c# pdf to image pdfsharp : Create pdf fillable form control Library platform web page asp.net html web browser Some+Assembly+Required_The+Application+of+State+Open+Meeting+Laws+to+Email+Correspondence1-part743

2004] 
A
PPLYING 
S
TATE 
O
PEN 
M
EETING 
L
AWS 
T
E
MAIL 
C
ORRESPONDENCE
729 
because  the  predominant  methods  of  communicating  in  the  1950s  and 
1960s were easily categorized as meetings or non-meetings and the other 
relevant aspects of a statute’s definition of meeting, such as the number of 
participants required, were easily applied. Indeed, the leading law review 
article published on the subject of open meeting statutes during this time 
period—a 1962 note in the Harvard Law Review—foresaw only four sig-
nificant aspects of open meeting statutes that were likely to be subjects of 
dispute:  (1)  identification  of  government  bodies  to  which  the  statutes 
would apply;
34
(2) establishment of provisions for providing notice of pub-
lic meetings;
35
(3) determination of when the statutes would permit closed 
executive sessions;
36
and (4) development of a means for enforcing viola-
tions of the statutes.
37
Notably absent from that list is the determination of 
whether a particular contact among members of a public body would fall 
within a statute’s definition of the term “meeting.” 
However, technological advances, changes in popular societal modes 
of  communication,  and  the  mischievous  tendencies  of  the  human mind 
soon  created  a  number  of  controversies  concerning  whether  particular 
communications qualified as “meetings” under the various state statutes, 
two of which merit mention here. First, in what often was an obvious effort 
to evade the strictures of state open meeting statutes, public officials some-
times had preplanned serial conversations among themselves for the pur-
pose  of  discussing  public  business,  and  courts  were  left  to  consider 
whether state open meeting statutes could be construed to prohibit commu-
nications that appeared outside the statutes’ literal definition of “meeting.” 
Second, courts were called upon to decide whether a statutory prohibition 
on informal “meetings” applied to communications that were not face-to-
face, such as telephonic conference calls. Consideration of the manner in 
which courts have approached these issues is instructive in considering the 
proper approach for considering the legality of email communications.  
1.  Serial Communications. 
As discussed above, most states’ open meeting statutes provide that a 
meeting of members of a public body does not occur unless the number of 
participants surpasses a defined threshold, whether it be a majority of the 
members, a quorum, a majority of a quorum, or a statutorily-set number of 
34
Open Meeting Statutes, supra note 16, at 1205-07. 
35  Id. at 1207-08. 
36
Id. at 1208-11. 
37
Id. at 1211-16. 
Create pdf fillable form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
adding a signature to a pdf form; create fill pdf form
Create pdf fillable form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
auto fill pdf form fields; add signature field to pdf
730 
G
EO
. M
ASON 
L. R
EV
.
[V
OL
. 12:3 
the members.
38
This numerosity requirement gives rise to the question of 
whether the members of a public body can avoid a state’s open meeting 
requirement by discussing public business in multiple sub-groups. For ex-
ample, if a statute provided that an assemblage of three members of a pub-
lic body constituted a “meeting,”
39
the chairman of a public body might 
shuttle back and forth among multiple members of the public body for the 
purpose of engaging in a group discussion without ever having three mem-
bers talking to each other at the same time. This creates the classic, and 
difficult, question of whether an open meeting statute should be construed 
by the courts to prohibit conduct that does not fall within the literal prohi-
bitions of the statute. Not surprisingly, courts have approached this issue in 
a myriad of ways. 
Some courts have more or less ignored the literal language of an open 
meeting statute in order to find a violation. For example, in Blackford v. 
School Board of Orange County,
40
a county school board was faced with 
“a  major  redistricting  problem”  and sought  to  avoid  public  uproar  over 
each and  every  possible redistricting alternative that might be discussed 
during the  decision-making  process.
41
However,  Florida’s open meeting 
statute required that “[a]ll meetings of any board . . . at which official acts 
are to be taken are declared to be public meetings open to the public at all 
times.”
42
In an attempt to comply with Florida’s open meeting statute while 
at the same time develop consensus on an open meeting plan with a mini-
mum  of  public  uproar,  the  board  devised  a  plan  by  which  the  county 
schools superintendent conducted one-on-one meetings in “rapid-fire suc-
cession” with each school board member to discuss redistricting options.
43
In devising this plan, the board relied on prior Florida case law providing 
that conversations between a school board member and a member of the 
school  board  staff—such  as  the  superintendent—did  not  constitute  a 
“meeting” of the board.
44
Based on this case law, the board members be-
lieved that no prohibited “meeting” could occur because there would never 
be even two members of the school board having a conversation with each 
other on the subject of redistricting.
45
38
See supra notes 27-33 and accompanying text. 
39  See, e.g., V
A
. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 2.2-3701 (Michie Supp. 2004) (providing, for most public bodies, 
that an informal assemblage of three or more members constitutes a meeting for purposes of Virginia’s 
open meetings statute). 
40  375 So. 2d 578 (Fla. Dist. Ct. App. 1979). 
41
Id. at 579. 
42
Id. 
43  Id. at 580. 
44
Id. at 579-80. 
45
Id. 
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
.net fill pdf form; convert pdf to fillable form online
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable
create a fillable pdf form; best pdf form filler
2004] 
A
PPLYING 
S
TATE 
O
PEN 
M
EETING 
L
AWS 
T
E
MAIL 
C
ORRESPONDENCE
731 
The Florida District Court of Appeal disagreed. Because the board’s 
clear intent was to develop a group consensus through preplanned commu-
nications with the school superintendent, the court held that the series of 
one-on-one discussions in effect involved communications by board mem-
bers with each other, albeit through a prearranged intermediary, in viola-
tion of Florida’s open meeting statute: 
While we agree that one swallow a summer cannot make, we are convinced that the sched-
uling of six sessions of secret discussions, repetitive in content, in rapid fire seriatim and of 
such obvious official portent, resulted in six de facto meetings by two or more members of 
the board at which official action was taken. As a consequence, the discussions were in con-
travention of the Sunshine Law. Further, the frank admission as to the reason for this modus 
operandi leads us to conclude that in effect “the (board) met in secret (and) used staff mem-
bers as intermediaries in order to circumvent public meeting requirements.”46  
The Michigan Supreme Court used essentially the same analysis in 
dealing with efforts by the University of Michigan Board of Regents to 
narrow the pool of potential candidates for university president in a non-
public  manner.
47
In  Booth  Newspapers,  Inc.  v.  University  of  Michigan 
Board of Regents, the university regents sought to avoid the requirements 
of Michigan’s open meeting statute by authorizing a single regent to re-
duce the pool of potential candidates for university president “after numer-
ous telephone calls and meetings with the advisory committees and infor-
mal subquorum groups of regents.”
48
It was undisputed that this procedure 
was placed in effect in large part in order to avoid having to conduct these 
sensitive deliberations in an open meeting. As stated by the court: 
The acknowledged purpose of the telephone calls and the subquorum meetings was to 
achieve the same intercommunication that could have been achieved in a full board meeting. 
During this process, the board avoided quorum meetings because it would have been re-
quired to conduct a public meeting under the OMA. In fact, Regent Roach told an Ann Ar-
bor News reporter on November 15, 1987, that if it had not been for the OMA and the desire 
not to discuss these matters in public, “we would [have been] able to sit down with all the 
regents present, discuss the problems and talk about all the candidates at a much earlier 
point. [Instead], it [took] three or four hours to go around the horn on the telephones and 
find out what everybody is thinking.”
49
Armed with this candid, if ill-conceived, admission of an evasive pur-
pose, the court had little difficulty concluding that the “around the horn” 
telephone calls and pre-planned subquorum meetings, taken together, were 
46
Blackford, 375 So. 2d. at 580-81 (alterations in original) (quoting Occidental Chem. Co. v. 
Mayo, 351 So. 2d 336, 341 (Fla. 1977)). 
47  Booth Newspapers, Inc. v. Univ. of Mich. Bd. of Regents, 507 N.W.2d 422 (Mich. 1993). 
48
Id. at 424-25. 
49
Id. at 425 (footnotes omitted) (alterations in original). 
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual
create a fillable pdf form from a word document; convert fillable pdf to word fillable form
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel.
convert pdf fill form; acrobat fill in pdf forms
732 
G
EO
. M
ASON 
L. R
EV
.
[V
OL
. 12:3 
tantamount  to  a  meeting of  the entire Board  of Regents.
50
Other courts 
similarly have held that preplanned serial gatherings designed to evade the 
requirements of an open meeting statute in fact constitute illegal meetings 
under such statutes.
51
By contrast, other state courts have come to the opposite conclusion, 
holding that serial gatherings of groups smaller than the statutory require-
ment for a “meeting” do not run afoul of open meeting statutes. In Moberg 
v.  Independent School District No. 281,
52
the Minnesota Supreme Court 
considered allegations that a school board had violated Minnesota’s open 
meeting statute by discussing school closures in closed meetings. Because 
Minnesota’s open meeting statute did not define the term “meeting,” the 
court first had to establish the circumstances in which informal communi-
cations could constitute a “meeting” under the statute.
53
Because a public 
body can act only through a quorum of its members, the court held that the 
types of contacts subject to Minnesota’s open meeting statute are “those 
gatherings of a quorum or more members of the governing body, or a quo-
rum  of  a  committee,  subcommittee,  board,  department,  or  commission 
thereof,  at  which  members  discuss, decide,  or  receive information as  a 
group on issues relating to the official business of that governing body.”
54
In response to the argument that limiting meetings to quorum-sized gather-
ings would allow evasion of the statute, the court stated as follows: 
Appellants correctly point out that this rule may be circumvented by serial face-to-face or 
telephone conversations between board members to marshal their votes on an issue before it 
is initially raised at a public hearing. It does not follow that two- or three-person conversa-
tions should be prohibited, however, because officials who are determined to act furtively 
50
Id. at 430 (“Even members of the committee acknowledged that its ‘round-the-horn’ decisions 
and conferences achieved the same effect as if the entire board had met publicly, received the candidate 
ballots, and ‘formally’ cast their votes.”).  
51
See, e.g., Roberts v. City of Palmdale, 853 P.2d 496, 503 (Cal. 1993) (“[A] concerted plan to 
engage in collective deliberation on public business through a series of . . . telephone calls passing from 
one member of the governing body to the next would violate the open meeting requirement.”); Stock-
ton Newspapers, Inc. v. Members of the Redevelopment Agency, 214 Cal. Rptr. 561, 565 (Cal. Ct. 
App. 1985) (“Thus a series of nonpublic contacts at which a quorum of a legislative body is lacking at 
any given time is proscribed by the Brown Act if the contacts are ‘planned by or held with the collec-
tive concurrence of a quorum of the body to privately discuss the public’s business’ either directly or 
indirectly through the agency of a nonmember.”); State ex rel. Cincinnati Post v. City of Cincinnati, 
668 N.E.2d 903, 906 (Ohio 1996) (holding that a series of back-to-back meetings by subgroups of the 
city council in an attempt to evade open meeting requirements in fact constituted an illegal meeting 
under the Ohio open meeting statute); McComas v. Bd. of Educ., 475 S.E.2d 280, 291 (W. Va. 1996) 
(citing with approval decisions from other jurisdictions holding that serial communications of subquo-
rum groups can constitute an illegal meeting under appropriate circumstances). 
52  336 N.W.2d 510 (Minn. 1983). 
53
Id. at 516. 
54
Id. at 518. 
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
change font size pdf fillable form; convert excel spreadsheet to fillable pdf form
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from
convert pdf into fillable form; create pdf fillable form
2004] 
A
PPLYING 
S
TATE 
O
PEN 
M
EETING 
L
AWS 
T
E
MAIL 
C
ORRESPONDENCE
733 
will hold such discussions anyway, or might simply use an outsider as an intermediary. 
There is a way to illegally circumvent any rule the court might fashion, and therefore it is 
important that the rule not be so restrictive as to lose the public benefit of personal discus-
sion between public officials while gaining little assurance of openness. Of course, serial 
meetings in groups of less than a quorum for purposes of avoiding public hearings or fash-
ioning agreement on an issue may also be found to be a violation of the statute depending 
upon the facts of the individual case.55  
Similarly, the Georgia Court of Appeals held in Claxton Enterprise v. 
Evans County Board of Commissioners
56
that no illegal meeting occurred 
when the administrator  of a  county board of commissioners  called each 
commissioner seriatim to propose that the commissioners amend the record 
of a prior meeting in order to change the basis for their decision to go into 
closed session.
57
The court held that no illegal meeting occurred because a 
meeting under Georgia’s open meeting statute takes place at a “designated 
time and place” and the serial telephone conversations at issue took place 
at different times and at no particular place.
58
While finding that no illegal meeting occurred, the Claxton Enterprise 
court was careful to point out that telephonic meetings could violate the 
statute under certain circumstances: 
Although a meeting is required to be open only when a quorum of a governing body or its 
agents have gathered at a designated time and place to take official action, such a gathering 
can be realized through virtual as well as actual means. The quorum does not have to be 
gathered in a physical space. In this digital age, we recognize that meetings may be held in 
ways that were not contemplated when the Act was initially drafted . . . . Thus, a “meeting,” 
within the definition of the Act, may be conducted by written, telephonic, electronic, wire-
less, or other virtual means. A designated place may be a postal, Internet, or telephonic ad-
dress. A designated time may be the date upon which requested responses are due.
59
While the above-quoted caveat is hardly a model of judicial clarity, it 
does appear to support the notion that truly serial communications cannot 
constitute an illegal “meeting” because there is no unity of time involved in 
the communications. However, if the members of a public body were con-
tacted serially, but asked to respond in some form or fashion at a common 
time, it appears that the Claxton Enterprise court would find the unity of 
time to exist that could support a finding of an illegal meeting.
60
To  the  extent  that  the  decisions  addressing  serial  communications 
could inform the question of whether email communications can constitute 
55 Id. 
56
549 S.E.2d 830 (Ga. Ct. App. 2001). 
57
Id. at 835. 
58  Id. 
59
Id. (citation omitted). 
60
Id. 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. Load PDF from stream programmatically.
pdf add signature field; convert pdf to form fillable
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Create PDF document from OpenOffice Text Document with embedded Export PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation. ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
pdf form filler; pdf fillable form creator
734 
G
EO
. M
ASON 
L. R
EV
.
[V
OL
. 12:3 
an illegal “meeting,” there are a few general principles that appear to un-
derlie  the  seemingly  contradictory  decisions  discussed  above.  First,  in 
dealing with serial communications, courts have treated the parties’ intent 
as being important. The cases finding serial communications to constitute 
an illegal meeting have done so in large part because the public officials 
involved  conducted  subquorum  meetings  for  the  specific  purpose  of 
achieving qualitatively the same result that they could achieve by conduct-
ing an illegal meeting.
61
Indeed, some of the cases involved admissions by 
the parties  that they prearranged their subquorum gatherings  for the ex-
press purpose of gaining all of the benefits of a meeting while evading the 
legal requirement that meetings be open to the public.
62
While the reason-
ing that would aggregate a series of individually-legal communications to 
find an illegal meeting seems a bit strained as a matter of literal statutory 
construction, it is not difficult to see why a court would find that justice 
and the public interest justified a broad construction of the statute in the 
face of open efforts at evasion.  
Conversely, the decisions finding that serial communications did not 
constitute an illegal meeting generally have lacked these same egregious 
facts. Instead,  they involved  a  series  of gatherings  that  appeared  much 
more attributable to happenstance or ignorance than evasive intent.
63
In-
deed, the Texas Court  of Appeals fastened  on this distinction in  Harris 
County Emergency  Service  District  No.  1  v.  Harris  County  Emergency 
Corps.
64
In Harris County, the court observed that precedent supported the 
notion that serial gatherings could constitute an illegal meeting, but found 
that such an analysis did not apply because “there is no evidence that the 
district members were attempting to circumvent the [Texas open meeting 
statute] by conducting telephone polls with each other.”
65
Second, the differing results in the serial gathering cases appear at-
tributable, at least in part, to simple philosophical differences among the 
deciding courts as to whether the role of filling gaps in an open meeting 
statute lies with the state legislature or with the courts. Courts holding that 
61 Stockton Newspapers, Inc. v. Members of the Redevelopment Agency, 214 Cal. Rptr. 561, 565 
(Cal. Ct. App. 1985); Blackford v. Sch. Bd., 375 So.2d 578, 580-81 (Fla. Dist. Ct. App. 1979); Booth 
Newspapers v. Univ. of Mich. Bd. of Regents, 507 N.W.2d 422, 429 (Mich. 1993); State ex rel. Cin-
cinnati Post v City of Cincinnati, 668 N.E.2d 903, 906-07 (Ohio 1996). 
62
See, e.g., Blackford, 375 So. 2d at 580; Booth Newspapers, 507 N.W.2d at 425. 
63
See, e.g., Moberg v. Indep. Sch. Dist. No. 281, 336 N.W.2d 510, 518 (Minn. 1983) (stating in 
dictum that serial gatherings could be illegal if the purpose were to subvert the purposes of Minnesota’s 
open meeting statute); Harris County Emergency Serv. Dist. No. 1 v. Harris County Emergency Corps, 
999 S.W.2d 163, 169 (Tex. Ct. App. 1999) (noting that there had been no purpose to evade Texas’ open 
meeting statute). 
64
999 S.W.2d at 163. 
65
Id. at 169. 
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual
converting a word document to a fillable pdf form; create fillable form from pdf
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server.
create fillable pdf form; adding signature to pdf form
2004] 
A
PPLYING 
S
TATE 
O
PEN 
M
EETING 
L
AWS 
T
E
MAIL 
C
ORRESPONDENCE
735 
pre-planned  serial  gatherings  constitute  an  illegal  meeting  have  largely 
justified  their  rulings  on  the  basis  that  a  finding  of  no  illegal  meeting 
would exalt form over  substance  and would  countenance an  intentional 
evasion of the statutes’ provisions through exploitation of a loophole in the 
definition of “meeting.”
66
On the other hand, the Georgia Court of Appeals 
decided in Claxton Enterprise that no illegal meeting occurred because the 
Georgia  statute’s definition of “meeting” included only  those  gatherings 
that took place at a single time and place, even if that allowed public offi-
cials to achieve precisely the same type of interaction through serial gath-
erings that would be permitted if a quorum gathered at a single time and 
place  to  discuss  public  business.
67
Presumably,  the  Claxton  Enterprise 
court did not address whether its holding allowed the members of a public 
body to exploit a loophole in the law because the court’s mission was to 
apply the law as written and leave it to the legislature to close any such 
loopholes.
68
2.  Telephone Conference Calls 
Another instructive issue addressed by some courts in construing open 
meeting statutes’ requirement of open meetings is whether members of a 
public body can avoid the requirements of such statutes by having their 
conversations over the telephone instead of in person. The issue of confer-
ence call communications differs from serial communications in at least 
one  important respect. A telephonic conference  call results in the  same 
66
Roberts v. City of Palmdale, 853 P.2d 496, 503 (Cal. 1993) (noting the public officials’ “con-
certed plan” to evade California’s open meeting statute through serial subquorum meetings); Blackford, 
375 So. 2d at 580-81 (noting the defendants’ “frank admission” that they conducted serial meetings in 
order to avoid application of Florida’s Sunshine Law); Booth Newspapers, 507 N.W.2d at 425 (noting 
the defendants’ admission that they conducted multiple subquorum deliberations in order to evade open 
meeting requirements); State ex rel. Cincinnati Post,, 668 N.E.2d at 906 (noting evasive intent behind 
serial subquorum discussions). 
67
See Claxton Enters. v. Evans County Bd. of Comm’rs, 549 S.E.2d 830, 835 (Ga. Ct. App. 
2001) (“It is clear to us that because the Board engaged in a deliberative process and voted on official 
business, a ‘meeting,’ as that term is used in common parlance, occurred. However, because that meet-
ing did not fall within the Act’s definition of a meeting, the Board did not violate the letter of the 
law.”). 
68
Id. In an illustrative decision, the Nevada Supreme Court held in Del Papa v. Bd. of Regents of 
the Univ. & Comty. Coll. Sys., 956 P.2d 770, 776-78 (Nev. 1998), that the serial responses by telephone 
or fax violated Nevada’s open meeting statute not because such serial communications constituted a 
“meeting,” but because the public officials’ conduct violated another provision of the open meeting 
statute that explicitly prohibited use of electronic communications to evade the spirit or letter of the 
statute. By so holding, the court appears to have recognized that it is not its place to rewrite the legisla-
ture’s definition of the term “meeting,” but instead to enforce the legislature’s command that evasion of 
open meeting requirements through electronic communications is equally prohibited. Id.  
736 
G
EO
. M
ASON 
L. R
EV
.
[V
OL
. 12:3 
type of real-time communication and simultaneous deliberation that  one 
could achieve by meeting in person. The only difference is the medium in 
which this real-time communication occurs. In this sense, telephone con-
ference calls are fundamentally different from serial communications. The 
quality of the interaction in serial communications is different from that of 
a simultaneous discussion, as the participants in serial communications are 
not simply deliberating simultaneously through a slightly altered medium. 
For this reason, it seems at least an arguable position that serial communi-
cations are an attempt to comply with open meeting statutes rather than an 
effort to evade them.  
By contrast, it is difficult to characterize a conscious decision to con-
duct joint discussions and deliberations by telephone instead of in person 
as  anything  other  than  an attempt  to  evade  open  meeting  requirements 
through sharp practice. Despite the obviously evasive nature of telephone 
conference calls, courts have not uniformly found statutory prohibitions on 
secret meetings to extend to group conversations over the telephone. These 
differing results appear to stem largely from differences in state court phi-
losophies as  to  the  proper role, if  any, of  the judiciary  in closing clear 
loopholes in state open meeting statutes, or in construing such statutes to 
avoid finding such self-defeating loopholes. Two cases illustrate the differ-
ent ways that courts have dealt with this issue. 
In  Stockton  Newspapers,  Inc.  v.  Members  of  the  Redevelopment 
Agency of the City of Stockton,
69
the California Court of Appeal considered 
whether  a  telephone  conference  among  a  quorum  of  a  redevelopment 
agency could constitute an illegal closed “meeting.”
70
The California open 
meeting statute, as it existed at that time, defined “meeting” to include col-
lective decisions made by a majority of the members of a public body, but 
did not specify the modes of communication that would qualify as a meet-
ing.
71
After concluding that this definition was broad enough to encompass 
the informal exchange of facts,
72
the court held that the fact that the group 
discussion occurred over the telephone did not change that the conversa-
tions occurred as part of a meeting: 
Considering the ease by which personal contact is established by use of the telephone and 
the common resort to that form of communication in the conduct of public business, no rea-
son appears why the contemporaneous physical presence at a common site of the members 
69
214 Cal. Rptr. 561, 565 (Cal. Ct. App. 1985), 
70  Id. 
71
Id. at 564. 
72
Id. (“Since deliberation connotes not only collective discussion but also the collective acquisi-
tion and exchange of facts preliminary to the ultimate decision, the Brown Act is applicable to collec-
tive investigation and consideration short of official action.” (citations and internal quotations omit-
ted)). 
2004] 
A
PPLYING 
S
TATE 
O
PEN 
M
EETING 
L
AWS 
T
E
MAIL 
C
ORRESPONDENCE
737 
of a legislative body is a requisite of such an informal meeting. Indeed if face-to-face con-
tact of the members of a legislative body were necessary for a “meeting,” the objective of 
the open meeting requirement of the Brown Act could all too easily be evaded.73 
The Virginia Supreme Court displayed a very different judicial phi-
losophy in Roanoke City School Board v. Times-World Corporation,
74
1983 case in which the court considered whether a telephone conference 
among the members of a school board ran afoul of Virginia’s open meeting 
statute. In Roanoke City, the chairman of a city school board convened a 
telephonic conference call with the entire school board in order to convey 
information concerning the eligibility of a potential candidate for school 
superintendent.
75
Virginia’s open meeting statute, as it existed at the time, 
defined the term “meeting” to include a public body’s meetings when sit-
ting  as  a  body, as well  as  the “informal  assemblage”  of  three  or  more 
members of a public body.
76
Because the school board was not in actual session at the time of the 
conference call,  the  legality of the conference call  hinged on whether it 
involved an “informal assemblage” of the members of the school board. In 
addressing this issue, the Roanoke City court held that the physical assem-
blage of the members in  a single location was necessary to trigger Vir-
ginia’s open meeting requirements.
77
Of course, such a result essentially 
advises public officials that they can have exactly the type of conversations 
prohibited by Virginia’s open meeting statutes as long as they do it on the 
telephone instead of in person. The court had a ready response to this ar-
gument:  “The appellees argue that  if a telephone conference call  is not 
prohibited by the Act, then the Act contains a ‘glaring loophole.’ This may 
be, but, if true, it is a loophole that must be closed and corrected by the 
General Assembly, not by the courts.”
78
Whatever  one  might  think  of  the  Roanoke  City  court’s  narrow 
conception of the term “assemblage,” there is little doubt that the appellees 
were correct about the impact of the court’s decision. Holding that mem-
bers of a public body cannot meet in groups of three or more in person, but 
can do exactly that if they communicate by telephone, creates an enormous 
loophole in an open meeting statute, one that would have the effect of ren-
73 Id. at 565. 
74
307 S.E.2d 256 (Va. 1983). 
75
Id. at 256-57. 
76  Id. at 257-58 (quoting the then-existing definition of “meeting” in Virginia’s Freedom of 
Information Act). 
77
Id. at 259 (“Irrespective of one’s preferred definition, whether it be coming together, assem-
bling, gathering, or meeting, the physical presence of the participants is essential. A telephone confer-
ence call does not qualify.”). 
78
Id.  
738 
G
EO
. M
ASON 
L. R
EV
.
[V
OL
. 12:3 
dering meaningless the statute’s prohibition on secret meetings. Indeed, if 
left unchecked, a ruling  that  left  telephone conference calls  outside  the 
reach  of  open  meeting  statutes  would  merely  move  the  “smoke-filled 
room” that open meeting statutes were designed to eliminate from a den or 
back room to the phone wires, with members able to conduct precisely the 
type of secret, unverifiable meetings by telephone that are clearly prohib-
ited in person.  
Not surprisingly, the Virginia General Assembly recognized the grave 
threat posed to open meeting statutes by the Roanoke City decision and 
swiftly amended the Virginia Freedom of Information Act so that the defi-
nition of “meeting” included telephonic conference calls among three or 
more members of a public body.
79
The same scenario repeated itself a dec-
ade later in Kansas, as the Kansas Supreme Court, adopting the reasoning 
of Roanoke City, held that the Kansas Open Meetings Act did not prohibit 
group conference calls,
80
with the Kansas legislature quickly intervening to 
make explicit that an illegal meeting could occur by conference call.
81
As a matter of policy, once a state legislature has decided to prohibit 
informal meetings, it necessarily follows that having the same type of in-
teraction by telephone conference call should be prohibited as well. Oth-
erwise, the prohibition of closed informal meetings is meaningless. For that 
reason, in states where the legality of telephone conferences has arisen as 
an issue, the end result generally has been that a telephone conference is 
subject to the same restrictions as a face-to-face conference. Such states 
have reached this common-sense result either through courts construing the 
state’s open meeting statute to include telephone conferences within the 
definition of “meeting,”
82
or by the state legislature stepping in explicitly 
79 See 1984 Va. Acts Ch. 252 (codified as amended at V
A
. C
ODE 
A
NN
. § 2.2-3701 (Michie Supp. 
2004)).  
80
See State ex rel. Stephan v. Bd. of County Comm’rs, 866 P.2d 1024, 1028 (Kan. 1994) (“Tele-
phone calls are not included in KOMA. The legislature recognized this fact in 1977 and declined to 
include them. If they are to be included, it is up to the legislature to do so.”).  
81
See K
AN
. S
TAT
. A
NN
. § 75-4317(a) (2004) (defining “meeting” to include “any gathering, 
assembly, telephone call or any other means of interactive communication” by a majority of a quorum 
of a public body); Del Papa v. Bd. of Regents of the Univ. & Comty. Coll. Sys., 956 P.2d 770, 777 n.6 
(Nev. 1998) (noting that the Kansas legislature amended the definition of “meeting” in response to the 
Stephan decision); Theresa M. Nuckolls, Kansas Sunshine Law; How Bright Does It Shine Now? The 
Kansas Open Meetings Act (Part II—KOMA), 72:6 J. K
AN
. B
AR
. A
SS
34, 37 (July 2003) (“The 
Kansas Legislature reacted to [Stephan] by deleting the requirement of prearrangement and adding to 
the definition [of ‘meeting’] any “telephone call or any other means of interactive communication.”).  
82
See, e.g., Claxton Enter. v. Evans County Bd. of Comm’rs, 549 S.E.2d 830, 835 (Ga. Ct. App. 
2001) (“Thus, a ‘meeting,’ within the definition of the Act, may be conducted by written, telephonic, 
electronic, wireless, or other virtual means.”); Del Papa, 956 P.2d at 776 (holding that the legislature’s 
failure to override the state Attorney General’s Opinion was evidence of the legislature's intent to 
preserve the interpretation that voting by telephone to make a public decision violates the Open Meet-
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested