(Slip Opinion) 
OCTOBER  TERM,  2014 
Syllabus 
NOTE: Where it is feasible, a syllabus (headnote) will be released, as is
being done in connection with this case, at the time the opinion is issued.
The syllabus constitutes no part of the opinion of the Court but has been
prepared by the Reporter of Decisions for the convenience of the reader. 
See United States v. Detroit Timber & Lumber Co., 200 U. S. 321, 337. 
SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES 
Syllabus 
KING 
ET AL
. v. BURWELL, SECRETARY OF HEALTH
 
AND HUMAN SERVICES, 
ET AL
CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR 
THE FOURTH CIRCUIT 
No. 14–114.  Argued March 4, 2015—Decided June 25, 2015 
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act grew out of a long his-
tory of failed health insurance reform.  In the 1990s, several States 
sought to expand access to coverage by imposing a pair of insurance 
market  regulations—a  “guaranteed  issue” requirement,  which bars 
insurers from denying coverage to any person because of his health,
and  a  “community  rating”  requirement,  which  bars  insurers  from
charging  a  person higher premiums  for the  same  reason.   The re-
forms achieved the goal of expanding access to coverage, but they al-
so  encouraged  people  to wait until  they  got  sick to  buy  insurance. 
The result was an economic “death spiral”: premiums rose, the num-
ber of people buying insurance declined, and insurers left the market 
entirely.  In 2006, however, Massachusetts discovered a way to make
the guaranteed issue and community rating requirements work—by 
requiring individuals to buy insurance and by providing tax credits to 
certain individuals to make insurance more affordable.  The combi-
nation of these three reforms—insurance market regulations, a cov-
erage mandate, and tax credits—enabled Massachusetts to drastical-
ly reduce its uninsured rate. 
The Affordable Care Act adopts a version of the three key reforms 
that  made  the  Massachusetts  system  successful.    First,  the  Act 
adopts the guaranteed issue and community rating requirements.  42 
U. S. C. §§300gg, 300gg–1.  Second, the Act generally requires indi-
viduals to maintain health insurance coverage or make a payment to
the IRS, unless the cost of buying insurance would exceed eight per-
cent of that individual’s income.  26 U. S. C. §5000A.  And third, the 
Act  seeks  to make insurance  more affordable  by  giving  refundable 
tax credits to individuals with household incomes between 100 per-
Pdf form creator - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
best pdf form creator; change font pdf fillable form
Pdf form creator - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
pdf form save with reader; pdf form creation
KING v. BURWELL 
Syllabus 
cent and 400 percent of the federal poverty line.  §36B.
In addition to those three reforms, the Act requires the creation of 
an “Exchange”  in each State—basically, a  marketplace  that allows
people to compare and purchase insurance plans.  The Act gives each 
State  the  opportunity  to  establish  its  own  Exchange,  but  provides 
that the  Federal Government will establish  “such Exchange”  if  the 
State does not.  42 U. S. C. §§18031, 18041.  Relatedly, the Act pro-
vides that tax credits “shall be allowed” for any “applicable taxpayer,”
26 U. S. C. §36B(a), but only if the taxpayer has enrolled in an insur-
ance plan through “an Exchange established by the State under [42
U. S. C.  §18031],”  §§36B(b)–(c).   An IRS  regulation  interprets  that
language as making tax credits available on “an Exchange,” 26 CFR
§1.36B–2,  “regardless  of  whether  the  Exchange  is  established  and
operated by a State . . . or by HHS,” 45 CFR §155.20. 
 Petitioners are four individuals who live in Virginia, which has a
Federal Exchange.  They do not wish to purchase health insurance. 
In their view, Virginia’s Exchange does not qualify as “an Exchange
established by the State under [42 U. S. C. §18031],” so they should 
not receive any tax credits.  That would make the cost of buying in-
surance  more than  eight percent  of  petitioners’  income, exempting
them from  the Act’s coverage  requirement.   As  a  result  of the IRS 
Rule,  however,  petitioners  would  receive  tax  credits.    That  would 
make the cost of buying insurance less than eight percent of their in-
come, which would subject them to the Act’s coverage requirement. 
Petitioners challenged the IRS Rule in Federal District Court.  The 
District Court dismissed the suit, holding that the Act unambiguous-
ly made tax credits available to individuals enrolled through a Fed-
eral Exchange.  The Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit affirmed.
The Fourth Circuit viewed the Act as ambiguous, and deferred to the
IRS’s interpretation under Chevron U. S. A. Inc. v. Natural Resources 
Defense Council, Inc., 467 U. S. 837. 
Held: Section  36B’s  tax  credits  are  available  to individuals  in States 
that have a Federal Exchange.  Pp. 7–21.
(a) When  analyzing  an  agency’s  interpretation  of  a  statute,  this
Court often  applies the two-step framework announced in Chevron, 
467 U. S. 837.  But Chevron does not provide the appropriate frame-
work  here.    The  tax  credits  are  one  of  the  Act’s  key  reforms  and
whether  they  are  available  on  Federal  Exchanges  is  a  question  of
deep  “economic  and political  significance”;  had  Congress  wished  to
assign that question to an agency, it surely would have done so ex-
pressly.  And it is especially unlikely that Congress would have dele-
gated  this  decision  to  the  IRS, which has  no  expertise  in  crafting
health insurance policy of this sort. 
It is  instead the Court’s task  to  determine  the correct reading of 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Tell Users How to Create New PDF File and Load PDF from Other Files. Free PDF creator SDK for Visual Studio .NET. C# Project: PDF Creator Library DLLs.
change font in pdf form; pdf create fillable form
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Free PDF creator SDK library compatible with Visual Basic .NET class and able to create PDF in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET program.
add image field to pdf form; create a fillable pdf form
Cite as:  576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
Syllabus 
Section 36B.  If the statutory language is plain, the Court must en-
force it according to its terms.  But oftentimes the meaning—or am-
biguity—of certain words or phrases may only become evident when 
placed in context.  So when deciding whether the language is plain,
the Court must read the words “in their context and with a view to 
their place in the overall statutory scheme.”  FDA v. Brown & Wil-
liamson Tobacco Corp., 529 U. S. 120, 133.  Pp. 7–9.
(b) When read in context, the phrase “an Exchange established by
the State under [42 U. S. C. §18031]” is properly viewed as ambigu-
ous.  The phrase may be limited in its reach to State Exchanges.  But 
it  could  also  refer  to  all  Exchanges—both  State  and  Federal—for
purposes of the tax credits.  If a State chooses not to follow the di-
rective in Section 18031 to establish an Exchange, the Act tells the 
Secretary  of  Health  and  Human  Services  to  establish  “such  Ex-
change.”  §18041.  And by using the words “such Exchange,” the Act 
indicates that State and Federal Exchanges should be the same.  But 
State and Federal Exchanges would differ  in a fundamental way if
tax credits were available only on State Exchanges—one type of Ex-
change would help make insurance more affordable by providing bil-
lions  of  dollars  to  the  States’  citizens;  the  other type  of Exchange 
would  not.    Several  other  provisions  in  the  Act—e.g.,  Section 
18031(i)(3)(B)’s requirement that all Exchanges create outreach pro-
grams  to “distribute  fair  and  impartial  information  concerning  . . . 
the  availability  of  premium  tax  credits  under  section  36B”—would 
make  little  sense  if  tax  credits  were  not  available  on  Federal  Ex-
changes.
The argument that the phrase “established by the State” would be
superfluous if Congress meant to extend tax credits to both State and
Federal  Exchanges  is  unpersuasive.    This  Court’s  “preference  for 
avoiding surplusage constructions is not absolute.”  Lamie v. United 
States Trustee, 540 U. S. 526, 536.  And rigorous application of that
canon does not seem a particularly useful guide to a fair construction
of the Affordable Care Act, which contains more than a few examples 
of inartful drafting.  The Court nevertheless must do its best, “bear-
ing in mind the ‘fundamental canon of statutory construction that the 
words of a statute must be read in their context and with a view to 
their place in the overall statutory scheme.’ ”  Utility Air Regulatory 
Group v. EPA, 573 U. S. ___, ___.  Pp. 9–15. 
(c) Given that the text  is ambiguous,  the Court  must look  to  the 
broader  structure  of  the  Act  to  determine  whether  one  of  Section 
36B’s  “permissible  meanings  produces  a  substantive  effect  that  is 
compatible with  the rest  of the  law.”   United  Sav.  Assn. of  Tex.  v. 
Timbers of Inwood Forest Associates, Ltd., 484 U. S. 365, 371. 
Here, the statutory scheme compels the Court to reject petitioners’ 
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
metadata.Keywords = "University, Public, etc."; metadata.Creator = "MS Office String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; String outputFilePath
add fillable fields to pdf; change text size pdf form
VB.NET PDF - How to Add Barcode on PDF Page
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. This VB.NET PDF barcode creator add-on, which combines the PDF
change pdf to fillable form; change font pdf fillable form
KING v. BURWELL 
Syllabus 
interpretation because it would destabilize the individual insurance 
market in any State with a Federal Exchange, and likely create the 
very “death spirals” that Congress designed the Act to avoid.  Under 
petitioners’ reading, the Act would not work in a State with a Federal 
Exchange.  As they see it, one of the Act’s three major reforms—the 
tax credits—would not apply.  And a second major reform—the cov-
erage requirement—would not apply in a meaningful way, because so
many individuals would be exempt from the requirement without the 
tax credits.  If petitioners are right, therefore, only one of the Act’s 
three major reforms would apply in States with a Federal Exchange.
The combination of no tax credits and an  ineffective coverage re-
quirement could well push a State’s individual insurance market into
a death spiral.  It is implausible that Congress meant the Act to op-
erate  in  this  manner.    Congress  made  the  guaranteed  issue  and 
community rating requirements applicable in every State in the Na-
tion, but those requirements only work when combined with the cov-
erage  requirement  and  tax  credits.    It  thus  stands  to  reason  that 
Congress meant for those provisions to apply in every State as well.
Pp. 15–19. 
(d) The structure of Section 36B itself also suggests that tax credits
are not limited to State Exchanges.  Together, Section 36B(a), which 
allows  tax  credits  for  any  “applicable  taxpayer,”  and  Section
36B(c)(1), which defines that term as someone with a household in-
come  between  100  percent  and  400  percent  of  the  federal  poverty
line, appear to make anyone in the specified income range eligible for
a tax credit.  According to petitioners, however, those provisions are 
an empty promise in States with a Federal Exchange.  In their view, 
an  applicable taxpayer  in  such a  State  would be  eligible  for a  tax 
credit, but the  amount  of that  tax credit  would always be zero  be-
cause of two provisions buried deep within the Tax Code.  That ar-
gument fails because Congress “does not alter the fundamental de-
tails of a regulatory scheme in vague terms or ancillary provisions.” 
Whitman v. American Trucking Assns., Inc., 531 U. S. 457.  Pp. 19– 
20. 
(e) Petitioners’ plain-meaning arguments are strong, but the Act’s
context and structure compel the conclusion that Section 36B allows 
tax credits for insurance purchased on any Exchange created under 
the  Act.  Those credits are  necessary for  the Federal Exchanges to
function  like  their  State  Exchange  counterparts,  and  to  avoid  the
type  of  calamitous  result  that  Congress  plainly  meant  to  avoid.
Pp. 20–21. 
759 F. 3d 358, affirmed. 
R
OBERTS
, C. J., delivered the  opinion of the Court, in which K
EN-
VB.NET PDF metadata library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in
metadata.Keywords = "University, Public, etc." metadata.Creator = "MS Office Dim inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim outputFilePath
allow saving of pdf form; pdf form maker
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Codes to Create Linear and 2D Barcodes on
as 2d barcodes QR Code, Data Matrix, PDF-417, etc Imaging.Basic.dll", "RasterEdge. Imaging.Barcode.Creator.dll" and barcode, which will be in the form of REImage
add form fields to pdf; create a pdf form from excel
Cite as:  576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
Syllabus 
NEDY
, G
INSBURG
, B
REYER
, S
OTOMAYOR
, and K
AGAN
, JJ., joined.  S
CALIA
J., filed a dissenting opinion, in which T
HOMAS 
and A
LITO
, JJ., joined.  
VB.NET Imaging - Generate Barcode Image in VB.NET
Barcode creator SDK to write & customize ISSN barcode generation in VB.NET imaging project. ITF-14 valid for scanner reading on any pages in a PDF or TIFF
create a pdf form online; add image to pdf form
C# TIFF: Create Linear and 2D Barcodes on TIFF Document Using C#
TIFF Barcodes Creation. This C# TIFF Barcode Creator Add-on the supported barcode types are listed in the following form. C# TIFF Micro PDF-417 Creating, C# TIFF
add fields to pdf; pdf form save with reader
_________________ 
_________________ 
Cite as:  576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
Opinion of the Court 
NOTICE: This opinion is subject to formal revision before publication in the
preliminary print of the United States Reports.  Readers are requested to
notify the Reporter of Decisions, Supreme Court of the United States, Wash-
ington, D. C. 20543, of any typographical or other formal errors, in order
that corrections may be made before the preliminary print goes to press. 
SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES 
No. 14–114 
DAVID KING, 
ET AL
., PETITIONERS v. SYLVIA 
BURWELL, SECRETARY OF HEALTH
 
AND HUMAN SERVICES, 
ET AL
ON WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES COURT OF 
APPEALS FOR THE FOURTH CIRCUIT
 
[June 25, 2015]
C
HIEF 
J
USTICE 
R
OBERTS
delivered  the  opinion  of  the
Court. 
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act adopts a 
series of interlocking reforms designed to expand coverage
in the individual health insurance market.  First, the Act 
bars insurers from  taking a  person’s health  into  account
when  deciding  whether  to  sell  health  insurance  or  how 
much to charge.  Second, the Act generally requires each 
person to maintain insurance coverage or make a payment 
to the Internal Revenue Service.  And third, the Act gives 
tax  credits  to  certain  people  to  make  insurance  more
affordable. 
In addition to those reforms, the Act requires the crea-
tion of an “Exchange” in each State—basically, a market-
place  that  allows people  to compare and  purchase insur-
ance plans.  The Act gives each State the  opportunity to
establish its own Exchange, but provides that the Federal 
Government will establish the Exchange if the State does 
not. 
This  case  is  about  whether  the  Act’s  interlocking  re-
Create Thumbnail in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Go to the toolbar: Select "Thumbnail Creator" & activate RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode JBIG Twain Scanning; DICOM Reading; Form Recognition
add form fields to pdf without acrobat; adding text to pdf form
VB Imaging - Micro PDF 417 VB Barcode Generation
in a programming way. Following are the main features of this VB.NET Micro PDF 417 barcode creator SDK. The Barcode Creator Add-on
add submit button to pdf form; change font pdf form
KING v. BURWELL 
Opinion of the Court 
forms  apply  equally  in  each  State  no  matter  who  estab-
lishes the State’s Exchange.  Specifically, the question pre- 
sented  is  whether  the  Act’s  tax  credits  are  available  in 
States that have a Federal Exchange. 
The  Patient  Protection  and  Affordable  Care  Act,  124 
Stat. 119, grew out of a long history of failed health insur-
ance  reform.  In the  1990s,  several States  began  experi-
menting with ways to expand people’s access to coverage.
One common approach was to impose a pair of insurance
market  regulations—a  “guaranteed  issue”  requirement,
which barred insurers from denying coverage to any per-
son  because  of  his health,  and  a  “community  rating”  re-
quirement, which barred insurers from charging a person
higher  premiums  for  the  same  reason.  Together,  those 
requirements  were  designed  to  ensure  that  anyone  who
wanted to buy health insurance could do so.
The  guaranteed  issue  and  community  rating  require-
ments  achieved  that  goal,  but  they  had  an  unintended 
consequence:  They  encouraged  people  to  wait  until  they
got  sick to  buy  insurance.  Why buy  insurance  coverage 
when you  are healthy, if  you can buy the same coverage
for  the  same  price  when  you  become  ill?    This  conse-
quence—known  as  “adverse  selection”—led  to  a  second: 
Insurers were forced to increase premiums to account for 
the fact that, more and more, it was the sick rather than 
the healthy who were buying insurance.  And that conse-
quence  fed  back  into  the  first:  As  the  cost  of  insurance 
rose,  even  more  people  waited  until  they  became  ill  to
buy it.
This  led  to  an  economic  “death  spiral.”    As  premiums 
rose higher and higher, and the number of people buying 
insurance sank lower and lower, insurers began to leave 
the  market  entirely.    As  a  result,  the  number  of  people 
Cite as:  576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
Opinion of the Court 
without insurance increased dramatically.
This cycle happened  repeatedly  during the 1990s.  For 
example,  in  1993,  the  State  of  Washington  reformed  its
individual insurance market by  adopting  the guaranteed 
issue and community rating requirements.  Over the next 
three years, premiums rose by 78 percent and the number
of people enrolled fell by 25 percent.  By 1999, 17 of  the
State’s  19  private  insurers  had  left the  market, and  the
remaining  two  had  announced  their  intention  to  do  so. 
Brief  for  America’s  Health  Insurance  Plans  as  Amicus 
Curiae 10–11. 
For another  example, also  in  1993, New York  adopted 
the guaranteed issue and community rating requirements. 
Over the next few years, some major insurers in the indi-
vidual market raised premiums by roughly 40 percent.  By
1996,  these  reforms  had  “effectively  eliminated  the  com-
mercial  individual  indemnity  market  in  New  York  with
the largest individual health insurer exiting the market.”
L.  Wachenheim  &  H.  Leida,  The  Impact  of  Guaranteed 
Issue and Community Rating Reforms on States’ Individ-
ual Insurance Markets 38 (2012). 
In  1996,  Massachusetts  adopted  the  guaranteed  issue
and  community  rating  requirements  and  experienced 
similar  results.    But  in  2006,  Massachusetts  added  two 
more reforms: The Commonwealth required individuals to 
buy insurance or pay a penalty, and it gave tax credits to
certain  individuals  to  ensure  that  they  could  afford  the 
insurance they were required to buy.  Brief for Bipartisan 
Economic Scholars as Amici Curiae 24–25.  The combina-
tion  of  these  three  reforms—insurance  market  regula-
tions,  a  coverage  mandate,  and  tax  credits—reduced  the 
uninsured rate in Massachusetts to 2.6 percent, by far the 
lowest in the  Nation.  Hearing  on  Examining Individual
State  Experiences  with  Health  Care  Reform  Coverage
Initiatives  in  the  Context  of National  Reform  before  the 
Senate  Committee  on  Health,  Education,  Labor,  and 
KING v. BURWELL 
Opinion of the Court 
Pensions, 111th Cong., 1st Sess., 9 (2009). 
The  Affordable Care Act  adopts  a version of the  three 
key reforms that made the Massachusetts system success-
ful.  First, the Act adopts the guaranteed issue and com-
munity rating requirements.  The Act provides that “each
health insurance  issuer that offers health insurance cov-
erage in the individual . . . market in a State must accept 
every  . . .  individual  in  the  State  that  applies  for  such
coverage.”    42  U. S. C.  §300gg–1(a).    The  Act  also  bars 
insurers from charging higher premiums on the basis of a 
person’s health.  §300gg.
Second, the Act generally requires individuals to main-
tain health insurance coverage or make a payment to the
IRS.  26 U. S. C. §5000A.  Congress recognized that, with-
out  an  incentive,  “many  individuals  would  wait  to  pur-
chase  health  insurance  until  they  needed  care.”  42 
U. S. C.  §18091(2)(I).    So  Congress  adopted  a  coverage 
requirement  to  “minimize  this  adverse  selection  and 
broaden the health insurance risk pool to include healthy 
individuals, which will lower health insurance premiums.” 
Ibid.  In Congress’s view, that coverage requirement was
“essential to creating effective health insurance markets.” 
Ibid.  Congress also provided an exemption from the cov-
erage requirement for anyone who has to spend more than
eight  percent  of  his  income  on  health  insurance.    26 
U. S. C. §§5000A(e)(1)(A), (e)(1)(B)(ii).
Third, the Act seeks to make insurance more affordable 
by  giving  refundable  tax  credits  to  individuals  with 
household incomes between  100 percent and 400 percent 
of the federal poverty line.  §36B.  Individuals who meet 
the Act’s requirements may purchase insurance with  the 
tax credits, which are provided in advance directly to the 
individual’s insurer.  42 U. S. C. §§18081, 18082. 
These three reforms are closely intertwined.  As noted, 
Cite as:  576 U. S. ____ (2015) 
Opinion of the Court 
Congress found that the guaranteed issue and community 
rating requirements would not work without the coverage
requirement.  §18091(2)(I).  And the coverage requirement
would  not  work  without  the  tax  credits.    The  reason  is 
that, without the tax credits, the cost of buying insurance
would exceed eight percent of income for a large number of 
individuals, which would exempt them from the coverage 
requirement.  Given the relationship between these three 
reforms, the Act provided that they should take effect on
the same day—January 1, 2014.  See Affordable Care Act,
§1253, redesignated §1255, 124 Stat. 162, 895; §§1401(e),
1501(d), id., at 220, 249. 
In addition to those three reforms, the Act requires the 
creation  of  an  “Exchange”  in  each  State  where  people
can  shop  for  insurance,  usually  online.    42  U. S. C. 
§18031(b)(1).  An Exchange may be created in one of two 
ways.  First, the Act provides that “[e]ach State shall . . . 
establish  an  American  Health  Benefit  Exchange  . . .  for 
the  State.”  Ibid.   Second,  if a State nonetheless  chooses 
not  to establish  its own Exchange, the Act provides that 
the  Secretary  of  Health  and  Human  Services  “shall  . . .
establish  and  operate  such  Exchange  within  the  State.” 
§18041(c)(1).
The  issue  in  this case  is  whether  the Act’s tax  credits 
are  available  in  States  that  have  a  Federal  Exchange
rather than a State Exchange.  The Act initially provides
that  tax  credits  “shall  be  allowed”  for  any  “applicable 
taxpayer.”    26  U. S. C.  §36B(a).    The  Act  then  provides
that  the  amount  of  the  tax  credit  depends  in  part  on 
whether the  taxpayer  has  enrolled  in  an  insurance  plan 
through  “an  Exchange  established  by  the  State  under 
section 1311 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care 
Act  [hereinafter  42  U. S. C.  §18031].” 
26  U. S. C. 
§§36B(b)–(c) (emphasis added). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested