c# pdf to image pdfsharp : Convert pdf forms to fillable software SDK cloud windows wpf html class Some+Assembly+Required_The+Application+of+State+Open+Meeting+Laws+to+Email+Correspondence0-part742

2004] 
719 
SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED: THE APPLICATION OF 
STATE OPEN MEETING LAWS TO EMAIL 
CORRESPONDENCE 
John F. O’Connor and Michael J. Baratz
*
I
NTRODUCTION
One of the many outgrowths of the “good government” movement of 
the 1950s and 1960s was the proliferation of state Sunshine laws.
1
Every 
state in the Union has enacted Sunshine laws designed to make the inner 
workings of state and local government more accessible to the public at 
large.
2
State  Sunshine  laws generally  have  two  components.  First,  state 
Sunshine laws typically contain “open records” provisions that allow citi-
zens and the press to inspect and/or obtain copies of certain government 
records.
3
Second, state Sunshine laws contain “open meeting” provisions, 
which require state and/or local government bodies, subject to enumerated 
exceptions, to conduct their meetings in a manner open to the public.
4
This 
Article concerns the scope of the open meeting aspect of state Sunshine 
laws. 
John F. O’Connor, Partner, Steptoe & Johnson 
LLP
. B.A., University of Rochester; M.S.Sc., 
Syracuse University; J.D., University of Maryland School of Law. Michael J. Baratz, Associate, Step-
toe & Johnson 
LLP
. B.A., George Washington University; J.D., George Washington University School 
of Law. The authors were counsel of record for the petitioners in Beck v. Shelton, 593 S.E.2d 195 (Va. 
2004). The views expressed in this Article are those of the authors only, and are not necessarily the 
views of Steptoe & Johnson 
LLP
, its attorneys or clients. The authors would like to thank Howard H. 
Stahl of Steptoe & Johnson 
LLP
for his perceptive comments on the issues discussed in this Article. Mr. 
Stahl was lead counsel for the petitioners in Beck v. Shelton. The authors also would like to thank 
Mayor Bill Beck, Vice Mayor Scott Howson, Councilmember Matt Kelly, and Councilmember Tom 
Fortune, all of Fredericksburg, Virginia. All of these fine public servants were exemplary clients 
throughout the Beck v. Shelton litigation and made litigation of this case a rewarding experience for all 
of their lawyers.  
1
Teresa D. Pupillo, Note, The Changing Weather Forecast: Government in the Sunshine in the 
1990s—An Analysis of State Sunshine Laws, 71 W
ASH
. U. L.Q. 1165, 1167 (1993) (“However, state 
and local governing bodies were not required to open their doors under state open meeting statutes until 
the 1950s and 1960s.”). 
2 Id. (“Today all fifty states and the District of Columbia have open meeting statutes governing 
state and local legislative bodies.”). 
3
Daniel J. Solove, Access and Aggregation: Public Records, Privacy and the Constitution, 86 
M
INN
. L. R
EV
. 1137, 1161 (2002) (“Today, all fifty states have open records statutes, a majority of 
which are modeled after the [federal Freedom of Information Act].”). 
4
See infra Part II.A (discussing enactment and development of state open meeting statutes). 
Convert pdf forms to fillable - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
add fillable fields to pdf online; convert pdf file to fillable form online
Convert pdf forms to fillable - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
attach image to pdf form; auto fill pdf form from excel
720 
G
EO
. M
ASON 
L. R
EV
.
[V
OL
. 12:3 
Most open meeting statutes prohibit the members of local government 
bodies not just from conducting official meetings in secret, but also from 
conducting  informal,  out-of-session  “meetings”  as  well.  This  feature of 
open meeting statutes leaves public officials, and ultimately state attorneys 
general and the courts, with the sometimes difficult task of determining 
what types of informal communications among public officials constitute 
illegal  “meetings,”  and  which  types  of  communications  are  outside  the 
scope of an open meeting statute altogether. This task is further compli-
cated as the public’s typical modes of communication change over time. In 
essence, public officials, courts, and state attorneys general often are re-
quired to determine the legality of new and sophisticated methods of com-
munication under statutes that were enacted before the public had ready 
access to personal computers or even telephones with conference call ca-
pabilities.  
If a state statute prohibits informal “meetings” of a quorum of any 
public body, then the classic smoke-filled  room  where a  quorum of  the 
public body gathers to make the deals that later will be adopted at a prop-
erly-convened  open  meeting is  the  easy  case.  The  issue becomes  a  bit 
murkier, however, when public officials communicate in other ways that 
may or may not be contrary to the literal terms of a state open meeting 
statute. For example, courts have grappled with whether communications 
that would constitute a meeting if conducted in person lose their character 
as  a  meeting  when conducted by  telephone  conference  call.
5
Similarly, 
enterprising public officials have at times sought to evade the strictures of 
a state open meeting statute by engaging in a pre-planned series of one-on-
one conversations, and courts have had to determine whether such an eva-
sion is permissible under state law.
6
This Article considers whether the exchange of emails
7
among public 
officials can—or should—constitute an illegal “meeting” under state open 
meeting statutes. The manner of resolving this question also may shed light 
on whether other types of electronic communication—such as chat rooms 
or instant messaging—run afoul of state open meeting statutes. These are 
just some of the challenges courts face in applying statutes written thirty 
years ago to methods of communication that were not even conceived of at 
5 See infra Part II.B.2. 
6
See infra Part II.B.1. 
7
One commentator has defined emails in the following manner: 
E-mail is a service that two or more parties use to transmit words converted into digital form 
between two or more computer terminals through a service provider where the message is 
maintained in electronic storage until accessed by the recipient. E-mail is easy to use and 
time-saving, and, with a mouse-click, detailed messages can be sent to many parties simul-
taneously. 
James G. Colvin, II, E-Mail, Open Meetings, and Public Records, C
OLO
. L
AW
., Oct. 1996, at 99, 100. 
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded fonts. Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable
convert html form to pdf fillable form; convert an existing form into a fillable pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Convert OpenOffice Spreadsheet data to PDF. Export PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation. Turn ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
create a fillable pdf form in word; attach file to pdf form
2004] 
A
PPLYING 
S
TATE 
O
PEN 
M
EETING 
L
AWS 
T
E
MAIL 
C
ORRESPONDENCE
721 
that time.
8
Public officials face this same challenge in attempting to deter-
mine just what they can and cannot do in communicating with other mem-
bers of the public body to which they belong.  
On March 5, 2004, the Supreme Court of Virginia clarified some of 
these issues, at least under Virginia’s Freedom of Information Act,
9
when 
the court issued its landmark opinion in Beck v. Shelton.
10
In Beck, the Vir-
ginia  Supreme  Court  became  the  first  state  supreme  court  to  decide 
whether  the exchange of email  correspondence by members of a public 
body can constitute an illegal closed “meeting” under a state open meeting 
statute.  The  Beck  court held  that the exchange of  ordinary  email  corre-
spondence by  members of a public body  could not constitute an illegal 
meeting for purposes of Virginia’s FOIA statute.
11
Because the concept of 
a “meeting” connotes an assemblage or gathering of the members of the 
public body, the court held that the exchange of ordinary email correspon-
dence, which does not involve simultaneous deliberation or discussion of 
any kind, was no more a “meeting” than is the exchange of letters through 
the mails.
12
As the first state high court to resolve this issue, the Virginia 
Supreme Court’s reasoning in Beck v. Shelton may have significant impli-
cations for the manner in which open meeting statutes are construed under 
similar statutes across the country. 
Part I of this Article provides some background into the development 
of state open meeting statutes. These provisions generally prohibit closed 
“meetings” of local government bodies in the absence of a statutory excep-
tion that permits a particular subject to be discussed in executive session. 
Of course, a requirement of open “meetings” raises the issue of whether 
particular interaction among public officials constitutes a “meeting” in the 
first instance, and Part II will discuss some of the ways in which courts 
have approached this question under a variety of factual scenarios. 
Part III of this Article analyzes the Virginia Supreme Court’s decision 
in Beck v. Shelton, in which the court held that the exchange of ordinary 
email correspondence among members of a public body is not tantamount 
8 See Jessica M. Natale, Exploring Virtual Legal Presence: The Present and the Promise, 1 J. 
H
IGH 
T
ECH
. L. 157, 159 (2002) (“The major problem with virtual presence conforming to preexisting 
open-meeting laws, is the interpretation of what it means to be present for these meetings.”); Brian J. 
Caveney, Comment, More Sunshine in the Mountain State: The 1999 Amendments to the West Virginia 
Open Governmental Proceedings Act and Open Hospital Proceedings Act, 102 W. V
A
. L. R
EV
. 131, 
174 (1999) (noting that West Virginia’s open meeting statute “does not address electronic mail com-
munications to discuss ‘public business’ between members of a governing body”). 
9
Virginia Freedom of Information Act, V
A
. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 2.2-3700 to 3714 (Michie 2001 & 
Supp. 2004). 
10  593 S.E.2d 195 (Va. 2004). 
11
Id. at 200. 
12
Id. at 199. 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. including ASP.NET web services and Windows Forms application. After creating a PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF
create a pdf form to fill out; convert word document to fillable pdf form
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
provide best ways to create PDF forms and delete PDF forms in C#.NET framework project. A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in
convert pdf to fillable pdf form; pdf form fill
722 
G
EO
. M
ASON 
L. R
EV
.
[V
OL
. 12:3 
to holding an illegal, informal “meeting” under Virginia’s FOIA statute.
13
In the authors’ estimation, the Virginia Supreme Court got it exactly right 
in Beck. An ordinary email is nothing more than a piece of written corre-
spondence transmitted through an efficient and inexpensive means. More-
over, email correspondence is like letters—and unlike face-to-face meet-
ings and telephone conference calls—in that the transmission of an email 
creates a perfect public record as to the substance of the communications, 
one that generally must be retained and made available to the public under 
state open records statutes.
14
Therefore, the public’s interest in overseeing 
the workings of local government is protected in the same way that it is for 
all  other types  of  written correspondence—the  public  may  review  such 
correspondence by making a records request under the open records provi-
sions of state law. 
Beyond being correct as a matter of statutory construction, the authors 
believe that permitting the exchange of email correspondence among pub-
lic officials makes sense from a public policy standpoint, and Part IV of 
this Article explains the basis for this conclusion. There is an inherent ten-
sion between open government on one hand, and government efficiency on 
the  other.  Government can become exceedingly  efficient when not bur-
dened by the requirements of state sunshine laws, but such efficiency can 
be both undemocratic and contrary to the public’s interest. At  the  other 
extreme, notions of  open government  for the sake  of open government, 
while sounding  nice  in  the abstract, can  easily  create paralysis in local 
government, with public officials unable to coordinate with each other in a 
way that promotes, not retards, the public’s interest in good government.
15
It makes little sense from a policy standpoint for a state’s open meeting 
statute to  prohibit communications—such as  emails—that are subject to 
disclosure under state  open records  laws. Prohibiting  email communica-
tions under the auspices of an open meeting statute would hinder the effi-
ciency of local government solely in the interest of creating public access 
to  communications  to  which  the  public  already  has  a  right  of  access 
through state open records statutes. The public interest in open government 
13
Id. at 200. 
14
Id. at 199 (“There is no question that e-mails fall within the definition of public records . . . .”); 
see also Op. Ark. Att’y Gen. No. 99-018, 1999 WL 182169, at *2 (Mar. 22, 1999) (“The electronically 
stored e-mail message would be a ‘public record’ subject to disclosure . . . .”); Op. Md. Att’y Gen. No. 
96-016, 1996 WL 305985, at *3 (May 22, 1996) (“An e-mail message surely falls within this definition 
[of ‘public record’].”); Op. N.D. Att’y Gen. No. 98-O-05, 1998 WL 1057738, at *4 n.8 (Mar. 3, 1998) 
(“[E]-mail messages or letters between Board members are records subject to the open records and 
records retention laws . . . .”). 
15  See Moberg v. Indep. Sch. Dist. No. 281, 336 N.W.2d 510, 517 (Minn. 1983) (“There is a 
point beyond which open discussion requirements may serve to immobilize a body and prevent the 
resolution of important problems.”). 
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Batch create adobe PDF document from multiple forms in VB Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word Create and save editable PDF with a blank page
converting a word document to pdf fillable form; convert pdf fillable form to word
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF Since RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK is based on .NET framework ASP.NET web service and Windows Forms for any
convert word form to fillable pdf; add attachment to pdf form
2004] 
A
PPLYING 
S
TATE 
O
PEN 
M
EETING 
L
AWS 
T
E
MAIL 
C
ORRESPONDENCE
723 
is best served by encouraging the interaction and coordination of public 
officials in a manner that allows for efficient governance yet produces a 
record to which the public has a right of access. 
I.  T
HE 
D
EVELOPMENT AND 
S
TRUCTURE OF 
S
TATE 
O
PEN 
M
EETING 
L
AWS
A.  The Enactment of Open Meeting Statutes by the States 
At common law,  the  public  had no right  to attend the  meetings  of 
government bodies.
16
In seventeenth and eighteenth century England, pub-
lication of parliamentary debates was a punishable offense.
17
In the United 
States, our Constitution was crafted in large part through secret meetings of 
the Constitutional Convention,
18
and congressional committees historically 
conducted much of their business in closed session.
19
Indeed, as recently as 
1950,  Alabama  was  the  only  state  with an  open meeting statute  on  its 
books.
20
Over the next decade, however, due in large part to lobbying from 
16
City of Miami Beach v. Berns, 245 So. 2d 38, 40 (Fla. 1971) (“We do not overlook the argu-
ments that the right to attend meetings of government bodies did not exist at common law . . . . ); State 
ex rel. Stephan v. Bd. of County Comm’rs, 866 P.2d 1024, 1025 (Kan. 1994) (“Preliminarily, we note 
there is no common-law right of the public or press to attend meetings of governmental bodies, and any 
such right is created by statute and is governed by the statutory language employed.”); Beacon Journal 
Publ’g. Co. v. City of Akron, 209 N.E.2d 399, 404 (Ohio 1965) (“It is clear that the public has no 
common-law right to attend meetings of governmental bodies.”) (citation omitted); Roanoke City Sch. 
Bd. v. Times-World Corp., 307 S.E.2d 256, 258 (Va. 1983) (“[T]here is no common-law right of the 
public or press to attend the meetings of governmental bodies.”); Note, Open Meeting Statutes: The 
Press Fights for the “Right to Know,” 75 H
ARV
. L. R
EV
. 1199, 1203 (1962) [hereinafter Open Meeting 
Statutes] (“It is clear that the public has no common law right to attend meetings of government bod-
ies.”); David A. Barrett,  Note, Facilitating Government Decision Making: Distinguishing Between 
Meetings and Nonmeetings Under the Federal Sunshine Act, 66 T
EX
. L. R
EV
. 1195, 1197 (1988) (“Nei-
ther the Constitution nor the common law, however, grants the public a right of access to the delibera-
tive processes of government.” (footnotes omitted)). 
17
Open Meeting Statutes, supra note 16, at 1203. 
18  Id. at 1202 (“[T]he delegates to the Constitutional Convention, for example, felt constrained to 
work in secrecy.”); see also Cass R. Sunstein, Government Control of Information, 74 C
AL
. L. R
EV
889, 889 (1986) (“The practice of withholding information when important public policies so require is 
nothing new; the Constitution’s framers themselves kept their deliberations secret.”); Pupillo, supra 
note 1, at 1166-67 (“Although the Founding Fathers recognized the importance of public participation 
in the democratic process, they closed the Constitutional Convention to the public.” (footnote omit-
ted)). 
19
Open Meeting Statutes, supra note 16, at 1203 (noting that, as of 1962, approximately one-
third of congressional committee meetings were closed to the public). 
20  Note, Government in the Sunshine Act: Opening Federal Agency Meetings, 26 A
M
. U. L. R
EV
154, 154 n.3 (1976) [hereinafter Government in the Sunshine Act]; Open Meeting Statutes, supra note 
16, at 1199-1200 & n.7. 
724 
G
EO
. M
ASON 
L. R
EV
.
[V
OL
. 12:3 
press  organizations and civic groups,
21
a number of states enacted open 
meeting statutes, to the point where twenty-six states had such statutes in 
effect by 1962.
22
By 1976, when New York enacted its open meeting stat-
ute, all fifty states and the District of Columbia had statutes in effect which 
prohibited most categories of closed meetings by state and local govern-
ment bodies.
23
The structure of most state open meeting statutes is relatively simple. 
The  statutes  generally  identify  the  types of government  bodies  that  are 
subject to the statute
24
and then provide that such public bodies must con-
duct their meetings in open session
25
unless the subject matter of the meet-
21 James Bowen, Behind Closed Doors: Re-examining the Tennessee Open Meetings Act and Its 
Inapplicability to the Tennessee General Assembly, 35 C
OLUM
. J. L. & S
OC
. P
ROBS
. 133, 140-41 
(2002) (noting the role played by the Tennessee media in lobbying for enactment of Tennessee’s Open 
Meetings Act and the role the press played nationally in the open meetings movement); Rick L. Dun-
can, No More Secrets: How Recent Legislative Changes Will Allow the Public Greater Access to In-
formation, 1 T
EX
. T
ECH 
J. T
EX
. A
DMIN
. L. 115, 118 (2000) (noting that open meeting legislation “was 
spurred by media organizations who had become disgruntled by the frequency at which public officials 
were denying admittance to meetings of government bodies”); John J. Watkins, Open Meetings Under 
the Arkansas Freedom of Information Act, 38 A
RK
. L. R
EV
. 268, 272-73 (1984) (“Various journalism 
organizations—notably the American Society of Newspaper Editors and Sigma Delta Chi, the national 
journalism fraternity—[by 1950] began to press for open meetings legislation at the state and federal 
levels.”); Open Meeting Statutes, supra note 16, at 1199 (noting the role of the Freedom of Information 
Committee of the American Society of Newspaper Editors and other civic groups in campaigning for 
enactment of state open meeting laws). 
22
Open Meeting Statutes, supra note 16, at 1199-1200 (“Twenty-six states [as of 1962] have 
open meeting statutes applicable to state and local governmental bodies; ten years ago only one of these 
laws existed in its present form.” (footnote omitted)). 
23
See Government in the Sunshine Act, supra note 20, at 154 n.3 (noting that, as of 1976, the 
District of Columbia and all states except for New York had an open meetings statute in effect); Timo-
thy P. Whelan, New York’s Open Meetings Law: Revision of the Political Caucus Exemption and Its 
Implications for Local Government, 60 B
ROOK
. L. R
EV
. 1483, 1483 (1995) (discussing New York’s 
enactment of its Open Meetings Law in 1976). 
24
For example, Virginia’s open meeting statute defines a “public body” subject to the statute’s 
open meeting provisions as follows: 
“Public body” means any legislative body, authority, board, bureau, commission, district or 
agency of the Commonwealth or of any political subdivision of the Commonwealth, includ-
ing cities, towns and counties, municipal councils, governing bodies of counties, school 
boards and planning commissions; boards of visitors of public institutions of higher educa-
tion; and other organizations, corporations or agencies in the Commonwealth supported 
wholly or principally by public funds. It shall include . . . any committee, subcommittee, or 
other entity however designated, of the public body created to perform delegated functions 
of the public body or to advise the public body. It shall not exclude any such committee, 
subcommittee or entity because it has private sector or citizen members. Corporations or-
ganized by the Virginia Retirement System are “public bodies” for purposes of this chapter. 
V
A
. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 2.2-3701 (Michie Supp. 2004). 
25
See, e.g., G
A
. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 50-14-1(b) (2004) (“Except as otherwise provided by law, all 
meetings as defined in subsection (a) of this Code section shall be open to the public.”); 5 I
LL
. C
OMP
S
TAT
. A
NN
. 120/2(a) (West Supp. 2004) (“All meetings of public bodies shall be open to the public 
unless excepted in subsection (c) and closed in accordance with Section 2a.”); M
D
. C
ODE 
A
NN
., S
TATE 
2004] 
A
PPLYING 
S
TATE 
O
PEN 
M
EETING 
L
AWS 
T
E
MAIL 
C
ORRESPONDENCE
725 
ing falls within an enumerated statutory exception.
26
Of course, providing 
by statute that meetings of public bodies shall be open to the public begs 
the question of what exactly constitutes a “meeting.”  
As a general matter, states have dealt with defining the scope of the 
term “meeting” in three ways that are relevant to this Article. First, and by 
far the  most common  approach, state legislatures have enacted statutory 
definitions of the term “meeting” that include not only official sessions of a 
public body, but also situations where some defined portion of a public 
body is informally “gathered,” “assembled,” or “convened” together.
27
For 
example, Virginia’s FOIA statute defines the term “meetings” as follows: 
G
OV
T
§ 10-505 (1999) (“Except as otherwise expressly provided in this subtitle, a public body shall 
meet in open session.”); N.Y. P
UBLIC 
O
FFICERS 
L
AW
§ 103(a) (McKinney 2001) (“Every meeting of a 
public body shall be open to the general public, except that an executive session of such body may be 
called and business transacted thereat in accordance with section ninety-five of this article.”); 65 P
A
C
ONS
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 704 (West 2000) (“Official action and deliberations by a quorum of the members 
of an agency shall take place at a meeting open to the public unless closed under section 707 (relating 
to exceptions to open meetings), 708 (relating to executive sessions) or 712 (relating to General As-
sembly meetings covered).”); V
A
. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 2.2-3707(A) (Michie Supp. 2004) (“All meetings of 
public bodies shall be open, except as provided in § 2.2-3711.”). 
26  For example, Virginia’s FOIA statute requires public bodies to conduct their meetings in open 
session unless one of 33 statutory exemptions apply. V
A
. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 2.2-3711 (Michie Supp. 2004) 
(authorizing closed meetings when any of 29 statutory exemptions applies). 
27  See A
LASKA 
S
TAT
. § 44.62.310(h)(2) (Michie 2002) (defining meeting as a “gathering” of 
three or more members of a governmental body, or a majority if less than three); A
RIZ
. R
EV
. S
TAT
A
NN
. § 38-431 (West 2001) (“gathering” of a quorum of a public body); D
EL
. C
ODE 
A
NN
. tit. 29, § 
10002(b) (2003) (“the formal or informal gathering of a quorum of the members of any public body”); 
G
A
. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 50-14-1(a)(2) (1998) (“the gathering of a quorum of the members of the governing 
body of an agency”); H
AW
. R
EV
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 92-2(3) (Michie 2003) (“the convening of a board for 
which a quorum is required in order to make a decision or to deliberate toward a decision”); I
DAHO 
C
ODE
§ 67-2341(6) (Michie 2001) (“the convening of a governing body of a public agency to make a 
decision or to deliberate toward a decision on any matter”); 5 I
LL
. C
OMP
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. 120/1.02 (West 
Supp. 2004) (“any gathering of a majority of a quorum of the members of a public body”); I
ND
. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 5-14-1.5-2(c) (Michie Supp. 2001) (“a gathering of a majority of the governing body of a 
public agency”); I
OWA 
C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 21.2(2) (West 2001) (“a gathering in person or by electronic 
means, formal or informal, of a majority of the members of a governmental body”); K
AN
. S
TAT
. A
NN
§ 75-4317a
(1997) (“any gathering, assembly, telephone call or any other means of interactive commu-
nication” with the necessary quorum to discuss official business); K
Y
. R
EV
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 61.805(1) 
(Michie Supp. 2003) (“informational or casual gatherings held in anticipation of or in conjunction with 
a regular or special meeting”); L
A
. R
EV
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 42:4.2 (West 1990) (“the convening of a quo-
rum of a public body”); M
D
. C
ODE 
A
NN
., S
TATE 
G
OV
T
§ 10-502(g) (1999) (“to convene a quorum of a 
public body”); M
ASS
. G
EN
. L
AWS
, ch. 39 § 23A (West 1999) (“any corporal convening and delibera-
tion  of  a  governmental  body  for  which  a  quorum  is  required”);  M
ICH
 C
OMP
 L
AWS 
A
NN
 § 
15.2626(2)(a)
(West Supp. 2004) (“convening of a public body at which a quorum is present”); M
ISS
C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 25-41-3(b) (Supp. 2003)
(“an assemblage of members of a public body” or “any such 
assemblage through the use of video or teleconference devices”); M
ONT
. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 2-3-202 (2003)
(“convening of a quorum of the constituent membership” of a public body “whether corporal or by 
726 
G
EO
. M
ASON 
L. R
EV
.
[V
OL
. 12:3 
“Meeting” or “meetings” means the meetings including work sessions, when sitting physi-
cally, or through telephonic or video equipment pursuant to § 2.2-3708, as a body or entity, 
or as an informal assemblage of (i) as many as three members or (ii) a quorum, if less than 
three, of the constituent membership . . . of any public body.
28
The use of qualifying words such as “gathering” or “assemblage” is 
significant  because  this  language  suggests  that  not  all  communications 
among public officials would constitute a meeting under the statute. Tak-
ing perhaps the easiest example, a letter sent through the mails by one pub-
lic official to other members of the same public body would not seem to 
involve  a  “gathering”  or  “assemblage”  of  the  members,  and  therefore 
means of electronic equipment”); N
EV
. R
EV
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 241.015(2) (Michie Supp.
2003) (“gather-
ing of members of a public body at which a quorum is present to deliberate toward a decision”); N.H. 
R
EV
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 91-A:2 (2004) (“convening of a quorum of the membership of a public body”); N.J. 
S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 10:4-8(b) (West 2002) (“any gathering whether corporeal or by means of communication 
equipment, which is attended by, or open to, all of the members of a public body”); N.M. S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 
10-15-2(c) (Michie 2003) (“a gathering of the members called by the presiding officer,” including a 
meeting of a quorum of members of any public body); N.Y. P
UBLIC 
O
FFICERS 
L
AW
§ 102(1) (McKin-
ney 2001) (“the official convening of a public body”); 65 P
A
. C
ONS
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 703 (West 2000) 
(“[a]ny prearranged gathering of an agency which is attended or participated in by a quorum of the 
members”); N.C. G
EN
. S
TAT
. § 143-318.10(d)
(2003) (defining meeting as a “meeting, assembly, or 
gathering together at any time or place, or the simultaneous communication by conference telephone or 
other electronic means of a majority of a public body to conduct public business”); N.D. C
ENT
. C
ODE 
§ 
44-04-17.1(8) (2001) (“a formal or informal gathering, whether in person or through other means such 
as telephone or video conference” of a quorum of the members of the governing body); O
KLA
. S
TAT
A
NN
. tit. 25, § 304 (West Supp. 2004) (“conduct of business of a public body by a majority of its 
members being personally together” or as authorized by teleconference); O
R
. R
EV
. S
TAT
. § 192.610(5) 
(1999) (“convening of a governing body of a public body for which a quorum is required in order to 
make a decision or to deliberate toward a decision on any matter”); R.I. G
EN
. L
AWS 
§ 42-46-2(a) 
(Supp. 2003) (meeting means the convening of a public body and shall expressly include so-called 
workshops, working, or work sessions); S.C. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 30-4-20(d) (Law. Co-op. 1991) (a means of 
convening a quorum of members of a public body, whether in person or by means of electronic equip-
ment); T
ENN
. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 8-44-102(b)(2) (2002) (“the convening of a governing body of a public 
body for which a quorum is required in order to make a decision or to deliberate toward a decision on 
any matter”); T
EX
. G
OV
C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 551.001(4)(A) (Vernon Supp. 2004) (“a deliberation between 
a quorum of a governmental body”); U
TAH 
C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 52-4-2(2)(a) (2002) (“convening of a public 
body, with a quorum present, whether in person or by means of electronic equipment”); V
T
. S
TAT
A
NN
. tit. 1, § 310(2) (2003) (“a gathering of a quorum of the members of a public body”); W. V
A
C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 6-9A-2(4) (Michie 2003) (“the convening of a governing body of a public agency for 
which a quorum is required in order to make a decision or to deliberate toward a decision on any matter 
which results in an official action”); W
IS
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 19.82 (West Supp. 2002) (a meeting is rebut-
tably presumed when one-half or more of the members of a governmental body are present); W
YO
S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 16-4-402(a)(iii)
(Michie 2003) (“an assembly of at least a quorum of the governing 
body”). 
28
V
A
. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 2.2-3701 (Michie Supp. 2004). 
2004] 
A
PPLYING 
S
TATE 
O
PEN 
M
EETING 
L
AWS 
T
E
MAIL 
C
ORRESPONDENCE
727 
would not appear to constitute a “meeting” under statutory definitions in-
corporating these concepts.
29
By contrast, some state legislatures have enacted open meeting stat-
utes that explicitly sweep within their scope informal contact among mem-
bers of a public body even when such members are not “gathered,” “as-
sembled,” or “convened” together. For example, the Connecticut Freedom 
of Information Act defines the term “meeting” as follows: 
“Meeting” means any hearing or other proceeding of a public agency, any convening or as-
sembly of a quorum of a multimember public agency, and any communication by or to a 
quorum of a multimember public agency, whether in person or by means of electronic 
equipment, to discuss or act upon a matter over which the public agency has supervision, 
control, jurisdiction or advisory power . . . .
30
Under this statute, it would not be a defense to a claim of illegal con-
duct to admit communicating to a quorum of a public body but to deny that 
29
See Moberg v. Indep. Sch. Dist. No. 281, 336 N.W.2d 510, 518 (Minn. 1983) (noting that 
Minnesota’s open meeting statutes “[do] not apply to letters, or to telephone conversations between 
fewer than a quorum”); Beck v. Shelton, 593 S.E.2d 193, 198-99 (Va. 2004) (noting that Virginia’s 
open meeting statute did not regulate the exchange of letters by public officials). 
30  C
ONN
. G
EN
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 1-200(2) (West Supp. 2004) (emphasis added). Similarly, some 
state statutes have a provision separate and apart from the definition of the term “meeting” that ex-
pressly provides that email communications are subject to open meeting requirements. See, e.g., C
AL
G
OV
C
ODE
§ 54952.2 (West Supp. 2004) (“[A]ny use of direct communication, personal intermediar-
ies, or technological devices that is employed by a majority of the members of the legislative body to 
develop a collective concurrence as to action to be taken on an item by the members of the legislative 
body is prohibited.”); C
OLO
. R
EV
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 24-6-402(2)(d)(III) (West Supp. 2003) (“If elected 
officials use electronic mail to discuss pending legislation or other public business among themselves, 
the electronic mail shall be subject to the requirements of this section. Electronic mail communication 
among elected officials that does not relate to pending legislation or other public business shall not be 
considered a ‘meeting’ within the meaning of this section.”). The Kansas Open Meetings Act includes 
within the definition of meetings any “means of interactive communication.” K
AN
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 75-
4317a (1997) (“As used in this act, ‘meeting’ means any gathering, assembly, telephone call or any 
other means of interactive communication by a majority of a quorum of the membership of a body or 
agency subject to this act for the purpose of discussing the business or affairs of the body or agency.”). 
However, the Kansas Attorney General has opined that this phrase includes emails only to the extent 
that there is simultaneous discussion by public officials via email. Op. Kan. Att’y Gen. No. 95-13, 1995 
WL 40761, at *3 (Jan. 23, 1995). Other states statutorily define meeting in terms of a discussion of its 
members without requiring an element of simultaneity. See, e.g., M
O
. A
NN
. S
TAT
. § 610.010(5) (West 
2000) (A “public meeting” is any meeting of a public body “at which any public business is discussed, 
decided, or public policy formulated, whether corporeal or by means of communication equipment.” 
While informal gatherings for social or ministerial purposes are excluded, the term meeting does in-
clude “a public vote of all or a majority of the members of a public governmental body, by electronic 
communication or any other means, conducted in lieu of holding a public meeting with the members of 
the public governmental body gathered at one location in order to conduct public business.”); O
HIO 
R
EV
. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 121.22(B)(2) (Anderson Supp. 2003)
(“any prearranged discussion of the public 
business of the public body by a majority of its members”).  
728 
G
EO
. M
ASON 
L. R
EV
.
[V
OL
. 12:3 
the communication occurred while the members were gathered together, as 
the statute unambiguously prohibits any and all methods of communicating 
to a quorum. 
The third way in which state open meeting statutes deal with the con-
cept of “meeting” is essentially not to deal with the issue at all.
31
Some 
open meeting statutes—such as the Alabama Sunshine Law—do not define 
the term “meeting.”
32
Other state statutes—such as the Arkansas Freedom 
of  Information  Act—use a  circular definition  that  defines  “meeting”  to 
include the “meetings” of a statutorily-defined number of the members of a 
public body, which essentially defines a “meeting” as a “meeting.”
33
B.  Prior Controversies Over Which Modes of Communication Constitute 
a “Meeting” 
When states began enacting open meeting statutes in earnest in the 
1950s and 1960s, there was little expectation that controversies would arise 
over  whether  a  communication  constituted  a  meeting.  This  is  probably 
31
One state, Maine, does not even treat informal communications among members of a public 
body as constituting meetings under its open meeting statute. See M
E
. R
EV
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. tit. 1, § 402 
(West Supp. 2003) (defining “public proceedings” subject to open meeting provisions as “the transac-
tions of any functions affecting any or all citizens of the State” by public bodies); see also Marxsen v. 
Bd. of Dir., M.S.A.D. No. 5, 591 A.2d 867, 870 (Me. 1991) (noting that “informal discussions among 
[school] board members are not unlawful” so long as official action is taken only at a public proceed-
ing). Because this Article addresses whether the exchange of email communications violates open 
meeting statutes’ prohibition on informal meetings, and Maine’s statute does not prohibit informal 
meetings under any circumstance, the scope of Maine’s open meeting statute is irrelevant for purposes 
of this Article. Another state, South Dakota, does not define the term meeting; however, the state attor-
ney general has opined that a meeting occurs when a majority or quorum of the body is present and 
official business within the jurisdiction of the board, commission, or agency is discussed. See O
P
. S.D. 
A
TT
G
EN
. No. 89-08, 1989 WL 505659 (Apr. 3, 1989). 
32  A
LA
. C
ODE
§ 13A-14-2 (1975) (prohibiting closed meetings without defining the term “meet-
ing”); see also D.C. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 1-207.42(a) (2001) (requiring meetings to be conducted in open 
session without defining “meeting”); M
INN
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 13D.01 (West Supp. 2004) (Moberg v. 
Indep. Sch. Dist. No. 281, 336 N.W.2d 510, 516 (Minn. 1983) (noting that the Minnesota legislature 
did not define the term “meeting” in its open meeting statute)); N
EB
. R
EV
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 84-1409(2) 
(Michie 2003)
(“[
M
]eeting shall mean all regular, special, or called meetings, formal or informal, of any 
public body for the purposes of briefing, discussion of public business, formation of tentative policy, or 
the taking of any action of the public body.”). 
33
A
RK
. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 25-19-103 (Michie Supp. 2003) (“‘Public meetings’ means the meetings of 
any bureau, commission, or agency of the state, or any political subdivision of the state . . . supported 
wholly or in part by public funds or expending public funds . . . .”). The Arkansas statute requires in 
another section that “all meetings, formal or informal” be conducted in open session, which leads to the 
circular result that a prohibited informal meeting is a contact that qualifies as a meeting. Id. § 25-19-
106. Similarly, Washington state’s definition of a meeting is: “‘Meeting’ means meetings at which 
action is taken.” See W
ASH
. R
EV
. C
ODE 
§ 42.30.020(4) (2004).  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested