c# pdf to image pdfsharp : Create a pdf with fields to fill in application Library tool html .net windows online wbook7-part73

CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
60
R-squared
=
0.6570
Rbar-squared
=
0.6566
sigma^2
=
0.0040
log-likelihood =
5063.9904
Nobs, Nvars
=
3107,
4
# iterations
=
10
min and max lam =
-1.0710,
1.0000
***************************************************************
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
const
1.216656
35.780274
0.000000
educ
0.192118
14.564908
0.000000
homeowners
0.250041
29.083714
0.000000
income
-0.117625
-9.560005
0.000000
lambda
0.659193
43.121763
0.000000
% estimates from optimization approach using semo() function
Spatial error Model Estimates
Dependent Variable =
voters
R-squared
=
0.6570
Rbar-squared
=
0.6566
sigma^2
=
0.0040
log-likelihood =
5063.9904
Nobs, Nvars
=
3107,
4
# iterations
=
6
min and max lam =
-1.0710,
1.0000
***************************************************************
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
const
1.216673
35.780840
0.000000
educ
0.192125
14.565561
0.000000
homeowners
0.250036
29.083079
0.000000
income
-0.117633
-9.560617
0.000000
lambda
0.659176
43.119452
0.000000
The estimates from this model indicate that after taking into account
the influence of the explanatory variables, we still have spatial correlation in
the residuals of the model that can be modeled successfully with the SEM
model. As a conrmation of this, consider that the LR test implemented
with the function lratios produced the results shown below:
LR tests for spatial correlation in residuals
LR value
1163.01773404
Marginal Probability
0.00000000
chi-squared(1) value
6.63500000
Recall that this is a test of spatial autocorrelation in the residuals from
aleast-squares model, and the test results provide a strong indication of
spatial dependence in the least-squares residuals. Note also that this is the
only test that can be implemented successfully with large data sets.
Create a pdf with fields to fill in - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
change font size in fillable pdf form; convert pdf to fillable form online
Create a pdf with fields to fill in - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
create fillable form pdf online; convert pdf to pdf form fillable
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
61
Areasonable alternative wouldbe to simply estimatea FAR model using
the least-squares residuals to test for the presence of spatial dependence in
the errors. We illustrate this approach in Section2.5.
2.4 The general spatial model
Ageneral version of the spatial model includes both the spatial lagged term
as well as a spatially correlated error structure as shown in (2.23).
y = W
1
y+X +u
(2.23)
u = W
2
u+"
"  N(0;
2
"
I
n
)
One point to note about this model is that W
1
can equal W
2
,but there
may be identication problems in this case. The log likelihood for this
model can be maximized using our general optimization algorithm on a
concentrated version of the likelihood function. The parameters  and 
2
are concentrated out of the likelihood function, leaving the parameters 
and . This eliminates the ability touse the univariate simplex optimization
algorithm fmin that we used with the other spatial autoregressive models.
We can still produce a sparse matrix algorithm for the log likelihood
function and proceed in a similar fashion to that used for the other spatial
autoregressive models. One dierence is that we cannot easily impose re-
strictions on the parameters  and  to force them to lie within the ranges
dened by the maximum and minimum eigenvalues from their associated
weight matrices W
1
and W
2
.
When might one rely on this model? If there were evidence that spa-
tial dependence existed in the error structure from a spatial autoregressive
(SAR) model, the SAC model is an appropriate approach to modeling this
type of dependence in the errors. Recall, we can use the LM-test imple-
mented in the function lmsars to see if spatial dependence exists in the
residuals of an SAR model.
Another place where one might rely on this model is a case where a
second-order spatial contiguity matrix was used for W
2
that corresponds to
arst-order contiguity matrix W
1
.This type of model wouldexpress the be-
lief that the disturbance structure involved higher-order spatial dependence,
perhaps due to second-round eects of a spatial phenomena being modeled.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Select the fill color when drawing oval, rectangle, polygon and irregular shape. Select the line color when drawing annotations on PDF document. Default create.
create pdf fill in form; convert pdf into fillable form
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
pdf" ' Set PDF passwords. Dim userPassword As String = "you" Dim newUserPassword As String = "fill" Dim newOwnerPassword As String = "watch" ' Create setting
converting a word document to pdf fillable form; acrobat fill in pdf forms
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
62
Athird example of using matrices W
1
and W
2
might be where W
1
repre-
sented a rst-order contiguity matrix and W
2
was constructed as a diagonal
matrix measuring the distance from the central city. This type of congu-
ration of the spatial weight matrices would indicate a belief that contiguity
alone does not suce to capture the spatial eects at work. The distance
from the central city might also represent an important factor in the phe-
nomena we are modeling. This raises the identication issue, should we use
the distance weighting matrix in place of W
1
and the rst-order contiguity
matrix for W
2
,or rely on the opposite conguration? Of course, compar-
ing likelihood function values along with the statistical signicance of the
parameters  and  from models estimated using both congurations might
point to a clear answer.
The log likelihood function for this model is:
L = C −(n=2)  ln(
2
)+ln(jAj)+ ln(jBj)− (1=2
2
)(e
0
B
0
Be)
e = (Ay −X)
(2.24)
A = (I
n
−W
1
)
B = (I
n
−W
2
)
We concentrate the function using the following expressions for  and
2
:
 = (X
0
A
0
AX)
−1
(X
0
A
0
ABy)
(2.25)
e = By − x
2
= (e
0
e)=n
Given the expressions in (2.25), we can evaluate the log likelihood given
values of  and . The values of the other parameters  and 
2
can be
calculated as a function of the ; parameters and the sample data in y;X.
2.4.1 The sac() function
Documentation for the MATLAB function sac that carries out the non-
linear optimization of the log likelihood function for this model is shown
below. There are a number of things to note about this function. First, we
provide optimization options for the user in the form of a structure variable
`info'. These options allow the user to control some aspects of the maxlik
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
1_with_pw.pdf"; // Set PDF passwords. String userPassword = "you"; String newUserPassword = "fill"; String newOwnerPassword = "watch"; // Create setting for
create a fillable pdf form in word; convert pdf fill form
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Select the fill color when drawing oval, rectangle, polygon and irregular shape. Select the line color when drawing annotations on PDF document. Default create.
convert word form to pdf with fillable; convert word form to fillable pdf
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
63
optimization algorithm and to print intermediate results while optimization
is proceeding.
This is the rst example of a function that uses the MATLAB structure
variable as an input argument. This allows us to provide a large number
of input arguments using a single structure variable. Note that you can
name the structure variable used to input the options anything | it is the
eldnames that the function sac parses to nd the options.
PURPOSE: computes general Spatial Model
model: y = p*W1*y + X*b + u, u = lam*W2*u + e
---------------------------------------------------
USAGE: results = sac(y,x,W1,W2)
where: y = dependent variable vector
x = independent variables matrix
W1 = spatial weight matrix (standardized)
W2 = spatial weight matrix
info
= a structure variable with optimization options
info.parm
= (optional) 2x1 starting values for rho, lambda
info.convg = (optional) convergence criterion (default = 1e-7)
info.maxit = (optional) maximum # of iterations (default = 500)
info.method = 'bfgs', 'dfp' (default bfgs)
info.pflag = flag for printing of intermediate results
---------------------------------------------------
RETURNS: a structure
results.meth = 'sac'
results.beta = bhat
results.rho
= p (rho)
results.lam
= L (lambda)
results.tstat = asymptotic t-stats (last 2 are rho,lam)
results.yhat = yhat
results.resid = residuals
results.sige = sige = e'(I-L*W)'*(I-L*W)*e/n
results.rsqr = rsquared
results.rbar = rbar-squared
results.lik
= likelihood function value
results.nobs = nobs
results.nvar = nvars
results.y
= y data vector
results.iter = # of iterations taken
--------------------------------------------------
We take the same approach to optimization failure as we did with the
sem function. A message is printed to warn the user that optimization
failed, but we let the function continue to process and return a results struc-
ture consisting of failed parameter estimates. This decision was made to al-
low the user to examine the failed estimates and attempt estimation based
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
Dim inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1_AF.pdf" Dim fields As List(Of BaseFormField) = PDFFormHandler.GetFormFields(inputFilePath) Console
pdf add signature field; convert word to pdf fillable form online
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
Able to retrieve all form fields from adobe PDF file in C#.NET. C#.NET Demo Code: Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in C#.NET.
adding signature to pdf form; attach file to pdf form
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
64
on alternative optimization options. For example, the user might elect to
attempt a Davidson-Fletcher-Powell (`dfp') algorithmin place of the default
Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Smith (`bfgs') routine or supply starting values
for the parameters  and .
With regard to optimization algorithm failures, it should be noted that
the Econometrics Toolbox contains alternative optimization functions that
can be used in place of maxlik. Any of these functions could be substituted
for maxlik in the function sac. Chapter 10 in the Econometrics Toolbox
provides examples of using these functions as well as their documentation.
The next section turns to illustrating the use of the estimation functions
we have constructed for the general spatial autoregressive model.
2.4.2 Applied examples
Our rst example illustrates the use of the general spatial model with the
Anselin Columbus neighborhood crime data set. We construct a matrix W
2
for use in the model based on W
2
=W
0
W. To provide an illustration of
what this matrix inner product involving the rst-order contiguity matrix
W represents in terms of spatial structure, we use the spy function to pro-
duce comparative graphs of the two contiguity matrices that are shown in
Figure2.4. As we can see from the graphs, the inner product allows for a
more wide-ranging set of spatial influences reflecting secondary influences
not captured by the rst-order contiguity matrix. The sparse matrix litera-
ture refers to this phenomena where matrix products produce less sparsity as
\ll-in". The motivationfor this terminology shouldbe clear from the gure.
For another approach to producing \spatial lag" matrices, see the function
slag which represents a more appropriate way to create higher-order spatial
contiguity matrices.
Our example illustrates the point discussed earlier regarding model spec-
ication with respect to the use of W and W
2
by producing estimates for
two models based on alternative congurations of these two spatial weight
matrices. We also produce estimates based on a model that uses the W
matrix for both the autoregressive lag and the autoregressive error terms.
% ----- Example 2.9 Using the sac function
load Wmat.dat;
% standardized 1st-order contiguity matrix
load anselin.dat; % load Anselin (1988) Columbus neighborhood crime data
y = anselin(:,1); nobs = length(y);
x = [ones(nobs,1) anselin(:,2:3)];
W = Wmat;
vnames = strvcat('crime','const','income','house value');
W2 = W'*W;
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Click to create a note to replace selected text add a text box to specific location on PDF page Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all
fillable pdf forms; pdf create fillable form
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
Click to create a note to replace selected text add a text box to specific location on PDF page Outline width, outline color, fill color and transparency are all
convert html form to pdf fillable form; allow users to attach to pdf form
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
65
0
10
20
30
40
50
0
10
20
30
40
50
First-order contiguity structure
0
10
20
30
40
50
0
10
20
30
40
50
contiguity structure of W2
Figure 2.4: Spatial contiguity structures
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
66
subplot(2,1,1), spy(W);
xlabel('First-order contiguity structure');
subplot(2,1,2), spy(W2);
xlabel('contiguity structure of W2');
res1 = sac(y,x,W2,W);% general spatial model W2,W
prt(res1,vnames);
% print the output
res2 = sac(y,x,W,W2);% general spatial model W,W2
prt(res2,vnames);
% print the output
res3 = sac(y,x,W,W); % general spatial model W,W
prt(res3,vnames);
% print the output
The estimation results are shown below for all three versions of the
model. The rst model produced the worst t indicated by the lower R
2
value, but a slightly higher log likelihood function value. In addition, we see
that both the coecients on  and  are statistically signicant, as indicated
by the t−statistics and associated marginal probabilities. The negative spa-
tial lag parameter is problematical as this type of influence is dicult to
explain intuitively. Negative spatial lags would indicate that higher crime
rates in neighboring regions exerted a negative influence on crime on average
across the entire Columbus neighborhood sample. When considered from
an overall and limiting case viewpoint, this seems a logical impossibility.
General Spatial Model Estimates
Dependent Variable =
crime
R-squared
=
0.5591
Rbar-squared
=
0.5400
sigma^2
= 120.9027
log-likelihood =
-164.88367
Nobs, Nvars
=
49,
3
# iterations
=
8
***************************************************************
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
const
37.261470
5.472898
0.000002
income
-0.958005
-2.573394
0.013360
house value
-0.219046
-2.125609
0.038937
rho
-0.713070
-2.070543
0.044041
lambda
0.571698
18.759773
0.000000
General Spatial Model Estimates
Dependent Variable =
crime
R-squared
=
0.6528
Rbar-squared
=
0.6377
sigma^2
=
95.2216
log-likelihood =
-166.12487
Nobs, Nvars
=
49,
3
# iterations
=
6
***************************************************************
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
67
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
const
55.343773
4.628119
0.000030
income
-0.672762
-2.163164
0.035760
house value
-0.320741
-3.552861
0.000894
rho
0.512647
3.747903
0.000497
lambda
0.064988
0.829892
0.410886
General Spatial Model Estimates
Dependent Variable =
crime
R-squared
=
0.6512
Rbar-squared
=
0.6360
sigma^2
=
95.6698
log-likelihood =
-165.25612
Nobs, Nvars
=
49,
3
# iterations
=
7
***************************************************************
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
const
47.275680
4.138342
0.000147
income
-0.977532
-2.971857
0.004696
house value
-0.284369
-3.137873
0.002968
rho
0.167197
0.476045
0.636296
lambda
0.368187
1.348037
0.184248
The second model produced the typical positive coecient  on the spa-
tial lag term along with an insignicant estimate for . As noted above,
it also produced a better t to the sample data. Conrmation of these re-
sults from the second model are provided by the test for spatial dependence
in the disturbances of the SAR model that we carried out in example 2.7,
which are repeated below. From these results, we see that there is no ev-
idence of spatial dependence in the disturbances of the SAR model. This
explains why the parameter  in the general spatial version of this model is
not signicantly dierent from zero.
The third model that relies on the same W matrix for both the spatial
lag and error correlation terms produced estimates for both  and  that
were insignicant. Since we have statistical evidence of spatial correlation
in the residuals from least-squares as well as the statistical signicance of
the parameter  in the SAR model, we would reject this model as inferior
to the SAR model results.
By way of summary, I would reject the specication associated with the
rst model since it produces counter-intuitiveresults. An important point to
note regarding any non-linear optimization problem such as that involved
in the SAC model is that the estimates may not reflect global optimum.
Afew dierent solutions of the optimization problem based on alternative
starting values is usually undertakento conrm that the estimates do indeed
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
68
represent global solutions to the problem. The function sac allows the user
to input alternative starting values, making this relatively easy to do.
Given that we accept the second model as best, because the parameter 
is not statistically signicant, we would conclude that an SAR model would
suce for this sample data.
LM error tests for spatial correlation in SAR model residuals
LM value
0.33002340
Marginal Probability
0.56564531
chi(1) .01 value
6.63500000
Anal example uses the large Pace and Barry data set to illustrate the
sac function in operation on large problems. Example 2.10 turns on the
printing flag so we can observe intermediate results from the optimization
algorithm as it proceeds.
% ----- Example 2.10 Using the sac() function on a large data set
load elect.dat;
% load data on votes in 3,107 counties
y = (elect(:,7)./elect(:,8));
% convert to per capita variables
x1 = log(elect(:,9)./elect(:,8)); % education
x2 = log(elect(:,10)./elect(:,8));% homeownership
x3 = log(elect(:,11)./elect(:,8));% income
n = length(y); x = [ones(n,1) x1 x2 x3];
clear x1; clear x2; clear x3;
clear elect;
% conserve on RAM memory
load ford.dat; % 1st order contiguity matrix stored in sparse matrix form
ii = ford(:,1); jj = ford(:,2); ss = ford(:,3);
n = 3107;
clear ford; % clear ford matrix to save RAM memory
W = sparse(ii,jj,ss,n,n);
clear ii; clear jj; clear ss; % conserve on RAM memory
vnames = strvcat('voters','const','educ','homeowners','income');
to = clock; info.pflag = 1;
res = sac(y,x,W,W'*W,info);
etime(clock,to)
prt(res,vnames);
The results including intermediate results that were printed are shown
below. It took 602 seconds to solve this problem involving only 6 iterations
by the maxlikfunction. This functiontends tobefaster than the alternative
optimization algorithms available in the Econometrics Toolbox.
==== Iteration ==== 2
log-likelihood
bconvergence
fconvergence
-5052.2920
1.1386
0.4438
Parameter
Estimates
Gradient
CHAPTER 2. SPATIAL AUTOREGRESSIVE MODELS
69
Parameter 1
0.6329 -479.9615
Parameter 2
0.0636 -4927.5720
==== Iteration ==== 3
log-likelihood
bconvergence
fconvergence
-5068.0928
0.7587
0.0031
Parameter
Estimates
Gradient
Parameter 1
0.6644
-18.8294
Parameter 2
0.0185 -793.3583
==== Iteration ==== 4
log-likelihood
bconvergence
fconvergence
-5068.2786
0.2197
0.0000
Parameter
Estimates
Gradient
Parameter 1
0.6383
-54.3318
Parameter 2
0.0219
44.6226
==== Iteration ==== 5
log-likelihood
bconvergence
fconvergence
-5068.5622
0.0405
0.0001
Parameter
Estimates
Gradient
Parameter 1
0.6497
47.7892
Parameter 2
0.0223
27.5841
==== Iteration ==== 6
log-likelihood
bconvergence
fconvergence
-5068.5627
0.0107
0.0000
Parameter
Estimates
Gradient
Parameter 1
0.6500
0.6407
Parameter 2
0.0221
-3.6765
General Spatial Model Estimates
Dependent Variable =
voters
R-squared
=
0.6598
Rbar-squared
=
0.6594
sigma^2
=
0.0040
log-likelihood =
5068.5627
Nobs, Nvars
=
3107,
4
# iterations
=
6
***************************************************************
Variable
Coefficient
t-statistic
t-probability
const
1.193076
34.732852
0.000000
educ
0.180548
13.639337
0.000000
homeowners
0.267665
30.881364
0.000000
income
-0.107153
-8.596555
0.000000
rho
0.649976
39.916262
0.000000
lambda
0.022120
3.011273
0.002623
From the estimation results we see some evidence that a general spatial
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested