c# pdf to image free library : Convert word to pdf fillable form online application control cloud html web page wpf class tb102complete1-part863

TUGboat,Volume32(2011),No.3
251
LAT
E
Xtraining through spoken tutorials
Kannan M. Moudgalya
Abstract
Spoken Tutorials, a combination of screencast and
voice over, are meant for self-learning of free and
open source software (
FOSS
)systems. The pedagogy
involved in creating spoken tutorials for LAT
E
Xis ex-
plained. A checklist, instructions for conductors and
activity-based instructions for learners, along with
the spoken tutorial are what is needed to conduct the
two hour
SELF FOSS
Study Workshops. As one finds
out during the workshop how to learn from these
tutorials, one can complete the learning at home if
two hours are insufficient.
This method of learning has been shown to be
effective. As it allows the conducting of these work-
shops without the domain experts, this methodology
is scalable: we expect to conduct 500 workshops in a
period of six months. The students are trained free
of cost. The honorarium expenses for the conductors
of these workshops work out to Rs. 25 per student
per software package.
1 Introduction
Aspoken tutorial is a an audio-video tutorial that
explains an activity performed on the computer. An
expert explains the working of thesoftware by demon-
strating it on the screen, along with a running com-
mentary. Screencast software makes a movie of the
entire activity, both the screen and the spoken part.
This movie is the spoken tutorial. It is of ten minutes
duration. One can reproduce the commands shown
in the tutorial side by side and thus use it as an
effective instructional tool.
We have been using this methodology to create
aseries of tutorials in open source software families,
such as L
A
T
E
X, Scilab,
GNU
/Linux,
ORCA
,Python,
LibreOffice and
PHP
/My
SQL
.We have selected the
duration of a typical spoken tutorial to be about ten
minutes long. Although only a small topic can be
covered in ten minutes, by stringing them together,
one can come up with study plans that are capable
of teaching advanced topics as well.
Our approach involves the creation of a script
before creating the video. It is possible to translate
the script into other languages and use them for
dubbing, while screen shots continue to be in English.
For example, see a tutorial with Tamil audio at [1].
This will help those who are weak in English, while
not compromising on the employability.
Spoken tutorials can also be used to bridge the
digital divide: topics such as buying train tickets on-
line, locating low cost agricultural loans, and locating
information on first aid and primary health care can
be covered. One target audience for a spoken tutorial
is a remote child, working alone at midnight without
anyone to help her.
As the spoken tutorials are created for self-
learning, it is possible to conduct workshops even
without domain experts. This allows scaling up work-
shops using additional instructional methodologies.
The above mentioned points havebeen explained
in [4]. The motivation behind this effort is available
at [6]. An early work in this area is [3].
The initial part of this article focuses on cre-
ation of spoken tutorials on L
A
T
E
X and Xfig. The
rest of this paper is devoted to the methodology of
conducting workshops using these tutorials.
2 Creation of LAT
E
XSpoken Tutorials
We created the first few Spoken Tutorials in early
2007 to teach L
A
T
E
Xto our students. We had just
completed a textbook [2]. Had we not used LAT
E
X, it
would have taken several more years to complete it.
We wanted our students also to benefit from L
A
T
E
X.
We also wanted to contribute something back to the
community. We created the following tutorials:
1. What is compilation (9:17)
2. Letter writing (8:19)
3. Report writing (16:14)
4. Mathematical typesetting (24:46)
5. Equations (23:42)
6. Tables and figures (25:12)
7. Bibliographies (8:20)
8. Inside story of bibliographies (24:44)
9. LAT
E
Xon Windows (27:20)
10. Updating MiKT
E
Xon Windows (15:31)
11. Beamer (34:00)
The numbers inside the brackets indicate the time du-
ration in minutes and seconds. Although we wanted
the tutorials to be 10 minutes long, some of them
turned out to be longer. In those days, we did not
have a method to estimate the length of a spoken
tutorial before it was made. The original tutorial
on bibliography was longer than we wanted, so we
renamed it as the “inside story” and re-did a shorter
one lasting only 8:20.
In order to make L
A
T
E
Xavailable to Windows
users, we made tutorials 9 and 10 in the above list.
As our group had not used L
A
T
E
Xon Windows, we
had to learn it first before making a tutorial. Finally,
we created the spoken tutorial on Beamer. We now
insist on LAT
E
X-created slides to accompany all new
spoken tutorials.
Block diagrams are an important requirement
for any scientific writing. For this purpose, we cre-
L
A
T
E
Xtraining through spoken tutorials
Convert word to pdf fillable form online - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
attach image to pdf form; create fill pdf form
Convert word to pdf fillable form online - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
pdf create fillable form; create a fillable pdf form from a word document
252
TUGboat, Volume 32 (2011), No. 3
ated: introduction to Xfig (12:38), feedback diagram
in Xfig (12:02) and mathematics in Xfig (15:20). The
last tutorial explains a procedure to embed mathe-
matical formulae in figures, using Xfig and LAT
E
X.
There are a few reasons for not using a special-
purpose LAT
E
Xeditor for Unix systems:
1. We wanted d to teach LAT
E
X in the most pris-
tine form, without getting bogged down by the
editor’s details.
2. There isagoodamountof effortinvolved in
learning any special-purpose LAT
E
Xeditor.
3. Aswe don’tuse e one, it would d have taken a
considerable amount of our time and effort to
explain the working of a specialised editor.
4. As Unix users are reasonably comfortable with
the terminal, our approach would not create
much difficulty.
The situation is quite different for a Windows
user, who is generally not comfortable in working
with the terminal. As most of our audience use
Windows, we did not mind putting in some effort in
learning a specialised L
A
T
E
Xeditor for Windows and
creating tutorials 9 and 10 above.
All the spoken tutorials on LAT
E
Xexplain a three
step process: 1) Creating a source file with an editor;
2) Compiling the source withpdflatex; 3) Viewing
the resulting
PDF
file with a
PDF
browser.
The recorded area was divided to simultane-
ously show the editor, terminal and the
PDF
browser.
These three were arranged in a non-overlapping man-
ner in the early tutorials, such as letter writing,
mathematics and equations. In the letter writing
tutorial, a given source file was explained along with
an illustration of the effects of changes in the com-
mands. In the tutorial on Beamer presentations,
however, additional commands and text were copied
from another file and the effects demonstrated. A
screen shot of this is shown in Fig. 1.
Showing three or four non-overlapping windows
made the fonts small. This was addressed in the
Xfig tutorial, where the overlapping requirement was
done away with, so as to achieve large font sizes.
A screen shot of this is shown in Fig. 2. In all of
the above, only a small portion of the Desktop was
recorded to keep the recording size small.
All the tutorials mentioned above are available
at http://spoken-tutorial.org, along with all
the required source, style, bst and
PDF
files.
Spoken tutorial is based on demonstrations. We
want a learner to reproduce whatever is shown in
the tutorial. As it is active learning, it is effective.
To ensure that this happens, we insist that 75% of
every tutorial is devoted to demonstrations and not
more than 25% is concerned with theory. These
limits generally work well in all except perhaps the
first tutorial in a series. To solve this problem, we
recommend that the introductory tutorial be created
after all other tutorials in the series are completed.
Armed with these tutorials, one can also make the
introductory tutorial consist of 75% demonstrations
by playing these tutorials. This strategy has been
followed in creating [6].
3 Workshops using Spoken Tutorials
Spoken tutorials are created for self-learning. These
are also available for free download. Although one
can learn from these tutorials without any external
assistance, organised workshops are themost effective
way if we want to train a large number of people in
ashort time.
Ours differ from conventional workshops in many
ways: instructional material, conduct of the work-
shop, time duration of the workshop and the conduc-
tor of the workshop, to name a few. We will explain
these in detail now.
3.1 Instructional material
In order to conduct the workshops one needs the spo-
ken tutorials and the associated files, as mentioned
earlier. One can download these from our website
free of cost. If required, we also provide them on
CD
s,
once again free. In addition to these, we provide the
following three documents:
A checklist that has to be completed the day
before the workshop is conducted. This forces the
organiser of the workshop to verify for every
PC
(a)
that the spoken tutorials and resource files are copied;
(b) that the software to be taught in the workshop is
installed correctly; (c) whether the headphones are
working; (d) whether the spoken tutorial can be seen
and heard through the headphones. In case of online
tests, the organiser should also check the working of
the Internet. A copy of such a list is given in Fig. 3.
The second document is the instruction sheet
for the conductor of the workshop. This important
activity is covered in detail in the next section.
The rest of this section is devoted to the third
document, which contains instructions tothelearners.
This instruction sheet is meant to be used with the
spoken tutorials. We have reproduced the initial part
of the instruction sheet meant for learning LAT
E
Xon
GNU
/Linux system in Fig. 5.
These instruction sheets are for self-learners. In
view of this, the initial part of the instructions are
activity based, or equivalently contain verbs. For
instance, the first few instructions have the following
Kannan M. Moudgalya
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
formatting. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents. Professional
adding a signature to a pdf form; attach file to pdf form
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast. Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark.
converting a word document to a fillable pdf form; change font size in pdf fillable form
TUGboat, Volume 32 (2011), No. 3
253
Figure 1: Two files, terminal,
PDF
browser shown in non-overlapping fashion in the Beamer Spoken Tutorial [5]
Figure 2: Overlapping of Emacs editor, terminal, and Xfig allows the use of large fonts [7]
L
A
T
E
Xtraining through spoken tutorials
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents.
pdf add signature field; pdf fill form
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual
acrobat fill in pdf forms; create a pdf form that can be filled out
254
TUGboat, Volume 32 (2011), No. 3
Can log
These can be separated in 2
PC
s, possibly in 2 rooms
PC
Is the
PC
into
PC
?
PC
for spoken tutorial
PC
for test
No.
booting?
(if
FOSS
Spoken Tut.
Plays in
Audio
Internet
applicable)
loaded?
copied?
VLC
?
works?
works?
PC
1
PC
2
.
.
.
PC
50
Figure 3: A sample checklist to be completed before starting a
SELF FOSS
Study Workshop
Getting Started
1. 04:17: Performthefollowingcalculationsonthe
scilab command line:
phi =
5+1
2
psi =
5−1
2
Find 1/phi and 1/psi
2. 6:06: VerifyEuler’sidentity: Ise
πi
+1 close to
zero? Compare with cos(π) +i· sin(π)
Figure 4: AssignmentswithtimingfortheGetting
Started Spoken Tutorial on Scilab
verbs: click, locate, copy, open, gedit, right click, etc.
Theory is introduced only slowly.
These instructions are based on the time when
acertain activity has to be carried out. For exam-
ple, the instructions numbered 7, 8 and 9 in Fig. 5,
respectively, are supposed to be carried out at 1:57,
2:04 and 3:04 min.
There could be instructions to point out the dif-
ference in the activity. For example, the instruction
at 3:04 says not to invoke the commandskim, but to
useevince. This methodology can also be used to
correct minor mistakes, if any, in the spoken tutorial.
These instructions are detailed. For example, in
the invocation ofevince there is a space before the
ampersand (&) symbol to help emphasize it. Nor-
mally, such detailed instructions are unnecessary for
Unix users. But for Windows users who may not
know the difference between a terminal and an editor
and the concept of background jobs, the instructions
need to be detailed.
Finally, there are assignments that need to be
done at a specific time. This is clear from a sam-
ple assignment question of a Scilab spoken tutorial
workshop, given in Fig. 4.
3.2 Conductor of the workshop
We do not need a domain expert to conduct these
workshops. In a large country like India, one may
have to conduct these workshops in thousands of
places. It would be difficult to get domain experts
to even visit such a large number of places, let alone
lecturing in these workshops.
We insist that the conductor of the workshop
not answer any domain-dependent questions. There
are two reasons for this:
1. We are e not t sure e about t the e capability y of the
conductors of these workshops. We definitely
do not want them to give wrong answers.
2. Answeringdomain-dependentquestionscould
take up a lot of time. As a result, a conductor
may not be able to handle more than a few stu-
dents. It would be impossible even for an expert
to answer all the questions of twenty students,
the recommended ratio in our methodology.
The students are supposed to follow the steps exactly
as given in the instruction sheet and the spoken
tutorial. Two types of difficulties can arise:
1. Ifthestudentshavedifficultyinfollowinganyin-
struction, the conductor of the workshop should
point out the mistake made by the student. If
the mistake is a serious one, the conductor could
even ask the student to start the tutorial from
scratch. As the tutorials are short, one will not
have to spend a lot of time in repetition.
2. It is possible e for r a a student to o try y out some
changes of their own. They can do this so long
as they do not encounter any problems. If they
experience any difficulty, they are recommended
to go to the next tutorial. The idea is that there
are enough things (that work) to learn, before
trying something of one’s own.
To handle these two difficulties, the conductor of
the workshop need not be a domain expert. As
acorollary, a person who is trained to conduct a
workshop on a topic (say, L
A
T
E
X), can conduct a
workshop on another topic (say, Scilab) also.
The procedure indicated above suggests a defi-
nite set of things to learn during the workshop. The
learner may not have the freedom to learn whatever
Kannan M. Moudgalya
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Convert OpenOffice Text Document to PDF with embedded fonts. Export PDF from OpenOffice Spreadsheet data. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.Word.dll.
convert fillable pdf to word fillable form; change font size in fillable pdf form
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
NET PDF SDK- Create PDF from Word in Visual An excellent .NET control support convert PDF to multiple Evaluation library and components for PDF creation from
convert word doc to fillable pdf form; convert word to pdf fillable form online
TUGboat, Volume 32 (2011), No. 3
255
Spoken Tutorial Based LAT
E
X
Workshop on Linux
Spoken Tutorial Team
IIT Bombay
5August 2011
First tutorial: What is Compilation?
These detailed instructions are intended mainly for Win-
dows users, who may have to use
GNU
/Linux for learning
L
A
T
E
X.
GNU
/Linux users will already know most of this.
1. ClickthePlacesbuttoninthetoplefthandcorner
and then click the Home Folder. The folder that
opens is called your home folder.
2. Please locate the e folder LaTeX
Workshop that
is available on the desktop.
The sub-folder
01-compilation contains the following files that
you need for this tutorial:
hello.tex and
compiling.mov.
3. Pleasecopyhello.texfromthisfoldertoyour home
folder.
4. OpentheterminalusingthecommandCtrl-Alt-t,
by pressing all these three keys simultaneously.
5. Openthefilethatyoucopiedaboveintotheeditor
using the command
gedit hello.tex &
Do not forget the symbol ampersand (&) at the
end of the command, obtained by pressingshift 7.
Please leave spaces exactly as given above.
6. Rightclickoncompiling.mov,pointthecursoron
Open WithandselectVLC Media Player. Nowlis-
ten to this spoken tutorial.
7. Asshowninthevideoat1:57min,compilefromthe
terminal the file hello.tex using the command
pdflatex hello.tex
Note thatpdflatex is one command. Please do not
leave a space between pdf and latex.
8. Pausethevideoat2:04min. Youshouldnowbeable
to give the commandpdflatex hello.tex and get
afile hello.pdf. If there is any difficulty in this
step, please listen to the tutorial from 1:57min to
2:04min once again.
9. Thevideotalksabouta
PDF
viewer calledskim at
3:04min.
• Pleasedonotattempttouseskim—itisnot
available on
GNU
/Linux.
You have to use the
PDF
viewer evince instead.
Give the following command from theterminal to
open the
PDF
file:
evince hello.pdf &
Once again, do not forget the& symbol in the above
command.
Figure 5: Asampleofinstructionsfora
SELF FOSS
Study Workshop on L
A
T
E
X. To make it suitable for
self-study, all initial instructions are activity based.
they want. But there are enough new things to learn
in any case during the course of the workshop. This
topic is explained further in the next section.
3.3 Duration of the workshop
We recommend a duration of two hours for these
workshops. A workshop typically has about ten spo-
ken tutorials. In a twohour period, one can learn four
tutorials. More importantly, students will figure out
how to learn from spoken tutorials. Thus, students
can learn the remaining tutorials on their own.
So, why do we restrict the workshop to two
hours? There are many reasons for this:
1. Thiswillallowthesamefacilitytobeusedfor
other workshops or for other people or both.
2. Asourworkshopsare conducted free of cost,
it is not clear how many students are really
interested in the workshop. We do not want
to host any uninterested students longer than
absolutely necessary.
3. Thestudentswhoareinterestedinappearing
in the online exams have to necessarily com-
plete the tutorials on their own. This improves
the quality of learning and hence can indeed
help provide better learning than conventional
workshops.
4. Ingovernmentsupportedtrainingprogrammes,
not only do the students pay nothing, but there
are organisational expenses as well. For example,
the conductors of the workshop have to be paid
an honorarium for their time and effort. Such
expenses are reduced by minimising the work-
shop duration. If any workshop is conducted for
alonger period, there are also demands for a
break and financial support for refreshments.
Not all students who undergothe two hour workshops
have computers at home. So, if a college wants to
offer their premises for learning, we have no objection.
We tell them, however, that such sessions are not a
part of our training programme.
A comment about the quality of learning in
the two hour workshop is in order. In the previous
section, the highly regimented procedure of the work-
shop has been discussed. Although no green field
type of learning is possible, in no other method can
one learn in two hours:
1. how to write letters using LAT
E
X,
2. how to write reports,
3. writing mathematics and equations, and
4. andintroductiontopresentationsusingBeamer.
We guarantee all of the above in a two hour workshop.
The two hour workshops discussed above are
called Spoken Tutorial based education and learning
L
A
T
E
Xtraining through spoken tutorials
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
to create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and Create fillable PDF document with fields. Preview PDF documents without other plug-ins.
convert word form to fillable pdf; convert fillable pdf to html form
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Export PowerPoint hyperlink to PDF in .NET console application.
attach file to pdf form; adding a signature to a pdf form
256
TUGboat, Volume 32 (2011), No. 3
through Free
FOSS
Study Workshops or
SELF FOSS
Study Workshops. The word Free in the above de-
notes free of cost, unlike the word free that comes in
FOSS
,which denotes freedom.
As mentioned earlier, the students who undergo
training through these workshops do not pay any-
thing. As of now, we actually spend about Rs. 500
for every twenty students as honorarium expenses
for the organisers. Thus, the cost of training one stu-
dent on one software package is Rs. 25. We are now
planning to do away with this honorarium expense.
The
SELF FOSS
Study Workshops have been
extremely effective and also popular. In a workshop
on
GNU
/Linux conducted in an engineering college
in Alwar, Rajasthan, by their own student volunteer,
the average marks went up by 85% after the work-
shop, although the post workshop test was tougher
than the pre-workshop test. As a matter of fact,
every student passed the second test and received a
certificate of completion.
4 Conclusion and future work
This article has presented an instructional methodol-
ogy for conducting large number of
FOSS
workshops
on software systems, such as LAT
E
X, Scilab, Python,
PHP
/My
SQL
and
GNU
/Linux. Using this scalable
method, we expect to conduct about 500 workshops
in a period of six months, with an average number
of participants in each workshop of about 50.
Although the current workshops are organised
only for college students, we hope to extend them to
secondary schools as well. We will pursue this activ-
ity as soon as instructional material on LibreOffice
is ready. Office seems to be the most important
software for schools.
Amore interesting question is whether it is pos-
sible to create instructional material to teach L
A
T
E
X
for school students. It is likely that the methodology
of conducting the workshop will work for schools also.
What is not clear, however, is whether a special type
of instructional material has to be created exclusively
for schools.
We also desire to teach more advanced topics on
LAT
E
Xto the students who successfully complete the
basic training explained in this work. This requires
more spoken tutorials. We hope to get help from the
T
E
Xcommunity for this purpose.
Finally, it will be useful to create more rigorous
evaluation methods to check the efficacy of learning.
At present, we use only multiple choice questions. It
is not clear how to administer exams to check the
LAT
E
Xing capability of the large number of students
who may take the exam. To preserve scalability, we
need automatic evaluation methods.
References
[1] Tamildubbing: T.Vasudevanand
Priya. Report Writing in L
A
T
E
X,
Seen on 4 Nov. 2011. Video available
athttp://spoken-tutorial.org/
How-to-write-a-Report-using-LaTeX-Tamil.
[2] K.M.Moudgalya. DigitalControl. JohnWiley
&Sons Ltd., Chichester, 2007.
[3] K.M.Moudgalya. Spokentutorials. In
Technology for Education, T4E 2009, pages
17–23, Bangalore, August 2009. IEEE.
[4] K.M.Moudgalya. SpokenTutorial:
ACollaborative and Scalable Education
Technology. CSI Communications, 35(6):10–12,
September 2011. Available athttp:
//spoken-tutorial.org/CSI.pdf.
[5] K.M.Moudgalya. PresentationusingL
A
T
E
X
and Beamer, 3 November 2009. Video available
athttp://spoken-tutorial.org/Latex_
beamer_english.
[6] K.M.Moudgalya. WhatisaSpoken
Tutorial, 8 March 2011. Video available at
http://spoken-tutorial.org/What_is_a_
Spoken_Tutorial.
[7] K.M.Moudgalya. EmbeddingMaths
in Xfig, 9 Feb. 2011. Video available at
http://spoken-tutorial.org/Xfig_
Feedback_Diagram_with_Maths.
⋄ Kannan M. Moudgalya
Dept. of Chemical Engineering
IIT Bombay, Powai
Mumbai 400 076, India
kannan (at) iitb dot ac dot in
http://spoken-tutorial.org
Kannan M. Moudgalya
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
Free online C# source codes provide best ways to create PDF forms and delete PDF A professional PDF form creator supports to create fillable PDF form in C#
change font in pdf fillable form; convert word form to fillable pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
using RasterEdge.XDoc.Word; using RasterEdge.XDoc.Excel; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PowerPoint; How to VB.NET: Convert ODT to PDF.
convert pdf file to fillable form; auto fill pdf form from excel
TUGboat, Volume 32 (2011), No. 3
257
e-Readers and LAT
E
X
Alan Wetmore
Abstract
2011 has seen many e-readers arrive on store shelves;
anew generation of “touch screen” devices that in-
clude the Nook Simple Touch, Kobo eReader Touch,
and a higher resolution iRiver Story
HD
. They all
have the capability of loading user created content,
so the question arises: how well can they support
my legacy documents? The answer just might be,
surprisingly well. After we understand the capabili-
ties and some of the limitations we will explore how
we can re-purpose older documents and prepare new
L
A
T
E
Xdocuments for use with these e-readers.
1 Introduction
There are lots of new e-reader machines this year.
I’ve been trying out three: a Nook, a Kobo, and
an iRiver. When I was invited to give a talk at the
conference I decided to tell you about some of things
Idiscovered as I explored using these machines.
Ihave been interested in e-readers for a while,
but they all seemed to make it nearly impossible to
bring your own documents to them. Recently there
have been advances on more direct support of e-
readers published in the latest TUGboat by William
Cheswick [1] and Hans Hagen [2] as well as papers at
this conference by Boris Veytsman and Rishi. Based
on all of this work I am looking forward to seeing
some truly powerful capabilities arriving soon.
How we can use them: collect our legacy doc-
uments; carry our class notes; read a manual while
working away from the computer or in the field; ex-
pand our markets, ...
1.1 A quick tour of the machines
Common elements are:
Size Heightandwidthsimilartoamediumsized
paperback book, but quite thin.
Screen atouchscreenforselectingandnavigating.
About 6×8 inches (150×200 mm); either 600×
800 or 768× 1024 pixels. In 1991 these were
fair to good resolutions for a
PC
or low-end
workstation. There were a lot of 1024× 768 X
terminals out there.
Bezels surroundingthescreen,givingusawayto
hold the reader without obscuring the text as
well as a convenient place for the buttons that
navigate the menus and page through the docu-
ment.
Buttons atleastapowerswitch,oftenpageturning
buttons, sometimes a keyboard.
Syncing usuallythrougha
USB
cable to a
PC
,some-
times via wireless to their proprietary “Book-
store”. Usually there is also a program for our
computer that manages our purchases on the
device but the memory of the e-reader can also
appear as an external disk with folders where
we can copy our own files.
Memory expansion usually done e through h a a re-
movable micro
SD
card (
SD
in the iRiver). We
can copy files onto the card when the e-Reader
is tethered via
USB
and the micro
SD
card shows
up as another drive, or the card can be removed
from the reader and loaded and modified using
astandard card reader.
“Bookstores” are a universal feature, everyone
wants to “sell” you books, magazines, and any-
thing else they can think of. Some bookstores
make it easier than others to get the books you
create on the “shelf”.
Speed isoneofthemainthingsthataffectsourex-
perience; how “snappy” is the menu navigation,
how long does it take to process our document
and display it so we can start reading, and how
quickly and smoothly can we “turn the pages”?
All three seem acceptable to me.
Library organization Allofthereadersorganize
your “Library” and let you sort the display by
author or title. In addition there is usually a
search function that includes author, title, and
keywords from the metadata.
Navigation Thereadersallmakeiteasytopage
through a book using swipes on the touchscreen
and or dedicated page turning buttons. In addi-
tion they have additional capabilities for jump-
ing to particular pages.
Document formats Whileallofthereaderscan
deal with quite a fewformats we will concentrate
on just two—ePub and
PDF
. ePub because
it is usually the best supported format; it is
what everyone but the Kindle sells in their store.
PDF
because we have large legacy document
collections and produce them as a matter of
course. ePub has extensive support in the read-
ers for bookmarking and note taking to support
our reading.
How can we make ePub? There are two ways;
first by passing through an
HTML
intermediary,
and second by processing a
PDF
file. In both
cases we can use a tool calledcalibre to make
the conversion to ePub.
1. LAT
E
X
HTML
ePub
L
A
T
E
X2
HTML
(L
A
T
E
X) 
HTML
calibre (
HTML
) ePub
e-Readers and L
A
T
E
X
258
TUGboat, Volume 32 (2011), No. 3
Ihaven’t explored this route very much,
but it could be a feasible solution. The
drawback is that the conversion to
HTML
is not particularly robust with respect to
using arbitrary L
A
T
E
Xpackage files to en-
hance our documents.
2. LAT
E
X
PDF
ePub
PDF
LAT
E
X(LAT
E
X) 
HTML
calibre (
PDF
) ePub
This approach is discussed further in sec-
tion 3.3.
2
PDF
metadata
Metadata in
PDF
files is used by the e-readers to
fill out author information in the list of documents
available. You can use a
PDF
manipulator such as
Acrobat or you can include the information directly
using thehyperref package when you create your
PDF
file with
PDF
LAT
E
X.
\usepackage[%
bookmarks=true% style guide
,pdfauthor={Alan Wetmore}%
,pdfcreator={pdfLaTeX article.cls}%
,pdfkeywords={e-Readers,TUG2011}%
,pdfsubject={e-Readers}%
,pdftitle={e-Readers and LaTeX}%
]{hyperref}
3 The most important features
3.1 Standards compliance
It turns out that even though
PDF
and ePub are rea-
sonably well defined “standards”, e-readers are not
particularly consistent with how they consume and
display these files. When we feed these devices the
same files, they can produce substantially different
displays and they expose different navigation and
viewing options for us to use when we explore and
consume our documents.
3.2 Legacy
PDF
files
Many of us have large collections of
PDF
files that
we have accumulated over the years. The older ones
were of course generated without regard to reading
on anything other than paper, A4 or letter-size for
the most part, or on our computer screens. Many of
our gizmos and gadgets now ship with nothing more
than an abbreviated “Quick Start Guide”; sometimes
with a
CD
in the package with alonger manual, some-
times with or without a hint that there is a longer
manual hidden somewhere on a manufacturer’s web
site that we can download. In section 4, we’ll explore
arecently published textbook to see how well we can
read it on the various e-readers.
3.3 Converting
PDF
to ePub with calibre
One popular and powerful tool for converting be-
tween thevarious e-book formats iscalibre [5]. This
is a free and open source e-book library management
application; it is much more than conversion soft-
ware. In addition to organizing documents on your
computer, it interfaces with your reader device when
you plug it in, and then copies your documents to
and fro.
calibre doesn’textractalotof structurein-
formation from
PDF
files, and so doesn’t generate
particularly good ePub files as a result. My exper-
iments suggest that this is not yet a very fruitful
path; perhaps thepoppler library is now ready to
be used to improve this.
Alternatively, L
A
T
E
X2
HTML
might well be a bet-
ter starting point for generating ePub format docu-
ments.
3.4 Generating new
PDF
files
We will want to see what options we have for type-
setting new
PDF
files to be used with our e-readers.
In section 6 we’ll take a look at what a couple of very
simple choices with some standard packages can do
for us.
4 Exploring a textbook
We willbe using the text Principles of Uncertainty [3]
by Joseph P. Kadane of Carnegie Mellon University.
This is a large (499 pages) textbook of a traditional
size; it was produced by our friend Heidi Sestrich
using L
A
T
E
X. It is also available as a
PDF
file from
the author’s web site.
4.1 The original document
The original document was typeset on
US
letter (8.5
×11inch)sizepaperwithmarginsandcropmarks
for the final production size of approximately 6 by
9inches. It was typeset with pdfT
E
Xusing L
A
T
E
X
andhyperref. There is plenty of moderately high
level mathematical notation involved to exercise the
e-reader’s rendering engines. All of the readers suc-
cessfully load the book and allow us to read it, with
varying degrees of flexibility and robustness. I’ll be
concentrating on Chapter 4 of the book; the demon-
strations are viewable on theriver-valley.tv web
site with the conference videos.
4.2 Nook
As for
PDF
files, loading and viewing a
PDF
file looks
great at first; the full page is displayed on the screen
with mathematics intact. However, when you zoom
in for a closer look, things quickly break down. The
zoom control uses the same seven font size buttons
Alan Wetmore
TUGboat, Volume 32 (2011), No. 3
259
as the ePub viewer, but— instead of zooming— the
Nook adjusts the font size and reflows the document.
Plain text doesn’t fare too badly, but mathematics is
very corrupted, with the layout destroyed and many
missing symbols.
Duringthe conference Ross Moore supplied some
“tagged pdf” files with demonstrations of mathemat-
ics; when loaded onto the Nook all the mathematics
in these survived the zooming tests. This might be
one route to
PDF
files which are usable on all of the
devices.
4.3 Kobo
When viewing
PDF
files, a double tap to the screen
zooms the image to 200%; there are also seven zoom
levels available through a slider control. When the
image is zoomed, you can drag it around the screen
to change the viewport, with an overviewwidget that
shows which part of the page you are on. Unfortu-
nately there is no simple page advance mechanism in
zoomed mode, e.g., tapping at the margins doesn’t
advance the page. You must drag the image to ex-
pose either a left or right margin or activate the more
complete navigation widget, or double tap again to
return to full page mode and then tap at the margin.
4.4 iRiver
The original test document didn’t display at all well,
appearing as broken pages with overlong lines. How-
ever, the version cropped to the text box appeared
correctly with mathematics intact. The iRiver has
azoom control for
PDF
files that sort of works; al-
ternatively, one of the buttons brings up a rotate
menu allowing the image to rotate 90
to landscape
mode that expands the width of the image to fill
the wider screen by applying a one-third magnifica-
tion. For a well-crafted document this will usually
be enough zoom to make out the details of sub- and
super-scripts.
5 Idiosyncrasies of the devices
5.1 Nook
One interesting thing about the Nook is the simple
ability to load and use your own images for screen-
savers. I’ve loaded mine with a collection of iconic
TUG
images and meeting posters.
5.2 Kobo
After copying files to the
SD
card memory, when
you eject the memory card from the computer, the
Kobo spends some time “processing” the files. It is
likely that this includes scanning for meta-data and
rebuilding the list of books.
5.3 iRiver
The iRiver doesn’t have a touch screen, instead it
has lots of buttons arranged mostly as a QWERTY
keyboard plus a few more navigation and control
keys. It also uses full size
SD
cards instead of the
micro
SD
format that the other devices use.
6 Generating new
PDF
files
As promised, we will now explore what happens
as we process some text with a couple of options.
The first thing we will do is use the12pt option to
get larger text as the starting point on the device.
This should reduce the need for magnifying text that
caused problems for the Nook, while maintaining
maximum compatibility with L
A
T
E
X packages and
options.
First we willuse thegeometry package to choose
our “paper” size.
6.1 Letter paper size
Using thegeometry package to see where things go,
we start with the standard 8.5 by 11 inchpapersize.
We are also using themargin=1in option. This re-
sults in 95 character lines and oversize margins that
waste considerable screen space.
6.2 The screen option
Adding thescreen option from thegeometry pack-
age generates output for a 4×3 screen ratio, which
matches our screen rotated 90. It uses a 225 mm
by 180 mmpapersize. This results in 100 character
lines.
6.3 An epaper option
Setting thepapersize to 100 mm by 125 mm results
in 54 character lines. This is the final choice for the
epaperoption.Thefollowinglinecanbeaddedto
the internal database in the package file to add our
new epaper option.
\@namedef{Gm@epaper}#1{%
\Gm@setsize{#1}(100,125){mm}}%
%for e-readers
And for a final consideration, we’ll increase the mar-
gins to 2mm. Until thegeometry package has been
updated with a suitableepaper option we can use
the following in our preamble.
\usepackage[%
papersize={100mm,125mm},%
margin=2mm,%
includeheadfoot%
]{geometry}
e-Readers and L
A
T
E
X
260
TUGboat, Volume 32 (2011), No. 3
7 The future
We can expect more generations of these devices
in the next few years. Will they have better
PDF
engines? We can hope. We can also hope that
software updates tothecurrent machines improve the
PDF
engines. Maybe they will make use of internal
PDF
links soour tableof contents and cross references
will work.
Will Math
ML
be accepted into a future revision
of ePub? Probably, but will it actually be supported
by the readers? That is a much less certain outcome.
Will searching within a document be improved?
The current capabilities are simply too slow for
searching through reference materials, and without
live links in the index, that doesn’t really offer much
of an option.
While e-readers seem to be popular for best
sellers and light reading, they don’t as yet replace
real textbooks or the more robust
PDF
capabilities
of real computers or powerful tablets. But perhaps
they are more suited to consuming smaller chunks
of material on the order of individual lessons from
the Khan Academy [4].
References
[1] Cheswick,William: iT
E
X—Document
formatting in an ereader world, TUGboat32:2,
2011, 158–162.http://tug.org/TUGboat/
tb32-2/tb101cheswick.pdf.
[2] Hagen,Hans: E-books: OldWineinNew
Bottles, TUGboat32:2, 2011, 152–158.http:
//tug.org/TUGboat/tb32-2/tb101hagen.pdf.
[3] Kadane,JosephP.: Principles
of Uncertainty, CRC Press, 2011.
http://uncertainty.stat.cmu.edu.
[4] KhanAcademy.http://www.khanacademy.
org.
[5] Schember,John: CalibreQuickStartGuide.
http://calibre-ebook.com/about.
⋄ Alan Wetmore
US Army Research Laboratory
alan dot wetmore (at) gmail dot com
Alan Wetmore
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested