c# pdf to image free library : Converting a word document to a fillable pdf form application software utility html windows winforms visual studio Steptoe_TaxProcedureOutline_20120-part809

© 2012 Steptoe & Johnson LLP
Tax Procedure Outline: 
Audit to Litigation
Prepared by:
J. Walker Johnson
202 429 6225 direct
wjohnson@steptoe.com
Converting a word document to a fillable pdf form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
create pdf fill in form; create a fillable pdf form from a pdf
Converting a word document to a fillable pdf form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
convert word to pdf fillable form online; create a writable pdf form
Steptoe’s experienced tax controversy litigators include several who have served as Justice 
Department trial and appellate attorneys, judicial law clerks, and Treasury and IRS officials.  
Our practice combines trial-tested litigation skills with up-to-date substantive tax experience, 
enabling us to take on the most challenging cases and achieve outstanding results for our clients.  
Brief biographies of Steptoe attorneys who practice in the area of tax litigation, audit, and 
controversy are located immediately following the conclusion of the procedural outline, 
beginning on page 37. 
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; PDF document can be converted from ODT by using following C# demo code Following sample code may help you with converting ODP to PDF
create a fillable pdf form in word; convert fillable pdf to word fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET VB.NET Tutorial for Converting PDF from Microsoft Office Excel
add fillable fields to pdf online; attach image to pdf form
Tax Procedure Outline – Audit to Litigation 
In this outline, we discuss tax controversy procedures, starting before the filing of the return, 
continuing through the IRS examination and Appeals stages, and up to the beginning of the 
litigation stage.  The purpose of the outline is to identify and explain tax procedure requirements 
and opportunities.  Knowledge and use of applicable tax procedure rules can be critically 
important to achieving the successful resolution of substantive tax issues.  Tax controversy 
procedures create the danger of damaging pitfalls, as well as the opportunity to adopt creative 
and successful strategies. 
The outline proceeds on a chronological basis, from the beginning through the end of the tax 
process.  For each stage in the tax process, headings in the outline raise procedural questions, 
identify procedural risks, and describe procedural opportunities.  This outline does not contain 
in-depth analyses of the procedural rules, but does provide references to additional resources.   
When the Business Engages in a Tax Sensitive Transaction,  
What Document Retention Issues Should I Consider? 
I. 
The taxpayer must stress to participants in the transaction that they are creating a written 
record. 
A. 
Most business documents (paper and electronic) cannot be protected as 
confidential documents.   
B. 
The attorney-client privilege protects only confidential communications between 
an attorney and a client in the course of their professional relationship.  The Code 
§7525 privilege protects communications between a “federally authorized tax 
practitioner” and a client.  The work product doctrine protects only materials that 
contain an attorney’s mental impressions, conclusions, or analysis prepared in 
anticipation of or in the course of litigation.  The application and scope of these 
protections are often disputed.   
C. 
Participants in the transaction should avoid making written communications that 
are based on factual or legal assumptions, that jump to legal conclusions, or that 
contain speculation not grounded on fact or considered legal analysis.   
D. 
Ill-considered statements in documents and emails may serve as an audit roadmap 
for the IRS and observations regarding the merits of issues may undermine IRS 
settlement negotiations and subsequent litigation. 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
VB.NET Tutorial for Creating PDF document from MS Office Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF VB.NET Demo Code for Converting Word to PDF.
create fill pdf form; add signature field to pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Password: Set File Permissions. Password: Open Document. Edit Digital How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET VB.NET Demo Code for Converting PowerPoint to PDF.
create a fillable pdf form from a word document; create fillable form pdf online
II. 
Be sure to compile and maintain all information and documents relevant to the 
transaction. 
A. 
Maintain documents that relate to the structure of the transaction, the conduct of 
the transaction, the business purpose for the transaction, and other relevant issues.  
B. 
Document the identities of participants in the transaction and memorialize critical 
facts and analyses.    
C. 
Remember to preserve hard copies of relevant emails and electronic files (so-
called electronically stored information or ESI).  Also preserve emails and 
electronic documents in separate and easily retrievable electronic files.  If a key 
team member leaves, make sure you will have access to those electronic files and 
emails.  Find out how long your system retains emails in files before dumping 
them in a mass archive.  You may want to collect and separately preserve emails 
to avoid the need for wide-ranging electronic record searches years later.  
D. 
Maintain documents for time periods that are appropriate in light of the applicable 
statutes of limitation for the periods affected by the transaction.   
E. 
When controversy looms, taxpayers should institute a “litigation hold,” which 
reminds record keepers to maintain and not destroy relevant documents.    
1. 
Failure to institute a “litigation hold,” with the result that documents are 
destroyed, may lead to a charge of “spoliation” (see next section, 
below).    
2. 
Failure to institute a “litigation hold” will undermine a claim that 
documents subsequently drafted were prepared “in anticipation of 
litigation” and are protected under the work product doctrine.  In other 
words, if a taxpayer anticipated litigation it should have instituted a 
litigation hold.   
3. 
The taxpayer must have established policies for when to initiate a 
litigation hold, for ensuring that the scope of the hold is sufficiently 
broad, and for ensuring that documents are correctly retained. 
III.  At all times, act consistently with an established document retention policy.     
A. 
The purpose of a document retention policy is to manage, properly and legally, 
documents generated by the taxpayer.  Many documents are important and 
relevant enough to be retained.  On the other hand, if there is no business reason 
or legal obligation to retain a document, it can be properly destroyed, as a matter 
of practice and routine, to reduce administrative costs.   
B. 
The document retention policy should specify the types of documents to be 
retained, the manner in which they will be stored, and the length of time that they 
will be retained.   
C. 
Documents (paper and electronic) should not be destroyed if a legal “matter” to 
which they relate is reasonably foreseeable, pending or threatened.  Dire 
consequences can result if documents are improperly destroyed.  Employees 
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable may help you with converting PowerPoint(.pptx PDF document can be converted from PowerPoint2003 by
convert word form to pdf fillable form; asp.net fill pdf form
should be instructed to obtain legal advice when uncertainties arise.  Improper 
destruction or alteration of documents is called “spoliation,” and can lead to the 
imposition of sanctions, the drawing of adverse evidentiary inferences, and even 
the dismissal of a case in litigation.  Spoliation is serious and can doom a case to 
failure from the start.   
D. 
If documents are to be destroyed, ensure that established document retention 
policies are followed.  
IV.  Once the relevant documents and information have been compiled, handle it in ways that 
maintain applicable privileges and protections.   
A. 
Both the attorney-client privilege and the work product protection may be waived 
by voluntary disclosure.   
B. 
Accordingly, care must be taken that confidential documents and information are 
properly maintained in protected files and not disseminated or made available to 
persons other than those to whom the communications are addressed.   
C. 
Even an inadvertent disclosure to a third person may waive the privilege or 
protection.   
D. 
A waiver can occur not only for the disclosed document, but for all documents 
that address the same “subject matter.”  
Can I Be Proactive and Resolve Tax Issues Before the Return Is Filed?  
V. 
Some issues can be resolved under the IRS’s Pre-Filing Agreement Program. 
A. 
A Pre-Filing Agreement (PFA) can be used to resolve factual issues and issues 
involving the application of well-established legal principles to stipulated facts.  
However, note that the cost is $50,000 per issue. Rev. Proc. 2009-14, § 3.03 and 
3.08.  
B. 
Note:  PFAs cannot be used to resolve uncertain legal issues.  If the taxpayer 
wants comfort regarding a legal issue that is not well-settled, the taxpayer can 
request a private letter ruling.  Rev. Proc. 2012-1.   
C. 
Under the original PFA program, certain taxpayers could request a pre-filing 
examination of certain issues in a year for which a tax return was not yet due.  
Rev. Proc. 2001-22.  On December 22, 2004, the program was expanded so that a 
taxpayer can request such an examination and agreement for up to four years 
beyond the current tax year.  Rev. Proc. 2005-12.  The program was made 
permanent in 2009.  Rev. Proc. 2009-14.  Internal Revenue Manual section 4.30.1 
discusses the PFA procedures.  
D. 
Issues resolved in a PFA are permanently and conclusively resolved by means of 
a closing agreement for the year(s) covered by the PFA.  If the PFA resolves an 
issue for future years, a non-statutory PFA is executed.  Rev. Proc. 2009-14, § 7.   
E. 
The IRS website (www.IRS.gov) lists issues successfully completed in the 
program.   (http://www.irs.gov/businesses/article/0,,id=102667,00.html) 
Can I Avoid Tax Penalties by Disclosing Issues on the Tax Return? 
VI.  Disclosure of Issues on the Tax Return 
A. 
If the taxpayer has a reasonable basis for the tax treatment of an item, the item is 
not attributable to a tax shelter, and the taxpayer adequately discloses the item on 
the return, accuracy-related penalties could be avoided.  Code § 6662(d)(2)(B)(ii); 
Rev. Proc. 2012-15 § 3.03.   
B. 
Disclosures are made using Form 8275 or Form 8275-R (for positions contrary to 
Treasury regulations).  Treas. Reg. § 1.6662-4(f).   
C. 
Disclosure on Form 1120 Schedule UTP satisfies the disclosure requirement; a 
separate Form 8275 or Form 8275-R need not be filed.  Rev. Proc. 2012-15 § 
3.07; Instructions for IRS Form 1120 Schedule UTP (2010). 
1. 
Taxpayers are required to file Form 1120 Schedule UTP and disclose 
their uncertain tax positions.  Treas. Reg. § 1.6012-2(a)(4).   
2. 
Form 1120 Schedule UTP requires a concise description of each 
uncertain tax position for which the taxpayer or a related entity has 
recorded a reserve in its financial statements, each uncertain tax position 
that the taxpayer expects to litigate, and the maximum amount of 
potential federal tax liability attributable to each uncertain tax position.  
For 2012, Form 1120 Schedule UTP is not required for corporations that 
have assets below $50 million.  In 2014 the threshold declines to $10 
million.  Instructions for IRS Form 1120 Schedule UTP (2010). 
D. 
Note:  If the item is attributable to a tax shelter, disclosure alone will not prevent 
the imposition of penalties, see ¶ VII, below. 
Can and Should I Disclose Transactions That May be a “Tax Shelter”? 
VII.  “Tax Shelter” Disclosures 
A. 
Code Section 6011 may require a disclosure.  
1. 
Pursuant to Code Section 6011, the IRS has issued regulations that 
require the disclosure of “reportable transactions.”  Treas. Reg. § 
1.6011-4.  Successive versions of these regulations, applicable to 
different time periods, have been issued over the years.   
2. 
The regulations require taxpayers that participate, directly or indirectly, 
in a “reportable transaction” to file a disclosure statement with their tax 
return and with the IRS Office of Tax Shelter Analysis for each year that 
is affected by the reportable transaction.   Treas. Reg. 1.6011-4(a), (d) 
and (e).   
3. 
The regulations describe five classes of reportable transactions:  listed 
transactions, confidential transactions, transactions with contractual 
protection, transactions generating significant losses, and transactions of 
interest.  Proposed regulations would add a sixth class, patented 
transactions.  Treas. Reg. § 1.6011(b).      
4. 
Disclosure must be made on Form 8886.  Currently, disclosure on Form 
1120 Schedule UTP does not satisfy the disclosure requirement.  Rev. 
Proc. 2012-15 § 3.07; IRS Announcement 2010-75.  Taxpayers will 
need to disclose tax shelters resulting in tax reserves on the Schedule 
UTP form.    
5. 
Disclosures must be made for transactions that subsequently are 
identified by the Service as a listed transaction or a transaction of 
interest.  Treas. Reg. § 1.6011-4(e)(2).   
6. 
If a taxpayer does not make a required disclosure, such failure by the 
taxpayer will be treated as strong evidence that the taxpayer did not act 
in good faith with respect to the portion of any underpayment 
attributable to the transaction.  Treas. Reg. § 1.6664-4(d).  Thus, a 
taxpayer who fails to disclose a reportable transaction is unlikely to 
prevail in asserting the reasonable cause defense to the accuracy-related 
penalty.   
B. 
Code Section 6662A imposes a 20 percent accuracy-related penalty on 
“reportable transaction understatements.”  For purposes of Code Section 6662A, a 
“reportable transaction” is (1) a listed transaction, or (2) a reportable transaction, 
if a significant purpose of the transaction is the avoidance or evasion of Federal 
income tax.  The penalty is increased to 30 percent if the transaction is not 
properly disclosed by the taxpayer.    
C. 
Code Section 6707A imposes a penalty on taxpayers who fail to file required 
disclosures with respect to a reportable transaction.  The amount of the penalty is 
75 percent of the decrease in tax shown on the return as a result of the transaction, 
or the decrease in tax that would have resulted from the transaction if it were 
respected for Federal tax purposes. The penalty is subject to a minimum amount 
of $5,000 for individuals and $10,000 for corporations. The maximum penalty for 
failure to disclose a listed transaction is $100,000 for individuals and $200,000 for 
corporations; the maximum penalty for failure to disclose any other reportable 
transaction is $10,000 for individuals and $50,000 for corporations.  Note that the 
Code Section 6707A penalty can be imposed in addition to the Code Section 6662 
or the Code Section 6662A accuracy-related penalty. This penalty can be imposed 
regardless of whether the reportable transaction causes an understatement of tax.   
D. 
If the item is a “tax shelter,” disclosing the item on the return will not 
automatically avoid exposure to accuracy-related penalties.  Code § 
6662(d)(2)(C).   
1. 
Penalties can be avoided by declining to claim the tax benefits 
associated with the item, thus avoiding the associated tax 
“underpayment.”  The tax benefits could be claimed subsequently in an 
amended return or by an affirmative claim asserted during the 
examination process.  Code §6662(d)(2)(A).   
2. 
Penalties also can be avoided by filing a timely Qualified Amended 
Return (see ¶ VIII, below), but only if the taxpayer pays the tax and 
interest associated with the item.  The payment of tax is treated as tax 
shown on the original return and eliminates the underpayment on which 
the penalty is based.  Treas. Reg. § 1.6664-2(c)(2).   
E. 
A 20 percent accuracy-related penalty applies for understatements with respect to 
reportable transactions.  Code § 6662A.   Failure to disclose the transaction 
increases the penalty to 30 percent.  Code §6662A(c).   
F. 
For transactions entered into after March 30, 2010, a strict liability 20 percent 
penalty applies for nondisclosed noneconomic substance transactions.  Code § 
6662(b)(6).  Failure to disclose increases the penalty to 40 percent.   Code 
§6662(i)(1).   
G. 
Code § 6111 requires each “material advisor” with respect to a “reportable 
transaction” (as defined in Code § 6707A(c)) to file a return describing the 
transaction and the potential tax benefits expected to result from the transaction.  
If a material advisor fails to file a return required under Code § 6111, a penalty of 
$50,000 will be imposed for such failure.  Code § 6707.  In the case of listed 
transactions, the penalty is increased to the greater of $200,000 or 50 percent of 
the gross income derived by the material advisor with respect to the aid, 
assistance, or advice provided with respect to the transaction.   
H. 
Moreover, Code § 6112 requires each material advisor with respect to a 
“reportable transaction” (as defined in Code Section 6707A(c)) to maintain a list 
of investors in such transaction.  If a material advisor who is required by Code § 
6112 to maintain an investor list fails to make the list available to the IRS in a 
timely manner, the advisor will incur a penalty equal to $10,000 per day after an 
initial 20-day period, unless reasonable cause exists.  Code § 6708. 
Can I Disclose Issues to the IRS After the Tax Return Is Filed?   
VIII.  Disclosure of Issues on Qualified Amended Returns 
A. 
Disclosures can be made on a qualified amended return.  Treas. Reg. § 1.6664-
2(c)(2).   
B. 
Amounts of tax reported on a qualified amended return will be treated as if they 
had been reported on the original return for purposes of computing the amount of 
the tax “underpayment,” unless the original return reported a fraudulent position. 
Treas. Reg. § 1.6664-2(c)(2).   
C. 
To be “qualified,” the amended return must be filed before: (1) the date the 
taxpayer is first contacted concerning an IRS examination; (2) in the case of a 
promoted transaction, the date the tax shelter promoter is first contacted 
concerning an IRS examination; (3) in the case of a pass-through item, the date 
the pass-through entity is first contacted concerning an IRS examination; and (4) 
the date a John Doe summons is served on a third party with respect to an activity 
of the taxpayer for which the taxpayer claimed a tax benefit, and (5) the date on 
which the Service announces a settlement initiative for a listed transaction.  Treas. 
Reg. § 1.6664-2(c)(3)(i).   
D. 
If a taxpayer fails to disclose a listed transaction for which a tax benefit is 
claimed, an amended return will be treated as a “qualified” amended return only if 
it is filed before: (1) the dates described above for qualified amended returns in 
general; (2) the date the IRS first contacts a person regarding an examination of 
that person’s liability for penalties under Code § 6707(a) with respect to the 
undisclosed listed transaction of the taxpayer; and (3) the date on which the 
Service requests from a taxpayer’s material advisor (or any person who made a 
tax statement for the benefit of the taxpayer) the information required to be 
included in a list under Code Section 6112 relating to a transaction that is the 
same as, or substantially similar to, the undisclosed listed transaction.  Treas. Reg. 
§ 1.6664-2(c)(3)(ii).  
IX.  “Audit File” Disclosures 
A. 
Large taxpayers are subject to the Coordinated Industry Case (CIC) Program 
(formerly Coordinated Examination Program (CEP)) and are audited for every 
year.   
B. 
Errors, affirmative issues, and other items can be disclosed by a CIC taxpayer to 
the IRS at the start of the examination. The disclosure statement is treated as a 
qualified amended return.  Treas. Reg. § 1.6664-2(c)(4);  Rev. Proc. 94-69.    
1. 
This disclosure procedure will not prevent imposition of penalties if the 
disclosed item is attributable to a tax shelter. 
2. 
Disclosure of issues up front may help to create a better relationship 
with Exam.   
How Does the IRS Routinely Conduct a Field Examination? 
Can I Control the Process?  
X. 
IRS Audit/Examination Procedures   
A. 
The IRS is authorized by statute to conduct examinations.  Code § 7601.  The 
IRS’s power to examine taxpayers is broad and difficult to limit.   
1. 
Certain limits are imposed, such as the requirement that the time and 
place of the examination be reasonable under the circumstances and that 
the taxpayer not be subject to unnecessary examinations or multiple 
examinations for each taxable year.  IRC 7605(a) and (b).  
2. 
Otherwise, the examination may seek any information that “may be 
relevant or material.”  Code § 7602(a)   The IRS’s ability to examine tax 
returns and collect information is largely unfettered and difficult to limit.  
B. 
The IRS’s examination power extends to tax accrual workpapers.  See I.R.M. § 
4.10.20 (“Requesting Audit, Tax Accrual, or Tax Reconciliation Workpapers”).   
1. 
Tax accrual workpapers are audit workpapers that relate to the tax 
reserve for current, deferred and potential or contingent tax liabilities, 
however classified or reported on audited financial statements, and to 
footnotes disclosing those tax reserves on audited financial statements. 
These workpapers reflect an estimate of a company's tax liabilities and 
may also be referred to as the tax pool analysis, tax liability contingency 
analysis, tax cushion analysis, or tax contingency reserve analysis.  
I.R.M. § 4.10.20.2(2).   
2. 
Taxpayers have claimed that tax accrual workpapers are entitled to 
attorney-client privilege and work product protection with mixed 
success.  Textron Inc. & Subs v. United States, 577 F.3d 21 (1st Cir. 
2009).  But see Deloitte, LLP v. United States, 610 F.3d 138 (D.C. Cir. 
2010).   
3. 
The IRS states that it generally will not request tax accrual workpapers, 
absent unusual circumstances.   A request will be made when the 
examiner identifies a specific issue and needs additional facts, the 
examiner has sought facts regarding the issue from the taxpayer and 
third parties, and the examiner has sought a supplementary analysis of 
facts relating to the issue.  I.R.M. § 4.10.20.3.   
4. 
If the taxpayer has engaged in a listed transaction and disclosed that 
transaction, the IRS will request only the portion of the tax accrual 
workpapers that concerns that transaction.   I.R.M. § 4.10.20.3.2.3.   
5. 
If the taxpayer did not disclose its listed transaction, or engaged in 
multiple listed transactions, the IRS will request all tax accrual 
workpapers.  Id.   
C. 
Taxpayers should ask the IRS for an audit plan and a timetable.   
1. 
Taxpayers should seek to negotiate the scope and timing of the audit.   
2. 
Taxpayers should seek to control what documents and information the 
agents obtain access to, and should keep track of what materials the 
agents have examined.  Taxpayers should document all meetings in 
order to ensure a record of information provided orally and IRS 
positions or representations. 
3. 
Taxpayers should designate persons to whom the IRS can direct requests 
for information and should ask that the IRS submit its requests for 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested