c# pdf to image ghostscript : Convert pdf file to fillable form SDK application API wpf html azure sharepoint wbook18-part58

CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
170
rameter smoothing prior. We will provide an example of this in the next
section.
The function bgwr returns the entire sequence of draws made for the
parameters in the problem, allowing one to: check for convergence of the
Gibbs sampler, plot posterior density functions using a function pltdens
from the Econometrics Toolbox or compute statistics from the posterior
distributions of the parameters. Most users will rely on the prt function
that calls a related function to produce printed output very similar to the
resultsprintedfor the gwr function. If youdo want to access the  estimates,
note that they are stored ina MATLAB 3-dimensional matrix structure. We
illustrate how to access these in Example 4.5 of the next section.
4.5 An applied exercise
The program in example 4.5 shows how to use the bgwr function to produce
estimates for the Anselin neighborhood crime data set. We begin by using
an improper prior for  = 1000000 and setting r = 30 to demonstrate that
the BGWR model can replicate the estimates from the GWR model. The
program plots these estimates for comparison. We produce estimates for
all three parameter smoothing priors, but given the large  = 1000000,
these relationships should not eectively enter the model. This will result in
all three sets of estimates identical to those from the GWR. We did this to
illustrate that the BGWR can replicatethe GWR estimates withappropriate
settings for the hyperparameters.
% ----- example 4.5 Using the bgwr() function
load anselin.data; % load the Anselin data set
y = anselin(:,1); nobs = length(y); x = [ones(nobs,1) anselin(:,2:3)];
east = anselin(:,4); north = anselin(:,5); tt=1:nobs;
ndraw = 250; nomit = 50;
prior.ptype = 'contiguity'; prior.rval = 30; prior.dval = 1000000;
tic; r1 = bgwr(y,x,east,north,ndraw,nomit,prior); toc;
prior.ptype = 'concentric'; prior.ctr = 20;
tic; r2 = bgwr(y,x,east,north,ndraw,nomit,prior); toc;
dist = res2.dist; [dists di] = sort(dist); % recover distance vector
prior.ptype = 'distance';
tic; r3 = bgwr(y,x,east,north,ndraw,nomit,prior); toc;
vnames = strvcat('crime','constant','income','hvalue');
% compare gwr estimates with posterior means
info2.dtype = 'exponential';
result = gwr(y,x,east,north,info2);
bgwr = result.beta(di,:);
b1 = r1.bdraw(:,di,1); b2 = r1.bdraw(:,di,2); b3 = r1.bdraw(:,di,3);
Convert pdf file to fillable form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
change font size in fillable pdf form; converting a word document to a fillable pdf form
Convert pdf file to fillable form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
asp.net fill pdf form; create fill pdf form
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
171
b1m = mean(b1); b2m = mean(b2); b3m = mean(b3);
c1 = r2.bdraw(:,:,1); c2 = r2.bdraw(:,:,2); c3 = r2.bdraw(:,:,3);
c1m = mean(c1); c2m = mean(c2); c3m = mean(c3);
d1 = r3.bdraw(:,di,1); d2 = r3.bdraw(:,di,2); d3 = r3.bdraw(:,di,3);
d1m = mean(d1); d2m = mean(d2); d3m = mean(d3);
% plot mean of vi draws (sorted by distance from #20)
plot(tt,r1.vmean(1,di),'-b',tt,r2.vmean,'--r',tt,r3.vmean(1,di),'-.k');
title('vi means'); legend('contiguity','concentric','distance');
pause;
% plot beta estimates (sorted by distance from #20)
subplot(3,1,1),
plot(tt,bgwr(:,1),'-k',tt,b1m,'--k',tt,c1m,'-.k',tt,d1m,':k');
legend('gwr','contiguity','concentric','distance');
xlabel('b1 parameter');
subplot(3,1,2),
plot(tt,bgwr(:,2),'-k',tt,b2m,'--k',tt,c2m,'-.k',tt,d2m,':k');
xlabel('b2 parameter');
subplot(3,1,3),
plot(tt,bgwr(:,3),'-k',tt,b3m,'--k',tt,c3m,'-.k',tt,d3m,':k');
xlabel('b3 parameter');
As we can see from the graph of the GWR and BGWR estimates shown
in Figure4.6, the three sets of BGWR estimates are nearly identical to the
GWR. Keep in mind that we don't recommend using the BGWR model
to replicate GWR estimates, as this problem involving 250 draws took 193
seconds for the contiguity prior, 185 for the concentric city prior and 190
seconds for the distance prior.
Example 4.6 produces estimates based on the contiguity smoothing re-
lationship with a value of r = 4 for this hyperparameter to indicate a prior
belief in heteroscedasticity or outliers. We keep the parameter smoothing
relationship from entering the model by setting an improper prior based
on  = 1000000, so there is no need to run more than a single parameter
smoothingmodel. Estimates basedonany of the three parameter smoothing
relationships would produce the same results because the large value for 
keeps this relationfrom entering the model. The focus here is on the impact
of outliers in the sample data and how BGWR robust estimates compare
to the GWR estimates based on the assumption of homoscedasticity. We
specify 250 draws with the rst 50 to be discarded for \burn-in" of the Gibbs
sampler. Figure4.7 shows a graph of the mean of the 200 draws which rep-
resent the posterior parameter estimates, compared to the non-parametric
estimates.
% ----- example 4.6 Producing robust BGWR estimates
% load the Anselin data set
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Create PDF file from PowerPoint free online without email.
convert pdf to fillable pdf form; change font size in pdf fillable form
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. Create fillable PDF document with
pdf form filler; convert pdf file to fillable form online
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
172
load anselin.data;
y = anselin(:,1); nobs = length(y);
x = [ones(nobs,1) anselin(:,2:3)];
east = anselin(:,4); north = anselin(:,5);
ndraw = 250; nomit = 50;
prior.ptype = 'contiguity'; prior.rval = 4; prior.dval = 1000000;
% use diffuse prior for distance decay smoothing of parameters
result = bgwr(y,x,east,north,ndraw,nomit,prior);
vnames = strvcat('crime','constant','income','hvalue');
info.dtype = 'exponential';
result2 = gwr(y,x,east,north,info);
% compare gwr and bgwr estimates
b1 = result.bdraw(:,:,1); b1mean = mean(b1);
b2 = result.bdraw(:,:,2); b2mean = mean(b2);
b3 = result.bdraw(:,:,3); b3mean = mean(b3);
betagwr = result2.beta;
tt=1:nobs;
subplot(3,1,1),
plot(tt,betagwr(:,1),'-k',tt,b1mean,'--k');
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
0
50
100
b1 parameter
gwr
contiguity
concentric
distance
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
-4
-2
0
2
b2 parameter
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
-2
-1
0
1
b3 parameter
Figure 4.6: GWR and BGWR diuse prior estimates
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Following sample code may help you with converting ODP to PDF file. // odp convert to pdf
create a fillable pdf form online; convert an existing form into a fillable pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents. Convert Word to PDF file with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast.
add fillable fields to pdf online; c# fill out pdf form
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
173
legend('gwr','bgwr');
xlabel('b1 parameter');
subplot(3,1,2),
plot(tt,betagwr(:,2),'-k',tt,b2mean,'--k');
xlabel('b2 parameter');
subplot(3,1,3),
plot(tt,betagwr(:,3),'-k',tt,b3mean,'--k');
xlabel('b3 parameter');
pause;
plot(result.vmean);
xlabel('Observations');
ylabel('V_{i} estimates');
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
20
40
60
80
100
b1 parameter
gwr
bgwr
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
-4
-2
0
2
b2 parameter
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
-2
-1
0
1
b3 parameter
Figure 4.7: GWR and Robust BGWR estimates
We see a departure of the two sets of estimates around the rst 10
observations and around observations 30 to 45. To understand why, we
need to consider the V
i
terms that represent the only dierence between the
BGWR and GWR models given that we used a large  value. Figure4.9
shows the mean of the draws for the V
i
parameters. Large estimates for the
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file in VB
pdf add signature field; create fillable pdf form from word
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file.
convert word doc to fillable pdf form; convert pdf file to fillable form
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
174
V
i
terms at observations 2, 4 and 34 indicate aberrant observations. This
accounts for the dierence in trajectory taken by the non-parametric GWR
estimates and the Bayesian estimates that robustify against these aberrant
observations.
Toillustratehow robusticationtakes place, Figure4.8shows the weight-
ing terms W
i
from the GWR model plotted alongside the weights adjusted
by the V
i
terms, W
1=2
i
V
−1
i
W
1=2
i
from the BGWR model. A sequence of six
observations from 30 to 35 are plotted, with a symbol `o' placed at observa-
tion #34 on the BGWR weights to help distinguish this observation in the
gure.
Beginning with observation #30, the aberrant observation #34 is down-
weighted when estimates are produced for observations #30 to #35. This
downweightingof the distance-based weight for observation #34 occurs dur-
ing estimation of 
i
for observations #30 through #35, all of which are near
#34 in terms of the GWR distance measure. This alternative weighting
produces the divergence between the GWR and BGWR estimates that we
observe in Figure4.7 starting around observation #30.
0
10
20
30
40
50
0
0.5
1
Observation 30
O
BGWR
GWR
0
10
20
30
40
50
0
0.5
1
1.5
Observation 31
O
0
10
20
30
40
50
0
0.5
1
1.5
Observation 32
O
0
10
20
30
40
50
0
0.5
1
1.5
Observation 33
O
0
10
20
30
40
50
0
0.5
1
Observation 34
O
0
10
20
30
40
50
0
0.5
1
1.5
Observation 35
O
Figure 4.8: GWR and BGWR Distance-based weights adjusted by V
i
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; // Load a PowerPoint (.pptx) file. PPTXDocument doc = new PPTXDocument(inputFilePath); // Convert it to a PDF.
create fillable forms in pdf; create a pdf form to fill out and save
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Microsoft Office Word to adobe PDF file converter SDK image content into high quality PDF without losing Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable
convert word to fillable pdf form; convert pdf fillable form
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
175
Ultimately, the role of the parameters V
i
in the model and the prior
assigned to theseparameters reflects our prior knowledge that distance alone
may not be reliable as the basis for spatial relationships between variables.
If distance-based weights are used in the presence of aberrant observations,
inferences will be contaminated for whole neighborhoods and regions in our
analysis. Incorporatingthis prior knowledge turns out to be relativelysimple
in the Bayesian framework, and it appears to eectively robustify estimates
against the presence of spatial outliers.
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
0.8
1
1.2
1.4
1.6
1.8
2
2.2
2.4
2.6
neighborhoods
-Vi
Figure 4.9: Average V
i
estimates over all draws and observations
The function bgwr has associated prt and plt methods to produced
printed and graphical presentationofthe results. Some of the printedoutput
is shown below. Note that the time needed to carry out 550 draws was 289
seconds, making this estimation approach quite competitive to DARP or
GWR. The plt function produces the same output as for the GWR model.
Gibbs sampling geographically weighted regression model
Dependent Variable =
crime
R-squared
=
0.5650
sigma^2
=
0.7296
Nobs, Nvars
=
49,
3
ndraws,nomit
=
550,
50
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
create fillable PDF form in C#.NET. An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET. Able to add text field to specified PDF file
create fillable form pdf online; attach image to pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word, Excel Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page
form pdf fillable; auto fill pdf form fields
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
176
r-value
=
4.0000
delta-value
=
25.0776
gam(m,k) d-prior =
50,
2
time in secs
= 289.2755
prior type
=
distance
***************************************************************
Obs =
1, x-coordinate= 35.6200, y-coordinate= 42.3800
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
constant
74.130145
15.143596
0.000000
income
-2.208382
-9.378908
0.000000
hvalue
-0.197050
-5.166565
0.000004
Obs =
2, x-coordinate= 36.5000, y-coordinate= 40.5200
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
constant
82.308344
20.600005
0.000000
income
-2.559334
-11.983369
0.000000
hvalue
-0.208478
-4.682454
0.000023
The next task was to implement the BGWR model with a diuse prior
on the  parameter. The results indicated that the mean of the draws for 
was: around 32 for the contiguity prior, 43 for the concentric prior and 33
for the distance prior. The BGWR estimates were almost identical to those
from the improper prior  = 1000000,so wedo not present these graphically.
Given these estimates for  with a diuse prior, we can impose the pa-
rameter restrictions by setting smaller values for , say in the range of 1
to 10. This should produce diering estimates that rely on the alternative
parameter smoothing relationships. We used  = 1 to impose the parameter
smoothing relationships fairly tightly. The resulting parameter estimates
are shown in Figure4.10.
Here we see some departure between the estimates based on alterna-
tive smoothing relationships. This raises the question of which smoothing
relationship is most consistent with the data.
We can compute posterior probabilities for each of the three models
based on alternative parameter smoothing relationships using an approxi-
mationfromLeamer (1983). Since this is agenerallyuseful wayofcomparing
alternative Bayesian models, the bgwr() function returns a vector of the
approximate log posterior for each observation. The nature of this approx-
imation as well as the computation is beyond the scope of our discussion
here. The program in example 4.7 demonstrates how to use the vector of
log posterior magnitudes to compute posterior probabilities for each model.
We set the parameter  = 0:5, to impose the three alternative parameter
smoothingrelationships even tighter than the hyperparameter value of  = 1
used to generate the estimates in Figure4.10. A successive tightening of the
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
177
parameter smoothing relationships will show whichrelationship is most con-
sistent withthe sampledata andwhich relationship is rejectedby the sample
data. A fourth model based on  = 1000 is also estimated to test whether
the sample data rejects all three parameter smoothing relationships.
% ----- example 4.7 Posterior probabilities for models
% load the Anselin data set
load anselin.data; y = anselin(:,1); nobs = length(y);
x = [ones(nobs,1) anselin(:,2:3)]; [junk nvar] = size(x);
east = anselin(:,4); north = anselin(:,5);
ndraw = 550; nomit = 50; % estimate all three models
prior.ptype = 'contiguity';
prior.rval = 4; prior.dval = 0.5;
res1 = bgwr(y,x,east,north,ndraw,nomit,prior);
prior2.ptype = 'concentric';
prior2.ctr = 20; prior2.rval = 4; prior2.dval = 0.5;
res2 = bgwr(y,x,east,north,ndraw,nomit,prior2);
prior3.ptype = 'distance';
prior3.rval = 4; prior3.dval = 0.5;
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
20
40
60
80
100
b1 parameter
contiguity
concentric
distance
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
-4
-3
-2
-1
0
b2 parameter
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
-0.5
0
0.5
1
b3 parameter
Figure 4.10: Alternative smoothing BGWR estimates
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
178
res3 = bgwr(y,x,east,north,ndraw,nomit,prior3);
prior4.ptype = 'distance';
prior4.rval = 4; prior4.dval = 1000;
res4 = bgwr(y,x,east,north,ndraw,nomit,prior4);
% compute posterior model probabilities
nmodels = 4;
pp = zeros(nobs,nmodels); lpost = zeros(nobs,nmodels);
lpost(:,1) = res1.logpost;
lpost(:,2) = res2.logpost;
lpost(:,3) = res3.logpost;
lpost(:,4) = res4.logpost;
psum = sum(lpost');
for j=1:nmodels
pp(:,j) = lpost(:,j)./psum';
end;
% compute posterior means for beta
bb = zeros(nobs,nvar*nmodels);
b1 = res1.bdraw(:,:,1); bb(:,1) = mean(b1)';
b2 = res1.bdraw(:,:,2); bb(:,2) = mean(b2)';
b3 = res1.bdraw(:,:,3); bb(:,3) = mean(b3)';
c1 = res2.bdraw(:,:,1); bb(:,4) = mean(c1)';
c2 = res2.bdraw(:,:,2); bb(:,5) = mean(c2)';
c3 = res2.bdraw(:,:,3); bb(:,6) = mean(c3)';
d1 = res3.bdraw(:,:,1); bb(:,7) = mean(d1)';
d2 = res3.bdraw(:,:,2); bb(:,8) = mean(d2)';
d3 = res3.bdraw(:,:,3); bb(:,9) = mean(d3)';
e1 = res4.bdraw(:,:,1); bb(:,10) = mean(e1)';
e2 = res4.bdraw(:,:,2); bb(:,11) = mean(e2)';
e3 = res4.bdraw(:,:,3); bb(:,12) = mean(e3)';
tt=1:nobs;
plot(tt,pp(:,1),'ok',tt,pp(:,2),'*k',tt,pp(:,3),'+k', tt,pp(:,4),'-');
legend('contiguity','concentric','distance','diffuse');
xlabel('observations'); ylabel('probabilities');
pause;
subplot(3,1,1),
plot(tt,bb(:,1),'-k',tt,bb(:,4),'--k',tt,bb(:,7),'-.',tt,bb(:,10),'+');
legend('contiguity','concentric','distance','diffuse');
xlabel('b1 parameter');
subplot(3,1,2),
plot(tt,bb(:,2),'-k',tt,bb(:,5),'--k',tt,bb(:,8),'-.',tt,bb(:,11),'+');
xlabel('b2 parameter');
subplot(3,1,3),
plot(tt,bb(:,3),'-k',tt,bb(:,6),'--k',tt,bb(:,9),'-.',tt,bb(:,12),'+');
xlabel('b3 parameter');
% produce a Bayesian model averaging set of estimates
bavg = zeros(nobs,nvar); cnt = 1;
for j=1:nmodels
bavg = bavg + matmul(pp(:,j),bb(:,cnt:cnt+nvar-1)); cnt = cnt+nvar;
end;
ttp = tt';
b1out = [ttp bavg(:,1) bb(:,1) bb(:,4) bb(:,7) bb(:,10)];
CHAPTER 4. LOCALLY LINEAR SPATIAL MODELS
179
in.fmt = strvcat('%4d','%8.2f','%8.2f','%8.2f','%8.2f','%8.2f');
in.cnames = strvcat('Obs','avg','contiguity','concentric',...
'distance','diffuse');
fprintf(1,'constant term parameter \n');
mprint(b1out,in);
b2out = [ttp bavg(:,2) bb(:,2) bb(:,5) bb(:,8) bb(:,11)];
fprintf(1,'household income parameter \n');
mprint(b2out,in);
b3out = [ttp bavg(:,3) bb(:,3) bb(:,6) bb(:,9) bb(:,12)];
in.fmt = strvcat('%4d','%8.3f','%8.3f','%8.3f','%8.3f','%8.3f');
fprintf(1,'house value parameter \n');
mprint(b3out,in);
The graphical display of the posterior probabilities produced by the pro-
gram in example 4.7 are shown in Figure4.11 and the parameter estimates
are shown in Figure4.12. We see some divergence between the parameter es-
timates produced by the alternative spatial smoothing priors and the model
with no smoothing prior whose estimates are graphed using \+" symbols,
but not a dramatic amount. Given the similarity of the parameter esti-
mates, we would expect relatively uniform posterior probabilities for the
four models.
In Figure4.11 the posterior probabilities for the model with no parame-
ter smoothing is graphed as a line tomake comparisonwiththe three models
that impose parameter smoothing easy. We see certain sample observations
where the parameter smoothing relationships produce lower model probabil-
ities than the model without parameter smoothing. For most observations
however, the parameter smoothing relationships are relatively consistent
with the sample data, producing posterior probabilities above the model
with no smoothing relationship. As we would expect, none of the models
dominates.
ABayesian solution to the problem of model specication and choice is
to produce a \mixed" or averaged model that relies on the posterior prob-
abilities as weights. We would simply multiply the four sets of coecient
estimates by the four probability vectors to produce a Bayesian model av-
eraging solution to the problem of which estimates are best.
Atabular presentation of this type of result is shown below. The aver-
aged results have the virtue that a single set of estimates are available from
which to draw inferences and one can feel comfortable that the inferences
are valid for a wide variety of model specications.
constant term parameter
Obs
average contiguity concentric
distance
diffuse
1
65.92
62.72
63.53
77.64
57.16
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested