mind is that here we have n
2
terms to es-
timate, reflecting n V
i
vectors, one vector for each of the n observations. We
will use the same assumption as in Chapter3 regarding the V
i
parameters.
All n
2
parameters are assumed to be i.i.d. 
2
(r) distributed, where r is our
hyperparameter that controls the amount of dispersion in the V
i
estimates
across observations. As in Chapter3, we introduce a single hyperparameter
rto the estimation problem and receive in return n
2
parameter estimates.
Consider that as r becomes very large, the prior imposes homoscedasticity
on the BGWR model and the disturbance variance becomes 
2
I
n
for all
observations i.
The distribution for u
i
in the parameter smoothing relationship is nor-
mally distributed with mean zero and a variance based on Zellner's (1971)
g−prior. This prior variance is proportional to the parameter variance-
covariance matrix, 
2
(X
0
W
i
X)
−1
) with 
2
acting as the scale factor. The
use of this prior specication allows individual parameters 
i
to vary by
dierent amounts depending on their magnitude.
Converting a word document to pdf fillable form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
add signature field to pdf; asp.net fill pdf form
Converting a word document to pdf fillable form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
pdf fillable form; convert word document to fillable pdf form
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
161
The parameter 
2
acts as a scale factor to impose tight or loose ad-
herence to the parameter smoothing specication. Consider a case where
is very small, then the smoothing restriction would force 
i
to look like
adistance-weighted linear combination of other 
i
from neighboring obser-
vations. On the other hand, as  ! 1 (and V
i
= I
n
) we produce the
non-parametric GWR estimates. To see this, we rewrite the BGWR model
in a more compact form:
~y
i
=
~
X
i
i
+"
i
(4.30)
i
= J
i
γ+ u
i
(4.31)
Where the denitions of the matrix expressions are:
~y
i
= W
1=2
i
y
~
X
i
= W
1=2
i
X
J
i
=
w
i1
⊗I
k
::: w
in
⊗I
k
γ =
0
B
@
1
.
.
.
n
1
C
A
As indicated earlier, the notation is somewhat confusing in that ~y
i
de-
notes an n−vector, not a scalar magnitude. Similarly, "
i
is an n−vector and
~
X
i
is an n by k matrix. Note that (4.30) can be written in the form of a
Theil and Goldberger (1961) estimation problem as shown in (4.32).
~y
i
J
i
γ
!
=
~
X
i
−I
k
!
i
+
"
i
u
i
!
(4.32)
Assuming V
i
=I
n
,the estimates 
i
take the form:
^
i
= R(
~
X
0
i
~y
i
+
~
X
0
i
~
X
i
J
i
γ=
2
)
R = (
~
X
0
i
~
X
i
+
~
X
0
i
~
X
i
=
2
)
−1
As  approaches 1, the terms associated with the Theil and Goldberger
\stochastic restriction",
~
X
0
i
~
X
i
J
i
γ=
2
and
~
X
0
i
~
X
i
=
2
become zero, and we have
the GWR estimates:
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET VB.NET Tutorial for Converting PDF from Microsoft Office Excel
convert html form to pdf fillable form; convert pdf to fillable pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Word to PDF. 1.docx" Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" ' Load a Word (.docx) document.
create fill pdf form; convert word doc to fillable pdf form
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
162
^
i
=(
~
X
0
i
~
X
i
)
−1
(
~
X
0
i
~y
i
)
(4.33)
In practice, we can use a diuse prior for  which allows the amount of
parameter smoothing to be estimated from sample data information, rather
than by subjective prior information.
Details concerning estimation of the parameters in the BGWR model
are taken up in the next section. Before turning to these issues, we consider
some alternative spatial parameter smoothing relationships that might be
used in lieu of (4.27) in the BGWR model.
One alternative smoothing specication would be the \monocentric city
smoothing" set forth in (4.34). This relation assumes that the data obser-
vations have been ordered by distance from the center of the spatial sample.
i
= 
i−1
+u
i
(4.34)
u
i
 N[0;
2
2
(X
0
W
i
X)
−1
]
Given that the observations are ordered by distance from the center, the
smoothing relation indicates that 
i
should be similar to the coecient 
i−1
from a neighboring concentric ring. Note that we rely on the same GWR
distance-weighted datasub-samples, createdby transformingthe data using:
W
i
y;W
i
X. This means that the estimates still have a \locally linear" inter-
pretation as in the GWR. We rely on the same distributional assumption
for the term u
i
from the BGWR which allows us to estimate the parame-
ters from this model by making minor changes to the approach used for the
BGWR.
Another alternative is a \spatial expansion smoothing" based on the
ideas introduced by Casetti (1972). This is shown in (4.35), where Z
xi
;Z
yi
denote latitude-longitude coordinates associated with observation i.
i
=
Z
xi
⊗I
k
Z
yi
⊗I
k
x
y
!
+u
i
(4.35)
u
i
 N[0;
2
2
(X
0
W
i
X)
−1
)]
This parameter smoothing relation creates a locally linear combination
based on the latitude-longitude coordinates of each observation. As in the
case of the monocentric city specication, we retain the same assumptions
regarding the stochastic termu
i
,making this model simple to estimate with
minor changes to the BGWR methodology.
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET VB.NET Demo Code for Converting PowerPoint to PDF.
best pdf form filler; create a pdf with fields to fill in
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable may help you with converting PowerPoint(.pptx PDF document can be converted from PowerPoint2003 by
pdf add signature field; create fill in pdf forms
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
163
Finally, we could adopt a \contiguity smoothing" relationship based on
arst-order spatial contiguity matrix as shown in (4.36). The terms c
ij
rep-
resent the ith row of a row-standardized rst-order contiguity matrix. This
creates a parameter smoothing relationship that averages over the parame-
ters from observations that neighbor observation i.
i
=
c
i1
⊗I
k
::: c
in
⊗I
k
0
B
@
1
.
.
.
n
1
C
A
+u
i
(4.36)
u
i
 N[0;
2
(X
0
W
2
i
X)
−1
)]
Alternative approaches to specifying geographically weighted regression
models suggest that researchers need to think about which type of spatial
parameter smoothing relationship is most appropriate for their application.
Additionally, where the nature of the problem does not clearly favor one
approach over another, statistical tests of alternative models based on dif-
ferent smoothing relations might be carried out. Posterior odds ratios can
be constructed that will shed light on which smoothing relationship is most
consistent with the sample data. We illustrate model specication issues in
an applied example in Section4.5.
4.4.1 Estimation of the BGWR model
We use Gibbs sampling to estimate the BGWR model. This approach is
particularly attractive in this application because the conditional densities
all represent know distributions that are easy to obtain. In Chapter3 we
saw an example of Gibbs sampling where the conditionaldistributionfor the
spatial autoregressive parameters were from an unknown distribution and
we had to rely on the more complicated case of Metropolis within-Gibbs
sampling.
To implement the Gibbs sampler we need to derive and draw samples
from the conditional posterior distributions for each group of parameters,
i
;;, and V
i
in the model. Let P(
i
j;;V
i
;γ) denote the conditional
density of 
i
, where γ represents the values of other 
j
for observations
j 6= i. Using similar notation for the the other conditional densities, the
Gibbs sampling process can be viewed as follows:
1. start with arbitrary values for the parameters 
0
i
;
0
;
0
;V
0
i
0
2. for each observation i = 1;:::;n,
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; Following sample code may help you with converting ODP to PDF file. targetType, The target document type will be converted to.
create a fillable pdf form online; create fillable form from pdf
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
164
(a) sample a value, 
1
i
from P(
i
j
0
;
0
;V
0
i
0
)
(b) sample a value, V
1
i
from P(V
i
j
1
i
;
0
;
0
0
)
3. use the sampled values 
1
i
;i = 1;:::;n from each of the n draws above
to update γ
0
to γ
1
.
4. sample a value, 
1
from P(j
0
;V
1
i
1
)
5. sample a value, 
1
from P(j
1
;V
1
i
1
)
6. go to step 1 using 
1
i
;
1
;
1
;V
1
i
1
in place of the arbitrary starting
values.
The sequence of draws outlined above represents a single pass through
the sampler, and we make a large number of passes to collect a large sample
of parameter values from which we construct our posterior distributions.
We rely on the compact statement of the BGWR model in (4.30) to
facilitate presentation of the conditional distributions that we rely on during
the sampling.
The conditional posterior distribution of 
i
given ;;γ and V
i
is a mul-
tivariate normal shown in (4.37).
p(
i
j:::) / N(
^
i
;
2
R)
(4.37)
Where:
^
i
= R(
~
X
0
i
V
−1
i
~y
i
+
~
X
0
i
~
X
i
J
i
γ=
2
)
R = (
~
X
0
i
V
−1
i
~
X
i
+
~
X
0
i
~
X
i
=
2
)
−1
(4.38)
This result follows from the assumed variance-covariance structures for
"
i
;u
i
and the Theil-Goldberger (1961) representation shown in (4.32).
The conditional posterior distribution for  is a 
2
(m = n
2
)distribution
shown in (4.39).
p(j:::) / 
−(m+1)
expf−
1
22
n
X
i=1
("
0
i
V
−1
i
"
i
)g
(4.39)
"
i
= ~y
i
~
X
i
i
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
165
The sum in (4.39) extends over the subscript i to indicate that the n−
vector of the squared residuals (deflated by the n individual V
i
terms) from
each sub-sample of n observations are summed, and then these n sums are
summed as well.
The conditionalposterior distribution for V
i
is shown in (4.40), which in-
dicates that we draw ann-vector basedon a 
2
(r+1) distribution. Note that
the individual elements of the matrix V
i
act on the spatial weighting scheme
because the estimates involve terms like:
~
X
0
i
V
−1
i
~
X
i
=X
0
W
i
V
−1
i
W
i
X. The
terms W
i
=
p
exp(−d
i
=) from the weighting scheme will be adjusted by
the V
i
estimates, which are large for aberrant observations or outliers. In
the event of an outlier,observation i willreceive less weight when the spatial
distance-based weight is divided by a large V
i
value.
pf[(e
2
i
=
2
)+ r]=V
i
j:::g / 
2
(r + 1)
(4.40)
Finally, the conditional distribution for  is a 
2
(nk) distribution based
on (4.41).
p(j:::) / 
−nk
expf−
n
X
i=1
(
i
−J
i
γ)
0
(
~
X
0
i
~
X
i
)
−1
(
i
−J
i
γ)=2
2
2
g
(4.41)
Now consider the modications needed to the conditional distributions
to implement the alternative spatial smoothing relationships set forth in
Section4.4.1. Since we maintained the assumptions regarding the distur-
bance terms "
i
;u
i
,we need only alter the conditional distributions for 
i
and
. First, consider the case of the monocentric city smoothing relationship.
The conditional distribution for 
i
is multivariate normal with mean
^
i
and
variance-covariance 
2
Ras shown in (4.42).
^
i
= R(
~
X
0
i
V
−1
i
~y
i
+
~
X
0
i
~
X
i
i−1
=
2
)
(4.42)
R = (
~
X
0
i
V
−1
i
~
X
i
+
~
X
0
i
~
X
i
=
2
)
−1
The conditional distribution for  is a 
2
(nk) based on the expression in
(4.43).
p(j:::) / 
−nk
expf−
n
X
i=1
(
i
−
i−1
)
0
(
~
X
0
i
~
X
i
)
−1
(
i
−
i−1
)=
2
2
g
(4.43)
For the case of the spatial expansion and contiguity smoothing relation-
ships, we can maintain the conditional expressions for 
i
and  from the case
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
166
of the BGWR, and simply modify the denition of J, to be consistent with
these smoothing relations. One additional change needs to be made for the
case of the spatialexpansionsmoothing relationship,we need toadda condi-
tional distribution for the parameters 
x
;
y
in the model. This distribution
is a multivariate normal with mean
^
 = (
^
x
^
y
)
0
and variance-covariance
matrix 
2
(J
0
i
~
X
0
i
Q
−1
~
X
i
J
i
)
−1
as dened in (4.44).
^
 = (J
0
i
~
X
0
i
Q
−1
~
X
i
J
i
)
−1
(J
0
i
~
X
0
i
Q
−1
~y
i
)
(4.44)
Q = (V
i
+
~
X
i
(
~
X
0
i
~
X
i
)
−1~
X
0
i
=
2
)
4.4.2 Informative priors
Implementing the BGWR model with diuse priors on  may lead to large
values that essentially eliminate the parameter smoothing relationship from
the model. The BGWR estimates will then collapse on the GWR estimates
(in the case of a large value for the hyperparameter r that leads to V
i
=I
n
).
In cases where the sample data is weak or objective prior information sug-
gests spatial parameter smoothing should follow a particular specication,
we can use an informative prior for the parameter . A Gamma(a;b) prior
distribution which has a mean of a=b and variance of a=b
2
seems appropri-
ate. Given this prior, we could eliminate the conditional density for  and
replace it with a random draw from the Gamma(a;b) distribution.
In order to devise an appropriate prior setting for , consider that the
GWR variance-covariance matrix is: 
2
(
~
X
0
~
X)
−1
,so setting values for  > 1
would represent a relatively loose imposition of the parameter smoothing
relationship. Values of  < 1 would impose the parameter smoothing prior
more tightly.
A similar approach can be taken for the hyperparameter r. Using a
Gamma prior distribution with a = 8;b = 2 that indicates small values of r
around 4, should provide a fair amount of robustication if there is spatial
heterogeneity. In the absence of heterogeneity, the resulting V
i
estimates
will be near unity so the BGWR distance weights will be similar to those
from GWR, even with a small value of r.
Additionally,a 
2
(c;d) natural conjugate prior for the parameter  could
be used in place of the diuse prior set forth here. This would aect the
conditional distribution used during Gibbs sampling in only a minor way.
Some other alternatives oer additional flexibility when implementing
the BGWR model. For example, one can restrict specic parameters to
exhibit no variation over the spatial sample observations. This might be
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
167
useful if we wish to restrict the constant term to be constant over space.
Or, it may be that the constant term is the only parameter that would be
allowed to vary over space.
These alternatives can be implemented by adjusting the prior variances
in the parameter smoothing relationship:
var −cov(
i
)= 
2
2
(
~
X
0
i
~
X
i
)
−1
(4.45)
For example, assuming the constant term is in the rst column of the matrix
~
X
i
, setting the rst row and column elements of (
~
X
0
i
~
X
i
)
−1
to zero would
restrict the intercept term to remain constant over all observations.
4.4.3 Implementation details
We have devised a functionbgwr to carry out Gibbs sampling estimationof
the Bayesian GWR model. The documentationfor the function is shown be-
low, where a great many user-supplied options are available. These options
are input using a structure variable named `prior' with which alternative
types of parameter smoothing relationships can be indicated. Notethat only
three of the four parameter smoothing relationships discussed in Section4.4
are implemented. The Casetti spatial expansion parameter smoothing re-
lationship is not yet implemented. Another point to note is that you can
implement a contiguity smoothing relationship by either specifying a spatial
weight matrix or relying on the function to calculate this matrix based on
the x-y coordinates using the function xy2cont discussed in Chapter2.
PURPOSE: compute Bayesian geographically weighted regression
model: y = Xb(i) + e,
e = N(0,sige*V),
b(i) = f[b(j)] + u, u = delta*sige*inv(x'x)
V = diag(v1,v2,...vn),
r/vi = ID chi(r)/r,
delta = gamma(s,t),
r = Gamma(m,k)
f[b(j)] = b(i-1) for concentric city prior
f[b(j)] = W(i) b for contiguity prior
f[b(j)] = [exp(-d/c)/sum(exp(-d/c)] b for distance prior
c = GWR c.v. determined bandwidth
----------------------------------------------------
USAGE: results = bgwr(y,x,xcoord,ycoord,ndraw,nomit,prior)
where: y = dependent variable vector
x = explanatory variable matrix
xcoord = x-coordinates in space
ycoord = y-coordinates in space
prior = a structure variable with fields:
prior.rval, improper r value, default=4
prior.m,
informative Gamma(m,k) prior on r
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
168
prior.k,
(default: not used)
prior.dval, improper delta value (default=diffuse)
prior.s,
informative Gamma(s,t) prior on delta
prior.t,
(default: not used)
prior.ptype, 'concentric' for concentric city smoothing
'distance'
for distance based smoothing (default)
'contiguity' for contiguity smoothing
'casetti'
for casetti smoothing (not implemented)
prior.ctr, observation # of central point (for concentric prior)
prior.W,
(optional) prior weight matrix (for contiguity prior)
ndraw = # of draws
nomit = # of initial draws omitted for burn-in
---------------------------------------------------
RETURNS: a results structure
results.meth
= 'bgwr'
results.bdraw
= beta draws (ndraw-nomitxnobsxnvar) (3-d matrix)
results.sdraw
= sige draws (ndraw-nomit x 1)
results.vmean
= mean of vi draws (1 x nobs)
results.rdraw
= r-value draws (ndraw-nomit x 1)
results.ddraw
= delta draws (if diffuse prior used)
results.r
= value of hyperparameter r (if input)
results.d
= value of hyperparameter delta (if input)
results.m
= m prior parameter (if input)
results.k
= k prior parameter (if input)
results.s
= s prior parameter (if input)
results.t
= t prior parameter (if input)
results.nobs
= nobs
results.nvar
= nvars
results.ptype
= input string for parameter smoothing relation
results.xcoord = x-coordinates
results.ycoord = y-coordinates
results.ctr
= central point observation # (if concentric prior)
results.dist
= distance vector (if ptype = 0)
results.y
= y data vector
results.logpost = (nobs x 1) vector of approximate log posterior
results.time
= time taken for sampling
---------------------------------------------------
NOTE: use either improper prior.rval
or informative Gamma prior.m, prior.k, not both of them
uses exponential distance weighting function exp(-d/bwdith)
where d=distance and bwidth = gwr c.v. determined bandwidth
The user also has control over options for assigning a prior to the hy-
perparameter r that robusties with respect to outliers and accommodates
non-constant variance. Either an improper prior value can be set (as a rule-
of-thumb I recommend r = 4), or a proper prior based on a Gamma(m,k)
distributioncan be used. Here, one would try to rely on a prior in the range
of 4 to 10, because larger values produce estimates that are not robust to
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
169
heteroscedasticity or outliers. As an example, m = 8;k = 2 would imple-
ment a prior with the mean of r = 4 and the variance of r = 2, since the
mean of the Gamma distribution is m=k, and the variance is (m=k
2
).
The hyperparameter  can be handled in three ways: 1) we can sim-
ply assign an improper prior value using say, `prior.dval=20' as an input
option, 2) we can input nothing about this parameter producing a default
implementation based on a diuse prior where  will be estimated, and 3)
we can assign a Gamma(s,t) prior as in the case of the hyperparameter r.
Implementation with a diuse prior for  and a large value for the hyper-
parameter r will most likely reproduce the non-parameter GWR estimates,
and this approach to producing those estimates requires more computing
time. It is possible (but not likely) that a model and the sample data are
very consistent with the parameter smoothing relationship. If this occurs,
adiuse prior for  will produce a relatively small value as the posterior
estimate. In the most likely cases encountered in practice, small deviations
of the parameters from the smoothing relationship will lead to very large
estimates for , producing BGWR parameter estimates that come very close
to those from the non-parametric GWR model.
The value of the Bayesianapproach outlinedhere lies in the ability to ro-
bustifying against outliers, so a default value of r = 4 has been implemented
if the user enters no information regarding the hyperparameter r.
Consider how the following alternative implementations of the various
prior settings could be used to shed light on the nature of parameter vari-
ation over space. We can compare the results from a GWR model to a
BGWR model implemented with r = 4 and either a diuse prior for  or
an improper prior based on large  value. This comparison should show the
impact of robustication on the estimates, and a plot of the V
i
estimates
can be used to detect outliers. Another model based on r = 4 along with
an informative prior for   1 that places some weight on the parameter
smoothing restrictions can be used to see how this alters the estimates when
compared to the robust BGWR estimates. A dramatic dierence between
the robust BGWR estimates and those based on the informative prior for
 1 indicates that the parameter smoothing relation is inconsistent with
the sample data.
It may be necessary to experiment with alternative values of  because
the scale is unclear in any given problem. One way to deal with the scale is-
sue is to calibrate  based onthe diuse estimate. As an example, if 
2
=10,
then a value of  < 10 will impose the parameter smoothing restrictionmore
tightly. To see this, consider that the GWR variance-covariance matrix is
2
(
~
X
0
~
X)
−1
, so using  < 1 moves in the direction of tightening the pa-
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested