c# pdf to image pdfsharp : Attach image to pdf form SDK software API .net winforms html sharepoint wbook6-part72

CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
50
The point of this illustration is that ignoring information regarding the
spatial conguration of the data observations will produce dierent infer-
ences that may lead to an inappropriate model specication. Anselin and
Grith (1988) also provide examples and show that traditional specica-
tion tests are plagued by the presence of spatial autocorrelation, so that we
should not rely on these tests in the presence of signicant spatial autocor-
relation.
2.3 The spatial errors model
Here we turn attention to the spatial errors model shown in (2.14), where
the disturbances exhibit spatialdependence. Anselin (1988) provides a max-
imum likelihood method for this model which we label SEM here.
y = X +u
(2.14)
u = Wu + "
"  N(0;
2
I
n
)
ycontains an nx1 vector of dependent variables and X represents the usual
nxk data matrix containing explanatory variables. W is a known spatial
weight matrix and the parameter  is a coecient onthe spatially correlated
errors analogous to the serial correlation problem intime series models. The
parameters  reflect the influence of the explanatory variables on variation
in the dependent variable y.
We introduce a number of statistical tests that can be used to detect
the presence of spatial autocorrelation in the residuals from a least-squares
model. Use of these tests will be illustrated in the next section.
The rst test for spatial dependence in the disturbances of a regression
model is called Moran's I−statistic. Given that this test indicates spatial
correlation in the least-squares residuals, the SEM model would be an ap-
propriate way to proceed.
Moran's I−statistic takes two forms depending on whether the spatial
weight matrix W is standardized or not.
1. W not standardized
I= (n=s)[e
0
We]=e
0
e
(2.15)
2. W standardized
I= e
0
We=e
0
e
(2.16)
Attach image to pdf form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
pdf fillable form; create a pdf form to fill out
Attach image to pdf form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
convert pdf to fillable form; create a writable pdf form
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
51
Where e represent regression residuals. Cli and Ord (1972, 1973, 1981)
show that the asymptotic distribution for Moran's I based on least-squares
residuals corresponds to a standard normal distribution after adjusting the
I−statistic by subtracting the mean and dividing by the standard deviation
of the statistic. The adjustment takes two forms depending on whether W
is standardized or not. (Anselin, 1988, page 102).
1. W not standardized, let M = (I − X(X
0
X)
−1
X
0
)and tr denotes the
trace operator.
E(I) = (n=s)tr(MW)=(n −k)
V(i) = (n=s)
2
[tr(MWMW
0
)+ tr(MW)
2
+(tr(MW))
2
]=d − E(I)
2
d = (n − k)(n −k +2)
Z
I
= [I − E(I)]=V(I)
1=2
(2.17)
2. W standardized
E(I) = tr(MW)=(n − k)
V(i) = [tr(MWMW
0
)+ tr(MW)
2
+(tr(MW))
2
]=d − E(I)
2
d = (n− k)(n −k + 2)
Z
I
= [I −E(I)]=V(I)
1=2
(2.18)
We implement this test in the MATLAB function moran, which takes a
regression model and spatial weight matrix W as input and returns a struc-
ture variable containing the results from a Moran test for spatial correlation
in the residuals. The prt function can be used to provide a nicely formatted
print out of the test results. The help documentation for the function is
shown below.
PURPOSE: computes Moran's I-statistic for spatial correlation
in the residuals of a regression model
---------------------------------------------------
USAGE: result = moran(y,x,W)
where: y = dependent variable vector
x = independent variables matrix
W = contiguity matrix (standardized or unstandardized)
---------------------------------------------------
RETURNS: a structure variable
result.morani = e'*W*e/e'*e (I-statistic)
result.istat = [i - E(i)]/std(i), standardized version
result.imean = E(i),
expectation
VB.NET Image: Image Drawing SDK, Draw Text & Graphics on Image
text writing function and graphics drawing function, we attach links to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and
create a fillable pdf form; convert pdf fillable form to word
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Rectangle Annotation Imaging Control
Able to attach a user-defined shadow to created rectangle annotation to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and
convert pdf fill form; pdf form fill
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
52
result.ivar
= var(i), variance
result.prob
= std normal marginal probability
result.nobs
= # of observations
result.nvar
= # of variables in x-matrix
---------------------------------------------------
NOTE: istat > 1.96, => small prob,
=> reject HO: of no spatial correlation
---------------------------------------------------
See also: prt(), lmerrors, walds, lratios
---------------------------------------------------
Anumber of other asymptotic approaches exist for testing whether spa-
tial correlation is present in the residuals from a least-squares regression
model. Some of these are the likelihood ratio test, the Wald test and a
lagrange multiplier test, all of which are based on maximum likelihood esti-
mation of the SEM model.
The likelihood ratio test is based on the dierence between the log like-
lihood from the SEM model and the log likelihood from a least-squares
regression. This quantity represents a statistic that is distributed 
2
(1). A
function lratios carries out this test and returns a results structure which
can be passed to the prt function for presentation of the results. Documen-
tation for the function is:
PURPOSE: computes likelihood ratio test for spatial
correlation in the errors of a regression model
---------------------------------------------------
USAGE: result = lratios(y,x,W)
or: result = lratios(y,x,W,sem_result);
where:
y = dependent variable vector
x = independent variables matrix
W = contiguity matrix (standardized or unstandardized)
sem_result = a results structure from sem()
---------------------------------------------------
RETURNS: a structure variable
result.meth
= 'lratios'
result.lratio = likelihood ratio statistic
result.chi1
= 6.635
result.prob
= marginal probability
result.nobs
= # of observations
result.nvar
= # of variables in x-matrix
---------------------------------------------------
NOTES: lratio > 6.635, => small prob,
=> reject HO: of no spatial correlation
calling the function with a results structure from sem()
can save time for large models that have already been estimated
---------------------------------------------------
VB.NET Word: VB Tutorial to Convert Word to Other Formats in .NET
rendered REImage into desired document image format 2007 or later versions into PDF, tiff, bmp NET Word converting functions but also attach detailed programming
pdf add signature field; change pdf to fillable form
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Sample Code to Draw EAN-13 Barcode on Image
How to Attach EAN-13 Barcode Image to Word in VB.NET. NET EAN-13 barcode generation tutorial page on how to add & insert EAN-13 barcode into image, PDF or Word
.net fill pdf form; change font size in fillable pdf form
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
53
Note that we allow the user to supply a `results' structure variable from
the sem estimation function, which would save the time needed to esti-
mate the SEM model if the model has already been estimated. This could
represent a considerable savings for large problems.
Another approach is based on a Wald test for residual spatial autocor-
relation. This test statistic (shown in (2.19)) is distributed 
2
(1). (Anselin,
1988, page 104).
W
= 
2
[t
2
+t
3
−(1=n)(t
2
1
)]  
2
(1)
(2.19)
t
1
= tr(W: B
−1
)
t
2
= tr(WB
−1
)
2
t
3
= tr(WB
−1
)
0
(WB
−1
)
Where B = (I
n
−W), with the maximum likelihood estimate of  used,
and : denotes element-by-element matrix multiplication.
We have implemented a MATLAB function walds, that carries out this
test. The function documentation is shown below:
PURPOSE: Wald statistic for spatial autocorrelation in
the residuals of a regression model
---------------------------------------------------
USAGE: result = walds(y,x,W)
where: y = dependent variable vector
x = independent variables matrix
W = contiguity matrix (standardized)
---------------------------------------------------
RETURNS: a structure variable
result.meth = 'walds'
result.wald = Wald statistic
result.prob = marginal probability
result.chi1 = 6.635
result.nobs = # of observations
result.nvar = # of variables
---------------------------------------------------
NOTE: wald > 6.635, => small prob,
=> reject HO: of no spatial correlation
---------------------------------------------------
See also: lmerror, lratios, moran
---------------------------------------------------
Afourth approach is the Lagrange Multiplier (LM) test which is based
on the least-squares residuals and calculations involving the spatial weight
matrix W. The LM statistic takes the form: (Anselin, 1988, page 104).
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Code to Scan Document into TIFF Image File
generate those scanned documents in TIFF or PDF file format. you are also allowed to determine the image type, TIFF Here we attach a link which can lead you to
convert word to pdf fillable form online; convert pdf fillable forms
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
54
LM
= (1=T)[(e
0
We)=
2
]
2

2
(1)
(2.20)
T = tr(W + W
0
): W
Where e denote least-squares residuals and againwe use : todenote element
by element matrix multiplication.
This test is implemented in a MATLAB function lmerrors with the
documentation for the function shown below.
PURPOSE: LM error statistic for spatial correlation in
the residuals of a regression model
---------------------------------------------------
USAGE: result = lmerror(y,x,W)
where: y = dependent variable vector
x = independent variables matrix
W = contiguity matrix (standardized)
---------------------------------------------------
RETURNS: a structure variable
result.meth = 'lmerror'
result.lm
= LM statistic
result.prob = marginal probability
result.chi1 = 6.635
result.nobs = # of observations
result.nvar = # of variables
---------------------------------------------------
NOTE: lm > 6.635, => small prob,
=> reject HO: of no spatial correlation
---------------------------------------------------
See also: walds, lratios, moran
---------------------------------------------------
Finally, a test based on the residuals from the SAR model can be used
to examine whether inclusion of the spatial lag term eliminates spatial de-
pendence in the residuals of the model. This test diers from the four tests
outlined above in that we allow for the presence of the spatial lagged vari-
able Cy in the model. The test for spatial dependence is conditional on
having a  parameter not equal to zero in the model, rather than relying on
least-squares residuals as in the case of the other four tests.
One could view this test as based on the following model:
y = Cy+ X + u
(2.21)
u = Wu +"
"  N(0;
2
I
n
)
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
55
Where the focus of the test is on whether the parameter  = 0. This test
statistic is also a Lagrange Multiplier statistic based on: (Anselin, 1988,
page 106).
(e
0
We=
2
)[T
22
− (T
21
)
2
var()]
−1

2
(1)
(2.22)
T
22
= tr(W:W +W
0
W)
T
21
= tr(W:CA
−1
+W
0
CA
−1
)
Where W is the spatial weight matrix shown in (2.21), A = (I
n
−C) and
var() is the maximum likelihood estimate of the variance of the parameter
in the model.
We have implemented this test in a MATLAB function lmsar with the
documentation for the function shown below.
PURPOSE: LM statistic for spatial correlation in the
residuals of a spatial autoregressive model
---------------------------------------------------
USAGE: result = lmsar(y,x,W1,W2)
where: y = dependent variable vector
x = independent variables matrix
W1 = contiguity matrix for rho
W2 = contiguity matrix for lambda
---------------------------------------------------
RETURNS: a structure variable
result.meth = 'lmsar'
result.lm
= LM statistic
result.prob = marginal probability
result.chi1 = 6.635
result.nobs = # of observations
result.nvar = # of variables
---------------------------------------------------
NOTE: lm > 6.635, => small prob,
=> reject HO: of no spatial correlation
---------------------------------------------------
See also: walds, lratios, moran, lmerrors
---------------------------------------------------
It should be noted that a host of other methods to test for spatial de-
pendence in various modeling situations have been proposed. In addition,
the small sample properties of many alternative tests have been compared
in Anselin and Florax (1994) and Anselin and Rey (1991). One point to
consider is that many of the matrix computations required for these tests
cannot be carried out with very large data samples. We discuss this issue
and suggest alternative approaches in the applied examples of Section2.3.2.
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
56
2.3.1 The sem() function
To implement estimation of the spatial error model (SEM) we can draw on
the sparse matrix approach we used for the FAR and SAR models. One ap-
proach to estimating this model is based on an iterative approach that: 1)
constructs least-squares estimates and associated residuals, 2) nds a value
of  that maximizes the log likelihood conditional on the least-squares  val-
ues, 3) updates the least-squares values of  using the value of  determined
in step 2). This process is continued until convergence in the residuals.
Next, we present documentation for the function sem that carries out
the iterative estimation process. This is quite similar in approach to the
functions far and sar already described.
PURPOSE: computes spatial error model estimates
y = XB + u, u = L*W*u + e, using sparse algorithms
---------------------------------------------------
USAGE: results = sem(y,x,W,lmin,lmax,convg,maxit)
where: y = dependent variable vector
x = independent variables matrix
W = contiguity matrix (standardized)
lmin = (optional) minimum value of lambda to use in search
lmax = (optional) maximum value of lambda to use in search
convg = (optional) convergence criterion (default = 1e-8)
maxit = (optional) maximum # of iterations (default = 500)
---------------------------------------------------
RETURNS: a structure
results.meth = 'sem'
results.beta = bhat
results.lam
= L (lambda)
results.tstat = asymp t-stats (last entry is lam)
results.yhat = yhat
results.resid = residuals
results.sige = sige = e'(I-L*W)'*(I-L*W)*e/n
results.rsqr = rsquared
results.rbar = rbar-squared
results.lik = log likelihood
results.nobs = nobs
results.nvar = nvars (includes lam)
results.y
= y data vector
results.iter
= # of iterations taken
results.lmax = 1/max eigenvalue of W (or lmax if input)
results.lmin = 1/min eigenvalue of W (or lmin if input)
--------------------------------------------------
It should be noted that an alternative approach to estimating this model
would be to directly maximize the log likelihood function for this model
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
57
using a general optimization algorithm. It might produce an improvement
in speed, depending on how many likelihoodfunction evaluations are needed
when solving large problems. We provide an option for doing this in a
function semo that relies on a MATLAB optimization function maxlik
that is part of my Econometrics Toolbox software.
2.3.2 Applied examples
We provide examples of using the functions moran, lmerror, walds and
lratios that test for spatial correlation in the least-squares residuals as well
as lmsar to test for spatial correlation in the residuals of an SAR model.
These examples are based on the Anselin neighborhood crime data set. It
should be noted that computation of the Moran I−statistic, the LM error
statistic,andthe Wald test requirematrix multiplicationsinvolving the large
spatial weight matrices C and W. This is not true of the likelihood ratio
statistic implemented in the function lratios. This test only requires that
we compare the likelihoodfrom a least-squares model to that from a spatial
error model. As we can produce SEM estimates using our sparse matrix
algorithms, this test can be implemented for large models.
Example 2.7 shows a program that carries out all of the test for spatial
correlation as well as estimating an SEM model.
% ----- Example 2.7 Testing for spatial correlation
load wmat.dat;
% standardized 1st-order contiguity matrix
load anselin.dat; % load Anselin (1988) Columbus neighborhood crime data
y = anselin(:,1); nobs = length(y);
x = [ones(nobs,1) anselin(:,2:3)];
W = wmat;
vnames = strvcat('crime','const','income','house value');
res1 = moran(y,x,W);
prt(res1);
res2 = lmerror(y,x,W);
prt(res2);
res3 = lratios(y,x,W);
prt(res3);
res4 = walds(y,x,W);
prt(res4);
res5 = lmsar(y,x,W,W);
prt(res5);
res = sem(y,x,W);% do 1st-order spatial autoregression
prt(res,vnames); % print the output
Note that we have provided code in the prt function to provide a nicely
formatted print out of the test results from our spatial correlation testing
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
58
functions. From the results printed below, we see that the least-squares
residuals exhibit spatial correlation. We infer this from the small marginal
probabilities that indicate signicance at the 99% level of condence. With
regard to the LM error test for spatial correlation in the residuals of the
SAR model implemented in the function lmsar,we see from the marginal
probability of 0.565 that here we can reject any spatial dependence in the
residuals from this model.
Moran I-test for spatial correlation in residuals
Moran I
0.23610178
Moran I-statistic
2.95890622
Marginal Probability
0.00500909
mean
-0.03329718
standard deviation
0.09104680
LM error tests for spatial correlation in residuals
LM value
5.74566426
Marginal Probability
0.01652940
chi(1) .01 value
17.61100000
LR tests for spatial correlation in residuals
LR value
8.01911539
Marginal Probability
0.00462862
chi-squared(1) value
6.63500000
Wald test for spatial correlation in residuals
Wald value
14.72873758
Marginal Probability
0.00012414
chi(1) .01 value
6.63500000
LM error tests for spatial correlation in SAR model residuals
LM value
0.33002340
Marginal Probability
0.56564531
chi(1) .01 value
6.63500000
Spatial error Model Estimates
Dependent Variable =
crime
R-squared
=
0.6515
Rbar-squared
=
0.6364
sigma^2
=
95.5675
log-likelihood =
-166.40057
Nobs, Nvars
=
49,
3
# iterations
=
12
min and max lam =
-1.5362,
1.0000
***************************************************************
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
const
59.878750
11.157027
0.000000
income
-0.940247
-2.845229
0.006605
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
59
house value
-0.302236
-3.340320
0.001667
lambda
0.562233
4.351068
0.000075
As an example of estimating an SEM model on a large data set, we use
the Pace and Barry data set with the same model used to demonstrate the
SAR estimation procedure.
% ----- Example 2.8 Using the sem() function with a very large data set
load elect.dat;
% load data on votes in 3,107 counties
y = (elect(:,7)./elect(:,8));
% convert to per capita variables
x1 = log(elect(:,9)./elect(:,8)); % education
x2 = log(elect(:,10)./elect(:,8));% homeownership
x3 = log(elect(:,11)./elect(:,8));% income
n = length(y); x = [ones(n,1) x1 x2 x3];
clear x1; clear x2; clear x3;
clear elect;
% conserve on RAM memory
load ford.dat; % 1st order contiguity matrix stored in sparse matrix form
ii = ford(:,1); jj = ford(:,2); ss = ford(:,3);
n = 3107;
clear ford; % clear ford matrix to save RAM memory
W = sparse(ii,jj,ss,n,n);
clear ii; clear jj; clear ss; % conserve on RAM memory
vnames = strvcat('voters','const','educ','homeowners','income');
to = clock;
res = sem(y,x,W);
etime(clock,to)
prt(res,vnames);
We computed estimates using both the iterative procedure implemented
in the function sem and the optimization procedure implemented in the
function semo. The time required for the optimization procedure was 338
seconds, which compared to 311 seconds for the iterative procedure. The
optimization approach required only 6 function evaluations whereas the it-
erative procedure required 10 function evaluations. Needless to say, almost
all of the time is spent in the loglikelihood function evaluations. We present
the estimates from both approaches to demonstrate that they produce es-
timates that are identical to 3 decimal places. Both of these functions are
part of the spatial econometrics library, as it may be the case that the opti-
mization approach would produce estimates in less time than the iterative
approach in other applications. This would likely be the case if very good
initial estimates were available as starting values.
% estimates from iterative approach using sem() function
Spatial error Model Estimates
Dependent Variable =
voters
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested