c# pdf to image free library : Create a fillable pdf form from a pdf application Library utility azure .net windows visual studio web-3t0-part84

University of Bristol Information Services web-t3 
Web design 1: 
Introduction to creating a 
website using Dreamweaver 
MX 
Practical workbook 
Aims and Learning Objectives 
The aim of this course is to enable you to create a simple but well designed 
website to XHTML standards using Dreamweaver MX. 
When you have completed these exercises, you will be able to: 
create a simple but functional website to present information about yourself, department 
or other interest using essential (X)HTML tags and Dreamweaver MX; 
apply fundamental good web design principles to your pages; 
transfer your (X)HTML files from your local PC to a web server using the SSH Secure 
File Transfer program. 
Create a fillable pdf form from a pdf - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert excel spreadsheet to fillable pdf form; convert pdf file to fillable form online
Create a fillable pdf form from a pdf - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
convert pdf fillable forms; allow users to attach to pdf form
Document Information 
Format Conventions 
The following format conventions are used in this document: 
Computer input that you type is shown in a bold 
Courier New font 
<h2>Contact Information</h2> 
Hypertext links to be followed are shown in an 
underlined Courier New
font 
http://www.web-source.net/
Computer output, menu names and options, buttons, 
URLs are shown in a Courier New font 
Save, Go to, Refresh 
Computer keys that you must press are in a bold 
Courier New font and enclosed in angle brackets 
<Enter>, <n>, <N>, </> 
Menu selections are illustrated in a Courier New font 
using forward slash (/) to indicate a sub-menu. In the 
example, this would mean: select the Insert menu, 
then select Picture, then select From File… 
Insert/Picture/From File… 
Related documentation 
Other related documents are available from the web at: 
www.bristol.ac.uk/is/learning/documentation/docs-by-category.html#web
www.bristol.ac.uk/is/learning/documentation/docs-by-category.html#reg
www.bristol.ac.uk/is/learning/documentation/docs-by-category.html#net
Web design 1: Introduction to creating a website using Dreamweaver MX (April 05) 
www.bristol.ac.uk/is/learning/documentation/web-t3/web-t3.doc
If you have any comments or queries about this document mail iser-docs@bristol.ac.uk. 
This document may be used wholly or in part by the academic community, providing suitable 
acknowledgment is made. It may not be used for any commercial or profit-making purpose without 
permission. © 2005 University of Bristol. All rights reserved. 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server. Load PDF from stream programmatically.
create a fillable pdf form; convert html form to pdf fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create PDF document from OpenOffice Text Document with ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats
convert word form to fillable pdf; create fillable form from pdf
University of Bristol Information Services web-t3 
Contents 
Format conventions 
Related documentation 
What is the World Wide Web, how does it work? 
Publishing information on the web 
Task 1
Customising Dreamweaver..............................................................1
Task 2
Creating a basic web page................................................................4
Task 3
Structuring content...........................................................................6
Task 4
Adding formatted lists....................................................................10
Task 5
Changing text appearance..............................................................12
Task 6
Creating hypertext links.................................................................14
Task 7
Using images....................................................................................18
Task 8
Using tables......................................................................................21
Task 9
Review exercise - creating a personal website..............................26
Appendix A.
XHTML tags quick reference..................................................27
Appendix B.
Using colours on the web..........................................................29
Appendix C.
Design and planning tips..........................................................31
Appendix D.
Glossary of terms......................................................................33
Appendix E.
Useful resources........................................................................34
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual
create a fillable pdf form in word; attach file to pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET application. Load PDF from existing documents and image in SQL server.
convert excel to fillable pdf form; create fillable forms in pdf
Introduction 
This course aims to equip you with the basic skills needed to create your own website. You 
will learn how to design and produce basic web pages using the (X)HTML language and 
how to integrate them into a well-organised and user-friendly website. The course will also 
cover useful design tips and techniques to improve your site, as well as how to put your 
website on-line. 
Prerequisites 
This document assumes that you are familiar with the use of a computer keyboard and 
mouse, Microsoft Windows based products and the use of a web browser such as Netscape 
or Internet Explorer. 
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#.NET. An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET.
create fillable pdf form; convert pdf into fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
convert pdf to form fill; convert an existing form into a fillable pdf form
What is the World Wide Web, how does it work? 
The World Wide Web (WWW) is part of the Internet, which itself is "a network of interconnected 
computers", in other words the physical infrastructure used to transfer data (for example, emails, web 
documents etc.) between computers.  
The WWW is a body of virtual information stored on web servers. A web server is a computer 
system that runs software to allow people to look at the web pages stored on it from their own PCs. 
The University has its own web server (even several) which is connected to the Joint Academic 
NETwork (JANET). From home, you have to connect (you must be registered first) to the web server 
of an Internet Service Provider (ISP) to access the Internet. 
Publishing information on the web 
The HyperText Mark-up Language 
(X)HTML (HyperText Mark-up Language) is a document layout and hyperlink specification mark-
up language used to format text and information for the web; it is NOT a programming language 
like C++ or Java. (X)HTML consists of mark-up elements. The syntax of a typical element is as 
follows: 
<name attribute1="value" attribute2="value">text</name> 
At its most basic an (X)HTML element consists of an opening tag (<name>) and a closing tag 
(indicated by a forward slash before the tag name – </name>)containing text (or other elements). 
Tags consist of a tag name and sometimes one or more optional attributes carrying values, which 
modify the default behaviour and settings of the tag. (X)HTML elements instruct browsers (and other 
user agents such as screen readers) on how to render the content. The best way to understand the 
syntax of tags is to look at a few examples: 
<h1>heading level 1</h1> - a level 1 heading 
<a href="http://www.bristol.ac.uk">University of Bristol</a> - a 
link to the University of Bristol homepage 
<table width="80%" border="1" align="center"><tr><td>Cell 1 Row 
1</td></tr></table> - a table consisting of 1 row and 1 column 
A few (X)HTML elements do not contain anything, they either point to a resource (eg an image) or 
they insert an object (eg a line break, a line); these are called empty elements and they look like this: 
<name attribute1="value" /> 
For example: 
<br /> - inserts a line break 
<hr size="3" width="50%" noshade="noshade" /> - inserts a horizontal rule 
"Give me file x" 
"Here it is" 
Desktop 
computer -
"client" 
Computer on the 
Internet holding 
information -
remote "web 
server" 
opening 
tag 
attribute 
value 
closing 
tag 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
formatting. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents. Professional
convert pdf to fillable pdf form; create a pdf form that can be filled out
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual
attach image to pdf form; pdf create fillable form
<img src="picture.jpg" width="100" height="100" alt="picture of 
something" /> - inserts an image 
(X)HTML elements are the building blocks of the web. This means that (X)HTML is not going 
away. Since 1990, HTML standards as defined by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C, see 
http://www.w3.org
) have evolved considerably. Until recently, HTML 4.01 was the 
recommended standard, however it has been superseded by the eXtensible HyperText Mark-up 
Language (XHTML), which has now become the recommended standard. 
Making the transition from HTML to XHTML is really easy. Except for a few differences, most of 
HTML is compliant with XHTML. In XHTML: 
tags must be in lower case whereas HTML accepts UPPER as well as lower case; 
attribute values must be enclosed in double quotes (for example, <td width="120"> 
instead of <td width=120>); 
elements must be correctly nested (for example, <strong><em>properly nested 
tags</em></strong> instead of <strong><em>incorrectly nested tags</strong></em>), 
empty elements must be closed (for example, <hr /> instead of <hr>, <br /> instead of 
<br>), 
all attributes must be given explicit values (for example, <hr noshade="noshade" /> 
instead of <hr noshade>), 
(X)HTML files should be saved with the extension html rather than htm (eg welcome.html). 
Basic XHTML document structure 
(X)HTML syntax is not rocket science, and as such it is accessible to most people. To prove this 
point, let's look at a basic web page to see how it is structured: 
 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="iso-8859-1"?> 
 <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" 
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> 
 <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" lang="en"> 
 <head> 
<title>Joe's website - Home</title> 
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;  
charset=iso-8859-1" /> 
<meta name="description" content="Joe Bloggs's homepage." /> 
<meta name="keywords" content="keyword 1, keyword 2" /> 
 </head> 
10  <body><!-- content starts here --> 
11 
<h1>Joe Blogg's homepage</h1> 
12 
<p>Welcome to my world!</p> 
13 
<hr size="1" /> 
14 
<p>Maintained by <a href="mailto:jb@aol.com">Joe Blogg</a></p> 
15  </body> 
16  </html> 
The rather cryptic lines 1 and 2 tell the browser what versions of XML and XHTML your pages are 
written in. The XML declaration (line 1) is optional, but the XHTML declaration (line 2) is 
compulsory for your pages to validate against the standards as set by the World Wide Web 
Consortium (W3C). You will see many web page that do not include a <!DOCTYPE> and still work, 
however it MUST be included at the top of each page to ensure your pages will function properly in 
all browsers. 
The whole document is contained between the opening <html> tag (line 3) and the closing 
</html> tag (line 16). 
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel.
convert word doc to fillable pdf form; convert pdf to form fillable
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
change font size pdf fillable form; create a fillable pdf form from a word document
An (X)HTML document has two main parts: the head and the body. 
The head (enclosed between the opening <head> and closing 
</head> tags – lines 4 to 9) contains information about the file, 
including the title (between the opening <title> and closing 
</title> tags – line 5) of the page – displayed in the bar at the top of 
the web browser. The information contained in the body (between the 
<body> and </body> tags – lines 10 to 15) is what is actually 
displayed in the browser's main window. 
TIP 
Be consistent in naming the 
title of each page. For 
example, if your site is called 
Joe's website then it 
would be a good idea to give 
your CV page the
title 
Joe's website – CV.
The line <!-- content starts here -->  (line 10) is a comment and is ignored by 
browsers. Comments act as signposts to help you (or whoever might contribute to your site) make 
sense of your code, especially if you haven't looked at it for a while! They begin with <!-- and end 
with -->. 
The <html> </html>, <head> </head>, and <body> </body> tags are the only required 
structural elements of an (X)HTML document. As we have already said, the contents (text, images, 
links, etc) of your document are enclosed between the <body> and </body> tags. This means 
that other (X)HTML tags comprised between these two structural tags will modify the way contents 
display in a browser. 
In our example, the <h1> … </h1> tags (line 11) tell the browser to display the text Joe 
Blogg's Homepage as a level 1 heading (there are 6 levels) - that is, bold, larger font size with 
spacing before and after. 
The <p> and </p> tags (lines 12 and 14) form paragraphs; they insert a blank line before and after 
the paragraph, thus setting it apart from other elements.  
Finally, <a href="mailto:joe@topman.net">Joe Blogg</a> (line 14) creates a 
hyperlink to an email address. 
Here is how the code above would be rendered in a browser: 
Everything between 
the <body> … 
</body> tags 
displays in the main 
window
Web design 1: Introduction to creating a website 
Web design 1: Introduction to creating a website (web-t3)
1
Task 1  Customising Dreamweaver 
Objectives 
To customise Dreamweaver MX to produce XHTML compliant documents. 
Method 
You will use the Edit/Preferences menu in Dreamweaver. 
Comments 
It is easy to customise Dreamweaver to reflect your own preferences. Since we 
recommend writing University pages in XHTML, the first thing we need to do is to 
ensure that it will code our pages to XHTML 1.0 standards. 
Opening Dreamweaver 
1.1 Go to Start/Programs/Macromedia/Macromedia Dreamweaver MX. 
Figure 1 - Dreamweaver MX default interface on opening 
1.2 Hide the panel groups on the right by clicking on the hide panel groups arrow, 
and maximise the Document Window by clicking on the Maximise icon 
in 
the top right corner. 
Hide the Property Inspector by clicking the down arrow to the left of 
Properties in the bottom left corner. 
Customising Dreamweaver 
1.3 From the Edit menu, select Preferences (last option). 
1.4 In the Category column, select Code Hints and, in Options at the top, uncheck 
the Enable Auto Tag Completion box. 
Web design 1: Introduction to creating a website 
Web design 1: Introduction to creating a website (web-t3)
2
Figure 2 - the code hints category in preferences 
1.5 To set Dreamweaver to produce XHTML compliant code: 
¾
In the Category column, select Code Format and make sure it is set as 
follows: 
Figure 3 - code format options 
¾
Now select New Document under Category. Make sure the Default 
Document Type is set to HTML and tick the Make Document XHTML 
Compliant box. 
¾
Finally, select Validator under Category and choose XHTML 1.0 
Transitional. 
¾
Click on OK to close the Preferences dialogue box. 
1.6 To activate the above changes, you need to close the current document and open a new 
one. 
¾
Go to File/Close to close the current document (this will close the Document 
window) – alternatively you can click on the bottom close icon 
in the top right 
corner of the Document window (be careful not to click the one right at the top, 
which would result in closing the programme itself). 
¾
Go to File/New and click the Create button – by default the New Document 
dialogue box will be set to Basic page: HTML. 
Also check that the Make document XHTML compliant option is ticked, if 
it’s not then select it. 
Web design 1: Introduction to creating a website 
Web design 1: Introduction to creating a website (web-t3)
3
¾
Next in the View menu, select Code – alternatively, you can click on the Show 
Code View icon 
in the top left corner, just below the File menu. 
You now see the basic 'skeleton' of a new, XHTML compliant web page as created by 
Dreamweaver (see Figure 4). 
Notice the changes in the code, particularly at the top of the document: 
Figure 4 - code view of a new document in Dreamweaver MX 
Note      
If you have inherited a site created by someone else a while ago, it is likely that it has 
been written in HTML rather than XHTML. If this is the case, you do not need to change 
the default preferences as explained in task 1.5. 
1.7 Finally, you are going to set Dreamweaver to wrap text and to highlight invalid code; this 
will help you correct your errors. 
¾
Go to View/Code View Options and make sure all the options have a tick in 
front of them. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested