c# pdf to image without ghostscript : Create a fillable pdf form application SDK utility azure wpf asp.net visual studio wbook24-part65

CHAPTER 6. VAR AND ERROR CORRECTION MODELS
230
ec term il
-2.158992
-1.522859
0.129886
ec term in
-2.311267
-1.630267
0.105129
constant
8.312788
0.450423
0.653052
****** Granger Causality Tests *******
Variable
F-value
Probability
il
0.115699
0.890822
in
2.700028
0.070449
ky
0.725708
0.485662
mi
0.242540
0.784938
oh
1.436085
0.241087
pa
2.042959
0.133213
tn
0.584267
0.558769
wv
1.465858
0.234146
Johansen MLE estimates
NULL:
Trace Statistic
Crit 90%
Crit 95%
Crit 99%
r <= 0
il
214.390
153.634
159.529
171.090
r <= 1
in
141.482
120.367
125.618
135.982
r <= 2
ky
90.363
91.109
95.754
104.964
r <= 3
oh
61.555
65.820
69.819
77.820
r <= 4
tn
37.103
44.493
47.855
54.681
r <= 5
wv
21.070
27.067
29.796
35.463
r <= 6
pa
10.605
13.429
15.494
19.935
r <= 7
mi
3.192
2.705
3.841
6.635
NULL:
Eigen Statistic
Crit 90%
Crit 95%
Crit 99%
r <= 0
il
72.908
49.285
52.362
58.663
r <= 1
in
51.118
43.295
46.230
52.307
r <= 2
ky
28.808
37.279
40.076
45.866
r <= 3
oh
24.452
31.238
33.878
39.369
r <= 4
tn
16.034
25.124
27.586
32.717
r <= 5
wv
10.465
18.893
21.131
25.865
r <= 6
pa
7.413
12.297
14.264
18.520
r <= 7
mi
3.192
2.705
3.841
6.635
The results indicate that given the two lag model, two co-integrating
relationships were found leading to the inclusion of two error correction
variables in the model. The co-integrating relationships are based on the
trace statistics compared to the critical values at the 95% level. From the
trace statistics in the printed output we see that, H0: r  2 was rejected
at the 95% level because the trace statistic of 90.363 is less than the asso-
ciated critical value of 95.754. Keep in mind that the user has the option
of specifying the number of co-integrating relations to be used in the ecm
function as an optional argument. If you wish to work at the 90% level of
signicance, we would conclude from the johansen results that r = 4 co-
integrating relationships exist. To estimate an ecm model based on r = 4
we need simply call the ecm function with:
% estimate the model, using 4 co-integrating vectors
Create a fillable pdf form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
adding a signature to a pdf form; convert pdf to form fillable
Create a fillable pdf form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
asp.net fill pdf form; change font size in fillable pdf form
CHAPTER 6. VAR AND ERROR CORRECTION MODELS
231
result = ecm(y,nlag,4);
6.3 Bayesian variants
Despite the attractiveness of drawing on cross-sectional information from
related regional economic time series, the VAR model has empirical limi-
tations. For example, a model with eight variables and six lags produces
49 independent variables in each of the eight equations of the model for a
total of 392 coecients to estimate. Large samples of observations involving
time series variables that cover many years are needed to estimate the VAR
model, and these are not always available. In addition, the independent
variables represent lagged values, e.g., y
1t−1
;y
1t−2
;:::;y
1t−6
,which tend to
produce high correlations that lead to degraded precision in the parameter
estimates. To overcome these problems, Doan, Litterman and Sims (1984)
proposed the use of Bayesian prior information. The Minnesota prior means
and variances suggested take the following form:
i
 N(1;
2
i
)
j
 N(0;
2
j
)
(6.6)
where 
i
denotes the coecients associated with the lagged dependent vari-
able in each equation of the VAR and 
j
represents any other coecient.
The prior means for lagged dependent variables are set to unity in belief
that these are important explanatory variables. On the other hand, a prior
mean of zero is assigned to all other coecients in the equation, 
j
in (6.6),
indicating that these variables are viewed as less important in the model.
The prior variances, 
2
i
,specify uncertainty about the prior means
i
=
1, and 
2
j
indicates uncertainty regarding the means
j
= 0. Because
the VAR model contains a large number of parameters, Doan, Litterman
and Sims (1984) suggested a formula to generate the standard deviations
as a function of a small number of hyperparameters: ; and a weighting
matrix w(i;j). This approach allows a practitioner to specify individual
prior variances for a large number of coecients in the model using only a
few parameters that are labeled hyperparameters. The specication of the
standard deviation of the prior imposed on variable j in equation i at lag k
is:
ijk
=w(i;j)k
−
^
uj
^
ui
(6.7)
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. Load PDF from stream programmatically.
form pdf fillable; convert pdf file to fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create PDF document from OpenOffice Text Document with ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats
convert word to fillable pdf form; change font size in pdf fillable form
CHAPTER 6. VAR AND ERROR CORRECTION MODELS
232
where ^
ui
is the estimated standard error from a univariate autoregression
involvingvariable i, so that (^
uj
=^
ui
)is a scaling factor that adjusts for vary-
ing magnitudes of the variables across equations i and j. Doan, Litterman
and Sims (1984) labeled the parameter  as `overall tightness',reflecting the
standard deviation of the prior on the rst lag of the dependent variable.
The term k
−
is a lag decay function with 0    1 reflecting the decay
rate, a shrinkage of the standard deviation with increasing lag length. This
has the eect of imposing the prior means of zero more tightly as the lag
length increases, based on the belief that more distant lags represent less
important variables in the model. The function w(i;j) species the tight-
ness of the prior for variable j in equation i relative to the tightness of the
own-lags of variable i in equation i.
The overall tightness and lag decay hyperparameters used in the stan-
dard Minnesota prior have values  = 0:1,  = 1:0. The weighting matrix
used is:
W=
2
6
6
6
6
4
1
0:5 ::: 0:5
0:5
1
0:5
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
0:5 0:5 ::: 1
3
7
7
7
7
5
(6.8)
This weighting matrix imposes
i
= 1 loosely, because the lagged de-
pendent variable in each equation is felt to be an important variable. The
weighting matrix also imposes the prior mean of zero for coecients on
other variables in each equation more tightly since the 
j
coecients are
associated with variables considered less important in the model.
A function bvar will provide estimates for this model. The function
documentation is:
PURPOSE: Performs a Bayesian vector autoregression of order n
---------------------------------------------------
USAGE: result = bvar(y,nlag,tight,weight,decay,x)
where:
y
= an (nobs x neqs) matrix of y-vectors
nlag = the lag length
tight = Litterman's tightness hyperparameter
weight = Litterman's weight (matrix or scalar)
decay = Litterman's lag decay = lag^(-decay)
x
= an optional (nobs x nx) matrix of variables
NOTE: constant vector automatically included
---------------------------------------------------
RETURNS: a structure:
results.meth
= 'bvar'
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual
convert fillable pdf to word fillable form; allow users to attach to pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server.
convert word document to fillable pdf form; convert word form to fillable pdf form
CHAPTER 6. VAR AND ERROR CORRECTION MODELS
233
results.nobs
= nobs, # of observations
results.neqs
= neqs, # of equations
results.nlag
= nlag, # of lags
results.nvar
= nlag*neqs+1+nx, # of variables per equation
results.tight
= overall tightness hyperparameter
results.weight
= weight scalar or matrix hyperparameter
results.decay
= lag decay hyperparameter
--- the following are referenced by equation # ---
results(eq).beta = bhat for equation eq
results(eq).tstat = t-statistics
results(eq).tprob = t-probabilities
results(eq).resid = residuals
results(eq).yhat = predicted values
results(eq).y
= actual values
results(eq).sige = e'e/(n-k)
results(eq).rsqr = r-squared
results(eq).rbar = r-squared adjusted
---------------------------------------------------
SEE ALSO: bvarf, var, ecm, rvar, plt_var, prt_var
---------------------------------------------------
The function bvar allows us to input a scalar weight value or a more
general matrix. Scalar inputs will be used to form a symmetric prior, where
the scalar is used on the o-diagonal elements of the matrix. A matrix will
be used in the form submitted to the function.
As an example of using the bvar function, consider our case of monthly
mining employment for eight states. A program to estimate a BVAR model
based on the Minnesota prior is shown below:
% ----- Example 6.8 Estimating BVAR models
vnames = strvcat('il','in','ky','mi','oh','pa','tn','wv');
y = load('test.dat'); % use all eight states
nlag = 2;
tight = 0.1; % hyperparameter values
weight = 0.5;
decay = 1.0;
result = bvar(y,nlag,tight,weight,decay);
prt(result,vnames);
The printout shows the hyperparameter values associated with the prior.
It does not provide Granger-causality test results as these are invalid given
the Bayesian prior applied to the model. Results for a single equation of the
mining employment example are shown below.
***** Bayesian Vector Autoregressive Model *****
*****
Minnesota type Prior
*****
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#.NET. An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET.
convert word form to fillable pdf; create pdf fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
convert word doc to fillable pdf form; .net fill pdf form
CHAPTER 6. VAR AND ERROR CORRECTION MODELS
234
PRIOR hyperparameters
tightness =
0.10
decay
=
1.00
Symmetric weights based on
0.50
Dependent Variable =
il
R-squared
=
0.9942
Rbar-squared =
0.9936
sige
=
12.8634
Nobs, Nvars
=
171,
17
******************************************************************
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
il lag1
1.134855
11.535932
0.000000
il lag2
-0.161258
-1.677089
0.095363
in lag1
0.390429
1.880834
0.061705
in lag2
-0.503872
-2.596937
0.010230
ky lag1
0.049429
0.898347
0.370271
ky lag2
-0.026436
-0.515639
0.606776
mi lag1
-0.037327
-0.497504
0.619476
mi lag2
-0.026391
-0.377058
0.706601
oh lag1
-0.159669
-1.673863
0.095996
oh lag2
0.191425
2.063498
0.040585
pa lag1
0.179610
3.524719
0.000545
pa lag2
-0.122678
-2.520538
0.012639
tn lag1
0.156344
0.773333
0.440399
tn lag2
-0.288358
-1.437796
0.152330
wv lag1
-0.046808
-2.072769
0.039703
wv lag2
0.014753
0.681126
0.496719
constant
9.454700
2.275103
0.024149
There exists a number of attempts to alter the fact that the Minnesota
prior treats all variables in the VAR model except the lagged dependent
variable in an identical fashion. Some of the modications suggested have
focused entirely on alternative specications for the prior variance. Usually,
this involves a dierent (non-symmetric) weightmatrix W and a larger value
of 0.2 for the overall tightness hyperparameter  in place of the value  = 0:1
used in the Minnesota prior. The larger overall tightness hyperparameter
setting allows for more influence from other variables in the model. For
example, LeSage and Pan (1995) constructed a weight matrix based on
rst-order spatial contiguity to emphasize variables from neighboring states
in a multi-state agricultural output forecasting model. LeSage and Magura
(1991) employed interindustry input-output weights to place more emphasis
on related industries in a multi-industry employment forecasting model.
These approaches can be implemented using the bvar function by con-
structing an appropriate weight matrix. For example, the rst order conti-
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
formatting. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents. Professional
change font size pdf fillable form; create a pdf form to fill out and save
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual
create a pdf with fields to fill in; convert fillable pdf to html form
CHAPTER 6. VAR AND ERROR CORRECTION MODELS
235
guity structure for the eight states in our mining employment example can
be converted to a set of prior weights by placing values of unity on the main
diagonal of the weight matrix, and in positions that represent contiguous
entities. An example is shown in (6.9), where row 1 of the weight matrix
is associated with the time-series for the state of Illinois. We place a value
of unity on the main diagonal to indicate that autoregressive values from
Illinois are considered important variables. We also place values of one in
columns 2 and 3, reflecting the fact that Indiana (variable 2) and Kentucky
(variable 3) are states that have borders touching Illinois. For other states
that are not neighbors to Illinois, we use a weight of 0.1 to downweight
their influence in the BVAR model equation for Illinois. A similar scheme
is used to specify weights for the other seven states based on neighbors and
non-neighbors.
W=
2
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
4
1:0 1:0 1:0 0:1 0:1 0:1 0:1 0:1
1:0 1:0 1:0 1:0 1:0 0:1 0:1 0:1
1:0 1:0 1:0 0:1 1:0 0:1 1:0 1:0
0:1 1:0 0:1 1:0 1:0 0:1 0:1 0:1
0:1 1:0 1:0 1:0 1:0 1:0 0:1 1:0
0:1 0:1 0:1 0:1 1:0 1:0 0:1 1:0
0:1 0:1 1:0 0:1 0:1 0:1 1:0 0:1
0:1 0:1 1:0 0:1 1:0 1:0 0:1 1:0
3
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
5
(6.9)
The intuition behind this set of weights is that we really don't believe
the prior means of zero placed on the coecients for mining employment
in neighboring states. Rather, we believe these variables should exert an
important influence. To express our lack of faith in these prior means, we
assign a large prior variance to the zero prior means for these states by
increasing the weight values. This allows the coecients for these time-
series variables to be determined by placing more emphasis on the sample
data and less emphasis on the prior.
This could of course be implemented using bvar with a weight matrix
specied, e.g.,
% ----- Example 6.9 Using bvar() with general weights
vnames = strvcat('il','in','ky','mi','oh','pa','tn','wv');
dates = cal(1982,1,12);
y = load('test.dat'); % use all eight states
nlag = 2;
tight = 0.1;
decay = 1.0;
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel.
create a fillable pdf form online; convert word to pdf fillable form
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
convert pdf to fillable form online; convert pdf to fillable pdf form
CHAPTER 6. VAR AND ERROR CORRECTION MODELS
236
w = [1.0 1.0 1.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.1 0.1 0.1
1.0 1.0 1.0 0.1 1.0 0.1 1.0 1.0
0.1 1.0 0.1 1.0 1.0 0.1 0.1 0.1
0.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.1 1.0
0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1.0 1.0 0.1 1.0
0.1 0.1 1.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 1.0 0.1
0.1 0.1 1.0 0.1 1.0 1.0 0.1 1.0];
result = bvar(y,nlag,tight,w,decay);
prt(result,vnames);
Another more recent approach to altering the equal treatment character
of the Minnesota prior is a \random-walk averaging prior" suggested by
LeSage and Krivelyova (1997, 1998).
As noted above, previous attempts to alter the fact that the Minnesota
prior treats all variables in the VAR model except the rst lag of the de-
pendent variable in an identical fashion have focused entirely on alternative
specications for the prior variance. The prior proposed by LeSage and
Krivelyova (1998) involves both prior means and variances motivated by the
distinction between important and unimportant variables in each equation
of the VAR model. To motivate the prior means, consider the weighting
matrix for a ve variable VAR model shown in (6.10). The weight matrix
contains values of unity in positions associated with important variables in
each equation of the VAR model and values of zero for unimportant vari-
ables. For example, the important variables in the rst equation of the
VAR model are variables 2 and 3 whereas the important variables in the
fth equation are variables 4 and 5.
Note that if we do not believe that autoregressive influences reflected by
lagged values of the dependent variable are important, we have a zero on
the maindiagonalof the weight matrix. In fact, the weighting matrix shown
in (6.10) classies autoregressive influences as important in only two of the
ve equations in the VAR system, equations three and ve. As an example
of a case where autoregressive influences are totally ignored LeSage and
Krivelyova (1997) constructed a VAR system based on spatial contiguity
that relies entirely on the influence of neighboring states and ignores the
autoregressive influence associated with past values of the variables from
the states themselves.
CHAPTER 6. VAR AND ERROR CORRECTION MODELS
237
W =
2
6
6
6
6
6
4
0 1 1 0 0
1 0 1 0 0
1 1 1 0 0
0 0 1 0 1
0 0 0 1 1
3
7
7
7
7
7
5
(6.10)
The weight matrix shown in (6.10) is standardized to produce row-sums
of unity resulting in the matrix labeled C shown in (6.11).
C=
2
6
6
6
6
6
4
0
0:5
0:5
0
0
0:5
0
0:5
0
0
0:33 0:33 0:33
0
0
0
0
0:5
0
0:5
0
0
0
0:5 0:5
3
7
7
7
7
7
5
(6.11)
Using the row-standardizedmatrixC, we consider the random-walk with
drift that averages over the important variables in each equation i of the
VAR model as shown in (6.12).
y
it
=
i
+
n
X
j=1
C
ij
y
jt−1
+u
it
(6.12)
Expanding expression (6.12) we see that multiplying y
jt−1
;j = 1;:::;5
containing5 variables at time t−1 by the row-standardizedweight matrix C
shown in (6.11) produces a set of explanatory variables for each equation of
the VAR system equal to the mean of observations from important variables
in each equation at time t− 1 as shown in (6.13).
2
6
6
6
4
y
1t
y
2t
y
3t
y
4t
y
5t
3
7
7
7
5
=
2
6
6
6
4
1
2
3
4
5
3
7
7
7
5
+
2
6
6
6
4
0:5y
2t−1
+0:5y
3t−1
0:5y
1t−1
+0:5y
3t−1
0:33y
1t−1
+0:33y
2t−1
+0:33y
3t−1
0:5y
3t−1
+0:5y
5t−1
0:5y
4t−1
+0:5y
5t−1
3
7
7
7
5
+
2
6
6
6
4
u
1t
u
2t
u
3t
u
4t
u
5t
3
7
7
7
5
(6.13)
This suggests a prior mean for the VAR model coecients on variables
associated with the rst own-lag of important variables equal to 1=c
i
,where
c
i
is the number of important variables in each equation i of the model. In
the example shown in (6.13), the prior means for the rst own-lag of the
important variables y
2t−1
and y
3t−1
in the y
1t
equation of the VAR would
equal 0.5. The prior means for unimportant variables, y
1t−1
,y
4t−1
and y
5t−1
in this equation would be zero.
CHAPTER 6. VAR AND ERROR CORRECTION MODELS
238
This prior is quite dierent from the Minnesota prior in that it may
downweight the lagged dependent variable using a zero prior mean to dis-
count the autoregressiveinfluence of past values of this variable. Incontrast,
the Minnesota prior emphasizes a random-walk with drift model that relies
on prior means centered on a model: y
it
=
i
+y
it−1
+u
it
,where the in-
tercept term reflects drift in the random-walk model and is estimated using
adiuse prior. The random-walk averaging prior is centered on a random-
walk model that averages over important variables in each equation of the
model and allows for drift as well. As in the case of the Minnesota prior,
the drift parameters 
i
are estimated using a diuse prior.
Consistent with the Minnesota prior, LeSage and Krivelyova use zero
as a prior mean for coecients on all lags other than rst lags. Litterman
(1986) motivates reliance on zero prior means for many of the parameters
of the VAR model by appealing to ridge regression. Recall, ridge regression
can be interpreted as a Bayesian model that species prior means of zero
for all coecients, and as we saw in Chapter3 can be used to overcome
collinearity problems in regression models.
One point to note about the random walk averaging approach to speci-
fying prior means is that the time series for the variables in the model need
to be scaled or transformed to have similar magnitudes. If this is not the
case, it would make little sense to indicate that the value of a time series
observation at time t was equal to the average of values from important
related variables at time t −1. This should present no problem as time se-
ries data can always be expressed in percentage change form or annualized
growth rates which meets our requirement that the time series have similar
magnitudes.
The prior variances LeSage and Krivelyova specify for the parameters in
the model dier according to whether the coecients are associated with
variables that are classied as important or unimportant as well as the lag
length. Like the Minnesota prior, they impose lag decay to reflect a prior
belief that time series observationsfromthe moredistantpast exert a smaller
influence on the current value of the time series we are modeling. Viewing
variables in the model as important versus unimportant suggests that the
prior variance (uncertainty) specication should reflect the following ideas:
1. Parameters associated with unimportant variables should be assigned
a smaller prior variance, so the zero prior means are imposed more
`tightly' or with more certainty.
2. First own-lags of importantvariables are givena smaller prior variance,
CHAPTER 6. VAR AND ERROR CORRECTION MODELS
239
so the prior means force averaging over the rst own-lags of important
variables.
3. Parameters associated withunimportant variables at lags greater than
onewillbe given aprior variance that becomes smaller as thelaglength
increases to reflect our belief that influence decays with time.
4. Parameters associated with lags other than rst own-lag of important
variables will have a larger prior variance, so the prior means of zero
are imposed `loosely'. This is motivated by the fact that we don't
really have a great deal of condence in the zero prior mean specica-
tion for longer lags of important variables. We think they should exert
some influence, making the prior mean of zero somewhat inappropri-
ate. We still impose lag decay on longer lags of important variables
by decreasing our prior variance with increasing lag length. This re-
flects the idea that influence decays over time for important as well as
unimportant variables.
It should be noted that the prior relies oninappropriate zero prior means
for the important variables at lags greater than one for two reasons. First, it
is dicult to specify a reasonable alternative prior mean for these variables
that would have universal applicability in a large number of VAR model
applications. The diculty of assigning meaningful prior means that have
universal appeal is most likely the reason that past studies relied on the
Minnesota prior means while simply altering the prior variances. A prior
mean that averages over previous period values of the important variables
has universal appeal and widespread applicability in VAR modeling. The
second motivation for relying on inappropriate zero prior means for longer
lags of the important variables is that overparameterization and collinearity
problems that plague the VAR model are best overcome by relying on a
parsimonious representation. Zero prior means for the majority of the large
number of coecients in the VAR model are consistent withthis goalof par-
simony and have been demonstrated to produce improved forecast accuracy
in a wide variety of applications of the Minnesota prior.
Aflexible formwith which to state prior standarddeviations for variable
jin equation i at lag length k is shown in (6.14).
(a
ijk
) = N(1=c
i
;
c
); j 2 C;
k= 1;
i;j = 1;:::;n
(a
ijk
) = N(0;
c
=k); j 2 C;
k= 2;:::;m; i;j = 1;:::;n
(a
ijk
) = N(0;
c
=k); j: 2 C; k = 1;:::;m; i;j = 1;:::;n
(6.14)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested