Working Paper 143
3
SOCIAL PROTECTION CONCEPTS AND
APPROACHES: IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY AND
PRACTICE IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 
Andy Norton
n
Tim Conway
Mick Foster
Centre for Aid and Public Expenditure
February 2001
1
Overseas Development Institute
111 Westminster Bridge Road
d
London SE1 7JD
UK
Pdf form maker - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
allow users to save pdf form; create a pdf form to fill out
Pdf form maker - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
adding text to pdf form; adding form fields to pdf files
ISBN 0 85003 513 9
© Overseas Development Institute 2001
All rights reserved. Readers may quote from or reproduce this paper, but as copyright holder,
ODI requests due acknowledgement.
VB.NET Word: How to Add Watermark to Word File Using VB.NET Demo
Besides image watermark, this VB.NET Word document watermark maker component also allows VB.NET watermark creator SDK to add watermark on PDF document file and
pdf editable fields; create pdf form
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
VB.NET Image Rotator Add-on to Rotate Image, VB.NET Watermark Maker to Watermark Image.
add text field to pdf; create a fillable pdf form
3
Contents
Acronyms
5
Acknowledgements
6
Summary
7
Definition and rationale
7
Why now? The context for contemporary global interest in social protection
7
Lessons from experience
11
Implications for development agencies
14
Future directions in social protection
14
Conclusion – Social protection, the development process and poverty reduction
15
1. Introduction and Background
18
2. Social protection: defining the field of action and policy
21
2.1 Towards a conceptual and operational framework
21
2.2 The rationale for social protection
24
2.3 Why now? The global context for the contemporary concern with social protection
26
2.4 Conceptual foundations from the literature on poverty and deprivation
29
2.5 Development agency perspectives on social protection
35
2.6 The handling of social protection responsibilities in government structures
41
3. Reviewing experience and policy approaches
42
3.1 Poor people’s realities: implications for social protection from participatory research
42
3.2 Social protection through institutions outside the state: the historical experience of
developed countries
43
3.3 Developing country experiences with social protection through institutions outside the state 45
3.4 Social protection and the state: a review of policy instruments
50
4. Conclusion: future directions and strategic priorities
64
4.1 Global redistribution, global governance and globalisation of social policy
64
4.2 Governance and social protection
64
4.3 Social protection, the development process and poverty reduction
65
Bibliography
67
Annex 1: Social funds and social protection
73
Boxes
Box 1  The International Development Targets
19
Box 2  Principles for social protection policy and programme responses
24
Box 3  The rationale for social protection policy
24
Box 4  Defining social policy
29
Box 5  Conceptualisation of risk
31
4
Box 6 Risk management strategies
33
Box 7 The history of informal social protection in the United Kingdom: The ‘Friendly
Societies’
44
Box 8 Health insurance: NGO and CBO experience
49
Box 9 Health insurance financing in China
56
Box 10 The Maharashtra Employment Generation Scheme
61
Figures
Figure 1Initiating a virtuous circle: social protection, the development process and poverty
reduction
17
Tables
Table 1 Approaches to understanding vulnerability
30
Table 2 Summary of agency approaches to social protection
40
5
Acronyms
CG
Consultative Group
CPR
Common Property Resources
DFID
Department for International Development
DHS
Demographic and Health Survey
EC
European Commission (manages the European Community Aid Programme)
ESAF
Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility
EU
European Union
GDP
Gross Domestic Product
HDI
Human Development Index
HDR
Human Development Report
HIPC
Highly Indebted Poor Countries
IDTs
International Development Targets
IFI
International Financial Institution
IILS
International Institute for Labour Studies
ILO
International Labour Organisation
IMF
International Monetary Fund
IRDP
Integrated Rural Development Programme
NGO
Non-Governmental Organisation
PA
Poverty Assessments
p.c.
per capita
PPA
Participatory Poverty Assessments
PPP
Purchasing Power Parity
PRA
Participatory Rural Appraisal
ODA
Overseas Development Assistance
OECD
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
OED
Operations Evaluation Department (World Bank)
SAF
Structural Adjustment Facility
UDHR
Universal Declaration of Human Rights
WDR
(World Bank) world Development Report
6
Acknowledgements
This paper is based upon an issues paper which was commissioned by the Department for
International Development (DFID). That paper was intended to provide DFID with a strategic
overview of the field of social protection, providing thematic development of the concept, including
guidance on how DFID and other agencies might operationalise it more effectively in their own
policy and programme work.
The issues paper was presented at an inter-agency workshop, organised by ODI with DFID
funding, held at Easthampstead Park in March 2000. This Working Paper has benefited from
comments and suggestions from staff of the Social Development Division of DFID, particularly
Arjan de Haan and Ros Eyben; from delegates at the Easthampstead workshop; and from access to
documents supplied by delegates and others since that time. As in the original issues paper, this
document concentrates upon poorer developing countries, and focuses primarily upon social
protection in non-emergency situations. The funding by DFID of the editing and production of this
Working Paper is gratefully acknowledged.
The views expressed in this paper are of course those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect
those of DFID or the Overseas Development Institute.
7
Summary
Definition and rationale
This paper reviews contemporary conceptual developments regarding the meaning and importance
of social protection, and identifies ways in which international agencies could contribute to
improving the coverage and effectiveness of social protection as an integral component of poverty
reduction strategies.
For the purposes of this paper, social protection is taken to refer to:
‘the public actions taken in response to levels of vulnerability, risk and deprivation
which are deemed socially unacceptable within a given polity or society.’
Social protection thus deals with both the absolute deprivation and vulnerabilities of the poorest,
and also with the need of the currently non-poor for security in the face of shocks and life-cycle
events. The ‘public’ character of this response may be governmental or non-governmental, or may
involve a combination of institutions from both sectors.
The literature reviewed in the course of the production of this paper provided various rationales for
the development of social protection as a field of policy. These have included (among others) the
need to develop social support for economic reform programmes, or to make growth more efficient
and sustainable; the pursuit of social justice and equity, or the obligation to provide all citizens with
a minimum acceptable livelihood and protection against risk; and the promotion of social cohesion,
solidarity and stability. Drawing on these, it can be proposed that the overall rationale for pursuing
social protection is to promote dynamic, cohesive and stable societies through increased equity and
security.
Why now? The context for contemporary global interest in social protection
Social protection has long been a domestic concern of wealthy nations, which have developed
sophisticated institutional arrangements in order to protect against their citizens risk and provide
assistance to the destitute. Social protection has however been largely neglected, or addressed only
with inappropriate tools, in the majority of poor countries, where emphasis has been placed instead
upon the primacy of economic growth. Several factors can be seen to explain the increased
attention to social protection within development debates in recent years.
Globalisation
The current growth in interest in development agencies in the issue of social protection derives, to a
large extent, from the global reaction to various forms of economic or financial crisis over the
1990s. These have been seen to be associated with contemporary processes of globalisation, and
specifically with the growing integration of trade systems and capital markets, which are generally
seen to present two contrasting faces. On the one hand, they are seen as increasing opportunities for
all (including poorer people and poorer countries), while on the other hand they are seen as
increasing insecurity on a global scale. Other dimensions of contemporary global change of
relevance include:
8
•   Increasing inequality –  both within countries and between countries;
•   An increasingly liberalised international economic environment restricting many sources of
revenue which were previously available to governments to fund social expenditures; and
•   A global demographic transition which implies long-term changes in dependency ratios (in
particular, the growth in the absolute and relative numerical importance of older people).
In short, processes of international economic integration are increasingly leaving nation states with
less power to regulate conditions for relationships between capital and labour, conditions of access
to  internal  markets,  and  levels  of  budgetary  support  available  for  human  development.
Development processes are also contributing to positive processes of human development (such as
longer life spans) which may enhance pressures on public resources in the field of social protection.
Yet processes of accelerated integration of global societies and economies –  which have great
potential for increasing growth and human well-being – –  may in the long run be threatened if
growing inequality leads to a perception that basic requirements of social justice are not being met.
Analysis suggests that the institutional framework for social policy must adapt in response, at the
local, national and global levels – –  although the appropriate agenda for such a response is still
contested.
Changes in development practice
Within donor agencies, the last decade has seen an increasing emphasis on working holistically
with the full range of issues of concern to public policy, the public budget, and development in
general in order to achieve sustainable reductions in poverty. This approach – –  embodied in new
approaches such as the Comprehensive Development Framework, or the development of over-
arching Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers as part of debt relief processes – –  requires a balanced
understanding of public policy across all fields. An understanding of the policy field of social
protection is necessary in order to arrive at judgements about the appropriate overall mix of policies
at the national level.
Citizenship, governance and rights
Rights to elements of social protection are contained in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
In order to make these rights meaningful at the national level, governments and the international
community need to meet the following challenges. Notions of social protection need to be
converted into entitlements and standards which embody a sufficient level of consensus about the
state’s role, and the levels of risk and deprivation that are unacceptable within a given society, to
ensure policy which is deliverable, effective and sustainable. In the literature on social protection in
general the dimensions  of governance and rights seem underdeveloped.
1
They are however
significant for the following reasons:
•   Defining those levels of material well-being which constitute a minimum acceptable standard
(or right) is a fundamental element component of the notion of citizenship.
•   There is good historical evidence that, for economies in processes of change, the provision of
protection against risk from new levels of exposure to markets is a fundamental part of the
bargain between workers and state that accompanies structural reform.
1
This is in contrast to the literature on famines – –  with Dreze and Sen’s famous argument that the most effective
protection against widespread famine is a functioning, open, democratic political system.
9
•  
Defining the role of the state in these fields is highly contentious, and can only be handled
through political processes. The use of tax funded transfers to assist the poorest requires very
high levels of support within society to be politically sustainable – –  these are among the greatest
challenges that systems of democratic government face.
•   Social protection policy is also intimately connected to debates on social cohesion and social
exclusion. This reflects a view in the social sciences which emphasises that inclusion in a
collectivity which provides for mutual assistance is central to the definition of social life. To
look at this relationship from a different angle, when a collectivity such as the state loses the
capacity to provide for the needs of its members (citizens) in a crisis, it suffers a crisis of
legitimacy as a consequence, and accordingly finds it harder to govern.
We should also note that processes of globalisation increasingly require that the international
community sets parameters for these issues at a global level. Arguably, initiatives such as the
International Development Targets, the International Social Policy Principles and related processes
in UN Conferences and Conventions such as the World Summit for Social Development constitute
an emergent global approach to  the fundamental  values  that underpin approaches to social
protection.
Lessons from the literature on poverty, vulnerability and exclusion
Social protection is an integral component of any strategic effort to reduce the incidence and
severity of poverty. As such, it relates to a large body of literature on the definition, explanation
and identification of the poor; and, conversely, to decades of theoretical and empirical work on
what contributes to sustainable poverty-reduction. Three broad traditions of poverty analysis are
relevant, covering vulnerability and risk, social exclusion and social cohesion, and issues of
political economy and governance. The main lessons for social protection policy are as follows:
•   Identification  of  policy  options  should  begin  with  understanding  the  reality  of  the
vulnerabilities of the poor and the assets and capabilities that they can mobilise as individuals,
households and communities.
•   The range of social protection policy instruments should be integrated, striking an appropriate
balance between efforts designed to reduce, mitigate and cope with shocks.
•   Without care upon the part of policy-makers means-tested benefits, for example, may foster
stigma and dependency which themselves serve to exclude the recipients from participation as
full members of society. Social protection must be designed so as to provide for basic material
needs while fostering the inclusion of the recipients in the mainstream of society.
•   Evidence suggests states that are more dependent upon their citizens for their revenue (rather
than upon industries or donors), are more successful at converting per capita GDP into human
development improvements. Equitable and efficient revenue collection and effective, pro-poor
public services both require institutional capacity, good governance and accountability. When
these qualities are present, they improve the effectiveness of both state and non-state actors in
the management of risk and the provision of a subsistence minimum to all citizens. In many
societies  this  requires  the  resolution  of  deep-rooted,  fundamental  inequalities  between
privileged and marginalised segments of society.
10
•   Changes which enhance the ‘voice’ and political leverage of the poor and vulnerable are of
great value if they can be achieved. The translation of global human rights documentation into
concrete commitments to standards and entitlements play an important part in this process: the
principles themselves are a necessary but not sufficient condition for improvements in social
protection.
Institutional overlap and policy principles
Within the field of social protection, two general kinds of action are conventionally distinguished:
•  
Social  assistance, which encompasses public actions which are designed to transfer
resources to groups deemed eligible due to deprivation.
2
Deprivation may be defined by low
income, or in terms of other dimensions of poverty (e.g. social or nutritional status).
•  
Social insurance is social security that is financed by contributions and based on the
insurance principle: that is, individuals or households protect themselves against risk by
combining to pool resources with a larger number of similarly exposed individuals or
households.
From this description, it can be seen that social protection as a field of policy and action overlaps
with various other programmatic approaches which seek to deliver assistance to the poorest, or
which deal with strengthening the livelihoods and reducing the vulnerabilities of poor producers. It
is important therefore to read the definition of social protection provided above as referring to the
protection
of those  who  fall  temporarily  or  persistently under levels of  livelihood  deemed
acceptable, rather than the promotion of a general standard of opportunity and livelihood for all
citizens. While the definition remains broad, it can thus be used to distinguish social protection
from general development policy, although issues of ‘overlap’ will inevitably remain.
Another form of overlap is that with areas of sector policy. One of the major shocks against which
people wish to insure themselves is the costs of medical care. Another is the necessity, due to lack
of funds and / or need to increase household income-generating activities, to withdraw children
from school. Systems for funding social services are thus intimately bound in with social protection
issues.
Whether social protection is pursued through specialised agencies or regarded as a cross-cutting
consideration to inform the work of conventionally defined, sector-focussed state and donor
institutions, it is possible to identify some general principles for policy development. Policy options
should be:
•   Responsive to the needs, realities and conditions of livelihood of those who they are intended to
benefit;
•  
Affordable, both in the context of short and medium term budget planning for the public
budget, and in terms of not placing unreasonable burdens on households and communities;
•   Sustainable, both financially and politically –  with a requirement on government to ensure that
the state’s role in social protection reflects an adequate level of public support for interventions
to assist the poorest;
2
e.g. war veterans
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested