pdf to image converter using c# : Change font on pdf form Library control component .net azure asp.net mvc 201424pap7-part416

Figure 9: Contributions from TIPS Liquidity and Other Measures
Figure 9 shows the relative contributions from the liquidity and other measures based on Regression (9) in Table 6,
Panel B.The blue line plots the Model LII-implied TIPS spread minus the regression constant, and the green and red
lines plot the portion explained by TIPS liquidity measures and other measures, respectively.
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
−1
−0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
Percent
TIPS−indexed yield difference
Explained by liquidity measures
Explained by other measures
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
−1
−0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
Percent
TIPS−indexed yield difference
Explained by liquidity measures
Explained by other measures
68
Change font on pdf form - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
changing font size in pdf form; add form fields to pdf without acrobat
Change font on pdf form - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
can reader edit pdf forms; chrome save pdf form
Figure 10: Decomposing TIPS Yields and TIPS Breakeven Inflation
Graph A of Figure 10 decomposes the 10-year TIPS yield into the real yield and the TIPS liquidity premium, while
Graph B decomposes the 10-year TIPS BEI into expected inflation, the inflation risk premium and the TIPS liquidity
premium, both according to equation (30).
2000
2002
2004
2006
2008
2010
2012
−1
0
1
2
3
4
5
Percentage points
Graph A. Decomposing 10−Year TIPS Yields
TIPS yield
real yield
index lag effect
TIPS liq prem
2000
2002
2004
2006
2008
2010
2012
−4
−3
−2
−1
0
1
2
3
Percentage points
Graph B. Decomposing 10−Year Breakeven Inflation
BEI
inf exp
inf risk prem
(−) index lag effect
(−) TIPS liq prem
69
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing options TargetResolution = 150F; // to change image compression
adding text field to pdf; create a form in pdf from word
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce font resources: Font resources will also take up too Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing 150.0F 'to change image compression
create a pdf form; adding text fields to a pdf
Supplementary Appendix to
“Tips from TIPS: the Informational Content of Treasury
Inflation-Protected Security Prices”
-Not intended for publication -
1 All Parameter estimates
Table 1 reports parameter estimates for all five models mentionedin the paper.
2 Additional Model Results
Figure 1 shows the results for Model LI, while Figure 2 shows the results of Model LII estimated over the
pre-crisis period.
Figure 3 plots the yield fitting errors from Model LII. We see that the fit is generally worse for shorter-
term nominal yields and during the crisis period.
3 Robustness Checks
3.1 Gaussian Assumption for Expected Inflation
It’s now well known in the literature that, by allowing flexible correlations between the factors, the affine-
Gaussian bond pricing model outperforms affine models with stochastic volatilities in matching term pre-
mium dynamics.
1
Asimilar argument can be made for using Gaussian models to study inflation risk pre-
miums, which derive from the correlation between the real pricing kernel and inflation, even though such
models byconstructioncannot capturetime-varyinginflationuncertaintyandcannot decomposethe inflation
riskpremium further into time-varying inflation risks and time-varying prices of inflation risk.
In addition to time-varying inflation uncertainties, recent studies of inflation caps and floors by Kit-
sul and Wright (2013) and Fleckenstein, Longstaff, and Lustig (2014a) find that investors appear to attach
significantly more weight to extreme inflation outcomes (either deflation or high inflation) than a normal
distribution would suggest. These observations raise some doubt on the appropriateness of modeling infla-
tion as a conditional Gaussian process. Nevertheless, due to the short history of inflation caps and floors,
both papers focus on a short sample dominated by the financial crisis and the zero lower bound period; it
therefore remains to be seen whether the Gaussian assumption for inflation, both under the physical and the
risk-neutral measures, works better over a longer time span as the one used in the current study.
We first examine the inflation distribution under the physical measure. Giordani and S¨oderlind (2003)
analyze the probabilistic forecasts for inflation in the SPF over a long quarterly sample of 1969-2001. They
find that for most years, the histograms are bell shaped, reasonably symmetric with most of the probability
1
See Duffee (2002) and Daiand Singleton (2002), amongothers.
1
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
pdf fillable form creator; add forms to pdf
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
add text field to pdf acrobat; convert pdf to editable form
Table 1: Parameter Estimates
Model NL-noIE
ModelNL
ModelLI
ModelLII
ModelLII-PC
StateVariablesDynamics
dx
t
=K(  x
t
)dt +dB
t
K
11
0.8550 ( 0.3533)
0.6849
(0.4589)
0.8302
(0.6993)
0.4317 ( 0.1622)
0.7358
(0.3542)
K
22
0.1343 ( 0.0562)
0.1309
(0.0471)
0.1004
(0.0425)
0.0961 ( 0.0499)
0.0316
(0.0357)
K
33
1.4504 ( 0.3633)
1.4259
(0.7216)
1.2353
(0.9516)
1.8425 ( 0.4757)
1.3386
(0.6951)
100 
21
-0.7526 ( 0.5524) -1.8236
(1.1939) -1.1547
(0.8448) -1.6133 ( 0.9020) -0.6414
(0.2435)
100 
31
-4.4450 ( 4.8007) -4.8415
(8.4964) -7.1258 ( 30.8741) -1.7824 ( 0.9339) -4.8511
(8.3985)
100 
32
-0.9597 ( 0.2356) -1.0313
(0.2948) -1.0456
(0.4755) -0.7864 ( 0.1713) -0.5316
(0.2111)
NominalPricing Kernel
dM
N
t
=M
N
t
= r
N
(x
t
)dt  (x
t
)
0
dB
t
,
r
N
(x
t
)= 
N
0
+
N
0
1
x
t
, (x
t
)= 
N
0
+
N
x
t
N
0
0.0474 ( 0.0048)
0.0468
(0.0046)
0.0467
(0.0048)
0.0480 ( 0.0062)
0.0480
(0.0086)
N
1;1
3.6695 ( 3.0529)
4.9405
(5.2771)
6.2746 ( 22.3760)
2.4285 ( 0.7752)
3.2396
(5.1459)
N
1;2
0.8844 ( 0.1321)
0.9109
(0.1387)
0.8850
(0.2141)
0.7810 ( 0.0968)
0.4424
(0.0892)
N
1;3
0.7169 ( 0.0355)
0.7173
(0.0175)
0.7419
(0.0226)
0.7031 ( 0.0195)
0.6333
(0.0256)
N
0;1
0.3241 ( 0.1606)
0.3270
(0.1484) -0.0097
(0.2087)
0.1557 ( 0.1697)
0.2216
(0.2936)
N
0;2
-0.4335 ( 0.1819) -0.4019
(0.1533) -0.3696
(0.2725) -0.5355 ( 0.2110) -0.4906
(0.4491)
N
0;3
-1.2754 ( 0.3726) -1.2417
(0.3888) -1.1435
(0.3903) -1.3591 ( 0.4438) -1.5077
(2.1659)
[
N
]
11
-0.6953 ( 0.9033) -0.6529
(1.5192)
0.6238
(2.4162) -0.0138 ( 0.1295) -0.3677
(1.1468)
[
N
]
21
2.1331 ( 2.6939)
2.4644
(4.7106)
0.5454
(3.2112)
0.2964 ( 0.5159)
1.1200
(2.8701)
[
N
]
31
3.0734 ( 6.4541)
3.8734 (13.5898) -1.0467 ( 22.6787)
0.1262 ( 0.5179)
3.6061 ( 12.9735)
[
N
]
12
0.0339 ( 0.0409)
0.0650
(0.0583) -0.0732
(0.0474) -0.0223 ( 0.0650) -0.0827
(0.1901)
[
N
]
22
-0.1447 ( 0.0233) -0.2128
(0.0531) -0.0458
(0.0418) -0.1151 ( 0.0731) -0.1613
(0.1064)
[
N
]
32
-0.3576 ( 0.3013) -0.6065
(0.9297)
0.3068
(1.8944) -0.1980 ( 0.1120) -0.4788
(0.5115)
[
N
]
13
-0.0809 ( 0.1141) -0.1135
(0.1026)
0.1866
(0.4329)
0.0790 ( 0.1603) -0.0369
(0.2512)
[
N
]
23
0.6000 ( 0.1980)
0.7232
(0.3218)
0.0875
(0.1439)
0.5394 ( 0.2512)
0.4512
(0.2111)
[
N
]
33
0.1553 ( 0.8626)
0.3736
(1.8229) -1.0059
(2.1457) -0.4945 ( 0.4766)
0.7245
(1.5411)
Log PriceLevel
dlogQ
t
=(x
t
)dt+
0
q
dB
t
+
?
q
dB
?
t
, (x
t
)= 
0
+
0
1
x
t
0
0.0262 ( 0.0016)
0.0285
(0.0015)
0.0294
(0.0021)
0.0288 ( 0.0026)
0.0278
(0.0079)
1;1
-0.0326 ( 0.5805) -0.4711
(1.7446) -0.5261
(4.3530)
0.1582 ( 0.3076)
0.3895
(0.5149)
1;2
0.0867 ( 0.0578)
0.2378
(0.0400)
0.3515
(0.0849)
0.2684 ( 0.0300)
0.3883
(0.0376)
1;3
-0.2213 ( 0.1859) -0.2804
(0.1584) -0.1999
(0.2596) -0.1356 ( 0.1442)
0.0485
(0.0845)
100 
q;1
-0.0796 ( 0.0445)
0.0038
(0.0734)
0.0000
(0.1009) -0.1495 ( 0.0409) -0.0815
(0.0585)
100 
q;2
0.0066 ( 0.0673)
0.0869
(0.0739)
0.1625
(0.0620)
0.0763 ( 0.0581)
0.0575
(0.0581)
100 
q;3
-0.0278 ( 0.0589) -0.2586
(0.0459) -0.1526
(0.0674)
0.0224 ( 0.0619)
0.0154
(0.0533)
100 
?
q
0.9229 ( 0.0268)
0.9461
(0.0300)
0.9508
(0.0346)
0.8975 ( 0.0264)
0.7018
(0.0213)
2
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. passwordSetting.IsHighReso = True ' Allow to change document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
adding form fields to pdf; add text field pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. passwordSetting.IsHighReso = true; // Allow to change document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
change tab order in pdf form; pdf form creation
Table1 Continued
ModelNL-noIE
ModelNL
Model LI
Model LII
Model NL-PreCrisis
TIPS Liquidity Premium
l
t
=~ ~x
t
+
0
x
t
, d~x
t
=~(~  ~x
t
)dt+ ~dW
t
,
~
t
=
~
0
+
~
1
~x
t
:
~
0.8376
(0.0224)
0.8393
(0.0225)
0.5427
(0.0344)
~
0.5097
(0.2113)
0.4900
(0.2051)
0.1936
(0.2416)
~
0.0067
(0.0049)
0.0077
(0.0050)
0.0167
(0.0122)
~
0
0.3754
(0.3571)
0.4136
(0.3413)
0.2847
(0.5339)
~
~
1
-0.3981
(0.2114) -0.3770
(0.2052) -0.1041
(0.2412)
1
-0.8403
(0.2826) -0.3915
(0.5743)
2
-0.0527
(0.1024)
0.1032
(0.0802)
3
0.0121
(0.2293) -0.0000
(0.1607)
MeasurementErrors: Nominal Yields
100 
N;3m
0.1314
(0.0020)
0.1314
(0.0020)
0.1311
(0.0021)
0.1312
(0.0021)
0.1028
(0.0027)
100 
N;6m
0.0188
(0.0015)
0.0192
(0.0015)
0.0211
(0.0015) -0.0212
(0.0014) -0.0215
(0.0017)
100 
N;1y
0.0655
(0.0022)
0.0655
(0.0022)
0.0653
(0.0022)
0.0653
(0.0022)
0.0529
(0.0018)
100 
N;2y
0.0000 ( 51.7227)
0.0000
(9.0140)
0.0000 (3995.5010)
0.0000 (4062.7066) -0.0000 (104.5475)
100 
N;4y
0.0397
(0.0016)
0.0396
(0.0016)
0.0396
(0.0016)
0.0396
(0.0016)
0.0292
(0.0012)
100 
N;7y
0.0000 (150.5043) -0.0000 (100.1489)
0.0000 (4423.6406)
0.0000 (5024.8333) -0.0000 (148.9753)
100 
N;10y
0.0530
(0.0015)
0.0529
(0.0015)
0.0533
(0.0015)
0.0530
(0.0015)
0.0487
(0.0018)
MeasurementErrors: TIPS Yields
100 
T;5y
0.5374
(0.0801)
0.5400
(0.0785)
0.0806
(0.0033)
0.0812
(0.0033)
0.0642
(0.0047)
100 
T;7y
0.4217
(0.0849)
0.4231
(0.0843) -0.0000 (6302.1210) -0.0000 (6307.8897)
0.0000 ( 26.1627)
100 
T;10y
0.3879
(0.0632)
0.3874
(0.0605)
0.0653
(0.0033) -0.0644
(0.0033) -0.0610
(0.0050)
MeasurementErrors: Survey Forecastsof NominalShortRate
100 
f;6m
0.1890
(0.0146)
0.1893
(0.0146)
0.1872
(0.0141)
0.1891
(0.0146)
0.1654
(0.0137)
100 
f;12m
0.2965
(0.0222)
0.2945
(0.0218)
0.2944
(0.0219)
0.2968
(0.0224)
0.2225
(0.0203)
This table reports parameter estimates and standard errors for all five models we estimate. Standard errors are calculated using the BHHH
formulaand are reported in parentheses.
3
Annotate, Redact Image in .NET Winforms| Online Tutorials
Click "Font" to change annotations font color, size We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf
add date to pdf form; adding a signature to a pdf form
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF text box. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
convert word doc to pdf with editable fields; create a fillable pdf form from a pdf
1990
1995
2000
2005
2010
0
2
4
6
10−Year TIPS and Real Yields
Percent
Actual TIPS
Model TIPS
Model Real
1990
1995
2000
2005
2010
0
1
2
3
4
5
10−Year TIPS−based and True Breakeven Inflation
Percent
Actual TIPS
Model TIPS
Model True
1990
1995
2000
2005
2010
1
2
3
4
5
Percent
1−Year Inflation Expectation
SPF
Model
1990
1995
2000
2005
2010
1
2
3
4
5
Percent
10−Year Inflation Expectation
SPF
Model
−1.5
−1
−0.5
0
0.5
Percent
Inflation Risk Premiums
1−year
10−year
−1.5
−1
−0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
Percent
TIPS Liquidity Premiums
5−year
7−year
10−year
Figure 1: Model LI
The top left panel plotthe10-year actualTIPSyields (red), the10-year model-implied TIPSyields (black) and the 10-year model-
implied real yields (blue). The top right panel plots the 10-year actual TIPS breakevens (red), the 10-year model-implied TIPS
breakevens(black)andthe10-yearmodel-impliedtruebreakevens(blue). Themiddlepanels plotthe1- and10-year model-implied
inflation expectation, respectively, together with their survey counterparts from theSPF. The bottom left panelplotthe1- and 10-
yearmodel-implied inflation riskpremiums. Thebottomright panelplotthe5-, 7-, and10-year model-implied TIPS-indexed bond
yield differences.
4
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
add text field to pdf acrobat; pdf form save
1990
1995
2000
2005
0
2
4
6
10−Year TIPS and Real Yields
Percent
Actual TIPS
Model TIPS
Model Real
1990
1995
2000
2005
1
2
3
4
5
10−Year TIPS−based and True Breakeven Inflation
Percent
Actual TIPS
Model TIPS
Model True
1990
1995
2000
2005
1
2
3
4
5
Percent
1−Year Inflation Expectation
SPF
Model
1990
1995
2000
2005
1
2
3
4
5
Percent
10−Year Inflation Expectation
SPF
Model
0
0.5
1
Percent
Inflation Risk Premiums
1−year
10−year
−0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
2
Percent
TIPS Liquidity Premiums
5−year
7−year
10−year
Figure 2: Model LII Estimatedover the Pre-Crisis Period
The top left panel plotthe10-year actualTIPSyields (red), the10-year model-implied TIPSyields (black) and the 10-year model-
implied real yields (blue). The top right panel plots the 10-year actual TIPS breakevens (red), the 10-year model-implied TIPS
breakevens(black)andthe10-yearmodel-impliedtruebreakevens(blue). Themiddlepanels plotthe1- and10-year model-implied
inflation expectation, respectively, together with their survey counterparts from theSPF. The bottom left panelplotthe1- and 10-
yearmodel-implied inflation riskpremiums. Thebottomright panelplotthe5-, 7-, and10-year model-implied TIPS-indexed bond
yield differences.
5
1990
1995
2000
2005
2010
−100
−80
−60
−40
−20
0
20
40
basis points
Nominal Yield Fitting Errors
3−month
1−year
4−year
10−year
2000
2002
2004
2006
2008
2010
2012
−40
−20
0
20
40
60
basis points
TIPS Yield Fitting Errors
5−year
10−year
Figure 3: Time Series of YieldFitting Errors from Model LII
Thischartplotsthetimeseriesof fitting errors on nominalyields(top panel) and TIPSyields (bottompanel) based on ModelLII.
6
mass concentrated in interior intervals, suggesting that the normal distribution provides a good approxi-
mation to the physical distribution of inflation in those years. An update of their results using the same
methodology for each year from 1992 to 2013, showninFigures 4 and 5, demonstrates that the normal dis-
tribution continues to provide a reasonable approximation to the physical distribution of inflation forecasts
over recent years. This is consistent with the findings in Kitsul and Wright (2013): Figures 8 and 9 of their
paper show that even during the years of 2010-2012, a period that was dominated by deflation scares, the
physical distribution of expected inflation remains reasonably symmetricand assignmuch lower odds totail
outcomes than the corresponding options-implied PDFs.
2
To formally test the normality of each distribution shown in Figure 4 and 5, we use the 
2
statistic
described in Lahiri and Teigland (1987). The values of this statistic for one- and two-year ahead forecasts
are reported in the third and fifth columns of Table 2, respectively. The associated levels of significance
indicate that we reject the normality assumption for 13 out of 22 distributions (60% of the time) at the
one-year horizon and for 9 out of 22 distributions (40% of time) at the two-year horizon. We interpret the
results as suggesting that, despite the crude approximation of the true distribution using a few bins and the
sensitivity of the test to the treatment of the open intervals, the normalitydistribution can be thought of as a
reasonable approximation about half of the time over this period and more sofor longer forecast horizons.
Turning to risk-neutral distributions, Figure 6 plot the skewness and excess kurtosis of risk-neutral
distributions of inflation over the next one, five, and ten years, constructed from zero-coupon inflation caps
using a similar model-free methodology as in Kitsul and Wright (2013). The caps-implied skewness was
notably negative at 5- and 10-year horizons in the immediate aftermath of the crisis, but have hovered
around zero since late 2010 despite lingering worries about deflation. Similarly, the excess kurtosis was
significantly positive between late 2009 and late 2010, suggesting investors perceived higher risks of tail
inflation outcomes than implied by a normal distribution. The excess kurtosis had also largely dissipatedby
late 2010, although more recently it has drifted up again for the 5-year horizon.
Overall, the Gaussian model seems to be a more reasonable approximation of inflation dynamics over
along sample period like ours, although its inability to capture time-varying volatilities, asymmetric dis-
tributions, or heavy tails can be more problematic for periods with heightened deflation concerns such as
2009-2010, whichnonetheless constitutesonlyasmall part of our sampleperiod. Wetherefore viewthegen-
eral affine-Gaussian model as an important benchmark to investigate before exploring more sophisticated
models.
3.2 Parameter Stability
The literature has documented significant market dislocations in the nominal Treasury/TIPS market during
the 2008 financial crisis (see Campbell, Shiller, and Viceira (2009) and Fleckenstein, Longstaff, and Lustig
(2014b), among others). We therefore re-estimate Model LII over a pre-crisis sample ending on July 25,
2007. As can be seen from Table 1, the parameter estimates are very similar to those from Model LII
estimated over the full sample. A comparison between Figure 2 in this appendix and the bottom panels of
2
Those PDFs areconstructed using two different models: the unobserved component stochastic volatility model of Stock and
Watson (2007) and thetime-varying-parameterVAR modelwith stochasticvolatility of Primiceri (2005).
7
2
0
2
4
6
8
10
1992
2
0
2
4
6
8
10
1993
2
0
2
4
6
8
10
1994
2
0
2
4
6
8
10
1995
2
0
2
4
6
8
10
1996
2
0
2
4
6
8
10
1997
2
0
2
4
6
8
10
1998
2
0
2
4
6
8
10
1999
2
0
2
4
6
8
10
2000
2
0
2
4
6
8
10
2001
2
0
2
4
6
8
10
2002
2
0
2
4
6
8
10
2003
8
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested