c# pdf to image free library : Convert pdf fillable form to html SDK application service wpf azure windows dnn spiro_Jan130-part785

Archival  
Management  
Software 
A Report for the Council on  
Library and Information Resources 
by Lisa Spiro 
January 2009 
Council on Library and Information Resources 
Washington, D.C. 
Convert pdf fillable form to html - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
change font pdf fillable form; auto fill pdf form from excel
Convert pdf fillable form to html - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
convert pdf fillable forms; change pdf to fillable form
ii 
About the Author
Lisa Spiro directs Rice University's Digital Media Center, where she manages 
digital projects; provides training in XML markup, digital research tools, and 
multimedia; studies emerging educational technologies; and oversees the 
university's central multimedia lab. A Frye Leadership Institute fellow, she 
received her Ph.D. in English from the University of Virginia, where she 
worked at the Electronic Text Center and served as the managing editor of 
Postmodern Culture. She has published and presented on book history, 
institutional repositories, and the scholarly use of digital archives. She blogs 
about digital scholarship in the humanities at 
http://digitalscholarship.wordpress.com/
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast. Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents.
create a fillable pdf form from a word document; convert word form to fillable pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel in VB Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without
create a writable pdf form; adding signature to pdf form
iii 
Contents
Acknowledgments.........................................................................................................v 
Foreword........................................................................................................................vi 
1. Introduction.................................................................................................................1 
2. The Problem of Hidden Collections.......................................................................1 
3. The Role of Software in Addressing Hidden Collections..................................3 
4. Research Method........................................................................................................8 
5. How to Select Archival Management Software...................................................9 
6. Criteria for Choosing Archival Software............................................................10 
7. Types of Software.....................................................................................................18 
8. Possible Approaches to Federating Archival Description from 
Multiple Repositories............................................................................................29 
9. Conclusion.................................................................................................................32 
Works Cited...................................................................................................................33 
Appendixes 
Appendix 1: The Archival Workflow.......................................................................38 
Appendix 2: Archival Management Systems Features Matrix [Brief]..............42 
Appendix 3: Archival Management Systems Features Matrices [Full]............44 
Appendix 4: Notes from Interviews with Archivists about Archon, 
Archivists’ Toolkit, Cuadra STAR/Archives, Eloquent, and 
CollectiveAccess.....................................................................................................92 
Archivists’ Toolkit Summary.....................................................................................92  
Reasons for Selecting Archivists’ Toolkit.........................................................92 
Ease of Use..............................................................................................................93 
Installation and Maintenance..............................................................................94  
Ease of Customization..........................................................................................95 
User Community...................................................................................................95 
Weaknesses.............................................................................................................95 
Strengths..................................................................................................................96 
Archon Summary.........................................................................................................99 
Reasons for Selecting Archon..............................................................................99 
Ease of Use..............................................................................................................99 
Installation and Maintenance............................................................................100 
Ease of Customization........................................................................................100 
Weaknesses...........................................................................................................100 
User Community.................................................................................................101 
Strengths................................................................................................................102 
Overall Assessment.............................................................................................103 
Archon’s Response to User Feedback.............................................................103 
Cuadra STAR/Archives Summary ........................................................................104 
Reasons for Selecting Quadra...........................................................................104 
Installation and Maintenance............................................................................104 
Ease of Customization........................................................................................104 
User Community/Support................................................................................105 
Weaknesses...........................................................................................................105 
Strengths................................................................................................................105 
Overall Assessment.............................................................................................107 
Eloquent Archive Summary.....................................................................................108 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents.
change font size pdf fillable form; convert word form to pdf fillable form
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in
convert pdf fillable form to html; pdf create fillable form
iv 
Reasons for Selecting Eloquent.........................................................................108 
Ease of Use............................................................................................................108 
Ease of Installation...............................................................................................108 
Ease of Customization........................................................................................109 
User Community/Support................................................................................109 
Weaknesses...........................................................................................................109 
Strengths................................................................................................................110 
Eloquent’s Response to User Feedback...........................................................110 
CollectiveAccess Summary......................................................................................112 
Reasons for Selecting CollectiveAccess..........................................................112 
Ease of Use............................................................................................................112 
Ease of Customization........................................................................................112 
Weaknesses...........................................................................................................112 
User Community/Support................................................................................112 
Strengths................................................................................................................112 
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#.NET. An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET.
pdf form filler; add signature field to pdf
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel. Convert to PDF with
converting a word document to pdf fillable form; convert pdf into fillable form
Acknowledgments 
In preparing this report, I spoke or corresponded with a number of 
archivists, software developers, metadata specialists, and vendors. I 
would like to offer my sincere thanks for their insights and frankness; this 
report would be much less rich without their input. All errors are my 
own. 
•  Lisa Atkinson, University of Calgary  
•  Charles Blair, University of Chicago 
•  Leah Broaddus, Southern Illinois University Carbondale 
•  Christopher Burcsik, MINISIS Inc. 
•  Chris Burns, University of Vermont 
•  Christine de Catanzaro, Georgia Institute of Technology 
•  Nicole Cho, Coney Island History Project 
•  Michele Combs, Syracuse University 
•  Cara Conklin-Wingfield, The Parrish Art Museum 
•  Amanda Focke, Rice University 
•  Julie Grob, University of Houston 
•  Geneva Henry, Rice University 
•  Malcolm Howitt, DS Limited 
•  Cees Huisman, Adlib Information Systems BV 
•  Seth Kaufman, CollectiveAccess 
•  Shelly Kelly, University of Houston-Clear Lake 
•  Anne Kling, Cincinnati Historical Society 
•  Bill Landis, Yale University 
•  Daniel Meyer, University of Chicago 
•  Eric Milenkiewicz, University of California Riverside 
•  Sammie Morris, Purdue University 
•  Merilee Proffitt, RLG Programs, OCLC 
•  Chris Prom, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign/Archon 
•  Merv Richter, Eloquent Systems 
•  Melissa Salazar, New Mexico State Archives 
•  Dan Santamaria, Princeton University 
•  Amy Schindler, College of William and Mary  
•  Alice Schreyer, University of Chicago 
•  Jennifer Silvers, Oklahoma Historical Society 
•  Ilene Slavick, Cuadra Associates, Inc. 
•  Amanda Stevens, Council of Nova Scotia Archives 
•  Chuck Thomas, Florida Center for Library Automation 
•  Melissa Torres, Rice University 
•  Maxine Trost, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 
•  Peter Van Garderen, Artefactual Systems/ICA-AToM 
•  Bruce Washburn, OCLC/ArchiveGrid 
•  Rebecca L. Wendt, California State Archives 
•  Brad Westbrook, University of California San Diego/Archivists’ 
Toolkit  
•  Jennifer Whitfield, Past Perfect 
•  Kathy Wisser, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
convert an existing form into a fillable pdf form; create fillable pdf form
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files.
convert pdf fillable form; convert word to fillable pdf form
vi 
Foreword
With generous support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the 
Council on Library and Information Resources has launched a multiyear 
program that addresses the challenge of cataloging hidden collections—those 
materials held in special collections, archives, and other restricted or 
relatively inaccessible settings. The program has two major dimensions: first, 
to identify hidden collections of potential value to scholars; and second, to 
address the thorny issue of cataloging such materials efficiently, effectively, 
and in such a way that the catalog records are available to scholars through 
the Web. In this paper, Lisa Spiro describes and analyzes some of the major 
technologies that are available to librarians, curators, and archivists and the 
implications of deploying these systems for existing workflows. We offer this 
report to the community with the hope that it will foster discussion as well as 
aid CLIR’s evaluation of awards and articulation of lessons to be learned. Ms. 
Spiro has established a wiki at 
http://archivalsoftware.pbwiki.com/FrontPage
. We encourage readers to 
contribute their experiences.   
Amy Friedlander 
Director of Programs 
Council on Library and Information Resources 
January 9, 2009 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file. HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create fillable PDF document with fields.
convert pdf to fillable pdf form; create a fillable pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word Create and save editable PDF with a blank page Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic
convert word document to fillable pdf form; convert pdf to pdf form fillable
Archival Management Software 
1. Introduction  
Whether called “the elephant in the closet” (Mandel 2004, 106) 
or a “dirty little secret” (Tabb 2004, 123), hidden collections are 
becoming recognized as a major problem for archives and 
special collections. As the Council on Library and Information 
Resources (CLIR) stated in launching its Cataloging Hidden 
Special Collections and Archives Program, “Libraries, 
archives, and cultural institutions hold millions of items that 
have never been adequately described. These items are all but 
unknown to, and unused by, the scholars those organizations 
aim to serve”
(2008). Reducing archival backlogs and exposing 
once-hidden collections will likely require that archives 
revamp their workflows, but software can play a role in 
making archives more efficient and their collections more 
visible. 
What technologies can help archives and special collections 
tackle their “hidden collections” and make them available to 
researchers? This report explores archival management sys-
tems such as Archon, Archivists’ Toolkit (AT), Cuadra STAR, 
and Minisis M2A. It also considers tools for creating and 
publishing encoded archival description (EAD) finding aids. 
Archival management systems are a kind of software that 
typically provide integrated support for the archival 
workflow, including appraisal, accessioning, description, ar-
rangement, publication of finding aids, collection manage-
ment, and preservation. (Tools, on the other hand, are soft-
ware applications that typically focus on specific tasks and can 
be components of systems.) Rather than explicitly rec-
ommending particular software, this report takes archivists 
through the main decision points, including types of licenses, 
cost, support for collection management, and flexibility versus 
standardization. The report draws upon interviews with users 
as well as on previous studies of archival software and 
information provided by the developers and vendors. It offers 
features matrices for selected archival management systems so 
that archivists can make quick comparisons of different 
software. Instead of evaluating the performance of the soft-
ware, this report compares features and reports on the experi-
ences of archivists in implementing them. This report is in-
tended to be a resource for the archival community to build 
upon; hence it is available as a wiki at 
http://archivalsoftware.pbwiki.com/
, and archivists, 
information technology (IT) staff, and developers are invited 
to add new information to it. 
2. The Problem of Hidden Collections 
According to a 1998 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) 
survey of special collections libraries, about 28 percent of 
Lisa Spiro 
manuscript collections are unprocessed, while 36 percent of 
graphic materials and 37 percent of audio materials have not 
been processed (Pantich 2001). Furthermore, the survey found 
that “the most frequent type of available access is through 
card catalog records or manual finding aids,” which suggests 
that researchers often must be physically present at special 
collections and archives to know what they hold (Pantich 2001, 
8). As the ARL Task Force on Special Collections argues, the 
failure to process collections holds back research, leads to 
duplicates being purchased, and makes them more vulnerable 
to being stolen or lost because libraries and archives don’t 
know what they have. Studies have shown that between 25 
percent and 30 percent of researchers have not been able to use 
collections because they have not been processed (Greene and 
Meissner 2005, 211). As a result, stakeholders such as 
researchers and donors become frustrated. Indeed, in a much-
-
discussed article, Greene and Meissner report that “at 51% of 
repositories, researchers, donors, and/or resource allocators 
had become upset because of backlogs” (2005, 212). 
To confront the problem of unprocessed collections, Greene 
and Meissner promote “a new set of arrangement, preserva-
-
tion, and description guidelines that (1) expedites getting 
collection materials into the hands of users; (2) assures ar-
-
rangement of materials adequate to user needs; (3) takes the 
minimal steps necessary to physically preserve collection ma-
-
terials; and (4) describes materials sufficient to promote use” 
” 
(2005, 212-213).
Meeting researchers’ needs for access to ma-
terials trumps achieving perfection in archival description and 
arrangement. Likewise, the ARL Task Force proposes minimal 
processing, suggesting that “it is better to provide some level 
of access to all materials, than to provide comprehensive ac-
cess to some materials and no access at all to others” (Jones 
2003, 5). This access can be provided through the Online 
Public Access Catalog (OPAC) EAD finding aids, digital 
collections, or databases. Indeed, providing electronic access is 
crucial to making hidden collections more visible, since “in-
creasingly, materials that are electronically inaccessible are 
simply not used” (Jones 2003, 5). Thus, the Library of Congress 
Working Group on the Future of Bibliographic Control 
recommends that archives “make finding aids accessible via 
online catalogs and available on the Internet,” streamline 
cataloging, and “encourage inter-institutional collaboration for 
or 
sharing metadata records and authority records for rare and 
unique materials” (2008, 23-24). 
Among the criteria that archives and special collections should 
consider in determining how to process each collection are 
size, condition, significance, and, perhaps most important, the 
needs of researchers. Archives should keep in mind that 
archival descriptions may be part of distributed, federated 
catalogs, so they should adhere to best practices to ensure 
consistency of data. The ARL Task Force recognizes that some 
Archival Management Software 
collections may require more detailed description than others 
and that any decision will involve trade-offs. As one drafter of 
the ARL Task Force Report observed, “Collection-level 
cataloging is potentially dangerous because if not done right, 
it will merely convert materials from ‘unprocessed’ to 
‘hidden’”(Jones 2003, 9-10). 
Institutions have devised different approaches to hidden col-
lections based on the nature of their collections and the re-
-
sources available. Through the University of Chicago’s An-
drew W. Mellon Foundation–funded “Uncovering New Chi-
-
cago Archives Project” (UNCAP), graduate students are 
working with scholars and cultural heritage professionals to 
catalog hidden collections housed at a local library and mu-
seum (Shreyer 2007). For the museum collection, they are us-
ing item-level cataloging, whereas they are using more 
standard archival practices with the library collection. In ad-
dition, a professional archivist is using minimal processing 
techniques to process a jazz collection and a contemporary 
poetry collection housed at the university. Whereas the stu-
dents are producing detailed descriptions, the archivist is 
taking a more stripped-down approach, allowing Chicago to 
test the effectiveness of each model. Similarly, to reduce ar-
chival backlogs and provide research experiences for graduate 
students, the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) 
launched the Center for Primary Research and Training 
(CFPRT), which “pairs graduate students with unprocessed or 
underprocessed collections in their areas of interest and trains 
them in archival methods, resulting in processed collections 
for us and dissertation, thesis, or research topics for them” 
(Steele 2008). UCLA develops a plan for processing each 
collection and uses an online calculator to estimate costs.  
3. The Role of Software in Addressing Hidden 
Collections 
Reducing archival backlogs fundamentally requires adopting 
more-efficient means of processing collections, but software 
can contribute to that efficiency and make it easier for archives 
to provide online access to archival descriptions. At many 
archives, information is scattered across several different 
digital and physical systems, resulting in duplication of effort 
and difficulty in locating needed information. For instance, 
one archive uses a hodgepodge of methods to manage its 
collections, including paper accession records; an Access 
database for collection-level status information; lists and da-
-
tabases for tracking statistics; hundreds of EAD finding aids; 
hundreds of paper control folders providing collection-level 
information, some of which is duplicated in Word files or in 
XML finding aids; and item-level descriptions of objects to be 
digitized in Excel spreadsheets. This miscellany means that 
Lisa Spiro 
there are problems with versioning, redundancy, finding in-
formation, and making that information publicly accessible. 
Likewise, Chris Prom found that many archives are using a 
variety of tools at various steps in their workflows, so much so 
that “their descriptive workflows would make good subjects 
for a Rube Goldberg cartoon.” Examples include the In-
-
tegrated Library System (ILS) for the creation of MARC re-
-
cords, NoteTab and XMetaL for authoring finding aids, Access 
for managing accessions, Word for creating container lists, and 
DynaWeb for serving up finding aids (Prom 2008, 27). (See 
Appendix 1 of this paper for a more detailed description of the 
archival workflow.)  
In addition to the inefficiencies of using multiple systems to 
manage common data, Prom et al. (2007, 158-159) notes a 
correlation between using EAD and other descriptive stan-
dards with larger backlogs and slower processing speeds. 
(EAD is an XML-based standard for representing archival 
finding aids, which describe archival collections.) Some insti-
tutions simply lack the ability to produce EAD finding aids or 
MARC catalog records. As Prom et al. suggest, “Until creating 
an on-line finding aid and sharing it with appropriate content 
aggregators is as easy as using a word processor, the archival 
profession is unlikely to significantly improve access to the 
totality of records and papers stored in a repository” (2007, 
159).
One of the ARL Task Force on Special Collections’ 
recommendations thus focuses on developing usable tools to 
describe and catalog archival collections: “Since not all 
institutions are currently employing applicable national 
standards, the development of easy-to-use tools for file en-
-
coding and cataloging emerge as a priority. These tools should 
be simple enough to be used by students or paraprofessionals 
working under the supervision of librarians or archivists” 
(Jones 2003, 11). Greene and Meissner (2005, 242) suggest that 
software can play a vital role in streamlining archival 
workflows by enabling archivists to describe the intellectual 
arrangement of a collection without investing the time to 
organize it physically. In 2003, Carol Mandel observed that “I 
also have been told again and again that we really don’t have 
software for managing special collections. We don’t have the 
equivalent of your core bibliographic system that helps you 
bring things in and move them around efficiently and know 
what you are doing with them” (Mandel 2004, 112). 
Fortunately, powerful software for managing special collec-
tions and archives is emerging. This report is more a sampling 
of leading archival management systems that offer English-
language user interfaces than a comprehensive examination of 
every potentially relevant application.
1
Of course, software 
Archival/collection management and description software that go beyond 
the scope of this report include Andornot Archives Online, 
ARGUS/Questor, Collections MOSAiC Plus, CollectionSpace, Embark, 
Filemaker Pro, HERA2, IDEA, KE EMu, Microsoft Access, Mimsy xg, 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested