c# pdf to image pdfsharp : Create a fillable pdf form from a word document software application dll windows winforms azure web forms wbook5-part71

CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
40
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
nz = 12428
Figure 2.2: Sparsity structure of W from Pace and Barry
even ner grid with increments of 0.001 around the optimal estimate from
the second pass.
Note that we used a MATLAB sparse function eigs to solve for the
eigenvalues of the contiguity matrix W, which requires 60 seconds to solve
this part of the problem as shown in the output below. The time necessary
to perform each pass over the grid of 21 values for  was around 10 seconds.
With a total of 3 passes to produce an estimate of  accurate to 3 decimal
digits, we have a total elapsed time of 1 minute and 30 seconds to solve
for the maximum likelihood estimate of . This is certainly a reasonable
amount of computational time for such a large problem on a reasonably in-
Create a fillable pdf form from a word document - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert pdf to fillable form online; convert pdf into fillable form
Create a fillable pdf form from a word document - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
attach image to pdf form; create a fillable pdf form
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
41
expensive desktop computing platform. Of course, there is still the problem
of producing measures of dispersion for the estimates that Pace and Barry
address by suggesting the use of likelihood ratio statistics.
elapsed_time = 59.8226 % computing min,max eigenvalues
elapsed_time = 10.5280 % carrying out 1st 21-point grid over rho
elapsed_time = 10.3791 % carrying out 2nd 21-point grid over rho
elapsed_time = 10.3747 % carrying out 3rd 21-point grid over rho
estimate of rho =
0.7220
estimate of sigma =
0.0054
How does our approach compare to that of Pace and Barry? Example2.3
shows a program to estimate the same FAR model using our far function.
% ----- Example 2.3 Using the far() function
%
with very large data set from Pace and Barry
load elect.dat;
% load data on votes
y = elect(:,7)./elect(:,8); % proportion of voters casting votes
ydev = y - mean(y);
% deviations from the means form
clear y;
% conserve on RAM memory
clear elect; % conserve on RAM memory
load ford.dat; % 1st order contiguity matrix stored in sparse matrix form
ii = ford(:,1); jj = ford(:,2); ss = ford(:,3);
n = 3107;
clear ford; % clear ford matrix to save RAM memory
W = sparse(ii,jj,ss,n,n);
clear ii; clear jj; clear ss; % conserve on RAM memory
tic; res = far(ydev,W); toc;
prt(res);
In terms of time needed to solve the problem, our use of the simplex
optimization algorithm takes only 10.6 seconds to produce a more accurate
estimate than that based on the grid approach of Pace and Barry. Their
approach which we modied took 30 seconds to solve for a  value accurate
to 3 decimal digits. Note also in contrast to Pace and Barry, we compute
aconventional measure of dispersion using the numerical hessian estimates
which takes only 1.76 seconds. The total time required to compute not only
the estimates and measures of dispersion for  and , but the R−squared
statistics and log likelihood function was around 100 seconds.
elapsed_time = 59.8226 % computing min,max eigenvalues
elapsed_time = 10.6622 % time required for simplex solution of rho
elapsed_time = 1.7681 % time required for hessian evaluation
elapsed_time = 1.7743 % time required for likelihood evaluation
total time
= 74.01
% comparable time to Pace and Barry
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
to create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and Create and save editable PDF with a blank page Create fillable PDF document with fields.
form pdf fillable; convert pdf fill form
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both .NET WinForms and ASP to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
convert fillable pdf to word fillable form; create fill pdf form
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
42
First-order spatial autoregressive model Estimates
R-squared
=
0.5375
sigma^2
=
0.0054
Nobs, Nvars
=
3107,
1
log-likelihood =
1727.9824
# of iterations =
13
min and max rho =
-1.0710,
1.0000
***************************************************************
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
rho
0.721474
59.495159
0.000000
Many of the ideas developed in this section regarding the use of MAT-
LAB sparse matrix algorithms will apply equally to the estimation proce-
dures we develop in the next three sections for the other members of the
spatial autoregressive model family.
2.2 The mixed autoregressive-regressive model
This model extends the rst-order spatial autoregressive model to include
amatrix X of explanatory variables such as those used in traditional re-
gression models. Anselin (1988) provides a maximum likelihood method for
estimating the parameters of this model that he labels a `mixed regressive
-spatial autoregressive model'. We will refer to this model as the spatial
autoregressive model (SAR). The SAR model takes the form:
y = Wy + X +"
(2.12)
"  N(0;
2
I
n
)
Where y contains an nx1 vector of dependent variables, X represents the
usual nxk data matrix containing explanatory variables and W is a known
spatialweight matrix,usually a rst-order contiguitymatrix. The parameter
is a coecient on the spatially lagged dependent variable, Wy, and the
parameters  reflect the influence of the explanatory variables on variation
in the dependent variable y. The model is termed a mixed regressive -
spatial autoregressive model because it combines the standard regression
model with a spatially lagged dependent variable, reminiscent of the lagged
dependent variable model from time-series analysis.
Maximum likelihood estimationof this model is based on a concentrated
likelihood function as was the case with the FAR model. A few regressions
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
component to convert Microsoft Office Word, Excel and Create and save editable PDF with a blank Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET
pdf add signature field; convert word document to pdf fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create PDF document from OpenOffice Text Document with embedded ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
convert an existing form into a fillable pdf; convert fillable pdf to html form
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
43
are carried out along with a univariate parameter optimization of the con-
centrated likelihood function over values of the autoregressive parameter .
The steps are enumerated in Anselin (1988) as:
1. perform OLS for the model: y = X
0
+"
0
2. perform OLS for the model Wy = X
L
+"
L
3. compute residuals e
0
=y− X
^
0
and e
L
=Wy −X
^
L
4. given e
0
and e
L
nd  that maximizes the concentrated likelihood
function: L
C
=C − (n=2)ln(1=n)(e
0
−e
L
)
0
(e
0
−e
L
)+lnjI − Wj
5. given ^ that maximizes L
C
, compute
^
 = (
^
0
−
^
L
) and ^
2
"
=
(1=n)(e
0
−e
L
)
0
(e
0
−e
L
)
Again we face the problem that using a univariate simplex optimization
algorithm to nd a maximum likelihood estimate of  based on the concen-
trated log likelihood function leaves us with no estimates of the dispersion
associated with the parameters. We can overcome this using the theoretical
information matrix for small problems and the numerical hessian approach
introduced for the FAR model in the case of large problems.
Since this model is quite similar to the FAR model which we already
presented, we will turn immediately to describing the function.
2.2.1 The sar() function
The function sar is fairlysimilar to our far function,withthedocumentation
presented below.
PURPOSE: computes spatial autoregressive model estimates
y = p*W*y + X*b + e, using sparse matrix algorithms
---------------------------------------------------
USAGE: results = sar(y,x,W,rmin,rmax,convg,maxit)
where: y = dependent variable vector
x = explanatory variables matrix
W = standardized contiguity matrix
rmin = (optional) minimum value of rho to use in search
rmax = (optional) maximum value of rho to use in search
convg = (optional) convergence criterion (default = 1e-8)
maxit = (optional) maximum # of iterations (default = 500)
---------------------------------------------------
RETURNS: a structure
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A best C#.NET PDF document SDK library for PDF form field manipulation in A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#
change font size pdf fillable form; adding a signature to a pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
formatting. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents. Professional
create fillable forms in pdf; convert pdf fillable form
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
44
results.meth = 'sar'
results.beta = bhat
results.rho
= rho
results.tstat = asymp t-stat (last entry is rho)
results.yhat = yhat
results.resid = residuals
results.sige = sige = (y-p*W*y-x*b)'*(y-p*W*y-x*b)/n
results.rsqr = rsquared
results.rbar = rbar-squared
results.lik
= -log likelihood
results.nobs = # of observations
results.nvar = # of explanatory variables in x
results.y
= y data vector
results.iter
= # of iterations taken
results.romax = 1/max eigenvalue of W (or rmax if input)
results.romin = 1/min eigenvalue of W (or rmin if input)
--------------------------------------------------
As in the case of far, we allow the user to provide minimum and maxi-
mum values of  to use in the search. This may save time in cases where we
wish to restrict our estimate of  to the positive range.
The other point to note is that this function also uses the numerical
hessian approach to compute measures of dispersion for large problems in-
volving more than 500 observations.
2.2.2 Applied examples
As anillustrationof using the sar function, consider the programin example
2.4, where we estimate a model to explain variation in votes casts on a
per capita basis in the 3,107 counties. The explanatory variables in the
model were: the proportion of population with high school level education
or higher, the proportion of the population that are homeowners and the
income per capita. Note that the population deflater used to convert the
variables to per capita terms was the population 18 years or older in the
county.
% ----- Example 2.4 Using the sar() function with a very large data set
load elect.dat;
% load data on votes in 3,107 counties
y = (elect(:,7)./elect(:,8));
% convert to per capita variables
x1 = log(elect(:,9)./elect(:,8)); % education
x2 = log(elect(:,10)./elect(:,8));% homeownership
x3 = log(elect(:,11)./elect(:,8));% income
n = length(y); x = [ones(n,1) x1 x2 x3];
clear x1; clear x2; clear x3;
clear elect;
% conserve on RAM memory
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from
convert pdf to fillable form; add attachment to pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual
convert pdf to form fill; convert word to fillable pdf form
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
45
load ford.dat; % 1st order contiguity matrix stored in sparse matrix form
ii = ford(:,1); jj = ford(:,2); ss = ford(:,3);
n = 3107;
clear ford; % clear ford matrix to save RAM memory
W = sparse(ii,jj,ss,n,n);
clear ii; clear jj; clear ss; % conserve on RAM memory
vnames = strvcat('voters','const','educ','homeowners','income');
to = clock;
res = sar(y,x,W);
etime(clock,to)
prt(res,vnames);
We use the MATLAB clock function as well as etime to determine the
overall execution time needed to solve this problem, which was 130 seconds.
The estimation results are presented below:
Spatial autoregressive Model Estimates
Dependent Variable =
voters
R-squared
=
0.6419
Rbar-squared
=
0.6416
sigma^2
=
0.0042
Nobs, Nvars
=
3107,
4
log-likelihood =
5053.5179
# of iterations =
13
min and max rho =
-1.0710,
1.0000
***************************************************************
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
const
0.753169
25.963031
0.000000
educ
0.148553
17.341543
0.000000
homeowners
0.208960
26.142340
0.000000
income
-0.085462
-9.413244
0.000000
rho
0.563764
39.797104
0.000000
We see from the results that all of the explanatory variables exhibit a
signicant eect on the variable we wished to explain. The results also
indicate that the dependent variable y exhibits strong spatial dependence
even after taking the eect of these variables into account as the estimate
of  on the spatial lagged variable is large and signicant.
As an illustration of the bias associated with least-squares estimation
of spatial autoregressive models, we present an example based on a spatial
sample of 88 observations for counties in the state of Ohio. A sample of
average housing values for each of 88 counties in Ohio will be related to
population per square mile, the housing density and unemployment rates in
each county. This regression relationship can be written as:
HOUSE
i
=+ POP
i
+γHDENSITY
i
+UNEMPLOY
i
+"
i
(2.13)
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it
allow users to attach to pdf form; convert word to pdf fillable form online
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files PDF document can be converted from PowerPoint2003 by
convert html form to pdf fillable form; convert pdf to form fillable
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
46
The motivation for the regression relationship is that population and
household density as well as unemployment rates work to determine the
house values in each county. Consider that the advent of suburban sprawl
and the notion of urban rent gradients suggests that housing values in con-
tiguous counties should be related. The least-squares relationship in (2.13)
ignores the spatial contiguity information whereas the SAR model would
allow for this type of variation in the model.
The rst task is to construct a spatial contiguity matrix for use with
our spatial autoregressive model. This could be accomplished by examin-
ing a map of the 88 counties and recording neighboring tracts for every
observation, a very tedious task. An alternative is to use the latitude and
longitude coordinates to construct a contiguity matrix. We rely on a func-
tion xy2cont that carries out this task. This function is part of Pace and
Barry's Spatial Statistics Toolbox for MATLAB, but has been modied to
t the documentation conventions of the spatial econometrics library. The
function documentation is shown below:
PURPOSE: uses x,y coord to produce spatial contiguity weight matrices
with delaunay routine from MATLAB version 5.2
------------------------------------------------------
USAGE: [w1 w2 w3] = xy2cont(xcoord,ycoord)
where:
xcoord = x-direction coordinate vector (nobs x 1)
ycoord = y-direction coordinate vector (nobs x 1)
------------------------------------------------------
RETURNS: w1 = W*W*S, a row-stochastic spatial weight matrix
w2 = W*S*W, a symmetric spatial weight matrix (max(eig)=1)
w3 = diagonal matrix with i,i equal to 1/sqrt(sum of ith row)
------------------------------------------------------
References: Kelley Pace, Spatial Statistics Toolbox 1.0
------------------------------------------------------
This function essentially uses triangles connecting the x-y coordinates in
space to deduce contiguous entities. As an example of using the function,
consider constructing a spatial contiguitymatrix for the Columbus neighbor-
hood crime data set where we know both the rst-order contiguity structure
taken from a map of the neighborhoods as well as the x-y coordinates. Here
is a program to generate the rst-order contiguity matrix from the latitude
and longitude coordinates and produce a graphical comparison of the two
contiguity structures shown in Figure2.3.
% ----- Example 2.5 Using the xy2cont() function
load anselin.data; % Columbus neighborhood crime
xc = anselin(:,5); % longitude coordinate
yc = anselin(:,4); % latitude coordinate
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
47
load Wmat.data;
% load standardized contiguity matrix
% create contiguity matrix from x-y coordinates
[W1 W2 W3] = xy2cont(xc,yc);
% graphically compare the two
spy(W2,'ok'); hold on; spy(Wmat,'+k');
legend('generated','actual');
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
nz = 232
generated
actual
Figure 2.3: Generated contiguity structure results
Example2.6reads in the data fromtwoles containinga database for the
88 Ohio counties as wellas data vectors containingthe latitudeand longitude
informationneeded to construct a contiguity matrix. We rely on a log trans-
formationof thedependent variablehouse values toprovide better scaling for
the data. Note the use of the MATLAB construct: `ohio2(:,5)./ohio1(:,2)',
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
48
which divides every element in the column vector `ohio(:,5)'containing total
households in eachcounty by every element inthe column vector `ohio1(:,2)',
which containsthe populationfor every county. This produces the number of
households per capita for each county as an explanatory variable measuring
household density.
% ----- Example 2.6 Least-squares bias
%
demonstrated with Ohio county data base
load ohio1.dat; % 88 counties (observations)
% 10 columns
% col1 area in square miles
% col2 total population
% col3 population per square mile
% col4 black population
% col5 blacks as a percentage of population
% col6 number of hospitals
% col7 total crimes
% col8 crime rate per capita
% col9 population that are high school graduates
% col10 population that are college graduates
load ohio2.dat; % 88 counties
% 10 columns
% col1 income per capita
% col2 average family income
% col3 families in poverty
% col4 percent of families in poverty
% col5 total number of households
% col6 average housing value
% col7 unemployment rate
% col8 total manufacturing employment
% col9 manufacturing employment as a percent of total
% col10 total employment
load ohio.xy; % latitude-longitude coordinates of county centroids
[junk W junk2] = xy2cont(ohio(:,1),ohio(:,2)); % make W-matrix
y = log(ohio2(:,6)); n = length(y);
x = [ ones(n,1) ohio1(:,3) ohio2(:,5)./ohio1(:,2) ohio2(:,7) ];
vnames = strvcat('hvalue','constant','popsqm','housedensity','urate');
res = ols(y,x);
prt(res,vnames);
res = sar(y,x,W); prt(res,vnames);
The results from these two regressions are shown below. The rst point
to note is that the spatial autocorrelation coecient estimate for the SAR
model is statistically signicant, indicating the presence of spatial autocor-
relation in the regression relationship. Least-squares ignores this type of
variation producing estimates that lead us to conclude that all three ex-
planatory variables are signicant in explaining housing values across the 88
county sample. In contrast, the SAR model leads us to conclude that the
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
49
population density (popsqm) is not statistically signicant at conventional
levels. Keep in mind that the OLS estimates are biased and inconsistent,
so the inference of signicance from OLS we would draw is likely to be
incorrect.
Ordinary Least-squares Estimates
Dependent Variable =
hvalue
R-squared
=
0.6292
Rbar-squared
=
0.6160
sigma^2
=
0.0219
Durbin-Watson =
2.0992
Nobs, Nvars
=
88,
4
***************************************************************
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
constant
11.996858
71.173358
0.000000
popsqm
0.000110
2.983046
0.003735
housedensity
-1.597930
-3.344910
0.001232
urate
-0.067693
-7.525022
0.000000
Spatial autoregressive Model Estimates
Dependent Variable =
hvalue
R-squared
=
0.7298
Rbar-squared
=
0.7201
sigma^2
=
0.0153
Nobs, Nvars
=
88,
4
log-likelihood =
87.284225
# of iterations =
13
min and max rho =
-2.0158,
1.0000
***************************************************************
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
constant
6.300144
35.621170
0.000000
popsqm
0.000037
1.196689
0.234794
housedensity
-1.251435
-3.140028
0.002332
urate
-0.055474
-7.387845
0.000000
rho
0.504131
53.749348
0.000000
Asecond point is that taking the spatial variation into account improves
the t of the model, raising the R-squared statistic for the SAR model.
Finally, the magnitudes of the OLS parameter estimates indicate that house
values are more sensitive to the household density and the unemployment
rate variables than the SAR model. For example, the OLS estimates imply
that a one percentage point increase in the unemployment rate leads to
adecrease of 6.8 percent in house values whereas the SAR model places
this at 5.5 percent. Similarly, the OLS estimates for household density is
considerably larger in magnitude than that from the SAR model.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested