c# pdf to image free library : Convert fillable pdf to html form Library application component .net html windows mvc synhdbk7-part852

67
Reference Oscillators
The  reference  oscillator  shown  in  Figure  6.11
provides AC excitation for synchro, resolvers and
inductosyns in systems where an AC reference is
not readily available. It is generally pin program-
mable for  various  common frequencies and can
be used with a wide variety of standard transduc-
ers. Some  have  a quadrature output  for  induc-
tosyn applications. Drive capability is in the 200
mA  range. They  come  in  a  hybrid  or  modular
form.
Power-Output Transformers
Figure  6.12  shows the construction,  equivalent  cir-
cuitry,  and  modular  packaging  of  a  typical  Scott-T
output  coupling  transformer,  with  load  parameters
indicated, to give some idea of the design constraints
OTHER FUNCTIONS AND INSTRUMENTS
SYNCHRO
V
L-L
/FREQ (HZ)
Z
SS
(ΩΩ)
11TR4c
15TRx4a
15TRx6a
18TRx4a
18TRx6b
23TR6
23TR6a
23TRx4a
23TRx6b
90V/400
90V/400
90V/60
90V/400
90V/60
90V/60
90V/60
90V/400
90V/60
180 to 250
50 to82
920
16 to 21
350 to 430
110 to 145
110 to 145
6.5 to 8.1
110 to 145
Table 6.2. Common Torque Receivers and their
Load Impedances.
Figure 6.11. Reference Oscillator.
Figure 6.12. Scott-T Output Coupling Transformer.
S1
S3
S2
L
L
L
R
R
SIN
COS
L = Leakage Reactance
R = Loss Resistance
in this class of applications. The key features of such
a transformer are:
Low distributed capacitance shunt and interwinding.
Low leakage reactance.
High magnetizing inductance.
Low core and copper losses.
Low static regulation.
Low flux density - well below the saturation knee
of the B-H curve.
Accurate centertapping.
Convert fillable pdf to html form - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
convert word to pdf fillable form; change font size pdf fillable form
Convert fillable pdf to html form - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
convert excel to fillable pdf form; pdf signature field
OTHER FUNCTIONS AND INSTRUMENTS
68
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded fonts. An advanced .NET control to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in Visual C# .NET.
create a fillable pdf form; pdf fill form
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#.NET. An advanced PDF form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in C#.NET.
attach image to pdf form; convert word form to pdf fillable form
69
MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
SECTION VII
Worst-Case Error Analysis of Typical S/D or R/D
Converters
Let us begin this important topic with a comprehen-
sive listing of error sources, together with brief expo-
sitions of the nature of their possible effects on accu-
racy ... assuming that they do affect a particular type
of converter. We shall first list the possible "external"
error sources - those that derive from system char-
acteristics  and  environment  stresses  outside  the
converter.
Reference carrier  frequency  variations  from  the
nominal. These can be first-order error sources,
but only in the RC-phase-shift types of converters.
Reference-carrier  rotor-to-stator  time-phase  shift
(α). The  effects of  this  error source  have  been
thoroughly discussed earlier (see Section II), but
note that second-order phase shifts can be intro-
duced by  circuit  components,  such as reference
and  data  isolation transformers,  quadrant selec-
tors, function generators, etc.
Reference carrier harmonics. Note that it is impor-
tant to distinguish between differential harmonics
(those that do not also appear in the data signals)
and total reference harmonics.
Reference amplitude variations.
Inequalities  between  the  rotor-to-stator  transfer
functions of  the  synchro  or resolver by the  con-
verter input impedance, or asymmetrical synchro
or resolver effective source impedances.
Quadrature voltage components in the input data
signal including "speed voltage" quadrature com-
ponents (discussed later in this section).
Excessive  shaft  velocity  -  i.e.,  a  greater  rate  of
change of θ per unit time (dθ/dt) than the convert-
er can track without error.
Acceleration -  the rate of change of  velocity per
unit time; or d²θ/dt².
Ambient temperature changes.
Changes in the power supply to the converter.
The passage of time (in other words, aging effects,
operating and/or nonoperating).
Humidity and other atmospheric effects, including
altitude changes, corrosion, etc.
Shock and vibration effects.
Noise - conducted, radiated, induced, and gener-
ated in ground loops - entering via the data, refer-
ence, and power-supply lines. Includes periodic
and  aperiodic,  as  well  as  random  components.
For  convenience,  common-mode  errors  may  be
included  in  this  category,  since  they  have  the
same effect as ground-loop-coupled noise.
Now  let  us  turn our  attention  to  possible "internal"
error sources; ones that derive from the inherent lim-
itations of circuit technique, and/or imperfections in
the circuit design, components, adjustments, or qual-
ity of control of the converter itself.
Quantizing uncertainty - i.e., the inevitable uncer-
tainty due to the fact that θ, being an analog quan-
tity, is a continuum (has all values between any ini-
tial condition and any other value to which it has
changed), and the digital output cannot change in
smaller steps than 1 LSB. Thus, if the actual input
value  is  more  than  that  expressed  digitally,  but
less  than  that  expressed  by  an  additional  LSB,
there is a quantizing error. The higher the resolu-
tion (i.e., the more bits in the angle-data word), the
smaller the uncertainty.
Nonmonotonicity is  the  failure  of  the  output  to
change in the same direction as the input changes
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
HTML webpage to interactive PDF file creator freeware. Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links Create fillable PDF document with fields.
create a pdf with fields to fill in; convert pdf to fill in form
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
PDF in VB.NET, VB.NET convert PDF to HTML, VB.NET convert PDF to Convert OpenOffice Spreadsheet data to PDF. Turn ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats.
convert pdf to fillable pdf form; convert pdf file to fillable form online
MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
(a problem at "major carry" transitions) in the out-
put codes of certain types of A/D converters.
Nonlinearity in  the  input/output  response  of  the
converter, regardless of the physical cause. This
error cannot be detected by checking the accura-
cy at one or a few points in the range. It is some-
times called "relative accuracy", or the "deviation
from the best straight-line characteristic."
Calibration error  -  i.e.,  difference  between  the
absolute value of θ and the actual value of the out-
put measure (usually) at full scale, under standard
(nominal) conditions.
Zero offset,  due  to  internally  generated  anom-
alous voltages and currents, at any point in the cir-
cuit. These effects are dependent on time, tem-
perature, and power supply.
Internal noise (and the output "jitter" it causes).
Finally, let us consider the possible sources of error
that may be present at the interfaces - input and out-
put - of the converter:
Sampling  errors - uncertainties caused by varia-
tion in the time of sampling (with respect to some
reference),  and  in  the  relative  accuracy  of  the
samples, from channel to channel, or from sample
to  sample  on  a  particular  channel. ("Accuracy"
includes gain, settling time, and aperture errors.)
Skew - error caused by sampling different input-
data channels on successive cycles (peaks of ref-
erence  carrier  wave),  caused  by  the  non-simul-
taneity of sampling.
Staleness - errors caused by the fact that data is
taken  (in  certain types of  converters)  only  once
per carrier cycle, and any changes in θ between
samples are not reflected in the output reading.
Hold  drift. After  sampling,  the  sample/hold  circuit
may not "freeze" the data perfectly, but may drift dur-
ing (or while waiting for) conversion. (This source may
alternatively be considered part of the converter).
Output loading errors.
The worst-case error statement for the performance
of a Synchro/Resolver-to-Digital converter can take
many  forms,  but  the  three  most  useful  forms  are
these:
1. A statement of the largest possible error in the
digitally  coded  value  of  θ,  for  specific  standard
external conditions (nominal values), including a
summation  of  all  internal errors,  but  excluding
interface errors (multiplexing, separate S/H, etc.).
2. A statement of the largest possible error in the
digitally coded value of θ, including a summation
of both the effects of the rated ranges of external
error  sources,  and  all  internal  errors,  but  still
excluding interface errors.
3. A statement of the largest possible error in the
digitally coded value of θ, computed by summing
all possible error sources, for a given set of exter-
nal conditions, a given set of interface hardware,
and a given load.
70
Figure 7.1. I Servo used in many synchro-to-digital
converters, has single-integrator feedback loop, and
exhibits both acceleration and velocity errors.
Ky
VELOCITY
ERROR = θ − φ
TIME
θ - φ
θ, φ
θ
φ
φ
Kv    (θ - φ) dt = Kv φ
Kv (θ - φ) = dφ/dt
t
0
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Best VB.NET component to convert Microsoft Office Word Create and save editable PDF with a blank page Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic
pdf form filler; create fill pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Create searchable and scanned PDF files from Excel in VB Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without
pdf create fillable form; attach file to pdf form
MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
From these three statements, the first might be said
to characterize the typical performance of the  con-
verter. It  is  only  useful  in  that  it  shows  what  the
device is capable of doing, given ideal external and
interface conditions. It can be a trap for the unwary.
Beware! The  second  statement  might  be  said  to
define the device's behavior realistically, as a guide
to  what  external  error  sources  may  be  tolerated.
Finally, the third statement might be called the "sys-
tem limit of error," and can only be made when the
nature  and  magnitude  of  every  error  source  is
known; therefore, it lies most properly in the domain
of the system designer.
Velocity and Acceleration Errors in Type I and
Type II Servos
It is clear from the discussion of the tracking S/D or
R/D converter on pages 19 to 22 that the dynamic
performance of any converter in which the measure-
ment  is the result  of  a  null-seeking  (or "servoing")
action  can  be  analyzed  in  the  same  way  that  a
closed-loop control system (or  servomechanism) is
analyzed. In this field of analysis, a Type I servo is
one  in which there is one significant time-constant
(integration) in the feedback loop - i.e., the equation
relation error to correction is  a first-order equation.
The  correction  (feedback)  loop  is  shown  in Figure
7.1, as is the graph of response to an acceleration
from rest, followed by a (later) deceleration to rest, at
a  new  value  of  θ. As  predicted  by  the  equations
shown,  both  velocity  and  acceleration  errors  are
inevitable, for practical loop gains.
Figure 7.2  shows the two-time-constant (double-inte-
grator) Type II servo, its response to an identical accel-
eration from rest, and later deceleration to rest. As the
equations predict, there is still a (momentary) acceler-
ation error, but the velocity error is zero. To summarize:
Type I Converter
In a Type I servo S/D or R/D converter, there are both
acceleration errors and velocity errors in the position
reading (φ):
where Ea = error in f due to acceleration,
Ev = error in f due to velocity,
Ka = acceleration-error constant,
Kv = velocity-error constant.
In a type I converter:
(constantly increasing error with constant accelera-
tion)
Ka = 0
Kv = 2000 (sec   )
–1
Ea =                  = ∞ 
80˚/sec
0
2
Ea = 
d φ
dt
2
2
Ka
Ev = 
dt
Kv
71
Figure 7.2. Type II Servo used in many advanced-
design synchro-to-digital converters, has double-
integrator feedback loop, and exhibits no velocity
error — although both acceleration errors remain.
TIME
θ - φ
θ, φ
θ
φ
φ
θ
ZERO
VELOCITY
ERROR
dφ/dt
Kv
Ka
Ka               (θ - φ) dt
2
= φ
Ka (θ - φ) = d
2
φ/dt
2
Kv (θ - φ) = dφ/dt
t
0
t
0
φ
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast. Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents.
convert pdf fillable form to html; change font pdf fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents.
convert pdf to fill in form; create a pdf form to fill out and save
MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
(fixed error at constant velocity)
Type II Converter
In a Type II servo S/D or R/D converter (such as the
true tracking converter described on pages 19 to 22),
there is no velocity error, but there is a finite acceler-
ation error (only during acceleration) in the position
reading (φ):
The dynamic behavior of standard S/D or R/D con-
verters is specified in terms of Kv and Ka. Typical
values  and  error  calculations  are  given  below,  for
both Type I and Type II designs, for typical velocities
and accelerations.
In a type II converter:
(fixed error with constant velocity)
(zero error at constant velocity)
Ev =               = 0˚   
360˚/sec
2
Ea =               = 0.01˚    
80˚/sec
8,000
Ka = 8000 (sec   )     
–2
Kv = ∞     
acceleration = 80˚/sec     
2
velocity = 360˚/sec     
Ea =          
Ka
d  φ 
dt
2
2
dφ 
dt
Ev =         = 0       (Kv = ∞) 
Ev =                  = 0.18˚ 
360˚/sec
2000
The Relationship Between Bandwidth, Tracking
Rate and Settling Time for Synchro/Resolver-To-
Digital Conversion
When using the low cost RDC-19220 or RD-19230
series monolithic converter for position and velocity
feedback it is important to understand the dynamic
response  for  a  changing  input. When considering
what bandwidth to set your converter, several para-
meters have to be taken into consideration.The abil-
ity  to  track  step  responses  and  accelerations  will
determine what bandwidth to select. The lower the
bandwidth the greater the noise immunity. The rela-
tionship between maximum tracking rate and band-
width determines the settling time for small and large
steps. For a small step the bandwidth is what deter-
mines the settling time; when you have a large step
the maximum slew rate and bandwidth is what deter-
mines the settling time. It is recommended that you
maintain  a  4:1  ratio  between  carrier  frequency  to
bandwidth; this will provide a greater rejection of car-
rier frequency ripple. As the bandwidth approaches
the carrier frequency, the converter may jitter due to
carrier frequency ripple.
RDC-19220 and RD-19230 Series Transfer
Function
The dynamic performance of these converters can
be  determined  from  their  transfer  function. See
Figure 7.3.
72
ERROR PROCESSOR
RESOLVER
INPUT
VELOCITY
OUT
DIGITAL
POSITION
OUT
(φ)
VCO
CT
S
A         + 1
1
B
S
S           + 1
10B
H = 1
+
-
e
A
2
S
Figure 7.3. Transfer Function Block Diagram.
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files.
c# fill out pdf form; add attachment to pdf form
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
convert word document to pdf fillable form; convert pdf to fillable form
73
MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
The components of gain coefficient are error gradi-
ent, integrator gain, and  VCO gain. These can be
broken down as follows:
- Error Gradient = 0.011 volts per LSB (CT + Error
Amp + Demod with 2 Vrms input)
- Integrator gain = (C
S
•F
S
) / 1.1•C
BW
[volts per sec-
ond per volt]
- VCO  gain  = 1/1.25•RV•C
VCO
[LSB's per  second
per volt]
FS = 70 KHz when RS = 30 KΩ, therefore R1 @ 1.5 MΩ
FS = 100 KHz when RS = 20 KΩ, therefore R1 @ 1 MΩ
FS = 134 KHz when RS = 15 KΩ, therefore R1 @ 750 KΩ
CVCO = 50 pF
Setup of bandwidth and velocity scaling for the opti-
mized critically damped case should proceed as fol-
lows:
0.011
R
1
• C
BW
• 1.1
1
Rv • C
VCO
• 1.25
A
1
A
2
R
1
=
C
S
= 10pf
1
C
S
• F
S
S = complex frequency variable (j ω)
Setup of bandwidth and velocity scaling for the opti-
mized critically damped case should proceed as fol-
lows:
• Select the desired f
BW
(closed loop)
• Select f
carrier
4 f
BW
• Compute:
EXAMPLE:
Reference: 2 KHz
Resolution: 16 bits
Bandwidth: 100 Hz
Max Tracking: 10 RPS
Rc = 30 KΩ
Rs = 30 KΩ
Fs = 70 KHz
• Compute:   C
BW
(pf) = 
3.2 • Fs (Hz) • 10
8
Rv • (f
BW
)
2
0.9
C
BW
• f
BW
• Compute:   R
B
• Compute:  
C
BW
10
Rv = 55KΩ •   
see converter max. tracking rate
application max. rate
Open Loop Transfer Function = 
A
(
S
B
+ 1
)
2
S
(
S
10B
+ 1
)
2
23 K
N/A
576
2304
15 K
N/A
23 K
108
432
1728
20 K
27
30 K or open
72*
288*
1152*
30 K
18*
R
(ΩΩ)
14
12
10
R
(ΩΩ)
16
Table 7.1. Maximum Tracking Rate in rps 
(revolutions per second).
*Use when computing Rv.
MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
Values calculated by using RDC-19220 component
selection  software. (Contact  factory  or  download
from http://www.ddc-web.com )
RDC-19220 or RD-19230 Maximum Tracking Rate
The tracking rate (nominally 4 volts) is limited by two
factors: Velocity  saturation  and  maximum  internal
clock rate (nominally 1,333,333 Hz).
The resistor Rv determines the velocity scaling. It is
the input resistor to an inverting integrator with a
Rv = 100 KΩ
C
BW
10 
= 2200 pf
C
BW
= .022 µf
R
B
= 410 KΩ
R
B
=                                  = 398KΩ
0.9
22626 • 10      • 100
C
BW
10 
–12
= 2200 pf
Rv = 55KΩ •      = 99KΩ
18
10
C
BW
(pf) = 
3.2 • 70,000 • 10
8
99,000 • (100)
2
= 22626 pf
= .022 µf
50 pf nominal feedback capacitor. When it inte-
grates to -1.25, the converter counts up 1 LSB and
when  it  integrates  to  +1.25,  the  converter  counts
down  1 LSB. When  a count is taken, a  charge  is
dumped on the capacitor, such that the voltage on it
changes 1.25 V in a direction to bring it to 0 V. The
output counts per second per volt input is therefore:
With Rs @ 30KΩ the internal clock rate is 1,333,333
Hz.
Absolute maximum tracking is calculated as follows:
For a 10-bit converter there are 210 = 1024 counts
per rotation.
1,333,333/1024=1302.08 rps or 1302.08/4=325.52 x
1024=333,333 counts per second per volt.
This is the absolute maximum rate; it is recommend-
ed to only run at 90% of this rate therefore the mini-
mum Rv will be limited to 55 KΩ.
Rs=20 KΩ internal clock nominally 2,000,000 Hz.
Rs=15 KΩ internal clock nominally 2,666,666 Hz.
Determining Acceleration Lag and Large Step
Response Settling Time
As you vary the bandwidth and the maximum track-
ing  rate this  will  determine  your  acceleration  con-
stant (Ka) and large step settling time.
(333,333) • (50 pf) • (1.25)
1
Rv =                                              = 48 KΩ
(Rv) • (50 pf) • (1.25)
1
74
MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
EXAMPLE:
Find the acceleration constant (Ka) and the acceler-
ation lag for a system with the following parameters:
Resolution: 16 bits
Bandwidth: 100 Hz
Reference: 1000 Hz
Max Tracking: 10 RPS
To solve for Ka:
EXAMPLE:
To solve for acceleration rate that results in 1 LSBof error:
Acceleration Lag = 
Acceleration Rate
Ka
Acceleration Rate (for 1 LSB error, 16-bit mode)
= (Ka)(Lag for 1 LSB error)
Acceleration Rate (for 1 LSB error, 16-bit mode)
(49,348)(0.0055˚)
sec
2
Acceleration Rate (for 1 LSB error, 16-bit mode)
272˚
sec
2
BW = 
2  • A
π
and Ka = A
2
therefore A = 
(BW)(π)
√2 
and Ka =   
(BW)(π)
√2 
2
Ka = 
(100 Hz)(π)
2
Ka = 
49,348
sec
2
To determine a large step response you must take
into  account the  maximum tracking rate and  band-
width.
EXAMPLE:
Solve for the large step response (179°) settling time
for a 16-bit mode system with the following parame-
ters:
Bandwidth = 100 Hz
Maximum Tracking Rate = 10 rps
Then we must add the settling time due to bandwidth
limitation; this is approximately 11 time constants in
16-bit mode.
Maximum Tracking =                        • 10 rps
360˚
1 revolution
= 3600˚/s
The Settling Time due to Tracking Rate:
t
TR
step size
max. tracking rate
179˚
3600˚/sec
= 49 msec
75
RESOLUTION
COUNTS/ROTATION
TIME CONSTRAINTS (TC)
10
1024
7
12
4096
8
14
16384
10
16
65536
11
Table 7.2. Time Constants
MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
Therefore  the approximate settling  time for a  large
step would be 98.5 msec. This is an approximation.
Synchros and resolvers are used in a wide variety of
dynamic  conditions. Understanding  how  the  con-
verter reacts to these input changes will allow you to
optimize the bandwidth and maximum tracking rate
for each application.
Speed-Voltage Susceptibility
When the synchro or resolver shaft is turning (dθ/dt
not equal to 0), a voltage is generated in the stator by
the motion of the rotor field. This voltage is analo-
gous to the "counter-EMF" induced in the armature
of  a  DC  motor; it  is  due  the  "generator  action"
inevitably produced by relative motion between a flux
field and a winding. In the synchro or resolver, this
voltage is proportional to the speed, has the  same
frequency as the reference carrier, and is in quadra-
ture  to the position signal  (data) normally found at
any shaft angle. Thus, if the normal resolver-format
signals produced at θ are:
  = K   sin θ sin ωt 
  = K   cos θ sin ωt, 
x
y
x
y
Time Constant =           
1
A
A = 222
= 4.5 msec
1
A
11 Time Constants = 49.5 msec
Large Step settling time = 
t
TR
+          • tc  
1
A
= 49 msec + 49.5 msec = 98.5 msec
where tc is the number of time constants
Then,  the  so-called  "speed-voltage"  component
would be a pair of  signals in perfect quadrature to
them, with an amplitude (relative to the normal data
signals) that is proportional to dθ/dt, the shaft-angle
velocity:
Where A is a constant of proportionality, or speed-
voltage  coefficient. It  is  not  uncommon  for  A  to
approach unity in modern synchro-sensed systems.
Therefore, speed voltage can hardly be considered
to  be  negligible,  or  even  a  second-order  effect
despite the fact that it is often neglected as an error
source, in specifying synchro/resolver converters!
Fortunately,  in  the  more  advanced  types  of  syn-
chro/resolver converters, the circuitry  discriminates
so  effectively  against  quadrature  components  that
the susceptibility  of the converter to  speed-voltage
error is negligible - at least up to very high velocities.
   = AK   sin θ sin ωt 
   = AK   cos θ sin ωt, 
xs
ys
x
y
76
1111
1110
1101
1100
1011
1010
1001
1000
0111
0110
0101
0100
0011
0010
0001
0000
ANALOG OUTPUT
(OR INPUT)
FULL
SCALE
Figure 7.4. Ideal Transfer Function for a D/S 
(or S/D) Converter.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested