c# pdf to image free library : Change font pdf fillable form Library application class asp.net html wpf ajax spiro_Jan133-part789

Archival Management Software 
25 
see everything we had.” Others caution, however, that 
importing existing finding aids into Archon can be 
difficult, given the variability of EAD.  
2. 
Archivists’ Toolkit (AT) 
(http://www.archiviststoolkit.org/) 
Developed by a consortium including the University of 
California, San Diego Libraries, the New York Univer-
-
sity Libraries, and the Five Colleges, Inc., Libraries and 
nd 
supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, AT 
bills itself as “the first open source archival data man-
agement system to provide broad, integrated support 
for the management of archives.” AT uses a Java 
desktop client and a database back-end (MySQL, MS 
SQL, or Oracle). Users report that AT makes it easier to 
produce finding aids and export EAD and MARC, 
generates useful reports, provides robust authority 
control, and offers good support for standards such as 
METS. Several archivists believe that AT will provide 
an integrated tool set for managing and describing 
archival information: “I like the promise of having a 
single database for collection management. You do the 
accession record, push a button, convert to a resource 
record, and export as EAD and MARC. It’s not quite 
there yet, but moving in that direction.” Another 
archivist noted that AT helps archives establish proc-
essing priorities by allowing them to mark and then 
find high-priority collections. In a presentation on AT, 
Georgia Tech Archives highlights several reasons for 
adopting it, including “developed by archivists,” 
“promotes efficiency and standardization,” “serves as 
master version of finding aid,” “improves description 
workflow,” and “decreases need for training in XML 
and encoding” (de Catanzaro, Thompson, and 
Woynowski 2007). However, archivists noted that it 
can be difficult to import existing finding aids and 
make AT accommodate existing workflows. AT does 
not yet provide Web-publishing capabilities.  
3.  
CollectiveAccess (http://www.CollectiveAccess.org) 
The recent recipient of a Mellon Collaborative Technol-
ogy Grant, CollectiveAccess allows museums and ar-
chives to manage their collections and provide rich on-
line access to them. CollectiveAccess is a Web-based 
tool built on PHP and my SQL, so it is cross-platform. 
According to its developer, Seth Kaufman, its chief 
advantages are that it  
•  is free; 
•  is customizable; 
•  has a flexible data model that accommo-
-
dates many types of collections and sup-
ports different data standards and con-
trolled vocabularies; 
Change font pdf fillable form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
change font size pdf fillable form; converting a word document to pdf fillable form
Change font pdf fillable form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
auto fill pdf form fields; create a fillable pdf form
Lisa Spiro 
26 
•  provides robust support for multimedia, in-
-
cluding images, audio, video, and text; is 
capable of automatic conversion of audio 
files to MP3 and video files to flash format; 
can zoom and pan images; and enables 
time-based cataloging of media files; and  
•  has a Web-based structure that facilitates 
ates 
distributed cataloging and enables admin-
istrative users to enter metadata and search 
collections online. 
Designed more as a collection management than ar-
chival management system, CollectiveAccess does not 
yet provide support for exporting EAD or MARC, al-
though that is promised for a future release. One user 
commented, “It’s so much easier than traditional col-
lection management systems that I’ve worked with.” 
4. 
International Council on Archives-Access to Memory 
(ICA-AtoM) (http://www.ica-atom.org/) 
ICA-AToM is open source, Web-based archival de-
de-
scription software that aims to make it easy for ar-
chives to provide online access to their archival hold-
ings, adhere to ICA standards, and support multiple 
collection types (even multirepository implementa-
tions) through flexible, customizable software. Ac-
cording to project lead Peter Van Garderen, the impe-
tus behind ICA-AToM was to expose hidden 
collections around the world by enabling small ar-
-
chives with limited resources to make available their 
collections online. ICA-AToM is designed to support 
aggregation of data from multiple institutions through 
OAI, IETF Atom Publishing Protocol (APP), and pos-
sibly other mechanisms. Developers are working on a 
pilot project with the Archives Association of British 
Columbia to build an aggregated union list portal. 
ICA-AToM aims to distinguish itself through its sup-
-
port for translation and internationalization, basis in 
ICA standards such as ISAD-G and ISAD-H, flexibility 
ity 
and customizability, and ease of installation and use. 
As a fully Web-based application, ICA-AToM can be 
accessed from anywhere with an Internet connection 
and can be hosted at a minimal cost. In the long term, 
the developers want ICA-AToM to become a platform 
to manage archival information, including creating 
digital repository interfaces to systems such as DSpace 
and Fedora through a plug-in architecture. They plan 
to build in Web 2.0 features such as user-contributed 
content, user tagging, and social networking. 
ICA-AToM is currently in beta testing. Version 1.2, due 
to be released in summer 2009, will provide support 
for accessioning, OAI harvesting, crosswalking to 
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C# Able to add text field to specified PDF file position in C# Support to change font size in PDF form.
pdf form fill; attach image to pdf form
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
framework. Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF document in C#.NET class. Support to change font color in PDF text box.
pdf signature field; convert fillable pdf to html form
Archival Management Software 
27 
standards such as DACS, EAD import and export, and 
many other features. Although ICA-AToM is designed 
more in accordance with ICA standards than U.S. 
standards, Van Garderen indicated that someone could 
easily add support for standards such as DACS and 
EAD and that version 1.2 will support EAD/MARC 
data import and export. For ICA-AToM, then, 
standards such as EAD and EAC will be exchange 
formats, while ISAD standards will be the core data 
format.  
ICA-AToM is new, and many of its features have yet to 
be released. For this reason, it is difficult to evaluate 
this software. However, members of the archival 
community are excited about its potential. An archivist 
who recently saw a presentation on ICA-AToM 
observed that the project has “impressive people on 
the team” and that the project lead is a trained archi-
vist. Development seems to be proceeding quickly: 
within a month, the developers added the capability of 
attaching digital objects and are working speedily on 
making ICA-AToM RAD compliant. A developer 
noted that “smart people” are behind ICA-AToM, but 
it is currently focused on archival description, so it 
might be limited for institutions that want fuller sup-
port for collection management and presentation.  
B. 
Commercial 
1.  
Cuadra STAR/Archives
(http://www.cuadra.com/products/archives.html) 
Cuadra STAR/Archives offers a number of features for 
managing and describing archival collections, in-
cluding creating accessions, tracking donors, creating 
finding aids, providing a Web interface to collections, 
and exporting EAD and MARC. Cuadra will host cus-
tomers’ data and provide assistance in importing ex-
isting data into the system.  
2.  
CALM (http://www.crxnet.com/page.asp?id=57) 
Calm for Archives, developed by DS, bills itself as “the 
leading archival solution in the UK.” It has a cli-
ent/server architecture and requires Windows. Calm 
allows significant user customization and enables 
linking to digital objects. It supports EAD and General 
International Standard Archival Description [ISAD 
(G)], and is compliant with International Standard 
Archival Authority Record for Corporate Bodies, 
Persons, and Families [ISAAR (CPF)], and National 
Council on Archives (NCA) name authority guidelines. 
It offers OAI support (with the provision of an 
additional module) and rich searching options. There is 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Word to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
convert word doc to fillable pdf form; convert pdf file to fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Excel to PDF. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
create fill pdf form; add fillable fields to pdf
Lisa Spiro 
28 
a CalmView Web server module (based on .NET 
technology) for Internet or intranet access.  
3.  
MINISIS M2A
(http://www.minisisinc.com/index.php?page=m2a)
MINISIS M2A was developed by MINISIS Inc. in 
collaboration with the Archives of Ontario in the 1990s. 
Since then, the precursor, ADD (archival descriptive 
database), has been enhanced to include more fields, 
more databases, more functionality, and more 
workflow and processing to become M2A as we know 
it today. M2A is flexible and customizable, and it 
supports standards such as EAD, ISAD(G), and RAD. 
Additional modules, such as client registration and 
space management, are available. MINISIS M2A is 
fully Web enabled and conforms to MARC, RAD, and 
EAD. MINISIS M2A can be expensive, but M2A Web, 
which is geared toward smaller archives, provides an 
inexpensive hosted solution for online creation and 
publishing of archival information. 
4.  
Adlib Archive 6.3.0 (http://www.adlibsoft.com/) 
Developed by a company based in the Netherlands, 
Adlib Archive 6.3.0 offers support for international 
standards such as ISAD(G) and ISAAR(CPF). Adlib 
uses a Windows-based desktop client and a database 
backend. Web publishing of archival information is 
available through the purchase of the Adlib Internet 
Server, which is built on Microsoft technologies. Adlib 
Archive provides support for OAI.  
5.  
Past Perfect 4.0 
(http://www.museumsoftware.com/pastperfect4. 
htm) 
Past Perfect describes itself as “affordable, flexible and 
easy to use” collection management software. It 
provides support for a number of collection manage-
-
ment tasks, such as accessions and deaccessions, loans 
and exhibits, fundraising, membership, and object-
level cataloging. The application is PC based, but a 
Web-based catalog can be built with the pur-chase of 
of 
the Past Perfect Online
34
module, which can be hosted 
by Past Perfect or installed on a local server. Past 
Perfect does not currently provide support for EAD, 
but that is being considered for a future release. 
6.  
Eloquent Archive 
(http://www.eloquentsystems.com/products/archive
s.shtml) 
Eloquent Archives describes itself as “an integrated 
application including all the functions for archival 
34
http://www.pastperfect-online.com/
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. C#.NET Sample Code: Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET Project. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
acrobat fill in pdf forms; pdf fill form
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable C#.NET Project DLLs: Conversion from OpenOffice to PDF in C#.NET. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
add fillable fields to pdf online; adding signature to pdf form
Archival Management Software 
29 
description, accessioning/de-accessioning, controlling 
vocabulary, custodial management, research requests, 
tracking, and other workflow management.” In 
addition to enabling archivists to manage and describe 
their collections, it provides support for tracking 
researchers and the usage of collections. Hosting for 
online access is available.  
8. Possible Approaches to Federating Archival 
Description from Multiple Repositories 
Researchers face many challenges in identifying and gaining 
access to archival holdings distributed at archives and special 
collections across the United States. Many archives have not 
described all of their collections or made that information 
available online. Even if archival description is online, 
researchers have to look in several places to find relevant 
resources, searching MARC records in WorldCat, MARC and 
EAD records in ArchiveGrid, National Union Catalog of 
Manuscript Collections (NUCMC) records in Archives USA, 
EAD finding aids aggregated in regional repositories such as 
Online Archive of California and TARO, and/or finding aids 
provided through the Web sites of particular archives. In order 
to facilitate discovery of archival resources, the CLIR Hidden 
Collections Program aims to provide a federated catalog 
drawing from multiple repositories. As the 2008 program 
description states, “The records and descriptions obtained 
through this effort will be accessible through the Internet and 
the Web, enabling the federation of disparate, local cataloging 
entries with tools to aggregate this information by topic and 
theme.” Archivists whom I interviewed recognize the value of 
aggregating information from multiple repositories. As one 
interviewee noted, “We just have to federate—there really 
isn’t a reason to stop at the stage of putting things on the Web. 
The point of EAD was not to put finding aids online, but to 
share, to get everyone together, to do things across a 
collection. If we don’t make the step forward to sharing, we 
might as well be using HTML.” 
However, federating archival descriptions poses some 
significant challenges. For one thing, an appropriate technical 
infrastructure needs to be developed, perhaps leveraging OAI-
PMH or RDF (Resource Description Framework). A federated 
catalog needs to be flexible enough to accom-modate the 
diverse data generated by archives, yet rigorous enough to 
present data in a standard format. Options for federating 
archival data include: 
1.  Make MARC and EAD available through a 
national/international service such as 
ArchiveGrid, Archives USA, or Archives Hub.  
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. VB.NET Demo Code for Converting PowerPoint to PDF. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll
create fillable form from pdf; converting pdf to fillable form
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. C#.NET Demo Code: Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
auto fill pdf form from excel; convert word form to fillable pdf
Lisa Spiro 
30 
OCLC’s ArchiveGrid
35
includes archival information 
from thousands of archives in the United States, the 
United Kingdom, Germany, Australia, and other 
countries. Archive Grid draws from two main data 
streams: archival records in WorldCat (about 90 
percent of the total records) and finding aids harv-
ested from contributing institutions.
36
These finding 
aids can be written in EAD, HTML, or plain text. To set 
up the harvesting, OCLC asks contributors to point to a 
Web site of finding aids that can be crawled. The 
crawler brings over the text of the finding aid, parses it 
so that it maps to the ArchiveGrid’s record structure, 
and adds it to the index. For harvested finding aids, 
ArchiveGrid links from its search results to the full 
finding aid on the contributor's Web site, similar to a 
Google result. Thematic collections are not currently 
represented; ArchiveGrid does not yet have consistent 
topical categories to apply across its varied 
contributions, but that could change. Archives pay 
nothing to contribute records to ArchiveGrid, but 
access to the full records in Archive Grid is available 
only through a subscription. However, through 
OpenWorldCat, researchers can access a large subset of 
archives’ MARC records that are also available through 
ArchiveGrid. It is possible that an archival version of 
the freely available OpenWorldCat—Open 
ArchiveGrid?—could be developed so that a subscrip-
-
tion would not be required. One archivist reported 
satisfaction with Archive Grid: “Archive Grid is 
harvesting our EAD files. … It seems to be gathering 
those OK.” 
Another aggregation model is provided by Archives 
Hub, the United Kingdom’s “national gateway to 
descriptions of archives in UK universities and 
colleges.”
37
Supported by Mimas, “a JISC and ESRC 
[Economic and Social Research Council]-supported 
national data centre” for higher education,
38
Archives 
Hub offers a distributed model for aggregating content 
from individual archives. Archives can become 
“spokes,” enabling them to retain control over their 
data and provide a custom search interface to their 
collections while also making their content available 
through a common interface (Archives Hub 2008). 
Archives Hub is built on the Cheshire full-text 
information retrieval system, which includes a Z39.50 
server. Archives Hub focuses on higher education 
institutions in the United Kingdom, but will accept 
35
http://archivegrid.org/
36
Author’s interview with Bruce Washburn, consulting software engineer 
for RLG Programs, July 1, 2008.
37
http://www.archiveshub.ac.uk/index.html
38
http://www.mimas.ac.uk/
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms C# Demo Code: Convert Excel to PDF in Visual C# .NET RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll.
convert pdf to form fillable; convert word document to fillable pdf form
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
convert pdf to fillable form; create a pdf form that can be filled out
Archival Management Software 
31 
contributions from other relevant repositories. (Nev-
ertheless, it is probably more appropriate as a model 
than as a repository for U.S. finding aids.) 
ProQuest’s Archives USA “is a current directory of 
over 5,500 repositories and more than 161,000 col-
lections of primary source material across the United 
States.”
39
It provides online access to the NUCMC from 
1959 to the present, names and subject indexes from 
the National Inventory of Documentary Sources 
(NIDS) in the United States, and collection descrip-
tions contributed by archives. Like ArchiveGrid, 
Archives USA allows repositories to contribute finding 
aids at no cost, but requires a subscription to access. 
2.  Harvest EAD from distributed repositories 
through OAI-PMH, Atom, or another technology 
Existing technologies such as OAI-PMH
40
and Atom
41
support harvesting and aggregating content from 
distributed repositories. The University of Illinois-
Urbana Champaign (UIUC) has already developed 
preliminary OAI services and tools to harvest infor-
mation from EAD and other sources.
42
As UIUC found, 
converting EAD to OAI-PMH poses several challenges: 
mapping a single EAD file to multiple OAI records; the 
variability of EAD-encoding practices; the complex 
hierarchical structure of EAD finding aids; and 
contextualizing individual results within the overall 
hierarchy (Prom and Habing 2002). Illinois 
experimented with “a schema that produces many DC 
[Dublin Core] metadata records from a single EAD 
file,” producing a collection-level record that linked to 
the EAD finding aid as well as providing links to 
related parts of the collection (Cole et al. 2002). Archon 
is now experimenting with harvesting finding aids 
from a static directory via OAI-PMH, but nothing has 
been released yet. Other archival management systems, 
including CALM for Archives, MINISIS M2A, and 
Adlib Archive, already provide support for OAI. The 
FCLA is also exploring using the OAI-PMH protocol to 
harvest EAD from registered provider sites (Florida 
Center for Library Automation 2008). While Kathy 
Wisser was at the North Carolina Echo Project, she 
he 
developed a proof-of-concept distributed repository 
using the Internet Archive’s Heretrix Web crawler and 
XTF as the indexer. 
39
ht
tp://archives.chadwyck.com/marketing/about.jsp
40
http://www.openarchives.org/
41
http://www.atomenabled.org/
42
http://oai.grainger.uiuc.edu/ 
Lisa Spiro 
32 
3. Adopt an archival management system that 
supports federation. 
ICA-AToM is being designed to support harvesting 
and syndication via OAI and IETF Atom Publishing 
Protocol. According to its Web site, “it can be set up as 
a multi-repository ‘union list’ accepting descrip-tions 
from any number of contributing institutions.” Perhaps 
software such as ICA-AToM could be adopted to 
provide a union list, although such a solution may not 
be flexible enough to accommodate the varied methods 
archives use to deliver archival information. 
9. Conclusion 
Hidden collections pose complex challenges to archives and 
special collections, but implementing appropriate software can 
help organizations work more efficiently and provide broader 
access to archival information. Adopting new software, 
however, will require that archives adjust their workflows and 
import existing data into the new system. This study identifies 
some of the key requirements for archival management 
software so that archivists can make informed selections. In 
choosing software, archives should determine which 
requirements are most important: Do they need to publish 
finding aids online? Do they need to import and export data in 
particular formats? Do they want support for key 
management functions, such as accessioning and gener-ation 
of reports? Do they prefer commercial or open source 
software? In addition, they should carefully study factors such 
as cost, customer service, and core functionality. This report 
has aimed to outline the collective understanding of archival 
management software at this time and to provide a basis for 
expanding that knowledge.  
Archival Management Software 
33 
Works Cited 
Author’s note: I have bookmarked over 200 Web pages relevant 
to this study, including most of the resources below, at 
http://www.diigo.com/user/lspiro/archival_tool_study
Archives Hub. 2008. Archives Hub: Creating and Managing 
Spokes. Available at 
http://www.archiveshub.ac.uk/arch/spokesnew.shtml
Archivists’ Toolkit. 2008. Features Matrix: Archivists’ Toolkit, 
Archon, and PastPerfect. Available at 
http://www.archiviststoolkit.org/Comparison_of_Archival_
Management_Software_3.pdf
Archon. October 2008. Archon™: Facilitating Access to Special 
Collections Project Update. Available at 
www.archon.org/ArchonUpdateOct2008.pdf
Association of Research Libraries Special Collections Task 
Force. 2006. Special Collections Task Force Final Status Report. 
Washington, D.C: Association of Research Libraries. Available 
at 
http://www.arl.org/rtl/speccoll/spcolltf/status0706.shtml
Baron, Robert. 1991. Choosing Museum Collection 
Management Software: The Systems Analysis. Available at 
http://www.studiolo.org/MusComp/STATEMNT.htm
Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan. n. d. MS 
Word 2000 EAD Templates and Macros. Available at 
http://bentley.umich.edu/EAD/bhlfiles.php
Canadian Heritage Information Network. 2003. Collections 
Management Software Review. Available at 
http://www.chin.gc.ca/English/Collections_Management/S
oftware_Review/introduction.html
Canadian Heritage Information Network. 2002. Collections 
Management Software Selection. (Last modified April 27, 
2002.) Available at 
http://www.chin.gc.ca/English/Collections_Management/S
oftware_Selection/index.html
Cole, Timothy, Joanne Kaczmarek, Paul Marty, Chris Prom, 
Beth Sandore, and Sarah Shreeves. 2002. Now That We’ve 
Found the ‘Hidden Web’ What Can We Do With It? The 
Illinois Open Archives Initiative Metadata Harvesting 
Experience. Presented at the Museums and the Web 2002, 
Boston, Mass., April 18-20, 2002. Available at 
Lisa Spiro 
34 
http://www.archimuse.com/mw2002/papers/cole/cole.html
Collections Trust. 2008. Software Survey—SPECTRUM 
Partners’ Systems. Available at 
http://www.mda.org.uk/software
Council on Library and Information Resources. 2008. 
Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives: Building 
a New Research Environment. Washington, DC: Council on 
Library and Information Resources. Available at 
http://www.clir.org/activities/details/hiddencollections.htm
l
de Catanzaro, Christine, Jody Lloyd Thompson, and Kent 
Woynowski. 2007. Archivists’ Toolkit: Issues in 
Implementation. Presented at the GALILEO Users’ Group 
Meeting, Fort Valley, Georgia, May 17, 2007. Available at 
http://smartech.gatech.edu/handle/1853/14405
Dewhurst, Basil. 2001. Planning and Implementing a 
Collection Management System. Health and Medicine Museums 
Newsletter 20 (July). Available at 
http://archive.amol.org.au/hmm/pdfs/hmm20.pdf
Di Bella, Christine. 2007. Philadelphia Area Consortium of 
Special Collections Libraries (PACSCL) 30-month Consortial 
Survey Initiative. Society of American Archivists Manuscript 
Repositories Newsletter (Summer). Available at 
http://www.archivists.org/saagroups/mss/summer2007.asp
#5
Digital Publishing Group, UC Berkeley Library. n. d. EAD 
History. Available at 
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/digicoll/bestpractices/ead_hist
ory.html
Florida Center for Library Automation. May 28, 2008. 
Sustaining & Growing The Opening Archives In Florida 
Project: Report of Ad Hoc Project Advisory Group Meeting. 
Available at 
http://www.fcla.edu/dlini/OpeningArchives/advisoryGrou
pMeeting.pdf
Greene, Mark, and Dennis Meissner. 2005. More Product, Less 
Process: Revamping Traditional Archival Processing. 
American Archivist 68(2): 208-263. Available at 
http://archivists.metapress.com/content/c741823776k65863
Groot, Tamara, Peter Horsman, and Rob Mildren. November 
2003. OSARIS: Functional Requirements for Archival 
Description and Retrieval Software. Paris: International 
Council on Archives. Available at 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested