c# pdf to image github : Convert pdf to form fill control SDK platform web page wpf .net web browser Teens_Paper_Final0-part904

1
T
EENS AND 
T
HEIR 
P
ARENTS IN THE 
21
ST
C
ENTURY
:
A
E
XAMINATION OF 
T
RENDS IN 
T
EEN 
B
EHAVIOR
AND THE 
R
OLE OF 
P
ARENTAL 
I
NVOLVEMENT
E
XECUTIVE 
S
UMMARY
This report by the Council of Economic Advisers analyzes key trends in teen behavior,
and investigates the  role of parents’ involvement  in their teenagers’  lives.   The  study
outlines  significant  opportunities  and  challenges  for  teens  in  the  21
st
century  and
demonstrates that teens are more likely to maximize opportunities and avoid risks when
parents are involved in their lives.
T
RENDS IN 
T
EENAGE 
B
EHAVIOR AND 
O
UTCOMES
· Teenagers today live far healthier, more prosperous and promising lives than ever
before.  Life expectancy for 15-year-olds today is 77 years compared with 62 at the
beginning of the century.  Such killers as typhoid, cholera, polio, and smallpox now
pose only minimal threats to American teens’ health.  Per capita income has increased
eight-fold over the course of the century, and things once considered luxuries such as
telephones, televisions, CDs and video games are now staples of teen existence.  Girls
and minorities now have vastly greater educational and occupational choices open to
them than ever before.
· Education levels have been improving across the board.  Today’s teens are taking
more  courses  in  core  academic  subjects  and  more  challenging  courses  than  their
counterparts in the 1980s.  African-Americans and whites now complete high school
at virtually the same high rate: almost 90 percent.
· College attendance rates have been increasing over the past decade, but income, race
and ethnicity still play a role.  Most young people enroll in post-secondary school
within 20 months of graduating high school.  Women now are enrolled in college in
greater numbers than men.  However, while 90 percent of children from the richest 25
percent of families pursue post-secondary education, just 60 percent of students from
the poorest 25 percent do.  And of those going on to post-secondary schools, nearly
three quarters of children from the richest families attend four-year colleges, while
over half of those from the  poorest families attend  vocational, technical or 2-year
institutions.
· School-based teen participation in community service has increased.  And community
service has been demonstrated to improve academic and social outcomes.  One study
Convert pdf to form fill - C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Automatically Fill in Field Data to PDF
asp.net fill pdf form; create a fillable pdf form from a word document
Convert pdf to form fill - VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
convert word document to pdf fillable form; convert fillable pdf to html form
2
found, for example, that teens who participated in community service programs had a
75 percent lower rate of school dropout, and a 43 percent lower rate of pregnancy.
· Despite increasing prosperity, teens today are at high risk for poor nutrition.
According to one recent estimate, only 5.5 percent of American teens are faced with
concern over where their next meal will come from.  But poor eating habits lead to
significant  nutrition  deficiencies  and  imbalances  among  today’s  teens,  with
overconsumption of fat and insufficient consumption of fruits and vegetables.  Some
60 percent of teen boys and 80 percent of teen girls are calcium deficient.  And the
rate of obesity has almost doubled in the last 20 years.  Between 10 and 15 percent of
children  and  adolescents  are  obese,  placing  them  at  higher  risk  for  diabetes  and
cardiovascular disease as adults.
· While there has been a recent decline in teen homicides and suicides, rates remain
high.  Guns are the leading cause of fatal teen violence—used in 85 percent of teen
homicides and 63 percent of teen suicides.  Analysis prepared for this report indicates
that  in  states  where  fewer  homes  have  guns,  there  are  fewer  teen  suicides  and
unintentional  gun-related  teen  deaths.    In  comparison  to  the  four  states  with  the
lowest levels of gun prevalence, the four states with the highest prevalence had twice
as many teen suicides and about 10 times as many gun-related accidental deaths.
· Teen birth and pregnancy rates are steadily declining. Among teens aged 15-19, the
overall birth rate has declined by 18 percent from 1991 to 1998 and have fallen in
every state, and across ethnic and racial groups.  Nonetheless, rates are still high and
remain a serious challenge.
· About 4 million young people smoke and the incidence of youth smoking rose during
the 1990s.  White teens are more likely to smoke than African-American teens.
Suburban teens and those with more highly educated parents are more likely to smoke
than teens living in cities or rural areas.  Research suggests that that the decline in
cigarette prices over the early 1990s led to about one third of the increase in smoking
among high-school seniors.
T
HE 
I
MPORTANCE OF THE 
P
ARENT
-T
EEN 
R
ELATIONSHIP
· Parental involvement is a major influence in helping teens avoid risks such as
smoking, drinking, drug use, sexual activity, violence, and suicide attempts, while
increasing educational achievement and expected attainment.  For many families,
eating dinner together can be an important way for children and parents to maintain
connection.  Significant differences were noted between teens who eat dinner with
their parents at least five times a week and those who do not. Similarly, significant
differences were found for teens  who reported feeling “close” to their mother and/or
father and those who did not.  These results persist after taking account of differences
in teens’ gender, poverty status, and family structure.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = True ' Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
convert word form to fillable pdf form; pdf form fill
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
convert pdf file to fillable form online; add attachment to pdf form
3
·  Smoking.  Among teens aged 15-16, 42 percent of teens who don’t feel close to
their mother and/or father smoke, compared with 26 percent of teens who do feel
close to at least one parent.  In this same age group, over 34 percent of teens who
don’t regularly eat dinner with their parents smoked, in contrast to just 25 percent
of teens who do eat dinner regularly with their parents.
· Drinking.  The prevalence of drinking is nearly twice as high among 15- to 16-
year-olds who do not feel close to a parent and among those who do not eat dinner
with a parent, compared with those who do.
· Drug Use.  About 50 percent of 15- to 16-year-olds who aren’t close to their
parents have used marijuana,  compared  with just 24 percent of those who  are
close to their parents.
· Violence.  Less than 30 percent of  teens aged 15-16 who eat dinner with their
parents have been in a serious fight, compared with more than 40 percent of those
who do not eat dinner with their parents.
· Sexual Activity.  Over 50 percent of teens who do not eat dinner with their parents
have had sex by age 15 to 16. By contrast, only 32 percent of teens  who do eat
dinner with their parents have ever had sex.
· Suicidal Thoughts.  Teens aged 15-16 who do not feel close to their parents are
about three times as likely to think about suicide as teens who are close to their
parents.
· Suicide Attempts.  Teens  aged  15-16  who  don’t  eat  dinner  with  their  parents
regularly are twice as likely to have attempted suicide.
· Educational Achievement. Teens of all ages who eat with their parents, or feel
close to their parents, have higher grade point averages.  In general, they are more
likely  to  intend  to  go  to  college,  and  they  are  less  likely  to  have  been  ever
suspended from school.
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = true; // Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
add fillable fields to pdf; convert pdf fillable form to word
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page. Line color and fill can be set in properties. Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
pdf signature field; convert pdf fillable forms
4
T
EENS AND 
T
HEIR 
P
ARENTS IN THE 
21
ST
C
ENTURY
:
A
E
XAMINATION OF 
T
RENDS IN 
T
EEN 
B
EHAVIOR
AND THE 
R
OLE OF 
P
ARENTAL 
I
NVOLVEMENT
This report analyzes key trends in teen behavior, and investigates the role of parents’
involvement in their teenagers’ lives.  It outlines significant opportunities and challenges for teens
in the 21
st
century and demonstrates that teens are more likely to take advantage of opportunities
and avoid risks when parents are involved in their lives.
1.  I
NTRODUCTION
The teenage years are a time of great opportunities—both educational and personal—for
children, but also a time when children face difficult growth challenges and decisions regarding
sexual activity, smoking and drinking, and suicide.  The key theme of this report is that parents
play  an  important  role  in  working  with  their  teenage  children  in  attaining  successes  and
minimizing risks.
This report provides new evidence that teenagers are most successful at meeting today’s
challenges if they have close bonds with their parents.  Young people are most likely to avoid
dangerous or destructive behavior when they are closer to their parents.  Similarly, teens who are
closer to their parents are more likely to be successful in school.  And the importance of parental
involvement persists whether families are headed by one parent or by two parents.
In fact, teens today are more highly educated and have greater potential for economic
success than ever in history, through opportunities to invest in education, work, and community
service.  The economic rewards of education are at an all-time high, and teens have responded by
completing high school and enrolling in college at record rates.  Work in the labor force during
high school provides income to the teen, can create opportunities for work and life skills, and in
some cases may be a useful way of gaining experience that leads to better economic outcomes in
the long run.   Finally, community service, often  in the form of  volunteerism for teenagers,
provides meaningful involvement that enriches teen lives and leads to greater success in and out
of school.
At the same time, parental bonds help teens face today’s difficult decisions and serious
risks to their well-being.  Though many harmful or destructive behaviors among teens are on the
decline—including youth violence, teenage pregnancy and childbearing, and, very recently, drug
use—these remain serious problems facing today’s teens.  However, results described in this
report show that young people who have a close parent-child bond are most likely to avoid
dangerous and destructive behavior.  The challenge for families is finding ways of remaining
connected while accommodating busy lives.  The challenge for society is to complement parents’
efforts by providing meaningful school and community activities for teens outside the home, and
by insuring that families have the flexibility they need to spend time together.
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties. Drawing Tab. Item. Name. Description. 7. Draw free form. Users can draw freehand annotation on
convert an existing form into a fillable pdf form; pdf form filler
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
fill color and transparency are all can be altered in properties. Drawing Tab. Item. Name. Description. 7. Draw free form. Users can draw freehand annotation on
change font in pdf fillable form; create fill in pdf forms
5
2.  E
XPANDING 
O
PPORTUNITIES FOR 
T
ODAY
T
EENAGERS
:
E
DUCATION
, W
ORK
AND 
C
OMMUNITY 
S
ERVICE
As we enter the 21
st
century, teenagers face greater opportunities for personal growth and
economic success than ever before.  While much has changed over the past 100 years (see Box 1
on the next  page), the focus of  this section  is  on  the  recent  changes that have shaped the
opportunities that  teens face  today—opportunities  for success arising  from greater levels  of
education, work, and community service.
Trends in High School Completion for Teens
Today, attending school is the dominant activity for teens, and there has been a striking
increase in high school graduation rates over time across demographic groups.  High school
completion rates for young adults (aged 25-29) are now nearly 90 percent for both whites and
African Americans, with the earlier pronounced differences between the races disappearing by
1998 (Chart 1).  Hispanics have not made the same gains, however, as the proportion of those
aged 25-29 completing high school was only 63 percent in 1998.  However, the figures for
Hispanics include individuals who immigrated as adults and thus have had fewer educational
opportunities in the United States.
Now,  more  than  ever,  a  high  school
diploma is a prerequisite for economic success.
A high school diploma is, of course, necessary
for college attendance, and the economic gains
from a college education are higher than ever
before  (described  in  the  section  below).    In
1999,  for  example,  men  with  a  high  school
education  earned  47  percent  more  than  drop
outs,  up  from  22  percent  in  1979.    But  in
addition,  research  shows  that  high  school
students  who  develop  strong  cognitive  skills
receive  clear  economic  gains.
1
 Among
individuals with a high school education, but no college, those with a greater mastery of basic
math and reading skills have higher wages.  Moreover, this link between basic skills and wages
appears to  have grown stronger over time, perhaps as a  result  of the structural shifts in the
economy toward service sector or computer-intensive jobs.
Students and their schools are responding to the greater earnings opportunities arising
from higher skills—teens are taking tougher courses and are achieving more in school.  High
school teens today are taking more courses in core academic subjects than did their counterparts
in the early 1980s, and the courses they are taking are more challenging.  For example, a higher
percentage  of  high  school  graduates  are  completing  algebra  and  higher-level  mathematics
courses, as well as courses in biology, chemistry, and physics, than in the 1980s.
1
See the Economic Report of the President, February 2000.
0
20
40
60
80
100
1940
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
Whites
Chart 1. High School Graduation Rates of 25- to 29-
Year-Olds by Race and Ethnicity
African Americans
Hispanics
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
RasterEdge .NET PDF SDK is such one provide various of form field edit functions. Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in VB.NET.
create a pdf form that can be filled out; converting pdf to fillable form
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Export PDF form data to html form in .NET WinForms and ASP.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. NET component to convert adobe PDF file to html
allow users to attach to pdf form; convert pdf to fillable form online
6
Box 1.  American Teens, Then and Now
In 1900 America had a very young population—more than 1 in 5 were between the ages of 10
and 19—but these youth had low life expectancy and limited economic opportunities by today’s
standards. Such killers as typhoid, cholera, polio, and smallpox now pose only minimal threats to
American  teens’  health.  Per  capita  income  has  increased  eight-fold  over  the  course  of  the
century,  and  things  once  considered luxuries, such  as telephones,  televisions, CDs  and video
games,  are now  staples of teen existence. Educational  attainment  has increased  hand-in-hand
with  this  substantial  increase  in prosperity.   In  1900  total high  school enrollment relative  to
teenage population aged 14-17 was only 10 percent.  For young  adults aged 25-29, the median
level of education was only about 8 years—less than 5 years for African Americans.  In contrast,
by 1997 the high school enrollment rate was 93 percent, and in 1998 88 percent of those aged
25-29 had completed high school. Increasing numbers attend college or graduate school. African
Americans  and  women  have  particularly  benefited  from  changes  over  time.    In  1900,  few
teenage girls could anticipate working outside their homes or farms—only a fifth of women of
all ages worked for pay, and those who did were mainly single and poor. Today, 60 percent are
in the labor  force, and women increasingly  hold professional jobs.  Over  40  percent of  those
enrolled in professional schools in 1996 were women, and women attend college at higher rates
than men. Similar changes have transpired for African Americans, whose high school completion
rates today are equal to those of whites.
*
The 1998 column presents the most recent statistics available for the late 1990s unless noted otherwise.
1
Data for 1900 and 1950 are for whites only.  In these years virtually all foreign born residents were white.
2
The 1900 statistics refer to high school graduates as a percent of persons 17 years old.
3
The 1900 statistics refer to bachelor’s or first professional degrees conferred per 100 persons 23 years old.
Trends for American Youth
1900
1950
1998
*
Population aged 10-19 who are foreign born (percent)
1
6.5
0.8
6.0
Life expectancy for 15-year-olds (years)
Black male
53.3
63.2
68.6
Black female
54.8
66.4
76.0
White male
61.3
69.2
75.0
White female
62.8
74.4
80.5
Live births per 1,000 women aged 15-19
---
81.6
51.1
Population aged 15-19 ever married (percent)
Male
1.2
3.3
1.4
Female
11.3
17.1
3.2
Average days of public school attendance per enrolled pupil
99
158
161
(‘79-’80)
Percent of enrolled pupils attending public school each day
68.6
88.7
90.1
(‘79-’80)
High school enrollment relative to population aged 14-17
10.2
76.1
92.8
Population aged 18-24 enrolled in college (percent)
Male
33.1 
(’67)
34.5
Female
2.3
19.2 
(’67)
38.6
Population aged 25-29 with high school diploma (percent)
6.3
2
52.8
88.1
Population aged 25-29 with 4 or more years of college (percent)
1.9
3
7.7
27.3
7
Moreover, when tested for basic proficiency, teenagers are doing better.  Data from the
National Assessment of Education Progress indicate that the fraction of 8
th
graders performing at
or above the “basic” achievement level in mathematics increased from 52 to 62 percent between
1990 and 1996; for 12
th
graders the fraction increased from 58 percent to 69 percent.  Progress
was also found in science achievement levels, relative to the early 1980s, though there was little
change in reading performance from 1971 though 1996.  In addition, improvement can be seen in
the scores on the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT, a test typically taken by college-bound high
school juniors and seniors).  Between 1976 and 1995, the combined verbal and mathematics
scores of African Americans climbed by over 50 points, while those of white students remained
roughly stable.  Observed trends in average SAT scores are particularly impressive given that the
proportion of high school graduates taking the test has increased by about a fourth since the early
1970s.
Going to College in an Increasingly High-Tech World
The clear goal for many teens is to attend college, as evident in the dramatic upward
trend in college completion rates over time.  As shown in Chart 2, college completion rates have
increased six-fold  from  1940 to  1998, from  5.9  percent  to  27.3 percent.   Women  are  now
continuing on to college in record numbers; since 1980 more women have been enrolled in
college than men.  (In 1998, for example, 38.6
percent of women aged 18-24 were enrolled in
college  compared with  34.5  percent of  men.)
However,  in  contrast  to  our  experience  with
high  school  completion  rates,  the  racial  and
ethnic gap in college graduation rates remains
large.
The  substantially  greater  economic
gains to college education have almost certainly
contributed  to  teens’  greater  desire  to  attend
college.  Between  1979  and  1999  median  real
weekly wages increased by  almost  15 percent
for male college graduates, while falling by 12 percent for men with only a high school diploma
(for full-time workers age 25 and over).  As a result of these trends, college graduates earned 68
percent more than high-school graduates in 1999, up from a 29 percent differential in 1979.
A significant part of the greater wages associated with college attendance may be the
shift of jobs toward greater use of information technology (IT) or computers in the workplace.  In
the last 10 years, firms’ expenditure on IT surged to become one of the largest components of
investment.  And employers seem to increasingly need workers with computer as well as basic
problem-solving skills.
Given these greater returns to a college education, and greater use of IT, it is increasingly
important that no groups of teenagers be left behind in educational success.  But some are lagging
behind.  Because African American students attend college at lower rates, they are considerably
less likely to prepare for careers in the high-paying information technology sector. A recent report
by the Office of Technology Policy
2
indicates a striking digital divide in the IT work force, with
2
“The Digital Work Force: Building Infotech Skills at the Speed of Innovation,” U.S. Department of
Commerce, Office of Technology Policy, June 1999.
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
1
11
21
31
41
51
Whites
Chart 2. College Completion Rates of 25- to 29-Year-
Olds by Race and Ethnicity
African Americans
Hispanics
8
African Americans and Hispanics significantly underrepresented in this rapidly growing, highly-
paid  sector.    Women  also  are  underrepresented  in  the  IT  sector,  but  in  contrast  to  racial
minorities, women are  underrepresented  because  they are  less likely  to  choose science  and
engineering fields when in college.
One key reason why some demographic groups are left behind in college attendance is
that parental income remains an important determinant  of college  attendance.   High-income
families are much more likely to send their teens to college, and they are particularly likely to
send them to four-year colleges (Table 1).
3
Table 1.  Percentage of Students From Families In Each Income Quartile Enrolling in Post-
Secondary Schools Within 20 Months of High School Graduation
Parental Income Quartile
Total
Vocational,
Technical
2-Year
College
4-Year
College
Top
90
5
19
66
Second
79
6
25
48
Third
70
7
25
38
Bottom
60
10
22
28
Source: Kane (1999), based on data from the high school class of 1992.
The vast majority (90 percent) of students whose parents were in the top quartile of the
income distribution were pursuing post-secondary education within 20 months of high school
graduation, compared with only 60 percent of students whose parents were in the bottom quartile
of  the  income distribution. And of  those  lower income  students enrolling in  post-secondary
education, fewer than half of students enrolled in 4-year college, compared with almost  three
quarters of students from the top income group.  Some of these differences in youths’ college
attendance may arise from differences in preparedness for college and in family attitudes toward
education,  rather  than  financial  barriers.    However,  even  after  considering  such  family
background influences, parental income remains an important determinant of college attendance
.
4
Thus, teens, their families, and the broader community continue to face the challenge of
finding  ways  to  insure  that more young  people  have  college access.    Educational  outreach
programs designed to motivate and support students from low-income families can be effective in
increasing prospects  for higher education  and subsequent employment.  GEAR UP (Gaining
Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) helps low-income students prepare
for education beyond high school by providing tutoring, counseling, mentoring, and financial aid.
TRIO programs are another important resource to help disadvantaged students prepare for and
succeed in college.  Statistics about Upward Bound, a TRIO program, indicated that students in
the program were four times more likely to earn a college degree than other students from similar
backgrounds.  The government has an important role in ensuring adequate funding for scholarship
and loan programs for higher education, thereby helping more young people take advantage of
strong demand for college-educated and high-tech workers.
3
Thomas J. Kane, “Rethinking The Way Americans Pay For College,” The Milken Institute Review, Third
Quarter 1999.
4
This paragraph is also based on Kane’s analysis.
9
Teens Working While in School
Working while in school can provide opportunities for learning that complement formal
education.  It may foster important life skills, such as accountability, punctuality, and time and
money management.  In fact, parents cite the development of these life skills as an important
reason for encouraging their teens to work.  Moreover, investing in a broad set of basic work-
related skills, including the ability to work with others and communicate  effectively, may be
particularly valuable in the long run.
The vast majority of teens spend some portion of their time working as well as attending
school.  Approximately 80 percent of high school students report that they have held a job at
some point during high school.  At any given time, about one-third of all high school students are
employed in the labor market, resulting today in
3.3 million students working.  However, while
student  employment  rates  have  not  changed
appreciably  over  time,  there  are  fairly
substantial differences between racial and ethnic
groups (see Chart 3).  Part of these differences
may  be  explained  by  the  differences  in
unemployment among teens  who  are  actively
seeking employment.  The unemployment rate
for white youths who are enrolled in high school
is currently 13.4 percent, whereas it is a much
higher  24 percent  for  African  Americans  and
Hispanics.    Higher  unemployment  rates  for
minorities suggest that it may  be  more difficult for them to find employment opportunities.
Across all demographic groups, about half of all 15- to 17-year-olds are working in the retail
sector (including restaurants, fast-food, or grocery stores).
Work  can  create  conflicts with  schooling  by  taking  time away  from other  valuable
activities, such as studying and sleeping.  The data suggest that when students work excessive
hours, work can lead to decreased educational attainment or lower academic performance. Data
on work intensity shows that among all employed students, only about 6 percent report working
full-time, but some part-timers may also work excessively.  Overall, the balance of the evidence
suggests that high intensity work can be detrimental, but that low to moderate intensity work can
be beneficial.
5
5
See Institute of Medicine, Protecting Youth at Work: Health, Safety, and Development of Working
Children and Adolescents in the United States, National Academy Press, 1998, for a survey of this
literature.  Also addressed in their study is the issue of safety on the job.   It has been estimated that each
year about 100,000 15-17 year-olds seek treatment in hospital emergency departments for work-related
injuries.  The rate of injury per hour worked appears almost twice as high for children and adolescents as
for adults—about 4.9 injured per 100 full-time equivalent workers among adolescents, compared with 2.8
for all workers.  The most common nonfatal injuries observed among working young people are cuts and
lacerations, sprains and strains, contusions, burns, and fractures.
0
10
20
30
40
50
1970
1975
1980
1985
1990
1995
Chart 3. Share of High School Students with Jobs
White
Hispanic
African 
American
10
Teens and Community Service
Teen service to the community is becoming a more integral part of their educational
experience.  High schools are placing a growing emphasis on “service learning”—community
service  integrated  with classroom  instruction.   In 1999,  83 percent  of  high  schools  offered
community service opportunities to their students and 46 percent offered service-learning, up
dramatically from 1983-84 levels of 27 percent and 9 percent, respectively.
6
Community service
in schools also reaches down to the middle schools—77 percent of middle schools had students
participating in community service activities recognized by and/or arranged through the school,
and 38 percent  of middle schools  had students participating in  service learning.   Moreover,
anecdotal evidence suggests that more schools are introducing community service graduation
requirements.  Cities such as Chicago, Illinois, Washington, D.C., and Louisville, Kentucky, have
recently implemented community service requirements for graduation, while Maryland has begun
the first state-wide requirement.
Efforts  to  encourage  volunteering  have  also  come  at  the  national  level.    In  1993,
President Clinton outlined a vision for a national service program that would allow young people
to serve their country while earning funds for a college education.  The result is  AmeriCorps,
which brings  together  people of  different racial, ethnic and  economic  backgrounds  to solve
community problems.  Since the program's inception 5 years ago, over 150,000  AmeriCorps
members aged 17 and over have served as tutors, mentors, disaster-relief workers, and other roles.
Today there are more than 350  AmeriCorps programs nationwide serving an estimated 4,000
communities.
There  is  considerable  evidence  that  community  service  results  in  higher  levels  of
educational attainment and the avoidance of risky behaviors for some teens.   Two carefully
evaluated community service programs, the Teen Outreach Program (TOP) and the Valued Youth
Program (VYP), are found to have had sizable positive effects on participants.
7
TOP, offered to
middle and high school students at sites across the United States and Canada, combined volunteer
community service opportunities with classroom discussions about life issues.  Results from a
random assignment evaluation, based on 7 years of follow-up data, show that TOP participants
had  a  32  percent  lower  rate  of course  failure in school, a 37 percent lower rate of  school
suspension, a 43 percent lower rate of pregnancy, and a 75 percent lower rate of school dropout,
compared to the control group.  VYP, on the other hand, was focused on middle school students
and succeeded by showing at-risk youth that they were valued by having them tutor younger
children.  Results after 2 years, based on a random assignment evaluation, show that the program
increased tutors’ reading grades and substantially cut school dropout rates: Only 1 percent of
tutors had dropped out by the end of the second year of the program, while 12 percent of students
in the control group dropped out.
Overall, extensive research suggests that teens improve on many dimensions when they
have meaningful involvement in useful and necessary tasks, and community service can provide
such involvement.  For example, youth who are at risk of destructive behavior are much more
likely  to  have  positive  attitudes  towards  life’s  opportunities  when  these  youth  participate
6
See Rebecca Skinner and Chris Chapman, “Service-Learning and Community Service in K-12 Public
Schools,”  National Center for Educational Statistics,  September 1999.  See also Brian Kleiner and Chris
Chapman, “Youth Service-Learning and Community Service among 6
th
- through 12
th
-Grade Students in the
United States: 1996-1999,” National Center for Educational Statistics, November 1999.
7
Cynthia Moore and Joseph Allen,  “The Effects of Volunteering on the Young Volunteer,” The Journal of
Primary Prevention, 1996.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested