c# pdf to image pdfsharp : .Net fill pdf form SDK software service wpf winforms windows dnn Simply_Put3-part680

Appendix C: 
Formulas for Calculating Readability 
Using SMOG  
Perhaps the quickest way to check a reading level manually is to use the SMOG estimating formula. G. 
Harry McLaughlin created SMOG (Simply Measure of Gobbledygook) in 1969 to estimate they years 
of education needed to understand a piece of writing.  
Here’s a quick way to estimate reading level.  
• Simply count the number of words with three or more syllables in three chains of 10 sentences in 
difference parts of your draft. 
• Then look up the approximate grade level in this chart. 
• The SMOG formula can predict the grade level difficulty within 1.5 grades in 68 percent of passages.  
McLaughlin worked with programming expert Alain Trottier to produce a free SMOG calculator. The 
online calculator can service 30 to 2000 words at this link: www.harrymclaughlin.com/SMOG.htm.  
31 
.Net fill pdf form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert fillable pdf to word fillable form; convert pdf fillable forms
.Net fill pdf form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
pdf fillable forms; convert pdf to form fillable
Appendix C: 
Formulas for Calculating Readability (continued)
Using Fry Formula
In 1977, Dr. Edward Fry created one of the most widely used readability formulas. Fry calculates the 
grade reading level by averaging the number of sentences and syllables per hundred words.  
Steps for you to follow: 
• Randomly choose three samples from your document with 100 words each.  
• Count the number of sentences in the hundred words, estimating length of the fraction of the last 
sentence to the nearest 1/10th. 
• Count the total number of syllables in the 100-word passage. Do not count numbers. Do count proper 
nouns. If you don’t have a hand counter available, an easy way is to simply put a mark above every 
syllable after the first syllable in each word. Then, when you get to the end of the passage, count the 
number of marks and add 100 to include the first syllable in each word that you did not mark.  
• Find the average number of sentences and the average number of syllables for the three samples by 
dividing the total of all three samples by three. 
• Use the graph on the next page to plot the average sentence length and number of syllables. The two 
lines will intersect at the approximate grade level. If a great deal of variability is found, try putting 
more sample counts into the average 
32 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file passwordSetting.IsAnnot = True ' Allow to fill form. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file
add signature field to pdf; fillable pdf forms
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Users can set graph annotation properties, such as fill color, line color and transparency. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file. C#.NET WPF PDF
create a fillable pdf form in word; .net fill pdf form
Appendix C: 
Formulas for Calculating Readability (continued) 
Fry Graph* for Estimating Grade Levels 
Average Number of Sentences 
(Per 100 words) 
Average Number of Syllables 
(Per 100 words) 
* From:  Fry, Edward.  Elementary Reading Instruction.  1977, McGraw-Hill 
33 
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = true; // Allow to fill form. passwordSetting passwordSetting); C# Sample Code: Change and Update PDF Document Password in C#.NET. In
auto fill pdf form fields; adding signature to pdf form
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Users can set graph annotation properties, such as fill color, line color and transparency. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file in .NET project.
convert word document to fillable pdf form; convert word form to fillable pdf form
Appendix C: 
Formulas for Calculating Readability (continued) 
Using Fry on Short Documents  
When your document has fewer than 300 words, you can use an adaptation of the Fry method.  
1. Count total words, total sentences, and total syllables for the entire text. (Note: hyphenated words 
count as one word.)  
2. Do these calculations: 
- Multiply the number of sentences by 100 and divide by the total number of words. This will give you 
the average number of sentences per 100 words.  
- Multiply the number of syllables by 100 and divide by the number of total words. This will give you 
the average number of syllables per 100 words.  
3. Plot the averages on the Fry graph to find the readability score.  
Here is an example with fewer than 100 words. 
34 
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
RasterEdge .NET PDF SDK is such one provide various of form field edit functions. Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in VB.NET.
create fillable forms in pdf; convert pdf fillable form to html
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
usages of annotation tabs on RasterEdge VB.NET HTML5 PDF text box to specific location on PDF page Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are
create a fillable pdf form from a word document; convert excel spreadsheet to fillable pdf form
Appendix C: 
Formulas for Calculating Readability (continued)  
Here are two examples testing 100 words: 
Example 1: 
Example 2: 
35 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
usages of annotation tabs on RasterEdge C#.NET HTML5 PDF text box to specific location on PDF page Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are
converting a word document to pdf fillable form; convert pdf to pdf form fillable
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
A professional PDF form reader control able to read PDF form field in C#.NET class. C#.NET Demo Code: Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in C#.NET.
convert word form to pdf fillable form; convert pdf file to fillable form online
Appendix C: 
Formulas for Calculating Readability (continued)  
Using Lexile Readability Analyzer 
Lexile Analyzer
®
,
produced by MetaMetrics
®
, allows you to test the readability of your text by generating a 
Lexile
®
measure. (A free, limited version is available at www.Lexile.com
.)  The Analyzer measures sentence 
length and the familiarity of words used. Your word choice will be compared to word frequencies within a large 
database of literature.  
The Lexile
®
measure is a text difficulty score followed by an “L”. The scale ranges from below 200L for 
beginning-reader material to above 1700L for advanced text.  
Lexile
®
Value 
Grade Level 
300L 
2
nd
grade 
400L 
3
rd
grade 
1300L 
12
th
grade 
Using PMOSE/IKIRSCH Document Readability Formula 
Researchers Mosenthal and Kirsch developed a measure for assessing document complexity, called the 
PMOSE/ IKIRSCH document readability formula. The PMOSE/IKIRSCH formula measures complexity based 
on three factors: 
The structure of the document, 
The density of the information, 
The relative dependence on information from other documents. 
This tool is particularly useful for documents that include forms, tables, graphs, charts, and lists. 
PMOSE/IKIRSCH measures the readability of information organized in rows and columns. The formula uses 
the number of rows and columns, the structure, and the number of labels and items to assess the chart or table. 
Scores range from Level 1 to Level 5 Proficiency. The Proficiency Level can be translated into a grade-level 
equivalent. 
Proficiency 
Grade Level 
Equivalent 
Level 1 
Grade 4 
>8 years of schooling 
Level 2 
Grade 8 
to high school diploma 
Level 3 
Grade 12 
some education after high school 
Level 4 
15 years of schooling 
college degree equivalent 
Level 5 
16 years of schooling or 
more 
advanced post college degree 
The next page is the Mosenthal and Kirsch’s worksheet that you can apply to your text. Please note that the 
complexity of word choice is not a consideration in this tool.  
36 
Appendix C: 
Formulas for Calculating Readability (continued)  
37 
Appendix D: 
Resources
Books 
Bigwood S, Spore M. Presenting Numbers, Tables, and Charts. New York: Oxford University Press; 2003.  
Debus, M. Methodological Review: A Handbook for Excellence in Focus Group Research, Academy for Education Development; 
1988. 
Doak C, Doak L, eds. Pfizer Principles for Clear Health Communication: A Handbook for Creating Patient Education Materials that 
Enhance Understanding and Promote Health Outcomes, Pfizer; 2
nd
Edition, 2004. 
(www.pfizerhealthliteracy.com/pdf/PfizerPrinciples.pdf
)  
Doak C, Doak L, Root J. Teaching Patients with Low Literacy Skills. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: J.B. Lippincott Company; 1996. 
(www.hsph.harvard.edu/healthliteracy/doak.html
)  
Graham L. Basics of Design: Layout and Typography for Beginners. Albany, NY: Delmar; 2001. 
Kirsch I, Jungeblut A, Jenkins L, Kolstad A. Adult Literacy in America: A first look at the findings of the National Adult Literacy 
Survey. 3rd edition. Vol. 201. Washington, DC: National Center for Education, U.S. Department of Education; 2002. 
Kutner M, Greenberg E, Jin Y, Paulsen C. The Health Literacy of American’s Adults: Results from the 2003 National Assessment of 
Adult Literacy (NCES2006-483). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education; 2006. 
Lohr, Linda. Creating Graphics for Learning and Performance: Lessons in Visual Literacy. NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall; 2003. 
Lynch P, Horton S. Web Style Guide, 2nd edition; 2005.  
National Cancer Institute. Clear & Simple: Developing Effective Print Materials for Low-literate Readers. Pub. No. NIH 95-3594. 
Washington, DC: DHHS; 1995.  
National Cancer Institute. Making Health Communication Programs Work.(aka “Pink Book”) U.S. Department of Health and Human 
Services; National Institutes of Health; 2004. 
Nelson R. Consumer Informatics: Applications and Strategies in Cyber Health Care (Health Informatics). Springer; 2004. 
Nielsen-Bohlman L, Panzer A, Kindig D, eds. Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion. Committee on Health Literacy, 
Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Washington, DC: The National 
Academies Press; 2004. 
Osborne H. Overcoming Communication Barriers in Patient Education. NAL Call No.: R118 O83 2001 ISBN: 083422030X. 
Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen Publishers, Inc; 2001.  
Rudd RE, Anderson JE, Oppenheimer S, Nath C. Health Literacy: An Update of Public Health and Medical Literature. Chapter 6 in 
Comings JP, Garner B, Smith C. (eds.) Review of Adult Learning and Literacy, Vol. 7. Mahway, NJ: Lawrence Erlbuam Assoc., pp. 
175-204, 2007.  
Southern Institute on Children and Families. The Health Literacy Style Manual. Covering Kids and Families National Program Office. 
Columbia, SC: Maximus (Reston, VA); 2005.
Strunk W. Jr., White E. The Elements of Style. New York, NY: MacMillan; 1979.  
Thompson T, Dorsey A, Miller K, Parrott R, eds. Handbook of Health Communication. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates; 
2003.  
38 
Appendix D: 
Resources (continued)
Journal Articles, Reports, Brochures, Pamphlets, and Miscellaneous Publications  
Albright J, de Guzman C, Acebo P, Paiva D, Faulkner M, Swanson J. Readability of patient education materials: Implications for 
clinical practice. Applied Nursing Research 1996; 9(3):139-43.  
Baker G. Writing easily read patient education handouts: A computerized approach. Seminars in Dermatology 1991; 10(2):102-6.  
Baker L, Wilson F. Consumer health materials recommended for public libraries: Too tough to read? Public Libraries 1996; 
35(2):124-30.  
Baker L, Wilson F, Kars M. The readability of medical information on InfoTrac: Does it meet the needs of people with low literacy 
skills? Ref User Serv Q 1997; 37(2):155-60.  
Baker S. Who can read consumer product information? American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy 1997; 27(2):126-31.  
Baker D, Parker R, Williams M, Clark W, Nurss J. The relationship of patient reading ability to self-reported health and use of health 
services. American Journal of Public Health 1997; 87:1027-30.  
Basara L, Juergens J. Patient package insert readability and design. American Pharmacy 1994; NS34(8):48-53.  
Brownson K. Education handouts. Are we wasting our time? Journal for Nurses in Staff Development 1998; 14(4):176-82.  
Carmona R. Improving Americans’ health literacy. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2005; 105:1345.  
Cardinal B, Seidler T. Readability and Comprehensibility of the Exercise Life (brochure). Perceptual and Motor Skills 1995; 80:399-
402.  
Coey L. Readability of printed educational materials used to inform potential and actual ostomates. Journal of Clinical Nursing 1996; 
5:359-366.  
Davis R, Jackson R, Bocchini J, Arnold C, Mayeaux E, Murphy P. Comprehension is Greater Using a Short Vaccine. Information 
Pamphlet with Graphics and Simple Language. Journal of General Internal Medicine 1994; 9(Supp. 2):103.  
Davis, T, Bocchini J, Jr, Fredrickson D, Arnold C, Mayeaux E, Murphy P, Jackson, RH, Hanna, N, Paterson, M. Parent 
Comprehension of Polio Vaccine Information Pamphlets. Pediatrics 1996; 97(6):804-10.  
Davis T, et al. Improving Vaccine Risk/Benefit Communications with an Immunization Education Package: A Pilot Study. 
Ambulatory Pediatrics 2002; 2(3):193-200. 
Feldman S, Quinlivan A, Williford P, Bahnson J, Fleischer A, Jr. Illiteracy and the readability of patient education materials. A look at 
Health Watch. North Carolina Medical Journal 1994; 55(7):290-2. 
Gabriel V, Stephenson T. Readability of patient information leaflets. Journal of Pediatric Pharmacy Practice 1998; 3(1):29-32. 
Grotsy R. Plain Language: It’s effect on organizational performance. Clarity. May 2004; 51:17-19. 
Hobbie C. Maximizing healthy communication: Readability of parent educational materials. Journal of Pediatric Health Care 1995; 
9(2):92-3. 
Hospital Case Management, It’s on paper but do they understand it? Simple testing gets written handouts on target. Hospital Case 
Management 1999; 7(4):75-6, 80. 
39 
Appendix D: 
Resources (continued)
Houts p, Doak C, Doak L, Loscalo,M. The role of pictures in improving health communication: a review of research on attention, 
comprehension, recall, and adherence. Patient Education and Counseling 2006; 61:173-190. 
Johnson H. Readability study of client health education materials: A resource for assuring the effectiveness of written materials. 
Raleigh (NC): North Carolina State Dept. of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources. May, 128 p. Available from: ERIC 
Document Reproduction Service, Springfield, VA 1994; No. ED382934.  
Katz M, Kripalani S, Weiss B. Use of pictorial aids in medication instructions: A review of the literature. American Journal of Health-
System Pharmacists. December 1, 2006; 63:2391-2397. 
Kleimann S, Enlow B. Is plain language appropriate for well-educated and politically important people? Results of research with 
congressional correspondence. Clarity. November 2003; 50:4-11. 
Koba H. Putting it plainly becomes communications. Mission of Ontario, Ministry of Health. Journal of the Canadian Medical 
Association 1993; 148(7):1202-03.  
Kreuter M, Strecher V, Glassman B. One size does not f t all: The case for tailoring print materials. Society of Behavioral Medicine 
1999; 21:276-83.  
Kripalani S, Weiss B. Teaching about health literacy and clear communication. Journal of General Internal Medicine 2006, 21(8):888-
90.  
Massett, H. Evaluation of CDC Print Materials. Presentation to the Office of Communication, CDC. December; 1996.  
Meade C, Howser D. Consent forms: How to determine and improve their readability. Oncology Nursing Forum 1992; 19(10):1523-
28.  
Meade C, McKinney W, Barnas G. Educating patients with limited literacy skills: The effectiveness of printed and videotaped 
materials about colon cancer. American Journal of Public Health 1994; 84(1):119-21.  
Michielutte R, Bahnson B, Beal P. Readability of the public education literature on cancer prevention and detection. Journal of Cancer 
Education 1990; 5(1):55-61.  
Michielutte R, Bahnson J, Dignan M, Schroeder E. The use of illustrations and narrative text style to improve readability of a health 
education brochure. Journal of Cancer Education 1992; 7(3):251-60.  
Montori V, Rothman R. Weakness in numbers: the challenge of numeracy in health care. Journal of General Internal Medicine 2005; 
20:1071-1072.  
Neuhauser, L. & Kreps, G. Online cancer communication interventions: Meeting the literacy, linguistic and cultural needs of diverse 
audiences. 
Patient Education and Counseling.
Available online: doi:10.1016/j.pec.2008.02.015  
Parker R, Gazmararian J. Health literacy: essential for health communication. Journal of Health Communication 2003; 8:S116-8.  
Plimpton S, Root J. Materials and strategies that work in low literacy health communication. Public Health Reports 1994; 109(1):86-
92.  
Rice M, Valdivia L. A simple guide for design, use, and evaluation of educational materials. Health Education Quarterly 1991; 
18(1):79-85. 
Riche J. Text and reader characteristics affecting the readability of patient literature. Reading Improvement 1991; 28(4):287-92. 
40 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested