itextsharp pdf to image c# : Cannot save pdf form in reader application Library utility azure asp.net winforms visual studio big-data-and-data-protection1-part1738

Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
10 
new issues in terms of data protection. In practice it may be 
difficult to say definitively that a particular example of 
processing is or is not big data. Indeed, organisations are 
sometimes reluctant to label what they are doing as big data.   
33.
A difficulty in identifying instances of big data analytics may 
also be due to the fact that, despite the level of discussion of 
big data, the actual take-up of it in the UK appears to be still 
relatively low, although it is growing. A survey
11
by e-skills UK 
for SAS found that in 2012 only 14% of firms with more than 
100 employees had adopted big data. This is expected to rise 
to 29% by 2017. The same survey estimated that take-up 
amongst small and medium-sized enterprises was less than 
0.2%. The creation of the Alan Turing Institute for Data 
Science, announced in the 2014 Budget
12
, is likely to further 
encourage the adoption of big data analytics in the UK. 
Big data and personal data  
34.
Personal data is data that relates to an identifiable living 
individual. ‘Identifiable’ means that the individual can be 
identified from that data, either alone or in combination with 
other information. In assessing whether the data could be 
combined with other information to identify an individual, it is 
necessary to consider what means are reasonably likely to be 
used to identify them. The ICO has produced guidance that 
explains this definition further
13
35.
Data protection is concerned with personal data, but it is 
important to remember that many instances of big data 
analytics do not involve personal data at all. Examples of non-
personal big data include: world climate and weather data; 
using geospatial data from GPS-equipped buses to predict 
arrival times; data from radio telescopes in the Square 
11
Big data analytics. Adoption and employment trends 2012-2017. e-skills UK, 
January 2013. Available from http://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/en/news/big-
data-analytics-assessment-demand-labour-and-skills-2012-2017  Accessed 25 
June 2014 
12
Department for Business Innovation and Skills. Plans for world class research 
centre in the UK. Press release 19 March 2014 
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/plans-for-world-class-research-centre-in-
the-uk Accessed 25 June 2014 
13
Information Commissioner’s Office. Determining what is personal data. ICO, 
December 2012. 
http://ico.org.uk/for_organisations/guidance_index/~/media/documents/library/
Data_Protection/Detailed_specialist_guides/PERSONAL_DATA_FLOWCHART_V1_
WITH_PREFACE001.ashx Accessed 25 June 2014 
Cannot save pdf form in reader - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
cannot save pdf form; adding text fields to pdf
Cannot save pdf form in reader - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
add photo to pdf form; pdf form change font size
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
11 
Kilometre Array
14
; data from sensors on containers carried on 
ships. These are all areas where big data analytics enable new 
discoveries and improve services and business processes, 
without using personal data. 
36.
However, there are many examples of big data analytics that 
do involve processing personal data, for example: data from 
monitoring devices on patients in clinical trials, mobile phone 
location data, data on purchases made with loyalty cards and 
biometric data from body-worn devices. 
37.
There is a trend towards what is sometimes called the ‘segment 
of one’: fine tuning the offer of products of services to an 
individual based on their characteristics such as age, 
preferences, lifestyle etc. Findings derived from big data 
analytics can be applied to marketing to individuals (eg ‘people 
with these characteristics tend to want these products or 
services at this time’). 
38.
Big data analytics also has the potential to create new personal 
data. For example, social media and other data about an 
individual could be analysed to find out about that person’s 
lifestyle as a factor in determining their credit rating, or 
whether they are at risk of developing a medical condition. 
Similarly, sensors in cars provide vast amounts of data about 
the car, but this can also be used to identify patterns in 
people’s driving behaviour, which can help to inform decisions 
about their insurance premiums. 
39.
Big data can be used to identify general trends, rather than to 
understand more about individuals or to make decisions about 
them. For example, data from travel cards that record journeys 
made by individuals, such as Oystercard, could be combined 
with traffic data to plan new bus routes. In such cases the data 
may often be anonymised before being analysed. 
Anonymisation 
40.
If personal data is fully anonymised, it is no longer personal 
data. In this context, anonymised means that it is not possible 
to identify an individual from the data itself or from that data in 
combination with other data, taking account of all the means 
that are reasonably likely to be used to identify them. 
14
Square Kilometre Array website https://www.skatelescope.org/ Accessed 25 
June 2014  
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
SaveFile(String filePath): Save PDF document file to a specified path in a file dialog and load your PDF document in will be a pop-up window "cannot open your
changing font size in pdf form field; best pdf form creator
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
because you can make sure that the PDF file cannot be altered pages Dim doc As PDFDocument = PDFDocument.Create(2) ' Save the new created PDF document into
change font size pdf form reader; add text field to pdf acrobat
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
12 
41.
In some cases, the data used for big data analytics is 
anonymised for the purposes of the analysis. For example, 
Telefonica’s Smart Steps
15
tool uses data on the location of 
mobile phones on its network in order to track the movement 
of crowds of people. This can be used by retailers to analyse 
footfall in a particular location. The data that identifies 
individuals is stripped out prior to the analysis and the 
anonymised data is aggregated to gain insights about the 
population as a whole and combined with market research data 
from other sources. Another example of this is in medical 
research, where data from clinical trials is rigorously 
anonymised before being made available for analysis. In 
practice, anonymised data may be used in a number of 
different scenarios: organisations may bring in anonymised 
data, or they may seek to irreversibly anonymise their own 
data before using it themselves or sharing it with others. 
42.
It may not be possible to establish with absolute certainty that 
an individual cannot be identified from a particular dataset in 
combination with other data that may exist elsewhere. Some 
commentators have pointed to examples of where it has been 
possible to identify individuals in apparently anonymised 
datasets, and so concluded that anonymisation is becoming 
increasingly ineffective 
16
. On the other hand, Cavoukian and 
Castro
17
have found shortcomings in the main studies on which 
this view is based. The issue is not about eliminating the risk of 
re-identification altogether, but whether it can be mitigated so 
it is no longer significant. Organisations should focus on 
mitigating the risks to the point where the chance of re-
identification is extremely remote.  The range of datasets 
available and the power of big data analytics make this more 
difficult, and this risk should not be underestimated, but that 
does not mean anonymisation is impossible or that it is not an 
effective tool. 
43.
Organisations using anonymised data need to be able 
demonstrate that they have carried out this robust assessment 
15
Telefonica. Smart Steps http://dynamicinsights.telefonica.com/488/smart-
steps Accessed 25 June 2014 
16
eg President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Big data and 
privacy. A technological perspective. White House, May 2014 
http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/PCAST/pcast_big_
data_and_privacy_-_may_2014.pdf Accessed 20 June 2014 
17
Cavoukian, Anne and Castro, Daniel. Big data and innovation, setting the 
record straight: de-identification does work. Office of the Information and Privacy 
Commissioner, Ontario, June 2014. 
http://www.privacybydesign.ca/index.php/paper/big-data-innovation-setting-
record-straight-de-identification-work Accessed 20 June 2014. 
C# Image: How to Use C# Code to Capture Document from Scanning
installed on the client as browsers cannot interface directly Save a the customized multi-page document to a a multi-page document (including PDF, TIFF, Word
add text field pdf; chrome save pdf with fields
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Add Rubber Stamp Annotation to Image
designed image and document, then you cannot miss RasterEdge image or document files; Able to save created rubber Suitable for VB.NET PDF, Word & TIFF document
add text field pdf; create a fillable pdf form
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
13 
of the risk of re-identification, and have adopted solutions 
proportionate to the risk. This may involve a range and 
combination of technical measures, such as data masking, 
pseudonymisation, aggregation and banding, as well as legal 
and organisational safeguards. The ICO’s Anonymisation code 
of practice
18
explains these in more detail. 
44.
Anonymisation may be used when data is shared externally or 
within an organisation. For example, an organisation may hold 
a dataset containing personal data in one data store, and 
produce an anonymised version of it to be used for analytics in 
a separate area.  Whether it remains personal data will depend 
on whether the anonymisation “keys” and other relevant data 
that enable identification are retained by the organisation.  
Even if the data remains personal data this is still a relevant 
safeguard to consider in order to enable processing to comply 
with the data protection principles. 
45.
Our Anonymisation code of practice
19
explains this and gives 
advice on anonymisation techniques. In addition, the UK 
Anonymisation Network (UKAN)
20
has an important role in 
providing expert advice on anonymisation techniques. This has 
been funded by the ICO and is co-ordinated by a consortium of 
the Universities of Manchester and Southampton, the Open 
Data Institute and the Office for National Statistics. 
46.
Anonymisation should not be seen merely as a means of 
reducing a regulatory burden by taking the processing outside 
the DPA. It is a means of mitigating the risk of inadvertent 
disclosure or loss of personal data, and so is a tool that assists 
big data analytics and helps the organisation to carry on its 
research or develop its products and services. It also enables 
the organisation to give an assurance to the people whose data 
it collected that it is not using data that identifies them for its 
big data analytics. This is part of the process of building trust 
which is key to taking big data forward. We return to the issue 
of building trust in the section on The business context. 
18
Information Commissioner’s Office. Anonymisation: managing data protection 
risk code of practice. ICO, November 2012. 
http://ico.org.uk/for_organisations/data_protection/topic_guides/~/media/docum
ents/library/Data_Protection/Practical_application/anonymisation-codev2.pdf 
Accessed 25 June 2014 
19
Ibid 
20
UK Anonymisation Network website http://ukanon.net/ Accessed 25 June 2014 
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Codes to Add Watermark in a TIFF Image
would not be obscured and cannot be removed for TIFF watermark embedding; Easily save updated TIFF powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
acrobat create pdf form; adding text to a pdf form
VB.NET Word: .NET Project for Merging Two or More Microsoft Word
REDocument), fileNameMerged, New DOCXEncoder()) 'save new word Unfortunately, it cannot be used in commercial profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
chrome save pdf form; adding text fields to a pdf
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
14 
Fairness 
47.
Under the first principle of the DPA, the processing of personal 
data must be fair and lawful, and must satisfy one of the 
conditions listed in Schedule 2 of the DPA (and Schedule 3 if is 
sensitive personal data as defined in the DPA). The first 
question for organisations to consider when using personal data 
for big data analytics is whether the processing is fair. This is 
particularly important when the type of processing is novel and 
complex, as in big data analytics. Big data is sometimes 
characterised as sinister or a threat to privacy or simply 
’creepy’ because it involves repurposing data in unexpected 
ways, using complex algorithms, and drawing conclusions 
about individuals
21
. Assessing whether the processing meets 
the requirement of fairness involves directly addressing this 
issue. 
48.
Fairness is partly about how personal data is obtained. The 
processing is unlikely to be fair if people are deceived or misled 
about how their data will be used at the point they are 
providing it. This means that transparency about how the date 
will be used is an important element in assessing whether big 
data analytics comply with the data protection principles. We 
discuss this further in the section on Transparency and privacy 
information
49.
It is also necessary to consider the effect of the processing on 
the individuals concerned. This does not simply mean whether 
it produces an outcome that they would want. For example, 
HMRC’s Connect
22
system uses analytics, drawing on a wide 
range of data sources, to identify tax fraud and while this may 
be unwelcome to those identified it does not follow that it is 
unfair (in certain circumstances there is also an exemption in 
21
Eg Naughton, John Why big data has made your privacy a thing of the past 
Guardian online 6 October 2013 
http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/oct/06/big-data-predictive-
analytics-privacy Accessed 25 June 2014; Richards Neil M. and King, Jonathan H. 
Three paradoxes of big data 66 Stanford Law Review Online 41 3 September 
2013 http://www.stanfordlawreview.org/online/privacy-and-big-data/three-
paradoxes-big-data Accessed 25 June 2014; Leonard, Peter. Doing big data 
business: evolving business models and privacy regulation. August 2013. 
International Data Privacy Law 18 December 2013. 
http://idpl.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2013/12/18/idpl.ipt032.short?rss=1 
Accessed 25 June 2014   
22
Smarter Government Public Sector Fraud Taskforce. A fresh approach to 
combating fraud in the public sector National Fraud Authority. March 2010. 
http://www.eurim.org.uk/activities/psd/A-fresh-approach-to-combating-fraud-in-
the-public-sector.pdf Accessed 25 June 2014 
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Create Windows TIFF Viewer | Online
document annotating support; Simple to save and output would be an notice with "cannot open your file powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf form save with reader; create a fillable pdf form from a pdf
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
viewing multiple document & image formats (PDF, MS Word SaveFile(String filePath): Save loaded file to a specified there will prompt a window "cannot open your
add editable fields to pdf; pdf form change font size
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
15 
section 29 of the DPA from the fairness requirement for 
personal data processed for tax purposes). Fairness involves a 
wider assessment of whether the processing is within the 
reasonable expectations of the individuals concerned. For 
example, every aspect of analysing loyalty card data to 
improve marketing should not always automatically be 
considered fair, or within customer expectations. The issues 
that can arise in this context are illustrated by the well-
publicised example of the US company, Target
23
Example  
The US retailer Target was interested in identifying points in 
consumers’ lives at which they are open to changes in their 
buying habits. As part of this they wanted to be able to predict 
when a customer was going to have a baby, so that they could 
market relevant products to them in advance. They started by 
analysing the purchases of customers in their ‘baby shower 
registry’ who had given the company their due date. From this 
they were able to identify a group of products which indicated 
that a customer was expecting a baby, and they found a 
correlation between the dates of those purchases and their 
due date. They then applied this to purchases by every female 
shopper in their customer database to identify those who were 
likely to be pregnant as well as their likely due date. Target 
could then send them marketing and offers on pregnancy and 
baby-related products, and take advantage of any change in 
their buying habits to encourage them to go on to buy other 
products. 
This was highlighted when a father complained to a Target 
store outside Minneapolis that his daughter, who was still in 
high school, had received these coupons when she wasn’t 
pregnant. It transpired that Target’s predictive model was 
accurate after all: his daughter was pregnant, but her father 
did not know it. The man subsequently apologised to the 
store.  
This is an example from the USA, which does not have the 
same data protection regime as the UK and the EU, but it 
nevertheless highlights issues of fairness and customer 
expectations that can arise in the context of big data analytics. 
23
Duhigg, Charles. How companies learn your secrets. New York Times online 16 
February 2012. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/19/magazine/shopping-
habits.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0  Accessed 21 July 2014. 
C# Excel: View Excel File in Window Document Viewer Control
Easy to view, edit, annotate and save Excel (.xlsx there will prompt a window "cannot open your file powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
adding an image to a pdf form; change font size in pdf form
C# PowerPoint: Document Viewer Creating in Windows Forms Project
C#.NET users to edit, annotate and save PowerPoint document NET tutorial, we will take a blank form as an control, there will prompt a window "cannot open your
convert pdf to editable form; pdf form creator
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
16 
50.
There is also a difference between using personal data when 
the purpose of the processing fits with the reason that people 
use the service and one where the data is being used for a 
purpose that is not intrinsic to the delivery of the service. A 
retailer using loyalty card data for market research is an 
example of the former. A social media company making its 
data available for market research is an example of the latter.  
This does not mean that the latter is necessarily unfair; this 
depends on what people are told when they join and use the 
social media service. It is important to make people aware of 
what is going to happen to their data if they choose to use the 
service.  This is discussed further in the section on 
Transparency and privacy information below. 
51.
How big data is used is an important factor in assessing 
fairness. Big data analytics may use personal data purely for 
research purposes, eg to detect general trends and 
correlations, or it may use personal data in order to make 
decisions affecting individuals, such as setting their insurance 
premium. Any processing of personal data must be fair, but if 
the analytics are being used to make decisions affecting 
individuals, the assessment of fairness must be even more 
rigorous. 
52.
There is a danger that the algorithms may be used in a way 
that perpetuates stereotyping or even bias. For example, an 
online customer’s likes, purchases and search history can be 
used to present targeted advertisements to them when they 
are searching or viewing web pages. This may be seen as a 
benefit of big data analytics because it tailors their experience 
of the internet to their interests. However, it can also mean 
that they are being profiled in a way that perpetuates 
discrimination, for example on the basis of race
24
. Research in 
the USA suggested that internet searches for “black-
identifying” names generated advertisements associated with 
arrest records much more frequently than those for “white-
identifying” names
25
. Profiling can also be used in ways that 
have a more direct effect, for example if decisions about a 
24
Rabess, Cecilia Esther.  Can big data be racist? The Bold Italic 31 March 2014. 
http://www.thebolditalic.com/articles/4502-can-big-data-be-racist Accessed 25 
June 2014 
25
Sweeney, Laetitia. Discrimination in online ad delivery. Data Privacy Lab 
January 2013. http://dataprivacylab.org/projects/onlineads/1071-1.pdf Accessed 
25 June 2014 
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
17 
person’s creditworthiness are based on information about 
where they live, their shopping habits or social contacts. This is 
a complex area. It is not necessarily the case that there is 
discrimination because a person belongs to a particular social 
group, but they are being treated in a certain way based on 
factors that they share with members of that group. 
53.
The quality of the data being used for the analytics may also be 
an issue. This is not so much a question of whether the data 
accurately records what someone said or did, but rather to 
what extent that provides a reliable basis for drawing 
conclusions. The issue of the quality and reliability of the data 
has been recognised as an issue in discussions of big data 
analytics.
26
54.
Organisations should also remember that under section 12 of 
the DPA, individuals have certain rights to prevent decisions 
being taken about them that are based solely on automated 
processing of their personal data. This situation may not have 
arisen very often, since there is usually human oversight of the 
decision in some form, but the increased use of big data 
analytics may now lead to more situations in which decisions 
are taken by automated processing. 
Conditions for processing personal data 
55.
Under the first principle of the DPA, the processing of personal 
data must not only be fair and lawful, but must also satisfy one 
of the conditions listed in Schedule 2 of the DPA (and Schedule 
3 if is sensitive personal data as defined in the DPA). This 
applies equally to big data analytics that use personal data. The 
Schedule 2 conditions that are most likely to be relevant to big 
data analytics, particularly in a commercial context, are 
consent, whether processing is necessary for the performance 
of a contract, and the legitimate interests of the data controller 
or other parties. Our Guide to data protection
27
explains these 
conditions in more detail. Here we consider how they relate to 
big data analytics specifically. 
26
Eg Forrester Consulting. Big data needs agile information and integration 
governance. Forrester Research Inc, August 2013. Available from: 
http://www.ibmbigdatahub.com/whitepaper/big-data-needs-agile-information-
and-integration-governance Accessed 25 June 2014 
27
Information Commissioner’s Office. Guide to data protection. ICO, November 
2009. 
http://ico.org.uk/for_organisations/data_protection/~/media/documents/library/
Data_Protection/Practical_application/the_guide_to_data_protection.pdf Accessed 
25 June 2014 
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
18 
Consent 
56.
If an organisation is relying on people’s consent as the 
condition for processing their personal data, then that consent 
must be freely given, specific and informed
28
. This means 
people must be able to understand what the organisation is 
going to do with their data and there must be a clear indication 
that they consent to it. If an organisation has collected 
personal data for one purpose and then decides to start 
analysing it for completely different purposes (or to make it 
available for others to do so) then it needs to make its users 
aware of this. This is particularly important if the organisation 
is planning to use the data for a purpose that is not apparent to 
the individual because it is not obviously connected with their 
use of a service. For example, if a social media company were 
selling on the wealth of personal data of its users to another 
company for other purposes. 
57.
It may be possible to have a process of graduated consent. A 
study commissioned by the International Institute of 
Communications
29
found that some users wanted to be able to 
give consent (or not) to different uses of their data throughout 
their relationship with a service provider, rather than having a 
simple ‘binary’ choice at the beginning. For example, they could 
give an initial consent to opt in to the system and then 
separate consent for their data to be shared with other parties. 
Furthermore, they wanted a value exchange, ie to receive 
some additional benefit in return for giving their consent. 
58.
It may be reasonable for organisations to use consent as a 
condition for processing in a big data context but they have to 
be sure that it is the appropriate condition. Furthermore, if 
people do not have a real choice and are not able to withdraw 
their consent if they wish, then the consent would not meet the 
standard required by the DPA. 
59.
If an organisation buys a large dataset of personal data for 
analytics purposes, then it becomes a data controller in respect 
of that data. The organisation needs to be sure that it has met 
28
For a detailed discussion of consent, see Article 29 Data Protection Working 
Party Opinion 15/2011 on the definition of consent. European Commission 13 July 
2011. http://ec.europa.eu/justice/data-protection/article-
29/documentation/opinion-recommendation/files/2011/wp187_en.pdf Accessed 
25 June 2014 
29
International Institute of Communications. Personal data management: the 
user’s perspective. International Institute of Communications, September 2012. 
http://www.iicom.org/open-access-resources/doc_details/226-personal-data-
management-the-users-perspective Accessed 25 June 2014 
Big data and data protection 
20140728 
Version: 1.0 
19 
a condition in the DPA for the further use of that data. If it is 
relying on the original consent obtained by the supplier as that 
condition, then it should ensure that this covers the further 
processing it plans for the data. 
60.
The apparent complexity of big data analytics should not 
become an excuse for failing to seek consent where it is 
required. Organisations must find the point at which to explain 
the benefits of the analytics and present users with a 
meaningful choice - and then respect that choice when they are 
processing their personal data. Paul Ohm argues
30
that Google 
“breached a wall of trust” by using search data to find 
correlations between search terms and recorded cases of flu in 
its Google Flu Trends
31
project. He suggests that if they had 
explained that they were doing this “to help avoid pandemics” 
or “to save lives”, users would have been likely to agree to it. 
This may be debateable, but his argument does raise the issue 
that if an organisation can identify potential benefits from using 
personal data in big data analytics, it should be able to explain 
these to users, and seek consent, if it is required as a condition 
for the processing. Furthermore, while consent may be the 
condition for processing, this does not mean that by consenting 
people trade all their privacy rights. The processing must still 
be fair and lawful, and they retain their rights under the DPA. 
Contracts and legitimate interests 
61.
While consent is one condition for processing personal data, it 
is not the only condition available under the DPA. Organisations 
do not have to seek consent in all cases, and other conditions 
may be relevant. 
62.
Condition 2 of Schedule 2 of the DPA is that the processing is  
necessary for the performance of a contract to which the data 
30
Ohm, Paul. The underwhelming benefits of big data. 161 University of 
Pennsylvania Law Review Online 339 (2013). 
http://www.pennlawreview.com/online/161-U-Pa-L-Rev-Online-339.pdf Accessed 
25 June 2014 
31
Ginsberg, Jeremy at al. Detecting influenza epidemics using search engine 
query data.  Google, 2009. 
http://static.googleusercontent.com/media/research.google.com/en//archive/pap
ers/detecting-influenza-epidemics.pdf. Accessed 25 June 2014. See also: Fung, 
Kaiser. Google flu trends’ failure shows good data > big data HBR Blog Network 
25 March 2014. http://blogs.hbr.org/2014/03/google-flu-trends-failure-shows-
good-data-big-
data/?utm_source=Socialflow&utm_medium=Tweet&utm_campaign=Socialflow 
Accessed 25 June 2014 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested