Chapter 3: Use PROC IMPORT to Read External Data Files and Excel Workbooks into SAS   33 
3.4 Data Access Methods for Excel Files Supported by PROC IMPORT  
The data access methods listed in Figure 3.4.1 are used to read data files Excel has the ability to create. 
Selecting a DBMS mode determines which utility will be used to process the external file to create an output 
SAS dataset. The input file may be a text file or an Excel spreadsheet. See the documents listed above for more 
details about the SAS software version you are using. Some of these data access methods (the DBMS=modes) 
require SAS/ACCESS Interface to PC Files software to function. You must have SAS/ACCESS Interface to PC 
Files licensed before you can import files directly from some versions Microsoft Excel workbooks. Some 
features relating to Microsoft Excel 2007, Excel 2010, and Excel 2013 when using Microsoft Windows, 
LINUX, and UNIX operating systems may not be available in SAS versions prior to the third maintenance 
release of SAS 9.2. Because the number of SAS, Excel, and operating system versions is large, I once again 
refer you to the SAS documentation to help you figure out what you have installed.  
If you suspect that your SAS and Excel software may have different bit configurations (32 or 64 bit), contact 
your IT Department. 
The DBMS identifiers listed in Table 3.4.1 are relative to the file formats that Microsoft Excel can read or write. 
The SAS documentation lists other DBMS identifiers that the PROC IMPORT can read. See the SAS 
documentation for your version of SAS for other options to read file formats available. Different versions of 
SAS may not be able to read to all of the versions of Excel. 
Table 3.4.1: DBMS Formats Available for Input. 
DBMS 
Identifier 
SAS/ACCESS 
Interface to PC Files 
Required 
General Description of the DBMS Output File  
CSV 
Text file with a comma delimiter 
TAB 
Text file with a tab delimiter 
DLM 
Text file with a user-defined delimiter 
EXCEL 
Excel workbook (2003 xls – 2013 xlsx) 
EXCELCS 
Excel workbook (2003 xls – 2007 xlsx) using the SAS 
PC Files Server 
EXCEL4 
Excel workbook using PROC DBLOAD 
EXCEL5 
Excel workbook using PROC DBLOAD 
XLS 
Excel workbook using file formats prior to Excel 2007 
except Excel 4 and Excel 5 
XLSX 
Excel workbook using file formats 2007, 2010, and 2013 
Table 3.4.2 lists some information about the input methods available when reading Excel worksheets. Some of 
these methods have limitations that are smaller than the full capabilities of the Excel version that created them. 
These restrictions are as a result of using the Microsoft JET or ACE engines to access the Excel workbooks. 
Table 3.4.2: DBMS Input Methods of Accessing Excel Files. 
Utility 
DBMS Model 
Excel Version 
Comments 
EXCEL  
LIBNAME statement  5, 95, 97, 2000, 
2002, 2003, 2007, 
2010, 2013 
This DBMS option will use the LIBNAME 
statement. Depending upon your version of 
SAS and Excel, access may be limited to the 
first 65,535 rows and 255 columns. 
EXCELCS  SAS PC Files Server  5, 95, 97, 2000, 
2002, 2003, 2007, 
2010, 2013 
This DBMS option will use the SAS PC 
Files Server. Depending upon your version 
of SAS and Excel, access may be limited to 
the first 65,535 rows and 255 columns. 
Pdf form change font size - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
add text field to pdf acrobat; add text fields to pdf
Pdf form change font size - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
add fillable fields to pdf online; cannot edit pdf form
34   Exchanging Data between SAS and Microsoft Excel 
Utility 
DBMS Model 
Excel Version 
Comments 
EXCEL4 or 
EXCEL5 
DBLOAD procedure  4, 5, 95 
This is supported only on the Microsoft 
Windows operating systems and is for SAS 6 
compatibility.  
XLS 
XLS format 
97, 2000, 2002, 
2003 
Some versions of SAS may not support the 
Chinese, Japanese, or Korean DBCS 
character sets. 
XLSX 
XLSX format 
2007, 2010, and 
later formats 
Some versions of SAS may not support the 
Chinese, Japanese, or Korean DBCS 
character sets or *.xlsb Excel files. 
3.5 Overview of the Examples 
The examples in this chapter will cover several but not all of the DBMS options used with PROC IMPORT. I 
like to group the input processing for PROC IMPORT into general categories within the DBMS options. 
Furthermore, I feel I must place a caveat onto these groupings because both SAS and Microsoft Excel are 
mature products that have changed over time. While these categories are generally accurate, your SAS version, 
Excel version, and computer hardware may not support every DBMS option, and each DBMS option might 
operate slightly differently depending upon what software you have installed. So make sure you verify what is 
available to you by looking in the SAS manual that relates to your environment. 
● 
An example retained for backward compatibility with files in the Excel 4 and Excel 5 formats. 
● 
Text file output options like CSV, TAB and DLM do not require  SAS/ACCESS Interface to PC Files  
because the methods read text files. 
● 
Options that read directly from a formatted Excel file.  
• 
LIBNAME options that both use and do not use the SAS PC Files Server. 
The options that generate text files will show one example and explain the differences that make the other 
options work.  
3.6 List of Examples 
Table 3.6.1 is a general description of the functions included in the examples shown in this chapter. Some of the 
examples here have minor overlaps in the features to show how they interact when additional features are 
included. 
Table 3.6.1: List of Examples for PROC IMPORT.  
Example Number  General Description 
3.1 
PROC IMPORT Using the DBMS=EXCEL4 or EXCEL5 Option. 
This example is included for backward compatibility with Excel 
formats Excel 4 and Excel 5, although I would consider it rare to find a 
computer using this Microsoft Excel software today. The example 
shows how to read to these old Excel formats. 
3.2  
PROC IMPORT Using the DBMS=DLM Option. This example 
shows how to use a delimiter to separate input values and read the 
header row of the input file as data. This example is equivalent to 
DBMS=CSV and DBMS=TAB but allows you to provide your own 
delimiter. 
3.3 
PROC IMPORT Using the DBMS=EXCEL Option. The three parts 
of this example all read Excel workbooks that do not need the PC Files 
es 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Flatten form fields. outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing TargetResolution = 150F; // to change image compression
create a pdf form online; pdf form save
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Flatten form fields. outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing TargetResolution = 150.0F 'to change image compression
adding an image to a pdf form; add signature field to pdf
Chapter 3: Use PROC IMPORT to Read External Data Files and Excel Workbooks into SAS   35 
Example Number  General Description 
Server to be processed. The main point of these code routines is to 
show how to read parts of worksheets within one workbook, and to 
change variable names and labels as the data is read from Excel into a 
SAS dataset. 
3.4 
PROC IMPORT Using the DBMS=EXCELCS Option. This 
example shows code that was executed on a 64-bit operating system 
using a 64-bit copy of SAS 9.3 and a 32-bit copy of Microsoft Excel. 
Since this computer operating system and SAS use a 64-bit 
configuration but Excel uses a 32-bit configuration, PROC IMPORT 
requires the use of the SAS PC Files Server. The “CS” part of 
DBMS=EXCELCS annotates this feature is in use.  
3.5 
PROC IMPORT Using the DBMS=XLS or XLSX to Select 
Columns. This example reads an Excel worksheet with no column 
headers (variable names) in the output Excel worksheet. It also 
demonstrates that PROC IMPORT will read an Excel sheet name with 
spaces. 
3.6 
PROC IMPORT Using the DBMS=XLS or XLSX to Select Rows. 
Reading Excel data from selected rows of an Excel worksheet.  
3.7 
PROC IMPORT Using the DBMS=XLS or XLSX to Select Excel 
Ranges. This example shows you how to use PROC IMPORT to read 
a range of cells from an Excel worksheet. 
Example 3.1 PROC IMPORT Using the DBMS=EXCEL4 or EXCEL5 Option 
The SAS IMPORT procedure maintains the backward compatibility features required to process Excel 
workbooks in the Excel 4 and Excel 5 formats. This example shows how to write Excel files in those formats. 
For Excel 4 workbooks the sheet name is the same as the file name (without the .xls) and there is only one sheet 
in the workbook. For Excel 5 formatted workbooks, the sheet name is “Sheet1”. 
* SAS code to import data from an Excel4 file.;  
* there is only one sheet in Excel4 files; 
PROC IMPORT  
DATAFILE='C:\My_Files\shoes_to_Excel_4_file.xls'  
DBMS=EXCEL4 
OUT=shoes_from_Excel_4 
REPLACE;  
RUN; 
* SAS code to import data from an Excel 5 file.;  
PROC IMPORT  
DATAFILE='C:\My_Files\shoes_to_Excel_5_file.xls'  
DBMS=EXCEL5 
OUT=shoes_from_Excel_5 
REPLACE;  
RUN; 
Example 3.2 PROC IMPORT Using the DBMS=DLM Option 
Using PROC IMPORT to read delimited files in Base SAS invokes the External File Interface (EFI), and the 
following code reads in a delimited file with commas as the delimiter from the external file named Shoes.csv in 
directory c:\My_files. This example uses the DBMS=DLM option with the DELIMITER=’,’ option to select a 
comma for the delimiter. In addition, it uses the DATAROW=1 and GETNAMES=NO options. These options 
cause the input SAS file to make the first row from the *.csv file appear as data in the SAS file. 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
change font size pdf form; best way to make pdf forms
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
create a pdf form; change font size pdf fillable form
36   Exchanging Data between SAS and Microsoft Excel 
NOTE: In Example 2.2 in Chapter 2, the code for PROC EXPORT used the PUTNAMES=NO option to write 
the 
'c:\My_Files\Shoes.csv'
output file with no variable names in the first row of the file. 
The output log listing below shows the External File Interface SAS code created by the “Generated SAS 
Datastep” when the PROC IMPORT step above ran. Notice that the input *.csv file did not have a row of 
headers associated with the data. So, SAS assigned variable names to the input variables (VAR1 to VAR7). 
PROC  IMPORT  
DATAFILE='c:\My_Files\Shoes.txt'  
DBMS=DLM  
OUT=shoes    
REPLACE;  
DELIMITER=','; 
DATAROW=1;  
GETNAMES=NO; 
GUESSINGROWS=400; 
RUN; 
Output 3.1:  Listing of the External File Interface Code Generated. 
2    PROC  IMPORT 
3        DATAFILE='c:\My_Files\Shoes.txt' 
4        DBMS=DLM 
5        OUT=shoes 
6        REPLACE; 
8        DELIMITER=','; 
9        DATAROW=1; 
10       GETNAMES=NO; 
11       GUESSINGROWS=400; 
12   RUN; 
13    /********************************************************************** 
14    *   PRODUCT:   SAS 
15    *   VERSION:   9.4 
16    *   CREATOR:   External File Interface 
17    *   DATE:      17FEB14 
18    *   DESC:      Generated SAS Datastep Code 
19    *   TEMPLATE SOURCE:  (None Specified.) 
20    ***********************************************************************/ 
21      data WORK.SHOES    ; 
22      %let _EFIERR_ = 0; /* set the ERROR detection macro variable */ 
23      infile 'c:\My_Files\Shoes.txt' delimiter = ',' MISSOVER DSD lrecl=32767 ; 
24          informat VAR1 $25. ; 
25          informat VAR2 $14. ; 
26          informat VAR3 $12. ; 
27          informat VAR4 best32. ; 
28          informat VAR5 $12. ; 
29          informat VAR6 $12. ; 
30          informat VAR7 $9. ; 
31          format VAR1 $25. ; 
32          format VAR2 $14. ; 
33          format VAR3 $12. ; 
34          format VAR4 best12. ; 
35          format VAR5 $12. ; 
36          format VAR6 $12. ; 
37          format VAR7 $9. ; 
38       input 
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
create a pdf form from excel; pdf form save in reader
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and chats) of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links
change font pdf fillable form; changing font size in pdf form
Chapter 3: Use PROC IMPORT to Read External Data Files and Excel Workbooks into SAS   37 
39                   VAR1 $ 
40                   VAR2 $ 
41                   VAR3 $ 
42                   VAR4 
43                   VAR5 $ 
44                   VAR6 $ 
45                   VAR7 $ 
46       ; 
47       if _ERROR_ then call symputx('_EFIERR_',1);  /* set ERROR detection 
macro variable */ 
48       run; 
NOTE: The infile 'c:\My_Files\Shoes.txt' is: 
Filename=c:\My_Files\Shoes.txt, 
RECFM=V,LRECL=32767,File Size (bytes)=24901, 
Last Modified=17Feb2014:15:55:41, 
Create Time=17Feb2014:16:14:58 
NOTE: 395 records were read from the infile 'c:\My_Files\Shoes.txt'. 
The minimum record length was 37. 
The maximum record length was 85. 
NOTE: The data set WORK.SHOES has 395 observations and 7 variables. 
NOTE: DATA statement used (Total process time): 
real time           0.07 seconds 
cpu time            0.03 seconds 
395 rows created in WORK.SHOES from c:\My_Files\Shoes.txt. 
NOTE: WORK.SHOES data set was successfully created. 
NOTE: The data set WORK.SHOES has 395 observations and 7 variables. 
NOTE: PROCEDURE IMPORT used (Total process time): 
real time           0.53 seconds 
cpu time            0.14 seconds 
For SAS 6.12 and above, the External File Interface writes out “Generated SAS Datastep Code” that could be 
captured and used elsewhere. The DELIMITER= statement is active only when DBMS=DLM, and this tells 
PROC IMPORT what character separates the data values within the input file. When DBMS= has a value of 
CSV or TAB, SAS assumes a delimiter of a comma or Tab character, respectively. The fact that the file name 
was “Shoes.txt” caused the “file-format-specific-statement” DELIMITER=DLM to identify the input file as a 
text file with values separated by commas not the default of spaces for *.txt files. 
Example 3.3 PROC IMPORT Using the DBMS=EXCEL Option 
Example 3.3 – Part 1 
The code in parts 1, 2, and 3 of Example 2.3 in Chapter 2 showed how to create an Excel workbook with 
different numbers of worksheets. The example shows how to create worksheet names with mixed-case letters in 
the name. However, this method will not write an Excel worksheet with a blank in the sheet name. The 
following code will read the Excel file and produce a SAS dataset called “Shoes” in the Work directory. Notice 
that the RANGE= value for the spreadsheet name was in capital letters and ended in a Dollar sign “$”. The 
spreadsheet name in the “RANGE=” statement did not need to be in uppercase letters. 
PROC IMPORT  
DATAFILE='c:\My_Files\Shoes.xls'  
DBMS=EXCEL  
OUT=shoes  
REPLACE;  
RANGE='SHOES$'n; 
RUN;  
Generate Barcodes in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Change Barcode Properties. RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & Decode JBIG 2 Files; Compress & Twain Scanning; DICOM Reading; Form Recognition & Processing
add fields to pdf form; adding text to pdf form
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
for example, a VB.NET Windows Form application. Please note that you can change some of the provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
adding text fields to a pdf; adding a signature to a pdf form
38   Exchanging Data between SAS and Microsoft Excel 
Example 3.3 – Part 2.  
If we want only part of the input Excel file, there are several ways to go about getting just what we want. The 
following code brings in only a few cells from the input Excel file. Here, we will also suppress the request to 
pull the variable names from the first row of the input data, since we are pulling data from the middle of the 
Excel file. 
PROC IMPORT  
DATAFILE='c:\My_Files\Shoes.xls'  
DBMS=EXCEL  
OUT=shoes  
REPLACE;  
GETNAMES=NO; 
RANGE='shoes$C2:F4'n; 
RUN; 
This SAS code does that job. The added command “GETNAMES=NO” and the modification of the 
“RANGE=” operand are the key parts of this SAS code. The SAS output file looks something like the 
following: 
Figure 3.1: SAS Output from Reading the Excel Range Using Absolute Addressing of Excel 
Cells. 
Only 12 cells were read from the Excel worksheet called “SHOES” and the SAS variable names were converted 
to F1, F2, F3, and F4 because the GETNAMES=NO statement suppressed reading any variable names. The 
“RANGE=” worksheet name value was in lowercase and included the location of the Excel cells to read into the 
SAS dataset. 
Example 3.3 – Part 3 
Users of Excel Workbooks have the option of creating subsets of cells in a worksheet that can be called by 
name; these areas are called Named-Ranges. Figure 3.2 below shows one of these named ranges called 
“small_range”. The range name was created while running Excel with the workbook Shoes.xls open.  
Generate Image in .NET Winforms Imaging Viewer| Online Tutorials
Change Barcode Properties. Multi-page Tiff Processing; RasterEdge OCR Engine; PDF Reading; Encode & JPEG 2000 Files; Twain Scanning; DICOM Reading; Form Recognition
create a form in pdf; adding image to pdf form
Chapter 3: Use PROC IMPORT to Read External Data Files and Excel Workbooks into SAS   39 
Figure 3.2: An Excel 2013 Worksheet with a Named Range Called “small_range” Highlighted. 
The SAS code below shows how to read the data from the Excel named-range called “small_range” into a SAS 
dataset. Because the GETNAMES=NO option is used, the variable names F1, F2, F3, and F4 that SAS 
generated are relatively vague variable names; this example will address a way to correct that issue. The 
DBDSOPTS= option allows you to use other SAS dataset options to change the output SAS dataset while it is 
being created. The SAS RENAME= dataset option was used here to change the variable names from F1, F2, … 
to more descriptive variable names. This is done in one pass over the data and makes the output file more useful 
when PROC IMPORT finishes. You do not need to make another pass over the data to rename the variables. 
The PROC DATASETS code adds LABEL values to the SAS dataset. The DBMS=EXCEL form of PROC 
IMPORT does not allow variable labels to be modified on input of the data; therefore, other code is needed to 
change the variable labels. 
PROC IMPORT  
DATAFILE='c:\My_Files\Shoes.xls'  
DBMS=EXCEL  
OUT=shoes  
REPLACE;  
GETNAMES=NO; 
DBDSOPTS='RENAME=(F1=Subsidiary F2=Stores F3=Sales F4=Inventory)';  
RANGE=small_range; 
RUN; 
PROC DATASETS LIBRARY=work NOLIST; 
MODIFY shoes; 
LABEL Subsidiary = "Subsidiary" 
Stores     = "Stores" 
Sales      = "Sales" 
Inventory  = "Inventory"; 
QUIT; 
40   Exchanging Data between SAS and Microsoft Excel 
Output 3.1:  Listing of the PROC IMPORT Code generated and the PROC DATASETS Listing. 
3    PROC IMPORT 
4        DATAFILE='c:\My_Files\Shoes.xls' 
5        DBMS=EXCEL 
6        OUT=shoes 
7        REPLACE; 
8        GETNAMES=NO; 
9        DBDSOPTS='RENAME=(F1=Subsidiary F2=Stores F3=Sales F4=Inventory)'; 
10       RANGE=small_range; 
11   RUN; 
NOTE: WORK.SHOES data set was successfully created. 
NOTE: The data set WORK.SHOES has 7 observations and 4 variables. 
NOTE: PROCEDURE IMPORT used (Total process time): 
real time           0.17 seconds 
cpu time            0.06 seconds 
12   PROC DATASETS LIBRARY=work NOLIST; 
NOTE: Writing HTML Body file: sashtml.htm 
13      MODIFY shoes; 
14         LABEL Subsidiary = "Subsidiary" 
15               Stores     = "Stores" 
16               Sales      = "Sales" 
17               Inventory  = "Inventory"; 
18   QUIT; 
NOTE: MODIFY was successful for WORK.SHOES.DATA. 
NOTE: PROCEDURE DATASETS used (Total process time): 
real time           0.25 seconds 
cpu time            0.15 seconds
Figure 3.3: The SAS Dataset Created by the Code Above. 
Example 3.4 PROC IMPORT Using the DBMS=EXCELCS Option 
This example is similar to Example 3.2, but the code was executed on a Windows 64-bit configuration. The 64-
bit operating system requires the use of the PC Files Server to execute any PROC IMPORT code where 
DBMS=EXCELCS. The SAS code for Part 1 reads the full Excel worksheet. The difference in the code is the 
use of the DBMS=EXCELCS option. Note that in most cases the “named-constants” are used as part of the 
Chapter 3: Use PROC IMPORT to Read External Data Files and Excel Workbooks into SAS   41 
syntax of the RANGE= option; the “named-constants” are not required when a range-name is used with the 
RANGE= statement. 
Example 3.4 – Part 1 
The following SAS code reads a full worksheet from an Excel file on a 64-bit computer; the DBMS=EXCELCS 
option uses the SAS PC Files Server to access and read the input Excel 32-bit workbook. 
PROC IMPORT  
DATAFILE='c:\My_Files\Shoes.xlsb'  
DBMS=EXCELCS 
OUT=shoes 
REPLACE;  
RANGE='SHOES$'n; 
RUN; 
Example 3.4 – Part 2 
The following segment of SAS code, while syntactically correct, reads the first row of data as variable names 
and produces unpredictable results because GETNAMES= is not supported when DBMS=EXCELCS. This 
code is intended to read three rows of data from the input Excel file. However, the first row is interpreted as 
SAS variable names.  
NOTE: The RANGE= value includes Excel cell references, which may not produce your desired output 
because the GETNAMES= statement is not supported when using the DBMS=EXCELCS option. I suggest that 
you use the DBMS=XLSX option instead, as shown in Example 3.5. This example shows what happens if you 
do not use the DBMS=XLSX statement.  
/* this code does not work */ 
PROC IMPORT 
DATAFILE='c:\My_Files\Shoes.xlsb' 
DBMS=EXCELCS 
OUT=shoes 
REPLACE; 
RANGE='shoes$C2:F4'n; 
RUN; 
Figure 3.4 shows the output SAS dataset generated by the PROC IMPORT code from above. The intended 
result was to read three data rows into the SAS dataset. However, the first row was read and translated into 
variable names.  
Figure 3.4: The SAS Dataset Created by the Code Above
.
42   Exchanging Data between SAS and Microsoft Excel 
Example 3.5 PROC IMPORT Using the DBMS=XLS or XLSX to Select Columns 
When using the DBMS=XLS option of PROC IMPORT with the ENDCOL and STARTCOL statements, the 
output SAS dataset is restricted to only the columns requested. This works like a KEEP statement, except the 
columns have to be contiguous. The input file is the SASHELP.SHOES dataset as exported to an Excel file. 
This example imports columns 2, 3, and 4 (Product, Subsidiary, and Number of Stores). 
NOTE:
There is a comment in the SAS log about a name change for the variable named “Number of Stores” 
because this text value has spaces embedded in the value. The value shown in Figure 3.5a for column 3 
(Number of Stores) is the label applied to the variable named “Number_of_Stores”. Also, ENDCOL= was 
placed before STARTCOL= to show the statement order is not important. The output SAS dataset has data from 
three rows and five columns of the input Excel worksheet. 
PROC IMPORT  
DATAFILE='c:\My_Excel_Files\Shoes.xls'  
DBMS=XLS 
OUT=shoes 
REPLACE; 
ENDCOL="4"; 
STARTCOL="2"; 
RUN; 
The system output log for Example 3.5 shows the name change of the variable “Number of Stores.” The log 
also verifies that only three columns were output to the SAS dataset from Excel. 
1   PROC IMPORT 
2       DATAFILE='c:\My_Excel_Files\Shoes.xls' 
3       DBMS=XLS 
4       OUT=shoes 
5       REPLACE; 
6       ENDCOL="4"; 
7       STARTCOL="2"; 
8   RUN; 
NOTE:    Variable Name Change.  Number of Stores -> Number_of_Stores 
NOTE: The import data set has 395 observations and 3 variables. 
NOTE: WORK.SHOES data set was successfully created. 
NOTE: PROCEDURE IMPORT used (Total process time): 
real time           0.03 seconds 
cpu time            0.04 seconds 
SAS output dataset: 
In Figure 3.5a, the SAS dataset label shown for the variable Number_of_Stores has two spaces; however, the 
actual variable name does not have any spaces embedded.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested