display first page of pdf as image in c# : Change font in pdf form SDK Library service wpf asp.net windows dnn 990421102-part877

on which the very identity of the liberal subject depends'.
33
At a
less  metaphorical  level,  Anthea  Trodd  writes  how  `In  mid-
Victorian Wctions of domestic crime we see a world of spying ser-
vants, conspiring wives, intrusive policemen, in which the home is
threatened from within and without, and the irreconcilable claims
of the private and public spheres exposed.'
34
Disciplinary surveillance is not the only aspect of Foucault's fas-
cination with the visible to be built upon. Jeremy Tambling, for
example, has drawn not just on Discipline and Punish, but on The
Birth of the Clinic (1963), and in particular on the passage Foucault
quotes from Bichat's Anatomie générale advising the making visible
of that which  lies below the human surface: `Open up  a few
corpses: you will dissipate at once the darkness that observation
alone could not dissipate.'
35
Tambling relates this imagery of illu-
mination both to George Eliot's interest in Bichat himself, as evi-
denced in chapter 15 of Middlemarch, and to the more general
imagery that we encounter in this novel. This is a novel permeated,
as a number of critics have noted, with optical imagery,
36
imagery
which is employed to suggest the importance of throwing light on
social anatomy ± piercing `the obscurity of those minute processes
which prepare human misery and joy',
37
as one of the phrases
which links novelist and physician puts it ± moving from an explo-
ration of the body to wider concerns; a thematics of imagery
which, as in Holmes's phrase, connects concept with the formal
organisation of Wction.
AFoucauldian reading of the nineteenth century emphasises
the fact that practices of surveillance, of bringing material to the
surface, worked in collaboration with practices of codiWcation
and classiWcation. In turn, this was linked to a broader aesthetic
drive: what Mark Seltzer has termed the `realist imperative of
making everything, including aesthetic states, visible, legible, and
governable'.
38
Many of these classiWcatory procedures are well
known, from the growth in statistical societies to the establish-
ment of the British Museum Catalogue; from cartography to the
work of natural historians; from graphology manuals to diction-
aries of plants andof dreams.Almostinevitably, the determinants
of classiWcation were dependent, to at least some extent, on the
the visible and the unseen
13
Change font in pdf form - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
create a fillable pdf form from a word document; create a form in pdf from word
Change font in pdf form - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
cannot save pdf form in reader; pdf form creation
recognition of something's, or someone's, material existence or
properties, which were subsequently orderedaccording to certain
schemata. Symptomatically, in terms of recent studies of such
enterprises, Thomas Richards remarks in The Imperial Archive:
Knowledge and the Fantasy of Empire (1993): `The ordering of the
worldandits knowledges intoa uniWedWeldwas located explicitly
in the register of representation.'
39
Numerous recentcritics of the
Victorian period suggest that if we can understand the laws and
associations that governed systems of representation during this
period, and the symbolic resonances that are at stake, we can, to
all intents and purposes, `read' the Victorians. Peter Brooks, in
Body Work. Objects of Desire in Modern Narrative (1993), writes of
the `semioticization' of the body during thenineteenth century:
Representing the body in modern narrative ±  . . . seems always to
involve viewing the body. The dominant nineteenth-century tra-
dition, that of realism, insistently makes the visual the master
relation to the world, for the very premise of realism is that one
cannot  understand  human  beings  outside  the context  of the
things that surround them, and knowing these things is a matter
of viewing them,  detailing them, and describing the concrete
milieux in which men and women enact their destinies.
40
Brooks's foregrounding of the body is crucial, because it points us
to the central site for debates concerning the relationship between
inner and outer, between assumptions concerning surface and
essence on the one hand, and the misleading guidance which exte-
riors can oVer about interiority on the other.
The idea was widespread, in the mid-century, that diVerent
social types, and diVerent types of character, were physiognomi-
cally distinguishable. Not only faces in their entirety oVered them-
selves up to be read, but facial expressions (pathognomy), lines on
the forehead (metoposcopy), lines on the hand (chiromancy and
chirognomy), and moles (neomancy) were all available for deci-
phering. This assumption that the appearance of bodies revealed
the truth about the person who inhabited it was not conWned to
ideas concerning individual personality traits. Notoriously, after
14
the victorians and the visual imagination
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing options TargetResolution = 150F; // to change image compression
change font in pdf fillable form; add email button to pdf form
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce font resources: Font resources will also take up too Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing 150.0F 'to change image compression
create a pdf form from excel; change font size in fillable pdf form
the mid-century, it became an increasingly consolidated article of
faith that racial characteristics were irrevocably inscribed through
the measurable size and shape of the human body.
41
`Nature', asserted Dickens in an article, `never writes a bad
hand. Her writing, as it may be read in the human countenance, is
invariably legible, if we come at all trained to the reading of it.'
42
Eliza Lynn, in her 1855Household Wordsarticle `Passing Faces', said
that one might expect to discover not just the individual secrets of
those we encounter through looking at their physiognomies, but
`their social condition and their histories, stamped on them as
legibly as arms are painted on a carriage-panel';
43
Mary Cowling, in
The Artist as Anthropologist (1989), has valuably shown quite how
readily both artists and anthropologists, following in the wake of
such physiologists as F. G. Gall, seized on external appearance, par-
ticularly the faces of those in modern urban crowds, as providing a
quick indication of the character of an individual. This pleasure is
linked to a form of understanding and control ± however illusory ±
derived from the belief that it is possible, through observation, to
gain knowledge of the mass, to turn faceless anonymity into indi-
viduality and hence render it less disturbing and threatening. In
turn, Cowling argues, the widespread acceptance of physiognomy
as  a  method  of human  interpretation, and the  notion  of the
anthropological type, `help us to understand the kind of interest
and pleasure which Victorian modern life art oVered'.
44
Such inter-
pretation rested on the assumptions articulated by Lavater in his
Essays  on  Physiognomy, Wrst  published  in  Leipzig  in  1774±8 and
unceasingly  in  demand  until  around  1870:  `is  not  all  nature
physiognomy; superWcies, and contents; body, and spirit; exterior
eVect,  and  internal  power;  invisible  beginning,  and  visible
ending?'
45
As Hippolyte Taine observed in his History of English
Literature (1863): `When you consider with your eyes the visible
man, what do you look for? The man invisible.'
46
Yet it would be wrong to assume an absolute acceptance by mid-
Victorians of these populist tenets. Notwithstanding Dickens's
compulsive fascination with personal appearance, it is notable that
in Hard Times(1854), a novel which protests against classiWcation as
the visible and the unseen
15
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
pdf form creator; create pdf forms
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Allow users to add comments online in ASPX webpage. Able to change font size in PDF comment box. Able to save and print sticky notes in PDF file.
create a fillable pdf form online; add form fields to pdf online
a means of dealing with individuals, he rebels, too, against the lan-
guage  of physiognomy.  He  describes  the  mill-hand,  Stephen
Blackpool, thus: `A rather stooping man, with a knitted brow, a
pondering expression of face, and a hard-looking head suYciently
capacious, on which his iron-grey  hair lay long and thin,  Old
Stephen might have passed for a particularly intelligent man in his
condition. Yet he was not.'
47
More provocatively, George Eliot
pointedly shows us in Adam Bede (1859) that appearance may be a
less sure guide to character than assumptionsabout appearance are
a reXection of the mind and the desires of the perceiver. In turn,
this is metonymic of the way in which even Eliot's earliest Wction
manifests, as Catherine Gallagher puts it, `a deep skepticism about
the legibility of facts, the apprehendable signiWcance of appear-
ances'.
48
The  narrator  warningly  describes  Adam's  wishful
responses to Hetty's prettiness: 
Every man under such circumstances is conscious  of being a
great physiognomist. Nature, he knows, has a language of her
own, which she uses with strict veracity, and he considers himself
an adept in the language. Nature has written out his bride's char-
acter for him in those exquisite lines of cheek and lip and chin, in
those eyelids delicate as petals, in those long lashes curled like the
stamen of a Xower, in the dark liquid depths of those wonderful
eyes. How she will dote on her children! 
We are admonished, however, after what proves a proleptic piece
of irony: `I believe the wisest of us must be beguiled in this way
sometimes, and must think both better and worse of people than
they deserve. Nature has her language, and she is not unveracious,
but we don't know all the intricacies of her syntax just yet, and in a
hasty reading we may happen to extract the very opposite of her
real meaning.'
49
Later, in Daniel Deronda (1876), a novel much more
insistently  concerned  with  the  problematics  of looking, Eliot
explicitly extends the  untrustworthy  principle of the physiog-
nomic scrutiny of faces to more generalised acts of interpretation:
`often the grand meanings of faces as well as of written words may
lie chieXy  in the impressions  of those  who look  on  them'.
50
Outside Wction, others record how their own misreadings served
16
the victorians and the visual imagination
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. passwordSetting.IsHighReso = True ' Allow to change document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
add fillable fields to pdf online; pdf save form data
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
RasterEdge.Imaging.Font.dll. passwordSetting.IsHighReso = true; // Allow to change document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
adding form fields to pdf files; add text field to pdf
to unsettle their conWdence in physiognomy. The art student Anna
Mary Howitt, who went to study in Munich in 1853, recounts her
experience of the deceptiveness of appearance. On one occasion,
she and some fellow students went on an outing to a model peni-
tentiary. Their guide drew their express attention to a group of
four women clustered round a washtub, and asked what they
could deduce about these inmates from their looks:
`Three out of the four', we remarked, `are the only agreeable
faces we have seen in the prison; and, judging from this momen-
tary glance at their countenances, we should say could not be
guilty of much crime; perhaps the fat old woman may be so; that
tall  young  girl,  however,  is  not  only  handsome,  but  gentle-
looking.'
`That tall young girl', replied our guide, `was the one who, a
year or two ago, murdered her fellow-servant, and cutting up the
body, buried it in the garden; the little woman next to her, some
two years since, murdered her husband; and the handsome, kind,
motherly-looking woman who stood next, destroyed her child of
seven years old. The fat old woman is in only for a slight oVence.
So much for judgment by physiognomy!'
. . . As I returned home, all the faces I met in the streets seemed
to me, as it were, masks. I saw faces in expression a thousand
times more evil than the countenances of those three unhappy
women. How was it? Was it alone that some unusually painful
and frightful circumstances had aroused passions in them which
only slept in the breasts of hundreds of other human beings who
wander about free and honourably in the world; or was expres-
sion, after all, a deception?
51
Despite this continuing interrogation of the certitude with which
the  surface  of the  body  rendered  character  legible,  the  idea
endured the nineteenth century, receiving its updated scientiWc
imprimatur  through  the  absorption,  in  part,  of Cesare
Lombroso's typology of criminal degeneracy. In turn, this was
challenged in a way that simultaneously called assumptions about
representation into question. In Robert Louis Stevenson'sDr Jekyll
and Mr Hyde (1886), the uncouth Hyde, even if bearing signs of
the visible and the unseen
17
Annotate, Redact Image in .NET Winforms| Online Tutorials
Click "Font" to change annotations font color, size We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf
add print button to pdf form; allow users to save pdf form
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Support to change font color in PDF text box. Ability to change text size in PDF text box. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
add fields to pdf; convert word document to editable pdf form
degeneration, genetic reversion and stuntedness, is more remark-
able for the intangible and revulsion-provoking aura which he
emanates  than  for  any  identiWable  physical  marks  of evil:  a
counter-blast to what Stevenson deplored, in `A Note on Realism',
as the realist compulsion to make everything `all charactered and
notable, seizing the eye'.
52
Innately present character traits were not the only indicators of
individuality which were believed, at least by some, to be decipher-
able from a body's appearance. Indeed, Dickens's argument in the
article  already  cited,  `The  Demeanour  of Murderers',  is  that
actions come to show their traces on human faces, rather than that
physiological characteristics are invariably indicative of a predis-
position to criminal activity. This is the developmental common-
place on which Oscar Wilde builds when showing that the palm of
Lord Arthur Savile comes to bear the stigmata of a murderer, or,
indeed, when  dramatically displacing Dorian Gray's transgres-
sions onto the features of his portrait. Codes of physical legibility
are, however, not conWned to moral histories, but operate in far
more materialist contexts. One need only recall Sherlock Holmes's
famous statement that `By a man's Wnger-nails, by his coat-sleeve,
by  his  boots,  by  his  trouser-knees,  by  the  callosities  of his
foreWnger and thumb, by his expression, by his shirt-cuVs ± by each
of these things a man's calling is plainly revealed',
53
such noting of
detail itself being advocated by the master detective as part of nec-
essary training in the capacity to observe and deduce. As Holmes's
own masterful adoption of disguises intimates, and the blurring of
the physical ± Wnger-nails and calluses ± with clothing in his procla-
mation to Watson suggests, identity came to be recognised as
something which was not innate, but performative ± the type of
performativity  recognised  by  Henry  James  when  he  makes
Madame Merle, in The Portrait of a Lady, say that `One's self ± for
other people ± is one's expression of one's self; and one's house,
one's furniture, one's garments, the books one reads, the company
one keeps ± these things are all expressive.'
54
In fact, the whole
Victorian literary fascination  with disguise and its capacity  to
deceive successfully ± from Mayhew's beggars with their carefully
concocted sores, through Isabel Vane, hiding behind her blue-
18
the victorians and the visual imagination
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Able to edit and change PDF annotation properties such as font size or color. Abilities to draw markups on PDF document or stamp on PDF file.
adding images to pdf forms; create a fillable pdf form from a pdf
tinted spectacles in East Lynne, to Rudyard Kipling's Kim's capacity
(apart from, one presumes, his tell-tale Irish eyes) to pass as a
bazaar-boy ± may be seen as a counter-current to the belief in the
suYciency of physiognomic encodement.
55
Additionally, and with
no performative deliberation on the part of their occupants, one
encounters  those  skins  which  have  been  both  literally  and
Wguratively inscribed with the marks of toil: Boucher's drowned
corpse, in Gaskell's North and South, stained with the industrial dye
which pollutes the streams of Milton; Tess's arms, in Tess of the
d'Urbervilles, scratched and torn by Weld work, which may be read
both as a sign of labour, and as a displacement of the way in which
sexual activity has lacerated her.
56
As with the individual body, the understanding of society as a
whole relied on the gathering and organisation of information
about its parts. This has led to systemic readings of Victorian
culture based upon what several commentators have isolatedas a
signiWcant feature of the period: its dependence, across a variety
of Welds, on the accumulation andpreciserecording of detail. The
importance of this proliferation of detail has been discussed in
relation to a range of contexts. Thus Carol Christ considered the
problems of relating details to the whole at a time when the col-
lapse of religious belief, and the co-terminous developments in
political and scientiWc theories, left the individual isolate: `con-
ceiving of the universe as a mass of particulars led logically to
seeing experience as wholly subjective and particular', and she
traces the eVect this response to detail had on Victorian poets.
57
Morecommon,however,is thelinkageof crowdeddetailwith the
literary ± usually Wctional ± and artistic practice of realism, with
its stress on the solid and the circumstantial, creating the rhetoric
whereby the reader or spectator may believe that the world repre-
sentedis in somewaycontinuous with their own.
58
`It is almostby
now a truism of criticism', remarked Laurie Langbauer in 1990,
`that the classical realism of nineteenth-century novels especially
draws on metaphors of sight for its eVect',
59
and she went on to
cite Mark Seltzer's observation that the techniques of realism,
with their emphasis on the particularities of the all-seeing narra-
tor's vision, `are concerned ªwith seeing, with a seeing in detailº,
the visible and the unseen
19
.. . to aid our acceptance as subjects not just of one true uniWed
vision but of an invisible supervision'.
60
Some critics, notably
Herbert Sussman and George Landow, have pointed to the ways
in which particular employment of detail, particularly in Pre-
Raphaelite work, stands for spiritual signiWcance made manifest,
through systems of typological symbolism, in the material
world.
61
Chris Brooks, in Signs for the Times (1984), relates such
Pre-Raphaelite manipulation of detail to a broader European
metaphysical context, taking as his starting point Thomas
Carlyle's own individualistic expansion of German transcenden-
talism in Sartor Resartus, and his insistence that in the Weld of
human investigation, there are material objects, which may be
seen by the bodily eye, and there are invisible objects, which not
only cannot be seen by any eye, but which cannot be pictured or
imaged in the mind. In particular, Brooks takes up Carlyle's
comment that `All visible things are emblems; what thou seest is
not there on its own account; strictly taken, is not there at all:
Matter exists only spiritually,andtorepresentsomeIdea,and body
it forth.'
62
He uses this to explore what he terms `symbolic
realism' at work in Dickens, in Pre-Raphaelite painting and in
mid-Victorian architecture.
Such  a  model  of inner  and  outer  representation  and
signiWcation, however, is a very static one. Carlyle is also notable
for his voicing of a sense ± later developed into the webs and circu-
latory systems of Darwin and Herbert Spencer, Eliot and Hardy ±
that there are hidden `bonds that unite us one and all'. In their
material form, these may be observed as a `venous-arterial circula-
tion, of Letters, verbal Messages, paper and other Packages, going
out from [an individual] and coming in . . . a blood-circulation,
visible to the eye'. Such Wlaments of communication, however, are
no more than symbols of `the Wner nervous circulation, by which
all things, the minutest that he does, minutely inXuence all men,
and the very look of his face blesses or curses whomso it lights on,
and so operates ever new blessing or new cursing: all this you
cannot see, but only imagine'.
63
Yet despite Carlyle's warning, crucial to my own argument,
that the unseen may be more powerful than the seen, countless
20
the victorians and the visual imagination
metaphors within Victorian writing substantiate the drive towards
specularity to which many critics of the late twentieth century
attest. It is such a desire to uncover which led Charlotte Brontë, in
the preface to the second edition of Jane Eyre, to write that the
world has found it `convenient to make external show pass for ster-
ling worth ± to let white-washed walls vouch for clean shrines. It
may hate him who dares to scrutinise and expose ± to rase the
gilding, and show base metal under it ± to penetrate the sepulchre,
and reveal charnel relics: but, hate as it will, it is indebted to him.'
64
As  Brontë makes  apparent  in  Gothically chilling  language, to
reveal is not always to put on display that which is pleasant, but rev-
elation is informed by a desire to lay bare the truth, whatever the
cost to one's peace of mind. Whilst Brontë is primarily concerned
with individual morality and hypocrisy,  however symptomatic
these may be of wider social failings, the language of exposure
increasingly resonates through acts of unveiling designed to illu-
minate areas of ignorance in relation to general social spheres.
The current fascination with the legibility of Victorian surfaces
and the apparent transparency of signifying systems has not, of
course, gone unchallenged. The very stability of the visible has
partly been called into question by those who, like Jonathan Crary,
have demonstrated how early nineteenth-century investigations in
optical science, involving both optical devices and physiological
experiments, led to the growing acceptance that visualisation is
itself dependent upon cerebral process, and to the accumulation of
knowledge `about the constitutive role of the body in the appre-
hension of a visible world'.
65
He describes, in other words, the
movement  from  an  eighteenth-century  model  of the  camera
obscura, with its implicit postulation of the objective observer, to
the admission of subjectivity into vision (whilst noting that, as
Victorians themselves readily admitted, the acknowledgement of
the role of subjectivity in seeing had taken place long before their
own century). However, as W. J. T. Mitchell has eVectively, if sym-
pathetically, pointed out, Crary's argument is weakened by the
way  his  `skepticism  about  the  ªsingle  nineteenth  century
observerº leads him, against all logic, to conclude that there is no
the visible and the unseen
21
observer, except in the ªdominant modelº he has extracted from
physiological optics and optical technology'.
66
One of the central
aims of my own study is to reinstate what might be thought of as
the  particularities  of spectatorship:  considering  not  just  the
intense attention which was paid to the mechanics of the eye, and
the growing interest in the linked involvement of the unconscious,
but, through investigating the terms in which visual acts were dis-
cussed and recorded, I shall be considering the ends which looking
at art was made to serve. This means going way beyond discus-
sions concerning the immediate operations of the eye, despite
their proliferation during the whole period, and considering the
act of viewing in the light of other current practices employed in
the interpretation of culture, dependent upon, and reinforcing,
the hidden, invisible, interwoven threads of ideology.
One should, however, avoid falling into the trap of believing
that Victorians necessarily privileged the importance of visibility:
as Carlyle's Sartor Resartus has already been used to indicate, the
unseen could be far more suggestive than the seen. This could hold
true not just in a straightforward religious sense, but also in a more
Carlylean  metaphysical one.
67
For  in  what  follows,  I  shall  be
drawing extensively on scientiWc writing, and emphasising the fre-
quent interpenetration of its concerns with literary and artistic
culture. This inXuence had its limits. In particular, and tellingly ±
telling, that  is,  when  it  comes  to  assessing  how  people  were
actively encouraged to look at works of art ± it was ± as we shall see
in chapter 7 ± rarely drawn upon by those whose professional task
it was to describe and encourage the act of seeing and interpreta-
tion.
68
Aside from this, however, the insistence by numerous scien-
tists on the importance of the imagination drew together diVering
Welds of speculative activity.
69
Yet the most far-thinking of scien-
tists were quick to express reservations about the extent of their
vision and powers. Thomas Huxley, for example, wrote in `Science
and Morals' that `Nobody, I imagine, will credit me with a desire to
limit the empire of physical science, but I really feel bound to
confess that a great many very familiar and, at the same time,
extremely important phenomena lie quite beyond its legitimate
limits.'
70
John Tyndall remarked in 1860 that `The territory of
22
the victorians and the visual imagination
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested