c# pdf to image free library : Convert excel to fillable pdf form application control class asp.net html wpf ajax spiro_Jan132-part788

Archival Management Software 
15 
asked questions, and user training. In some cases, help is 
included in annual maintenance fees, but in others it en-
-
tails additional costs. Open source projects may seem to be 
weaker than commercial projects with regard to user 
support. As one archivist using an open source system 
commented, “There’s no help desk.” However, lively 
communities often form around open source projects and 
provide support to new users or those experiencing prob-
lems. With Archon, CollectiveAccess, and Archivists’ 
Toolkit, archivists noted how responsive the developers 
are to questions. In addition, support for open source 
software may be available from consultancies or even the 
developers themselves. For example, the business plan for 
ICA AToM includes a provision for “charging a commis-
sion for brokering ICA-AtoM technical services between 
recommended third-party contractors and institutions 
seeking assistance with ICA-AtoM installation, hosting, 
customization, new feature development, etc.” To evaluate 
user support, talk to users of different software packages. 
•  Support for archival standards 
To facilitate interoperability and adherence to best prac-
tices, archives will want to select software that meets ar-
chival standards such as EAD, DACS, and MARC, as well 
as emerging standards such as EAC. Some archival 
systems, such as ICA-AToM, focus more on international 
(ICA) standards rather than on U.S. standards. In the case 
ase 
of archival software developed in Europe, Prom et al. warn 
that “such tools use a much more rigorous system of 
classification and provenance than do US repositories” 
(Prom et al. 2007, 159). However, even many non-U.S. 
applications support crosswalking between standards and 
include EAD support. 
•  Web-based versus desktop client 
ent 
Some archival management software (such as Archon, 
CollectiveAccess, and ICA-AToM) is entirely Web based, 
d, 
while other such software requires a desktop client (typi-
-
cally a PC) and connect to a database backend. Web-based 
software can be more intuitive for some users and enables 
distributed cataloging, since anyone with Web access can 
contribute records. With systems such as Archon, 
information can be published to the Web as soon as it is 
entered. However, some archives worry about the security 
and reliability of an entirely Web-based system; one archi-
-
vist noted her colleagues’ reluctance to “put all of our eggs 
in one basket.” If the Internet connection goes down, work 
stops (which is also true of networked client/server 
software). A client-based interface may offer greater con-
-
trol over data, but institutions may need to pay a fee for 
Convert excel to fillable pdf form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
create fill in pdf forms; change font size in fillable pdf form
Convert excel to fillable pdf form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
create a pdf form to fill out; convert an existing form into a fillable pdf
Lisa Spiro 
16 
each computer on which the software is installed. Licens-
-
ing models vary, however, so this is not always the case. 
•  Support for publishing finding aids online versus 
generating EAD for export 
Many archives face difficulty not only in creating EAD 
files but also in publishing them online. As one archivist 
remarked, “There’s been a big hole—people have been 
producing EAD for 10 years, but it’s still kind of difficult.” 
Some archival management systems address this problem 
by enabling archives to make available their finding aids 
on the Web. Indeed, a primary reason that Archon was 
developed was to facilitate publication of archival 
information online. Once an archivist enters information 
into Archon, it is automatically searchable and 
discoverable by Google (although archives can choose to 
defer publication of records until they have been ap-
proved). Likewise, many commercial systems offer sup-
port for online access to their collections, sometimes 
through the purchase of an additional module. However, 
some archives already have a mechanism for publishing 
their finding aids on the Web, so they may prefer software 
that enables them to easily export finding aids that they 
can then import into their existing Web-publication sys-
-
tem. Since most browsers now provide support for XML, 
archives could simply upload their EAD files to a Web 
server, include a call-out to an XSLT stylesheet at the top of 
each file for the purposes of presentation, and display their 
finding aids without too much effort. Projects such as the 
EAD Cookbook have made stylesheets freely available. 
Although this simple approach does not offer so-
phisticated searching and other features, it enables ar-
chives to publish their finding aids online at minimal cost. 
If archival management software does enable publishing 
archival collections online, archives should consider the 
quality and customizability of the end-user interface. Does 
it provide search and browse functions? Can users run 
advanced searches? Does it offer additional features, such 
as stored searches? Is the design clean and simple to 
navigate? Can it be easily customized to reflect the unique 
identity of the archive? Does the interface meet accessibil-
ity standards? Can it be translated into other languages?  
•  Support for linking to digital objects 
In addition to providing access to archival collections, ar-
chives may wish to make available digital surrogates of 
items, such as images, texts, audio files, or video. Many 
archival management systems offer a “digital library” or 
“online exhibit” function to provide Web-based access to 
items in their collections. In evaluating these features, ar-
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in using RasterEdge.XDoc.Excel; How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert ODT to PDF
convert pdf to pdf form fillable; create fillable pdf form
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Best C#.NET component to create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Create fillable PDF document with fields.
convert pdf fillable form; pdf add signature field
Archival Management Software 
17 
chives should consider what kind of media and metadata 
formats they support as well as how media are presented. 
For instance, CollectiveAccess has rich features for media 
support, including the automatic generation of MP3s upon 
loading an audio file to the server, an image viewer with 
pan and zoom, and the ability to mark time codes within 
video files. However, some archives may want to use a 
separate digital asset management system (DAM), such as 
ContentDM, DSpace, or Fedora, to provide online access to 
their collections, since they are using these robust systems 
for other digital collections. These institutions will want an 
easy way to batch export relevant metadata from their 
archival management system or, even better, a way to plug 
in their archival management system to their DAM. (ICA-
AToM plans to use a plug-in architecture for exposing the 
application to Web services or allowing it to interface with 
other Web services, such as DSpace or Fedora.) 
•  Support for collection management  
Some systems offer robust support for managing archival 
collections, including appraisals, locations, condition and 
conservation, and rights and restrictions. Some even allow 
users to create deeds of gift and location labels, track usage 
statistics, and manage requests for materials and reference 
help. Others focus more on archival description than on 
collection management. Many do both. Archives should 
determine what features are most essential to them, while 
noting that new versions of software often add features 
that they may desire. 
•  Reports, statistics, and project management 
Some software can enable institutions to run reports to, for 
example, track unprocessed collections or determine what 
is stored in a particular location. How easy is it to create 
and print out such reports? Through archival management 
software, organizations may also be able to track statistics 
such as the size of various collections, how many linear 
feet have been processed or deaccessioned over a year, and 
the most frequently requested collections.
13
Such statistics 
can help archives determine how to set processing 
priorities and can be valuable in reporting to organizations 
such as ARL. Indeed, some software even allows 
institutions to mark accessions that are high priority for 
processing, helping them manage hidden collections.  
•  Reliability and maturity 
13
The University of Michigan is developing archival metrics: 
http://www.si.umich.edu/ArchivalMetrics/
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#.NET. An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET.
add signature field to pdf; change pdf to fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET Convert OpenOffice Spreadsheet data to PDF. Turn ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
convert word to fillable pdf form; create a pdf form to fill out and save
Lisa Spiro 
18 
Some archives are shying away from software that is still 
in development such as Archivists’ Toolkit and Archon 
because “there are still bug reports.” Users did report that 
there were some bugs or missing features for both tools, as 
well as for commercial systems. However, they also said 
that their error reports were taken seriously and that the 
development teams are responsive to user questions and 
suggestions. In the contemporary computing environment, 
software is continually evolving; witness the “permanent 
beta” status of Web 2.0 tools such as Google Documents. It 
is possible for software to be too mature, built using out-of-
-
date technologies or approaches. On the other hand, some 
software never makes it out of beta or may not go in the 
direction anticipated, so institutions may lose time and 
resources if they adopt untested software. 
7. Types of Software  
In 2005, Katherine Wisser reported on an EAD Tools Survey 
that revealed the diversity of ways in which archives created 
finding aids and the difficulty that smaller institutions in par-
ticular had in authoring and publishing EAD. Wisser divided 
EAD tools into four categories: authoring, publishing, discov-
ery (search tools), and knowledge (best practice guides). One 
of the most used tools at the time was the EAD Cookbook, 
which provides a set of templates, stylesheets, and guidelines 
for creating finding aids. Wisser found a disparity in the kinds 
of tools institutions used: archivists at smaller archives tended 
to rely upon the EAD Cookbook, while those at larger 
institutions often developed their own solutions. Some insti-
tutions were willing to share those solutions, with the caveat 
that they reflected local practices.  
More recently, open source archival management systems 
such as Archon and AT and commercial solutions such as 
Cuadra STAR and MINISIS have offered other methods for 
creating archival description. The promise of such systems is 
that archivists no longer have to hand-code EAD, but can cre-
-
ate it through entering information into database fields. Rather 
than keeping archival data in multiple systems, archivists can 
manage, search, and manipulate data through a single 
interface. However, such systems can also enforce a rigor that 
may challenge existing workflows, and importing legacy data 
into them can be difficult. 
Below I briefly describe a range of archival software packages 
es 
that support exporting or publishing EAD and MARC or are 
likely to do so soon. Since the focus of this report is archival 
management systems, only brief descriptions of more spe-
cialized EAD authoring and publishing tools are provided, 
and no information is offered about digital asset management 
systems, institutional repository software, integrated library 
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application.
change font pdf fillable form; convert pdf fillable form to html
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel in VB Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without
convert word form to pdf fillable form; convert fillable pdf to word fillable form
Archival Management Software 
19 
systems, or digital collections software.
14
Appendix 2 summa-
rizes the features of archival management systems in brief, 
while Appendix 3 offers a detailed summary of these features. 
es. 
Appendix 4 presents summaries of my interviews with current 
users of several leading archival management systems. 
1.  EAD Authoring 
According to a 2006 study by Chris Prom, archivists use a 
variety of tools to create descriptive records, favoring “simple” 
tools: “Eighty-two percent use word processors; 55%, library 
catalog software; 34% custom databases; 31% text or HTML 
editors; 22% XML editors, and 14% digital library software” 
(Prom 2008, 21). Archives using XML editors typically have a 
larger backlog (58% of the collection) than those using word 
processors (37%), leading Prom to suggest that “[a]t least some 
of our backlog problems seem attributable to the adoption of 
complex tools and methodologies” (2008, 22). However, these 
institutions may have had larger backlogs to begin with. Prom 
found a low adoption rate of MARC and EAD—access to only 
an average of 37 percent of collections is provided through 
MARC, 13 percent through EAD (2008, 23-24). 
Often archives use a mix of methods to create finding aids. For 
instance, UC Berkeley converted legacy finding aids to EAD 
through a multifaceted approach, entering basic descriptive 
information into Web templates 
(http://www.cdlib.org/inside/projects/oac/toolkit/template
s/
) and employing WordPerfect to create the initial hierarchy 
for the collection. It then converted the WordPerfect files to 
EAD using macros and Perl scripts 
(http://www.cdlib.org/inside/projects/oac/toolkit/
). XML 
editors were primarily used as “reference tool[s],” since “[i]t is 
far faster to programmatically convert text to EAD in broad 
strokes than to apply the copy and paste method required 
when using these editors” (Digital Publishing Group, UC 
Berkeley Library, n.d.). Likewise, the University of Chicago 
uses Web forms to create the front matter for finding aids; 
archivists write inventories using Word, and then a script is 
run to generate EAD. Post-processing is done using an XML 
editor such as Oxygen. According to archivists at the 
University of Chicago, such an approach “provides the archi-
vist with a lot of flexibility.” 
Among the particular technologies used to create EAD are the 
following: 
A. XML/text editors 
XML editors enable archivists to see the entire hierarchy of a 
14
For more information about metadata description tools, see Smith-
Yoshimura and Cellentani 2007.
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel. Convert to PDF with
adding a signature to a pdf form; convert pdf to fillable form online
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable
add attachment to pdf form; best pdf form filler
Lisa Spiro 
20 
finding aid and engage in the intellectual activity of marking 
up an archival collection.
15
As one archivist noted, “The act of 
writing a finding aid is something where you need to be able 
to view contents as you write series description. Creating 
finding aids is not data entry, but an intelligent process. I think 
that encoding EAD helps you to write finding aids, to 
understand the texture of a document.” However, relying 
solely on XML editors to generate finding aids can be ineffi-
cient. According to “informal studies” at the University of 
Illinois-Urbana Champaign, “a skilled worker took 20 hours to 
encode a 100-page finding aid, using standard XML markup 
tools, on top of the time needed to actually write the collection 
description and develop a general box listing of its content” 
(Prom et al. 2007, 159). 
XML and customizable text editors include: 
1. 
XMetaL:
:
16
Extensible, collaborative commercial soft-
ware for authoring XML. To provide a more user-
friendly interface for creating and editing finding aids, 
Yale University has developed a finding aids authoring 
tool layered over XMetaL. Yale’s FACT tool customizes 
XMetaL to provide a “word processing” view of 
finding aids for staff who didn’t want to work with the 
XML elements. Archives such as the University of 
Minnesota have developed tips for using XMetaL to 
author EAD.
17
2. 
Oxygen:
18
Easy-to-use, commercial “cross platform 
form 
XML editor providing the tools for XML authoring, 
XML conversion, XML Schema, DTD, Relax NG and 
Schematron development, XPath, XSLT,” etc. Several 
archives and consortia, including Northwest Digital 
Archives, provide documentation for using Oxygen to 
create EAD.
19
3. 
NoteTab: A free or inexpensive text editor. Several 
al 
projects, including NC Echo,
20
Virginia Heritage,
21
and 
the EAD Cookbook,
22
have created clipbook libraries 
for NoteTab that facilitate the creation of EAD. Ac-
cording to a recent report by the Florida Center for Li-
brary Automation (FCLA), “the existing, customizable 
NoteTab templates maintained by FCLA have been 
very helpful for many organizations wishing to create 
15
See ArchivesHub’s Data Creation Web page for more on XML editors:  
http://www.archiveshub.ac.uk/arch/dc.shtml 
16
http://na.justsystems.com/content.php?page=xmetal
17
https://wiki.lib.umn.edu/Staff/FindingAidsInEAD 
18
http://www.oxygenxml.com/
19
See http://orbiscascade.org/index/northwest-digital-archives-tools
ools
20
See http://www.ncecho.org/ncead/tools/tools_home.htm
21
See http://www.lib.virginia.edu/small/vhp/admin.html
22
See http://www.archivists.org/saagroups/ead/ead2002cookbook.html
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable
allow users to attach to pdf form; convert pdf to form fill
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files.
c# fill out pdf form; convert word to pdf fillable form online
Archival Management Software 
21 
EAD-encoded finding aids” (Florida Center for Library 
Automation 2008). 
4. 
EAD Cookbook: The EAD Cookbook aims to make it 
easier for archives to create finding aids by providing 
authoring tools for Oxygen, XMetaL, and NoteTab. In 
addition, it offers a set of stylesheets for transforming 
XML finding aids into HTML and detailed guidance on 
creating and publishing EAD finding aids. 
5. 
MEX (Midosa-Editor in XML-Standards): Describes 
cribes 
itself as “a set of tools for everyday description work in 
archival institutions including the production of online 
finding aids with digitized images from the archival 
records.”
23
An open source application developed by 
the Federal Archives of Germany with support from 
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, MEX enables 
archivists to create, import, and edit EAD finding aids; 
attach digital objects; examine an entire XML file or a 
single element; create online presentations of finding 
aids; and provide both search and structured 
browsing. It is a plug-in to Eclipse, an open source Java 
development platform. 
B. Word processing templates 
A number of archives use or have used word processing 
software such as Microsoft Word, WordPerfect, or Open Office 
to create preliminary finding aids. In some cases, organi-
zations have created templates that make it easy to enter 
standard archival information. Often they also use macros or 
scripts to aid in the conversion to EAD. For example, Yale has 
experimented with Open Office as tool for EAD creation (Yale 
University Library 2003), the Bentley Library at the University 
of Michigan has developed macros to convert Word files to 
EAD XML (Bentley Historical Library, n. d.), and the Utah 
State Archives used WordPerfect to create container lists (Utah 
State Archives 2002). Similarly, the Utah State Archives 
produces container lists using Excel and MailMerge (Perkes 
2008). 
C.  Forms 
By using forms to produce finding aids, archives can speed 
their creation and ensure greater consistency. Forms can be 
Web based or desktop based: 
•  Berkeley Web Template: CGI script is a customizable cgi-
i-
driven Web application “that generates a user-defined 
HTML form template and then generates markup using 
23
See http://mextoolset.wiki.sourceforge.net/ and 
http://www.bundesarchiv.de/daofind/en/ 
Lisa Spiro 
22 
the values filled in by users. … Output may be in the form 
of METS, TEI, EAD, XML or SGML, even HTML or PDF” 
(University of California, Berkeley 2005). 
•  Online Archive of California: Makes available Web forms 
ms 
“for generating collection- through series-/subseries-level 
evel 
finding aids that are compliant with the OAC BPG EAD 
and EAD Version 2002. Encoders cut and paste segments 
of their non-EAD finding aids into the form. The form is 
then converted to a text file and saved as a XML EAD 
file.”
24
•  ArchivesHub: Provides a Web form for generating EAD 
AD 
2002.
25
•  EAD XForms: Justin Banks’s EAD templates allow users to 
to 
enter archival information into a form. The templates were 
built using Altova’s StyleVision2006 and require an XML 
editor such as Altova Authentic2006 or Altova XMLSpy to 
implement.
26
•  X-EAD: The University of Utah is developing form-based 
based 
desktop software for authoring and editing EAD.
27
D.  EAD Validation 
By validating EAD files, archives can ensure their adherence 
to standards and facilitate participation in union catalogs and 
regional repositories. Several online validation services are 
available, including the following: 
•  Florida Center for Library Automation’s Encoded Archi-
-
val Description Validator and XSL Transformer: A Web 
page that was “created for museums, archives, libraries, 
historical societies, and similar agencies in Florida who 
create collection finding aids (guides) according to the En-
coded Archival Description (EAD) standard, version 2002. 
The tools on this page permit EAD creators to a) validate 
(test) their EAD documents against the rules described in 
the EAD Document Type Definition maintained by the 
Library of Congress, b) generate a HTML version of their 
finding aid from the original EAD encoding, using a XSL 
stylesheet maintained for the ARCHIVES FLORIDA 
database, and c) derive Dublin Core metadata records 
from their original EAD documents.”
28
24
http://www.cdlib.org/inside/projects/oac/toolkit/
25
http://www.archiveshub.ac.uk/arch/dc.shtml#tools
26
http://www.archivists.org/saagroups/ead/tools.html
27
http://www.lib.utah.edu/digital/tools.php 
28
http://good-ead.fcla.edu/
Archival Management Software 
23 
•  RLG EAD Report Card: “The first automated program for 
or 
checking the quality of your EAD encoding.”
29
E.  EAD Publishing 
As several interviewees noted, publishing EAD finding aids 
online presents a real challenge, especially to smaller archives 
without much technical support. Finding aids can be con-
verted to HTML and placed on a Web server or loaded into an 
XML-database/publishing system—operations that are be-
-
yond the capabilities of many archives. Alternatively, archives 
can upload the XML file, include a call-out to an XSLT 
stylesheet, and use the browser to transform XML to HTML. 
Some archives deposit their finding aids with a regional re-
pository such as Online Archive of California (OAC), Texas 
Archival Resources Online (TARO), or North Carolina ECHO, 
and/or with an international repository such as OCLC’s Ar-
chives Grid. Other archives have adopted XML publishing 
platforms that allow searching and presentation of finding 
aids, an approach that requires much more technical support 
but also provides greater control over data. These publishing 
platforms include: 
•  PLEADE: “PLEADE is an open source search engine 
ne 
and browser for archival finding aids encoded in 
XML/EAD. Based on the SDX platform, it is a very 
flexible Web application.”
30
•  XTF: “The CDL eXtensible Text Framework (XTF) is a 
flexible indexing and query tool that supports search-
ing across collections of heterogeneous data and pre-
sents results in a highly configurable manner.”
31
The 
California Digital Library uses XTF to enable search 
and display of its finding aids, text and image collec-
tions, and other scholarly projects.  
•  Apache Cocoon: Archives and consortia such as Five 
ve 
College Archives & Manuscript Collections
32
are using 
the open source XML publishing framework Cocoon to 
publish finding aids.  
•  University of Chicago’s Mark Logic XML Database: 
The University of Chicago is developing an XML pub-
lishing infrastructure built on MarkLogic
33
a native 
XML database. MarkLogic, which is a commercial 
product, was selected because it is robust, scalable, and 
easy to use. MarkLogic uses XQuery, which supports a 
feature called “collection.” Through the collection tag, 
29
http://tinyurl.com/6qrzqb
30
http://www.pleade.org/en/index.html
31
http://www.cdlib.org/inside/projects/xtf/
32
http://asteria.fivecolleges.edu/about.html 
33
http://www.marklogic.com/
Lisa Spiro 
24 
different collections and archives can be defined, thus 
enabling the creation of a multi-institutional 
repository. Users can search the whole database or 
particular collections. The front end can be built on any 
platform and can be displayed in any way the archives 
want. The University of Chicago took this approach 
because their UNCAP project is multi-institutional and 
could be multiconsortial. Such an architecture will give 
participants the flexibility to create unique interfaces 
for different collections and projects. Chicago’s code 
will be available to anyone who asks. Archives that 
want to use the software will need MarkLogic, but 
there is a free version for a limited number of CPUs 
that will be sufficient for small institutions.  
II. Archival Management Systems 
Archival management systems may be less flexible than EAD 
creation tools, and getting legacy data into these systems can 
be challenging. However, they offer a number of features that 
may lead to greater efficiency and sustainability, such as 
support for authority control, reduced redundancy of data, 
easy data entry interfaces, the ability to analyze archival data 
through the generation of reports, and Web-publishing capa-
-
bilities. Both open source and commercial archival manage-
ment systems are available.  
A. Open Source 
1. 
Archon (http://www.archon.org) 
Developed by archivists at the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign, Archon makes it easy for archives 
to publish their finding aids online. As its developers 
explain, ”Archon automates many technical tasks, such 
as producing an EAD instance or a MARC record. Staff 
members do not need to learn technical coding and can 
concentrate on accomplishing archival work. Little or 
no training is needed to use the system, assuming the 
staff member or student worker has at least a passing 
familiarly with basic principles of archival 
arrangement and description” (Prom et al. 2007, 165). 
Archon, which is built on PHP 5 and MySQL, enables 
archivists to capture information about accessions, 
create and publish finding aids online, and export EAD 
and MARC. A digital library module supports 
presenting digital objects along with finding aids. A 
winner of the 2008 Mellon Awards for Technology 
Collaboration (MATC), Archon is easy to customize 
and provides support for authority control. Explaining 
the appeal of Archon, one archivist noted, “Archon is 
free and pretty easy to implement without much IT 
intervention. … It gave us a quick and easy way to put 
collections up on online, let patrons search them, and 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested