display first page of pdf as image in c# : Convert word document to editable pdf form software Library dll winforms .net asp.net web forms 9_8_20060-part881

Draft Articles on Diplomatic Protection 
with commentaries 
2006 
Text adopted by the International Law Commission at its fifty-eighth session, in 
2006, and submitted to the General Assembly as a part of the Commission’s report 
covering  the  work  of  that  session  (A/61/10).  The  report,  which  also  contains 
commentaries on the draft articles, will appear in Yearbook of the International Law 
Commission, 2006, vol. II, Part Two. 
Copyright © United Nations 
2006 
Convert word document to editable pdf form - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
adding text to a pdf form; best program to create pdf forms
Convert word document to editable pdf form - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
add submit button to pdf form; add forms to pdf
22 
2.  Text of the draft articles with commentaries thereto 
50.  The text of the draft articles with commentaries thereto adopted by the Commission at its 
fifty-eighth session are reproduced below. 
DIPLOMATIC PROTECTION 
(1) 
The drafting of articles on diplomatic protection was originally seen as belonging to the 
study on State Responsibility.  Indeed the first Rapporteur on State Responsibility, 
Mr. F.V. Garcia Amador, included a number of draft articles on this subject in his reports 
presented from 1956 to 1961.
16
The subsequent codification of State Responsibility paid little 
attention to diplomatic protection and the final draft articles on this subject expressly state that 
the two topics central to diplomatic protection - nationality of claims and the exhaustion of local 
remedies - would be dealt with more extensively by the Commission in a separate undertaking.
17
Nevertheless, there is a close connection between the articles on Responsibility of States for 
internationally wrongful acts and the present draft articles.  Many of the principles contained in 
the articles on Responsibility of States for internationally wrongful acts are relevant to 
diplomatic protection and are therefore not repeated in the present draft articles.  This applies in 
particular to the provisions dealing with the legal consequences of an internationally wrongful 
act.  A State responsible for injuring a foreign national is obliged to cease the wrongful conduct 
and to make full reparation for the injury caused by the internationally wrongful act.  This 
reparation may take the form of restitution, compensation or satisfaction, either singly or in 
combination.  All these matters are dealt with in the articles on Responsibility of States for 
internationally wrongful acts.
18
(2) 
Diplomatic protection belongs to the subject of “Treatment of Aliens”.  No attempt is 
made, however, to deal with the primary rules on this subject - that is, the rules governing the 
16
Yearbook … 1956 , vol. II, pp. 173-231, Yearbook … 1957 , vol. II, pp. 104--30, Yearbook … 1958 , vol. II, 
pp. 47-73, Yearbook … 1959 , vol. II, pp. 1-36, Yearbook … 1960 , vol. II, pp. 41-68, and Yearbook … 1961 , vol. II, 
pp. 1-54. 
17
Ibid., Official Records of the General Assembly Fifty-sixth Session, Supplement No. 10 (A/56/10), para. 77, 
commentary on article 44, footnotes 722 and 726. 
18
Articles 28, 30, 31, 34-37.  Much of the commentary on compensation (art. 36) is devoted to a consideration of 
the principles applicable to claims concerning diplomatic protection. 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
VB.NET Tutorial for Creating PDF document from MS Office Word. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents.
pdf form save; change font on pdf form
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
C# Demo Code to Create PDF Document from Word in C# Program with .NET XDoc.PDF Component. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF
create a form in pdf; can reader edit pdf forms
23 
treatment of the person and property of aliens, breach of which gives rise to responsibility to the 
State of nationality of the injured person.  Instead the present draft articles are confined to 
secondary rules only - that is, the rules that relate to the conditions that must be met for the 
bringing of a claim for diplomatic protection.  By and large this means rules governing the 
admissibility of claims.  Article 44 of the articles on Responsibility of States for internationally 
wrongful acts provides: 
“The responsibility of a State may not be invoked if: 
“( a)  The claim is not brought in accordance with any applicable rule relating to 
the nationality of claims; 
“( b)  The claim is one to which the rule of exhaustion of local remedies applies 
and any available and effective local remedy has not been exhausted.” 
The present draft articles give content to this provision by elaborating on the rules relating to the 
nationality of claims and the exhaustion of local remedies. 
(3) 
The present draft articles do not deal with the protection of an agent by an international 
organization, generally described as “functional  protection”.  Although  there are similarities 
between functional protection and diplomatic protection, there are also important differences.  
Diplomatic protection is traditionally a mechanism designed to secure reparation for injury to the 
national of a State premised largely on the principle that an injury to a national is an injury to the 
State itself.  Functional protection, on the other hand, is an institution for promoting the efficient 
functioning of an international organization by ensuring respect for its agents and their 
independence.  Differences of this kind have led the Commission to conclude that protection of 
an agent by an international organization does not belong in a set of draft articles on diplomatic 
protection.  The question whether a State may exercise diplomatic protection in respect of a 
national who is an agent of an international organization was answered by the International 
Court of Justice in the Reparation for Injuries case:  “In such a case, there is no rule of law 
which assigns priority to the one or to the other, or which compels either the State or the 
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
hardly edit PDF document. Under this situation, you need to convert PDF document to some easily editable files like Word document.
adding an image to a pdf form; edit pdf form
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
methods to convert target PDF document to other editable file formats using Visual C# code, such as, PDF to HTML converter assembly, PDF to Word converter
adding text fields to pdf; chrome save pdf form
24 
Organization to refrain from bringing an international claim.  The Court sees no reason why the 
parties concerned should not find solutions inspired by goodwill and common sense.  …”
19
PART ONE 
GENERAL PROVISIONS 
Article 1 
Definition and scope 
For the purposes of the present draft articles, diplomatic protection consists of the 
invocation by a State, through diplomatic action or other means of peaceful settlement, of 
the responsibility of another State for an injury caused by an internationally wrongful act 
of that State to a natural or legal person that is a national of the former State with a view 
to the implementation of such responsibility. 
Commentary 
(1) 
Draft article 1 makes no attempt to provide a complete and comprehensive definition of 
diplomatic protection.  Instead it describes the salient features of diplomatic protection in the 
sense in which the term is used in the present draft articles. 
(2) 
Under international law, a State is responsible for injury to an alien caused by its 
wrongful act or omission.  Diplomatic protection is the procedure employed by the State of 
nationality of the injured persons to secure protection of that person and to obtain reparation for 
the internationally wrongful act inflicted.  The present draft articles are concerned only with the 
rules governing the circumstances in which diplomatic protection may be exercised and the 
conditions that must be met before it may be exercised.  They do not seek to define or describe 
the internationally wrongful acts that give rise to the responsibility of the State for injury to an 
alien.  The draft articles, like those on the Responsibility of States for internationally wrongful 
acts,
20
maintain the distinction between primary and secondary rules and deal only with the 
latter. 
19
Reparation for Injuries suffered in the Service of the United Nations, Advisory  Opinion, I.C.J. Reports 1949
p. 174 at pp. 185-186. 
20
See Official Records of the General Assembly, Fifty-sixth Session, Supplement No. 10 (A/56/10), para. 77, 
general commentary, paras. (1) to (3). 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
C#.NET component to create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and Create and save editable PDF with a blank page, bookmarks
changing font size in a pdf form; change font in pdf form field
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images DNN, C#.NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET
change font size pdf form reader; android edit pdf forms
25 
(3) 
Diplomatic protection has traditionally been seen as an exclusive State right in the sense 
that a State exercises diplomatic protection in its own right because an injury to a national is 
deemed to be an injury to the State itself.  This approach has its roots, first in a statement by the 
Swiss jurist Emmerich de Vattel in 1758 that “whoever ill-treats a citizen indirectly injures the 
State, which must protect that citizen,”
21
and, secondly in a dictum of the Permanent Court of 
International Justice in 1924 in the Mavrommatis Palestine Concessions case that “by taking up 
the case of one of its subjects and by resorting to diplomatic action or international judicial 
proceedings on his behalf, a State is in reality asserting its own right, the right to ensure, in the 
person of its subjects, respect for the rules of international law”.
22
Obviously it is a fiction - and 
an exaggeration
23
- to say that an injury to a national is an injury to the State itself.  Many of the 
rules of diplomatic protection contradict the correctness of this fiction, notably the rule of 
continuous nationality which requires a State to prove that the injured national remained its 
national after the injury itself and up to the date of the presentation of the claim.  A State does 
not “in reality” - to quote Mavrommatis - assert its own right only.  “In reality” it also asserts the 
right of its injured national. 
(4) 
In the early years of international law the individual had no place, no rights in the 
international legal order.  Consequently if a national injured abroad was to be protected this 
could be done only by means of a fiction - that an injury to the national was an injury to the State 
itself.  This fiction was, however, no more than a means to an end, the end being the protection 
of the rights of an injured national.  Today the situation has changed dramatically.  The 
individual is the subject of many primary rules of international law, both under custom and 
treaty, which protect him at home, against his own Government, and abroad, against foreign 
21
E. de Vattel, The Law of Nations or the Principles of Natural Law Applied to the Conduct and to the Affairs of 
Nations and Sovereigns, vol. III (1758, English translation by C.G. Fenwick, Carnegie Institution, 
Washington 1916), chap. VI, p. 136. 
22
Mavrommatis Palestine Concessions (Greece v. U.K.) P.C.I.J. Reports, 1924, Series A, No. 2, p. 12.  This dictum 
was repeated by the Permanent Court of International Justice in the Panevezys Saldutiskis Railway case (Estonia v. 
LithuaniaP.C.I.J. Reports, 1939, Series A/B, No. 76, p. 16. 
23
J.L. Brierly, The Law of Nations:  An Introduction to the International Law of Peace, 6th edition (Oxford:  
Clarendon Press, 1963), Sir H. Waldock (ed), pp. 276-7. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. control is a professional and mature .NET solution which aims to convert PDF document to Word (DOC / DOCX
add form fields to pdf without acrobat; create a pdf form that can be filled out
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
C#.NET PDF SDK- Create PDF from Word in Visual C#. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it on the targetType, The target document type will be converted to.
create a form in pdf; adding text field to pdf
26 
Governments.  This has been recognized by the International Court of Justice in the La Grand
24
and Avena cases.
25
This protection is not limited to personal rights.  Bilateral investment treaties 
confer rights and protection on both legal and natural persons in respect of their property rights.  
The individual has rights under international law but remedies are few.  Diplomatic protection 
conducted by a State at inter-State level remains an important remedy for the protection of 
persons whose human rights have been violated abroad. 
(5) 
Draft article 1 is formulated in such a way as to leave open the question whether the State 
exercising diplomatic protection does so in its own right or that of its national - or both.  It views 
diplomatic protection through the prism of State responsibility and emphasizes that it is a 
procedure for securing the responsibility of the State for injury to the national flowing from an 
internationally wrongful act. 
(6) 
Draft article 1 deliberately follows the language of the articles on Responsibility of States 
for internationally wrongful acts.
26
It describes diplomatic protection as the invocation of the 
responsibility of a State that has committed an internationally wrongful act in respect of a 
national of another State, by the State of which that person is a national, with a view to 
implementing responsibility.  As a claim brought within the context of State responsibility it is 
an inter-State claim, although it may result in the assertion of rights enjoyed by the injured 
national under international law. 
(7) 
As draft article 1 is definitional by nature it does not cover exceptions.  Thus no mention 
is made of stateless persons and refugees referred to in draft article 8 in this provision.  Draft 
article 3 does, however, make it clear that diplomatic protection may be exercised in respect of 
such persons. 
(8) 
Diplomatic protection must be exercised by lawful and peaceful means.  Several judicial 
decisions draw a distinction between “diplomatic action” and “judicial proceedings” when 
24
La Grand case (Germany v. United States of America) I.C.J. Reports 2001, p. 466 at paras. 76-77. 
25
Case concerning Avena and Other Mexican Nationals (Mexico v. United States of AmericaI.C.J. Reports, 2004, 
p. 12 at para. 40. 
26
See Chapter 1 of Part Three titled “Invocation of the Responsibility of a State” (articles. 42-48).  Part Three itself 
is titled “The implementation of the International Responsibility of a State”. 
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. new PPTXDocument(inputFilePath); // Convert it to PDF document can be converted from PowerPoint2003 by
add editable fields to pdf; create a pdf form
27 
describing the action that may be taken by a State when it resorts to diplomatic protection.
27
Draft article 1 retains this distinction but goes further by subsuming judicial proceedings under 
“other means of peaceful settlement”.  “Diplomatic action” covers all the lawful procedures 
employed by a State to inform another State of its views and concerns, including protest, request 
for an inquiry or for negotiations aimed at the settlement of disputes.  “O ther means of peaceful 
settlement” embraces all form s of lawful dispute settlement, from negotiation, mediation 
and conciliation to arbitral and judicial dispute settlement.  The use of force, prohibited by 
Article 2, paragraph 4, of the Charter of the United Nations, is not a permissible method for the 
enforcement of the right of diplomatic protection.  Diplomatic protection does not include 
demarches or other diplomatic action that do not involve the invocation of the legal 
responsibility of another State, such as informal requests for corrective action. 
(9) 
Diplomatic protection may be exercised through diplomatic action or other means of 
peaceful settlement.  It differs from consular assistance in that it is conducted by the 
representatives of the State acting in the interest of the State in terms of a rule of general 
international law, whereas consular assistance is, in most instances, carried out by consular 
officers, who represent the interests of the individual, acting in terms of the Vienna Convention 
on Consular Relations.  Diplomatic protection is essentially remedial and is designed to remedy 
an internationally wrongful act that has been committed; while consular assistance is largely 
preventive and mainly aims at preventing the national from being subjected to an internationally 
wrongful act. 
(10)  Although it is in theory possible to distinguish between diplomatic protection and 
consular assistance, in practice this task is difficult.  This is illustrated by the requirement of 
the exhaustion of local remedies.  Clearly there is no need to exhaust local remedies in the case 
of consular assistance as this assistance takes place before the commission of an internationally 
wrongful act.  Logically, as diplomatic protection arises only after the commission of an 
internationally wrongful act, it would seem that local remedies must always be exhausted, 
subject to the exceptions described in draft article 15. 
27
 Mavrommatis Palestine Concessions, op. cit., Panevezy
ś
-Saldutiskis Railway case, op. cit., p. 4 at p. 16; 
Nottebohm case (Liechtenstein v. Guatemala), Second Phase Judgment, I.C.J. Reports 1955, p. 4 at p. 24. 
28 
(11)  In these circumstances draft article 1 makes no attempt to distinguish between diplomatic 
protection and consular assistance.  The draft articles prescribe conditions for the exercise of 
diplomatic protection which are not applicable to consular assistance.  This means that the 
circumstances of each case must be considered in order to decide whether it involves diplomatic 
protection or consular assistance. 
(12)  Draft article 1 makes clear the point, already raised in the general commentary,
28
that the 
present draft articles deal only with the exercise of diplomatic protection by a State and not with 
the protection afforded to its agent by an international organization.
29
(13)  Diplomatic protection mainly covers the protection of nationals not engaged in official 
international business on behalf of the State.  These officials are protected by other rules of 
international law and instruments such as the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations 
of 1961
30
and the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations of 1963.
31
Where, however, 
diplomats or consuls are injured in respect of activities outside their functions they are covered 
by the rules relating to diplomatic protection, as, for instance, in the case of the expropriation 
without compensation of property privately owned by a diplomatic official in the country to 
which he or she is accredited. 
(14)  In most circumstances it is the link of nationality between the State and the injured 
person that gives rise to the exercise of diplomatic protection, a matter that is dealt with in draft 
articles 4 and 9.  The term “national” in this ar ticle covers both natural and legal persons.  Later 
in the draft articles a distinction is drawn between the rules governing natural and legal persons, 
and, where necessary, the two concepts are treated separately. 
Article 2 
Right to exercise diplomatic protection 
A State has the right to exercise diplomatic protection in accordance with the 
present draft articles. 
28
See general commentary, para. (3). 
29
Reparation for InjuriesI.C.J. Reports 1949, p. 174. 
30
United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 500, p. 95. 
31
United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 596, p. 261. 
29 
Commentary 
(1) 
Draft article 2 is founded on the notion that diplomatic protection involves an 
invocation - at the State level - by a State of the responsibility of another State for an injury 
caused by an internationally wrongful act of that State to a national of the former State.  It 
recognizes that it is the State that initiates and exercises diplomatic protection; that it is the entity 
in which the right to bring a claim vests.  It is without prejudice to the question of whose rights 
the State seeks to assert in the process, that is its own right or the rights of the injured national on 
whose behalf it acts.  Like article 1
32
it is neutral on this subject. 
(2) 
A State has the right to exercise diplomatic protection on behalf of a national.  It is under 
no duty or obligation to do so.  The internal law of a State may oblige a State to extend 
diplomatic protection to a national, but international law imposes no such obligation.  The 
position was clearly stated by the International Court of Justice in the Barcelona Traction case: 
“… within the limits prescribed by international law, a State may exercise diplomatic 
protection by whatever means and to whatever extent it thinks fit, for it is its own right 
that the State is asserting.  Should the natural or legal person on whose behalf it is acting 
consider that their rights are not adequately protected, they have no remedy in 
international law.  All they can do is resort to municipal law, if means are available, with 
a view to furthering their cause or obtaining redress …  The State must be viewed as the 
sole judge to decide whether its protection will be granted, to what extent it is granted, 
and when it will cease.  It retains in this respect a discretionary power the exercise of 
which may be determined by considerations of a political or other nature, unrelated to the 
particular case”.
33
(3) 
Today there is support in domestic legislation
34
and judicial decisions
35
for the view that 
there is some obligation, however limited, either under national law or international law, on the 
32
See commentary to article 1, paras. (3) to (5). 
33
Case concerning the Barcelona Traction Light and Power Company Limited (Belgium v. Spain), Second Phase, 
Judgment, I.C.J. Reports 1970, p. 4 at p. 44. 
34
See the First Report of the Special Rapporteur on Diplomatic Protection, document A/CN.4/506, paras. 80-87. 
35
Rudolf Hess case, ILR vol. 90, p. 387; Abbasi v. Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth 
Affairs [2003] EWCA Civ. 1598; Kaunda v. President of the Republic of South Africa 2005 (4) South African Law 
Reports 235 (CC), ILM vol. 44 (2005), p. 173. 
30 
State to protect its nationals abroad when they have been subjected to serious violation of their 
human rights.  Consequently, draft article 19 declares that a State entitled to exercise diplomatic 
protection “should
… give due consideration to the possibility of exercising diplomatic 
protection, especially when a significant injury has occurred” (emphasis added).  The 
discretionary right of a State to exercise diplomatic protection should therefore be read with draft 
article 19 which recommends to States that they should exercise that right in appropriate cases. 
(4) 
Draft article 2 deals with the right of the State to exercise diplomatic protection.  It makes 
no attempt to describe the corresponding obligation on the respondent State to consider the 
assertion of diplomatic protection by a State in accordance with the present articles.  This is, 
however, to be implied. 
PART TWO 
NATIONALITY 
CHAPTER I 
GENERAL PRINCIPLES 
Article 3 
Protection by the State of nationality 
1. 
The State entitled to exercise diplomatic protection is the State of nationality. 
2. 
Notwithstanding paragraph 1, diplomatic protection may be exercised by a State 
in respect of a person that is not its national in accordance with draft article 8. 
Commentary 
(1) 
Whereas draft article 2 affirms the discretionary right of the State to exercise diplomatic 
protection, draft article 3 asserts the principle that it is the State of nationality of the injured 
person that is entitled, but not obliged, to exercise diplomatic protection on behalf of such a 
person.  The emphasis in this draft article is on the bond of nationality between State and 
national which entitles the State to exercise diplomatic protection.  This bond differs in the cases 
of natural persons and legal persons.  Consequently separate chapters are devoted to these 
different types of persons. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested