c# pdf to image free library : Convert pdf fillable form to word Library control component .net azure web page mvc Steptoe_TaxProcedureOutline_20123-part812

29 
If I Want to Settle Some Issues, but Also Want  
to Take Other Issues into the Tax Court, What Do I Do?  
G. 
Option #3 – Partially agreed case, with unagreed issues left for litigation in the 
Tax Court.  This typically is referred to as a “Partial Agreement.”    
1. 
Compute the deficiency or overassessment due based on (i) resolving the 
settled issues as agreed and (ii) resolving the unagreed issues not settled 
in favor of the taxpayer.   
2. 
Execute Form 870-AD reflecting the agreed deficiency, listing the issues 
that have been settled.  I.R.M. § 8.6.4.4.1.  
3. 
The Form 870-AD is a waiver of the IRS’s restrictions on assessment.  
The IRS will assess the tax due and send the taxpayer a notice 
demanding payment.   
4. 
The IRS will issue a statutory notice of deficiency seeking the tax due 
with respect to the unagreed issues. 
5. 
All of the agreed issues listed as settled in the Form 870-AD are 
resolved.  All other issues (raised or not raised, known or not known) 
remain fully in dispute.  The IRS can raise any unsettled issue in the Tax 
Court as a “new matter.”  Tax Court Rule 142.   
6. 
Having received a statutory notice of deficiency, the taxpayer can 
litigate in the Tax Court.  Alternatively, the taxpayer can choose to pay 
the deficiency asserted in the statutory notice and file a claim for refund.   
If I Have Chosen to Take Issues into Refund Litigation,  
What Procedural Steps Must I Take After Leaving Appeals, 
and How Quickly Must I Act in Order to Not Lose My Rights? 
XXXII.  Preparation for Refund Litigation 
A. 
The required first step is to file a Claim for Refund.  Code § 7422(a).   
B. 
The refund claim must be filed within the statutory limitations period.  Code § 
6511.   
1. 
If no Form 872 agreement extending the period of assessment has been 
executed, the claim must be filed within three years of the filing of the 
return.  Code § 6511(a). 
2. 
If a Form 872 agreement extending the period of assessment has been 
executed, the claim must be filed within six months following the 
expiration of the extended assessment period.  Code § 6511(c).  See 
Form 872.   
Convert pdf fillable form to word - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert word form to fillable pdf; pdf signature field
Convert pdf fillable form to word - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
create a pdf form to fill out and save; change font size in fillable pdf form
30 
3. 
Alternatively, a claim for refund can be filed within two years of the 
date a payment is made, but limited to the amount of that payment.  
Code § 6511(a). 
C. 
Contents of the refund claim  
1. 
The claim is filed using Form 1120X.     
2. 
Each issue must be adequately described in the refund claim.  Enough 
information must be provided to describe adequately the issue to the 
IRS.   
What Issues Can and Should I Raise in the Refund Claim?   
D. 
In order for an issue to be raised in the refund claim, the taxpayer should have 
reserved the issue for litigation in the Form 870-AD.   When the taxpayer signs 
the Form 870-AD, it agrees not to reopen the matters settled with the IRS.  This 
agreement is not fully binding, because the Form 870-AD is not a closing 
agreement under Code § 7121.  The taxpayer could be barred from reopening the 
agreement, however, under an estoppel theory.   
E. 
Under the Variance Doctrine, if an issue is not raised in the refund claim, that 
issue cannot be raised in subsequent tax litigation (the complaint cannot vary from 
the claim).  Treas. Reg. § 301.6402-2(b).   
1. 
Therefore, it is critical to raise in the refund claim all of the issues that 
you want to litigate.   
2. 
Be careful to consider whether raising an issue will have collateral tax 
effects.  If so, those tax effects should be claimed as well.   
F. 
Taxpayers that fail to timely file a formal, written refund claim containing an 
issue that they want to litigate may be able to contend that they have made an 
Informal Claim for Refund.  See, e.g., Arch Eng'g Co., Inc. v. United States, 783 
F.2d 190, 192 (Fed. Cir. 1986) (the minimum requirements for an "informal" 
refund claim include a written request for sums paid for a particular tax year).  
What Action Will the IRS Take Regarding the Refund Claim? 
G. 
IRS action on the claim 
1. 
The IRS may or may not act at all on the refund claim.   
2. 
The taxpayer can file the refund claim accompanied by a request that the 
IRS immediately disallow the refund claim.  IRS News Release IR-1600 
(Apr. 26, 1976).  Also, the taxpayer can contact its examining agents and 
ask for immediate disallowance.   
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents.
convert excel spreadsheet to fillable pdf form; convert pdf to form fill
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files.
convert pdf fillable form to word; allow users to attach to pdf form
31 
3. 
The IRS may send the taxpayer a notice of proposed disallowance of the 
refund claim.  The taxpayer can protest the proposed disallowance to 
IRS Appeals. 
a.  The IRS will enclose a Form 2297, asking the taxpayer to waive its 
right to receive a formal notice of disallowance.  These forms pose 
a danger to taxpayers, because they start the limitations period for 
filing suit, usually at an ill-defined date.   
4. 
The IRS will send a formal notice of claim disallowance.  The notice 
must be sent by certified or registered mail.  Code § 6532.  This notice is 
critical as it starts the limitations period for filing suit.   
Once the Refund Claim is Disallowed, How Long Do I Have to File the Refund Suit?   
H. 
The statute of limitations for filing the refund litigation.   
1. 
The refund suit must be filed within two years of the date of mailing of 
the formal notice of claim disallowance.   
2. 
If the taxpayer executed Form 2297, suit must be filed within two years 
of the date on which the IRS accepts that form.  Code § 6532(a)(3).  
Note that using this form can create confusion regarding when the 
limitations period begins to run.   
3. 
The statute of limitations for filing suit can be extended using Form 907, 
if the IRS agrees to execute that form.   Code § 6532(a)(2).   
If the IRS Fails to Disallow the Refund Claim, Can I File a Refund Suit Anyway?  
I. 
Ability to commence the refund litigation 
1. 
The taxpayer can file suit after the IRS denies the claim for refund.   
2. 
However, if the IRS has not acted on the claim within 6 months of its 
filing, the taxpayer is free to file suit.   Code § 6532(a)(1).   
3. 
If the taxpayer executed Form 2297, the taxpayer must wait 6 months to 
file suit. 
4. 
In order to accelerate the time for filing suit, the taxpayer can request 
that the IRS disallow the claim immediately.  IRS News Release IR-
1600 (Apr. 26, 1976).   
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast. Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents.
convert pdf form fillable; convert word form to pdf fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel in VB Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without
pdf form fill; convert html form to pdf fillable form
32 
If I Have Chosen to Take Issues into the Tax Court,  
What Procedural Steps Must I Take After Leaving Appeals? 
XXXIII. Preparation for Tax Court Litigation 
A. 
A petition must be filed with the Tax Court.   
B. 
A petition can be filed in the Tax Court only if the taxpayer has received a 
statutory notice of deficiency (the statutory notice sometimes is referred to as the 
taxpayer’s “ticket to the Tax Court”).   
C. 
The petition must be filed within 90 days of the date of the statutory notice.  Code 
§ 6213.   
D. 
T. C. Rule 34 describes the required form and contents of the petition.   
In Choosing Whether to Litigate in the Tax Court, District Court, or the  
Court of Federal Claims, What Are Some Important Issues I Should Consider?  
XXXIV. Choice of Litigation Forum Issues   
A. 
Should I litigate in the Tax Court?    
1. 
What is the applicable precedent in the Tax Court? 
2. 
The appeal will go to the Court of Appeals in the circuit in which the 
taxpayer resides or has its principal place of business.  Therefore, you 
should also consider the applicable precedent in that circuit.   
3. 
Consider the background, experience, and expertise of the Tax Court 
judges.  Consider the “attitude” and approach that the judges have taken 
regarding various types of issues.  Obviously, there is a great deal of tax 
law precedent in the Tax Court, which presents an expanded opportunity 
to “read the tea leaves.”    
4. 
Consider the foregoing factors in light of the type of issues that your 
case presents, and the types of arguments you will be making.  How well 
will your particular case “play” before the Tax Court “audience”?   
5. 
Your opposing counsel will be an IRS attorney from IRS District 
Counsel’s office.   
6. 
The Tax Court’s rules of procedure will apply.   
a.  The Tax Court has limited discovery procedures available for the 
parties. 
b.  In the Tax Court, the parties must stipulate to facts to the extent 
possible.       
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual C# .NET. odt convert to pdf ODTDocument odt = new ODTDocument
convert pdf to fillable pdf form; pdf form filler
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Best C#.NET component to create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Create fillable PDF document with fields.
auto fill pdf form fields; create pdf fillable form
33 
c.  In the Tax Court, trial will be to a judge, who will decide the case.  
I Have an Issue the IRS Did Not Identify During the Audit. 
In the Tax Court, What Can the IRS Do if It Spots the Issue? 
7. 
The IRS can raise new issues as “new matters.”  T.C. Rule 142.   
a.  The IRS has no restrictions on its ability to raise new issues in its 
answer to the taxpayer’s petition, and no restrictions on its ability 
to recover the tax associated with those new issues.     
b.  For example, suppose the taxpayer raises one issue in its petition, 
and that issue involves $100 of tax.  If the IRS spots a new issue, 
involving (say) $1000 of tax, it can raise that issue in its answer.  If 
the taxpayer loses both issues, its tax liability is increased by 
$1100.  (Contrast this result with the different result reached in the 
refund context below.)  
c.  On these “new matters,” the IRS has the burden of proof.  
However, typically this provides only a minimal advantage to the 
taxpayer.   
Are There Important Aspects of Refund Litigation I Should Consider?   
B. 
Refund Litigation 
1. 
A taxpayer has two options regarding refund litigation.   
a.  One option is to file suit in United States District Court.  The 
taxpayer can file suit in the district in which it resides or has its 
principal place of business.  There may be some flexibility 
regarding the district in which suit can be filed.   
b.  The other option is to file in the United States Court of Federal 
Claims.  This is a court with national jurisdiction, available to all 
taxpayers, wherever located.   
Should I Bring My Refund Suit in District Court?   
2. 
Litigation in District Court   
a.  What is the applicable precedent in the district?   
b.  Appeal from the district court will be to the Court of Appeals in 
which the district is located.  Therefore, you should also consider 
the applicable precedent in that circuit.     
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel. Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without
create fillable form pdf online; create fillable form from pdf
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#.NET. An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET.
create a pdf form that can be filled out; convert word doc to fillable pdf form
34 
c.  Typically, in contrast to the Tax Court, district court judges will 
not be tax specialists, but generalist judges who encounter tax 
issues only periodically.  Not being tax specialists, the judges may 
have different attitudes or approaches to tax issues.   
d.  In contrast to the Tax Court, because district courts hear far more 
types of cases than tax cases, there may be less tax law precedent 
to be considered that is relevant to your issue.     
e.  Jury trials are permitted in district courts.  Consider whether your 
case is one that you believe, or that the government likely will 
believe, is suited to be heard by a jury.   
f.  Opposing counsel usually will be from one of the regional 
litigation sections of the Tax Division of the Justice Department.  
g.  The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure will apply.   
h.  Discovery rules allow far more discovery than is permitted in the 
Tax Court.       
i.  A trial subpoena can be issued only to witnesses within the district, 
or outside the district but within a 100 mile radius of the 
courtroom.  Thus, distant witnesses can not be compelled to testify 
at the trial.   
Should I Bring My Refund Suit in the Court of Federal Claims?   
3. 
Litigation in the Court of Federal Claims   
a.  What is the applicable precedent in the Court of Federal Claims?   
b.  An appeal from the court will be to the Court of Appeals for the 
Federal Circuit.  Therefore, you should also consider the applicable 
precedent in that circuit.     
c.  Typically, Court of Federal Claims judges will not be tax 
specialists, but also will not be generalist judges.  The judges hear 
tax cases, patent cases, and claims against the United States.  
Consider the background, experience, and expertise of these 
judges, and consider the “attitude” and approach that they have 
taken regarding various types of issues.   
d.  No jury trials are permitted.   
e.  Opposing counsel will be from the Court of Federal Claims section 
of the Tax Division of the Justice Department.   
f.  The Rules of the Court of Federal Claims apply.  These rules differ 
from, but are generally similar to, the Federal Rules of Civil 
Procedure.   
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
add fillable fields to pdf online; convert an existing form into a fillable pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Convert OpenOffice Spreadsheet data to PDF. Export PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation. Turn ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
converting pdf to fillable form; convert word to fillable pdf form
35 
g.  On a showing of good cause, the court can issue a trial subpoena to 
a witness that is outside the 100-mile radius of the place of trial.   
I Have an Issue the IRS Did Not Identify During the Audit. 
In a Refund Suit, What Can the IRS Do if It Spots the Issue? 
C. 
In refund litigation, the government can raise new issues only as “offsets.”    
1. 
The government has no restrictions on its ability to raise new issues in 
its answer to the taxpayer’s complaint.   
2. 
However, there is a significant restriction on its ability to recover the tax 
associated with those new issues.  The government cannot affirmatively 
collect the tax related to the “offset” issue, but can only use “offset” 
issues to reduce the amount of a recovery that the taxpayer otherwise 
would be entitled to.       
3. 
For example, suppose the taxpayer raises one issue in its complaint, and 
that issue involves $100 of tax.  If the government spots a new issue, 
involving (say) $1000 of tax, it can raise that issue as an offset in its 
answer.  If the taxpayer wins its issue, but loses the offset issue, it 
recovers zero, since its $100 issue is “offset” by the issue that the 
government raised.  However, the government is not able to collect the 
remaining $900 related to the offset issue.  The “offset” issue can only 
reduce the amount that the taxpayer otherwise would be entitled to 
recover.  (Contrast this result with the different result reached in the Tax 
Court context above.)  
4. 
On these offset issues, the taxpayer has the burden of proof.    
Litigation Entails Different Sets of Procedural Rules,  
Poses Additional Dangers of Damaging Pitfalls, and Presents Different Opportunities for 
Creative and Successful Strategies. At the Pre-Litigation Stage, Taxpayers Should Keep 
Litigation Considerations in Mind. 
XXXV.  As taxpayers progress through the pre-litigation, administrative stage, they should have 
in mind their ultimate goal, and whether they expect that litigation may be necessary to 
achieve that goal. 
A. 
Is the issue under examination one that the taxpayer wants to settle, and keep out 
of litigation?  If so, the taxpayer may develop and present the case aggressively at 
the administrative stage, and take advantage of the full range of procedural 
options described above.   
B. 
Or, is the issue one that the taxpayer expects will be litigated?  If so, the taxpayer 
may resist development of the issue at the administrative stage, and decline to 
36 
fully expound its theories and arguments.  In such a case, taxpayers that 
aggressively pursue the issue at the administrative stage may prematurely “tip 
their hand” and undermine their litigation posture.  Thus, the ultimate litigation 
strategy should be considered even at the pre-litigation stage. 
*     *     *     *     *     *     * 
37 
Steptoe Tax Attorneys 
Arthur Bailey is a partner in Steptoe’s Washington office. He specializes in large complex tax cases, 
recently completing in the fall of 2011 a five week trial in Boston, Massachusetts. He has been lead trial 
counsel in tax cases tried in Tax Court, District Court, and the Court of Federal Claims. His government 
experience was as an appellate tax litigator and from both his government and Steptoe work experiences 
Mr. Bailey has argued appeals in all federal and several state appellate courts. He is recognized as a 
leading tax litigator by Chambers and Legal 500. Mr. Bailey can be reached at abailey@steptoe.com. 
Pat Derdenger is a partner in Steptoe’s Phoenix office. His practice emphasizes federal, state, and local 
taxation law. (Mr. Derdenger is certified as a tax law specialist by the Arizona State Bar.) He has been 
listed in The Best Lawyers in America since 1995 and has been listed in Southwest Super Lawyers for 
State, Local, and Federal Taxation since 2007. Mr. Derdenger provides advice and representation on 
income tax matters, employment tax matters, independent contractor/employee issues, responsible officer 
penalties, information return filing penalties, and excise taxes, the transportation excise tax and the 
communications excise tax. He has extensive experience in advising clients on various employment tax 
and independent contractor issues, including the treatment of “leased employees” for employment tax 
purposes. He also represents business clients in tax controversy matters, income, employment, and excise 
taxes with the IRS at the audit, appeals, and court levels, including the US Tax Court. Mr. Derdenger can 
be reached at pderdenger@steptoe.com. 
Dawn Gabel is a partner in Steptoe’s Phoenix office. Ms. Gabel focuses her practice on state and local 
tax matters. Ms. Gabel has a broad background in state and local tax law, with considerable experience 
related to property tax matters, including advice and litigation on valuation, exemption and classification 
issues for major industrial properties, resorts, golf courses, banks, apartment complexes, hospitals, office 
buildings, and agricultural and vacant land. She has also represented clients using the statutory valuation 
methodology for shopping centers. She represents clients in sales and use tax matters, encompassing audit 
and refund disputes, multi-state compliance, multi-state voluntary disclosure programs, and luxury and 
excise tax issues. She represents clients before the Department of Revenue, various County Assessors, 
Office of Administrative Hearings, the State Board of Equalization, the State Board of Tax Appeals, and 
the Arizona Tax Court and Court of Appeals. Ms. Gabel can be reached at dgabel@steptoe.com. 
Walker Johnson, the drafter of this outline, is a tax partner in Steptoe’s Washington office. Mr. Johnson 
formerly was a trial attorney in the Tax Division, US Department of Justice, where he litigated numerous 
tax cases. Since 1987 he has been an adjunct law professor in the LL.M. in Taxation program at 
Georgetown University Law Center, presenting the course Taxation of Financial Institutions and 
Products. At Steptoe, he has litigated numerous major tax cases, including cases such as New York Life 
(payment vs. deposit), American Electric Power (COLI policies), Textron (tax accrual workpapers), John 
Hancock (cross-border leveraged leasing), and others. He is recognized as a leading tax litigator by 
Chambers and Legal 500 Mr. Johnson can be reached at wjohnson@steptoe.com. 
Greg  Kidder is a partner in Steptoe’s Washington office. His practice focuses on federal income 
taxation issues, with particular emphasis on the taxation of corporate entities and cross-border 
transactions. Mr. Kidder advises clients on structuring corporate transactions, including mergers, 
acquisitions, and spin-off transactions for large public corporations, as well as closely held businesses. He 
38 
also advises clients on international issues, including deferral, foreign tax credits, and tax treaty matters. 
In addition to providing tax planning advice, He also assists clients in tax controversy matters, including 
all stages of the IRS administrative process and in litigation. He has extensive experience negotiating with 
field agents, appeals officers and district counsel in settling significant audit issues. Mr. Kidder can be 
reached at gkidder@steptoe.com. 
Matthew Lerner is a partner in Steptoe’s Washington office. His practice focuses on representing clients 
in all aspects of the tax controversy process, from pre-audit advice about file organization and privilege 
protection, to representation during IRS audits, appeals, and litigation in Federal Courts. He has also 
handled discovery matters in multiple foreign jurisdictions. His key clients include corporations and 
wealthy individuals with complex tax issues covering a broad range of substantive areas. He has recently 
handled matters for clients involving repair and rehabilitation expenses; classification of assets for 
depreciation purposes; losses from trading in securities and derivatives; debt versus equity classification; 
corporate spin-offs and liquidations; miscellaneous corporate fees and expenses; tax advantaged 
transactions; international intercorporate transactions and the foreign tax credit; tax accounting method 
questions; and valuation issues. Mr. Lerner is a frequent speaker to industry groups on important tax 
controversy issues. Mr. Lerner can be reached at mlerner@steptoe.com. 
Alexis MacIvor is of counsel in Steptoe’s Washington office where her practice focuses primarily on tax 
law. Ms. MacIvor’s experience includes tax planning, tax controversy, and tax litigation. Her tax 
controversy practice includes audit examinations, technical advice requests, protests, IRS Appeals 
proceedings, and refund claims. Ms. MacIvor has published and spoken on the Circular 230 regulations 
that impose broad practice requirements on tax advice provided by tax practitioners. Ms. MacIvor is an 
Adjunct Professor of Law in the LL.M. in Taxation program at Georgetown University Law Center and 
co-teaches the course Taxation of Financial Institutions and Products. Ms. MacIvor can be reached at 
amacivor@steptoe.com. 
Philip R. West is chair of the tax practice at Steptoe where his practice is focused mainly on international 
tax issues for both domestic and foreign clients. With more than 25 years in both private practice and 
government service, he has extensive practical experience minimizing the tax cost of international 
business operations and transactions, persuading decision-makers, and resolving tax controversies. Mr. 
West has deep substantive knowledge of income deferral, foreign tax credit, transfer pricing, FATCA, and 
tax treaty matters; as well as of the tax aspects of mergers, acquisitions, joint ventures, financings, 
investment funds, and tax minimization structures and transactions. Mr. West has been consistently 
effective in advocacy before the IRS, Treasury Department and Congress on both technical matters and 
issues of broad policy significance. Mr. West is regularly consulted and cited by government officials and 
the news media. For example, he recently testified before Congress, has advised numerous tax 
administrations around the world, and is often quoted by media outlets including the Wall Street Journal
Bloomberg, and many other publications. Mr. West speaks regularly to professional and academic 
audiences and has published widely on international tax and other matters. Mr. West can be reached at 
pwest@steptoe.com. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested