create pdf thumbnail image c# : Create a fillable pdf form in word application software tool html winforms azure online accessible_texts_a_guide_for_postsecondary_disability_service_providers0-part948

June 2011 
Accessible Texts: A Guide 
for Postsecondary Disability 
Service Providers 
HEATH Resource Center at the National Youth 
Transitions Center 
Author: Elizabeth Shook Torres 
Create a fillable pdf form in word - C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
Online C# Tutorial to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document
pdf save form data; cannot save pdf form
Create a fillable pdf form in word - VB.NET PDF Field Edit library: insert, delete, update pdf form field in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WPF
How to Insert, Delete and Update Fields in PDF Document with VB.NET Demo Code
pdf form save in reader; pdf form creation
Table of Contents 
Contents 
Table of Contents ................................................................................................................................. 1 
Introduction ............................................................................................................................................... 3 
Part I. The Legal Framework of Accessible Texts ........................................................................... 4 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973 ............................................................................................................. 4 
The Americans with Disabilities Act (and Amendments) ADAAA ........................................ 5 
Section 508 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 ....................................................... 7 
Higher Education Opportunity Act (2008) ................................................................................. 8 
Part II. An Overview of Available Formats........................................................................................ 9 
Common Formats Provided by Publishers or Authorized Entities ......................................... 9 
Microsoft Word ................................................................................................................................ 9 
Portable Document Format (PDF) ............................................................................................... 10 
Extensible Markup Language (XML) ........................................................................................... 11 
DAISY ............................................................................................................................................... 12 
Braille................................................................................................................................................. 13 
Part III. Assistive Technology for Accessible Texts ................................................................... 14 
Text-to-Speech Software ............................................................................................................ 14 
Kurzweil Educational Systems ..................................................................................................... 15 
Braille Embossers ........................................................................................................................... 15 
Screen Readers ............................................................................................................................... 16 
Accessible E-Books Readers ........................................................................................................ 17 
Part IV. Resources for Obtaining Electronic Texts ....................................................................... 18 
Request Electronic File Directly from Publisher..................................................................... 18 
Bookshare ......................................................................................................................................... 18 
LearningAlly (Formerly Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic (RFB&D)) .............................. 19 
Accesstext Network (ATN) ......................................................................................................... 19 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
to create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and Create and save editable PDF with a blank page Create fillable PDF document with fields.
change font pdf fillable form; add email button to pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF
Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create PDF document from OpenOffice Text Document with ODT, ODS, ODP forms into fillable PDF formats
pdf form creator; allow saving of pdf form
CourseSmart .................................................................................................................................... 20 
Scanning ............................................................................................................................................ 20 
Resources Appendix ............................................................................................................................... 21 
Professional Organizations and Listservs ..................................................................................... 21 
Accommodations/ Accessible Text Resources ............................................................................ 21 
Publications........................................................................................................................................... 22 
Training for Disability Support Providers .................................................................................... 23 
References ........................................................................................................................................... 24 
C# Create PDF from OpenOffice to convert odt, odp files to PDF in
Create PDF document from OpenOffice Presentation in both .NET WinForms and ASP to change ODT, ODS, ODP forms to fillable PDF formats in RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
create a pdf form online; add text field pdf
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
component to convert Microsoft Office Word, Excel and Create and save editable PDF with a blank Create fillable PDF document with fields in Visual Basic .NET
adding signature to pdf form; add editable fields to pdf
Introduction 
The purpose of this resource guide is to provide postsecondary disability 
support service providers with essential information and tools for supporting 
students who require printed texts in accessible formats.  As the number of 
students with disabilities entering postsecondary education institutions steadily 
increases, it is 
imperative
that disability support service providers have the 
knowledge to effectively support each student on their campus (NCES, 1999; 
NCES, 2006).   One important area of support that students with disabilities 
require is how to gain access to and utilize accessible texts (Gilson et al., 2007).  
Accessible texts are 
specialized 
formats of curricular texts and include such 
formats as Braille, audio, large print, and electronic text (AIM Center, n.d.). In 
fact, once a student who requires a text in an accessible format enrolls at a 
university, it is the 
university’s
responsibility to meet the student’s needs (AHEAD, 
2006).  This resource guide consists of a four sections that provide important 
information about accessible texts, including: 
Part I:  The legal landscape of accessible texts 
Part II:  An overview of common and available file formats for electronic 
texts 
Part III: Information about available assistive technologies for accessible 
texts 
Part IV: Outlets for obtaining electronic and accessible texts 
Resource Appendix:  Professional resources, publications, and tools for 
disability support providers 
This information was obtained through a collaborative effort with a variety of 
professionals in the postsecondary, legal, policy, and technological community.  It is 
intended to serve as a support for all providers of disability support services so 
that each student receives the support that he or she needs to fully access the 
postsecondary academic program.  
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
formatting. Create PDF files from both DOC and DOCX formats. Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents. Professional
change tab order in pdf form; create a pdf form to fill out
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF Convert both DOC and DOCX formats to PDF files. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from
adding form fields to pdf; pdf create fillable form
Part I: The Legal Framework of Accessible Texts 
This section provides an overview of the federal legal landscape that impacts 
and guides the use of accessible texts in higher education.  In essence, the right 
of students with disabilities to obtain and use accessible texts to access the 
curriculum is grounded in two pieces of civil rights law: the Americans with 
Disabilities Act and Amendments (ADAAA) and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 
(amended as Title IV of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998) (Brown & 
Brown, 2006).  These two pieces of federal legislation provide guidance to 
postsecondary education campuses for providing accommodations, including 
accessible texts, to qualified students with disabilities (AHEAD, 2006).  It is 
imperative that disability support service providers at postsecondary institutions 
fully
understand these two pieces of legislation so that they can provide 
appropriate supports to students with disabilities that allow them to access 
university programs and activities.  
Rehabilitation Act of 1973 
The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 was the first law that directly impacted 
students with disabilities enrolled in higher education institutions.   Specifically, 
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Title IV of the WIA) requires that 
public institutions
, meaning institutions that receive funding from the federal 
government, provide modifications, accommodations and auxiliary aids to students 
with a documented disability so that they are able to access the program content 
(Katsiyannis, Zahang, Landmark, & Reber, 2009; OCR FAQs, n.d.).   All applicable 
disability support personnel should be familiar with how the law governs the 
provision of accommodations, such as accessible texts. It is advisable for all 
disability support service personnel to inquire whether his or her institution 
accepts public funding.   
How Does Section 504 impact the work of higher education disability service 
providers?  
Section 504 mandates that enrolled students who self-disclose their 
disability to the university and who meet the law’s definition of disability are 
eligible to receive academic adjustments,  such as reasonable modifications, 
auxiliary aids and services (OCR FAQs, n.d.).    
The regulations of the  Office for Civil Rights (OCR) of the United States 
Department of Education give additional guidance on ´academic adjustmentsµ in 
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint.
adding images to pdf forms; allow users to save pdf form
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Form Process. Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in Visual
create a fillable pdf form in word; create a fillable pdf form from a word document
postsecondary education (34 C.F.R. Part 104, 104.44).  The regulations state that 
adjustments should: 
Ensure that a postsecondary institution’s academic requirements do 
not discriminate against a qualified individual with a disability 
Ensure that auxiliary aids that meet the student’s needs are available. 
Auxiliary aids directly involve accessible texts.  For instance, the 
regulations specify that ´readers for personal use or studyµ must be 
made available to qualified students who require them to access the 
curriculum.  (Subpart E of 34 CFR 104). 
Please note 
that accommodations are provided on a 
case by case basis 
(Katsiyannis et al., 2009).  If a student meets a particular disability requirement, 
then the student and the disability support personnel must work together to 
create an accommodations letter that fits the student’s needs. Within this letter, 
the use of accessible texts would be referenced as an appropriate accommodation. 
For a sample accommodations letter, please refer to the resources appendix.  
The Americans with Disabilities Act (and Amendments) ADAAA 
Following the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the ADA (1990), 
was the next piece of federal legislation that expanded the rights of students with 
disabilities in higher education institutions.  Although the ADA does not 
specifically reference the discrimination of students with disabilities in 
institutions of higher education, institutions that receive federal funding fall 
under the Act’s Title II provisions.  Title II explicitly mandates that all state or 
local ´public entitiesµ may not discriminate on the basis of disability against 
individuals with disabilities (ADA, II-1.2000).   Additionally, Title III of the Act 
expanded protection to students with disabilities enrolled in private institutions 
(Burke, Friedl, & Rigler, 2010).  The Act was amended in 2008 (as ADAAA) to widen 
the population of students with disabilities that it serves.
How does ADAAA impact the work of higher education disability service 
providers?  
ADAAA mandates that public entities must make appropriate academic 
adjustments and provide auxiliary aids to ensure that students with disabilities 
have equal access to the academic curriculum (Katsyiyannis et al., 2009; 
Leuchovius, 2010).  Specifically, the law states that public entities ´shall furnish 
appropriate auxiliary aids and services where necessary to afford an individual with 
a disability an equal opportunity to participate in, and enjoy the benefits of, a 
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
C#.NET PDF SDK- Create PDF from Word in Visual Evaluation library and components for PDF creation from Create fillable and editable PDF documents from Excel in
create pdf form; add fillable fields to pdf
service, program, or activityµ (OCR, 1998).   Similar to Section 504, ADAAA 
requires that postsecondary institutions ensure that students with disabilities 
have full access to academic programs and the curriculum (Burke, et al., 2010).  
Therefore, based on the needs of the individual student, accessible or alternative 
texts may be an appropriate accommodation because they allow the individual to 
access the course content and curriculum (AHEAD, 2006).   
There are a few reasons for why postsecondary institutions may not be 
required to provide an auxiliary aid, accommodation, or modification.  Reasons 
include, but are not limited to: 
If they create ´undueµ financial hardship for the university, 
Require a fundamental alteration to the program, violate 
accreditation requirements, or 
Require the waiver of essential program or licensing requirements 
within an academic course of study (Burke, et al., 2010; General 
Counsel, 2010; OCR, 1998).
For example, if a student cannot participate in an in-person lab that is required for 
a medical degree and the lab cannot be completed in any other manner, an 
appropriate auxiliary aid or accommodation may not be available.  However, these 
instances are very rare and a university’s disability support provider should have 
ample documentation specifying why a particular accommodation is not reasonable.  
Privately funded universities are covered under Title III of ADA/ADAAA 
and may not discriminate against students with disabilities.  However, these 
institutions are held to a much lower burden of proof and not expected to incur the 
same cost level as public entities (Leuchovius, 2010) 
Section 504 and the ADAAA both utilize the ADAAA’s definition of disability.  
As interpreted by the regulations of the Act prepared by OCR, individuals with 
disabilities are individuals who: 
(a)
Has a physical or mental impairment that limits major life activities: ´
any 
physiological disorder or any mentalµ or ´psychological disorder, such as 
mental retardation, organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, and 
specific learning disabilities.µ  Major life activities include, but are not 
limited to: caring for one’s self, performing manual tasks, walking seeing, 
hearing, speaking, breathing, learning, and working.  
(b)
Has a record of such impairment: 
´Has a history ofµ or has been classified as 
´having a mental or physical impairment that substantially limits one or more 
life activitiesµ
(c)
Is regarded as having such an impairment: 
A person who has a physical or 
mental impairment that does not substantially limit major life activities but 
that is treated by a recipient as constituting such a limitation; has a physical 
or mental impairment that substantially limits major life activities only as a 
result of the attitudes of others toward such impairment; or has none of the 
impairments but is treated by a recipient as having such an impairment.
(d)
Due to the passage of ADAAA, a disability service provider 
can no longer 
take into account mitigating measures, such as medications that treat the 
disability, when deciding whether an individual is a qualified person with a 
disability. ( ADAAA Regulations, 2011; Burke, et al., 2010
)  
Please note that the information above applies to the federal law. Several states 
have passed specific pieces of legislation that directly impact how higher education 
accommodations and accessible texts are administered at the postsecondary level 
by making the requirements more strict. Please check with your state’s public legal 
record or state legislative body as to whether your state has passed laws that 
impact your practices. 
Section 508 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 
Disability support providers should also be knowledgeable about Section 508 
of the WIA (1998).  The WIA amended the Rehabilitation Act in 1998 and several 
updates were added to the law.  One of the most important changes was the 
inclusion of Section 508.  Section 508 requires 
all Federal
government 
informational technology services to be accessible to people with disabilities 
(Brown & Brown, 2006; McKenzie, 2001).  Information technology includes such 
services as websites, computer hardware and software,   and multimedia products 
(McKenzie, 2001).   As such, Section 508 is a mandate that applies to the Federal 
government, not the private sector or the education sector (Brown & Brown, 2006).  
However, many state governments and institutions of higher education have 
adopted Section 508 standards as a best practice (AccessIT, 2010a).  Disability 
service providers should therefore inquire as to whether their university has 
adopted 508 standards and encourage university administrations to implement the 
standards.  
For more information about 508 standards, please visit the Section 508 Homepage
Please visit 
http://www.ittatc.org/laws/state.php for state accessibility information. 
Higher Education Opportunity Act (2008) 
The Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) of 2008 provides guidance to 
postsecondary institutions for making textbooks available to students. Disability 
support providers should be aware of these guidelines as a best practice.  Adhering 
to the guidelines could increase the opportunity of students with disabilities to 
receive textbooks and accessible files in a timely manner because following this 
guidance would ensure that course reading material would be readily available by 
the time a student registers.  Section 133 of the Act outlines the specific 
guidelines for postsecondary institutions receiving federal funding:  
´(1) disclose, on the institution's Internet course schedule and in a manner of the 
institution's choosing, the International Standard Book Number and retail price 
information of required and recommended college textbooks and supplemental 
materials for each course listed in the institution's course schedule used for pre-
registration and registration purposes, except that—   
(A) if the International Standard Book Number is not available for such college 
textbook or supplemental material, then the institution shall include in the 
Internet course schedule the author, title, publisher, and copyright date for such 
college textbook or supplemental material; and   
(B) if the institution determines that the disclosure of the information described 
in this sub-section is not practicable for a college textbook or supplemental 
material, then the institution shall so indicate by placing the designation 'To Be 
Determined' in lieu of the information required under this sub-section; and   
(2) if applicable, include on the institution's written course schedule a notice that 
textbook information is available on the institution's Internet course schedule, and 
the Internet address for such schedule.µ 
The HEOA (2008) also mandated the formation of the Advisory Commission on 
Accessible Instructional Materials in Postsecondary Education.  The Commission is 
charged with making recommendations to Congress for increasing the availability of 
accessible instructional materials for students with disabilities in postsecondary 
education.  
Part II. An Overview of Available Formats 
What’s out there?  What is the ´correctµ file format?   
This section provides an overview of common formats available to meet the 
needs of students who require accessible texts and course materials.  Please note 
that the ´bestµ file format is what best meets the need of the student. A student 
might not be aware of all of the available file formats and could be comfortable 
using a format that does not best meet his or her needs.  Therefore, it is 
important for disability service providers to be familiar with the available common 
file formats.  With any postsecondary accommodation, the student’s needs should 
come first and be respected during the development of the accommodations plan 
(Stodden, Conway, & Chang, 2003).   
Common Formats Provided by Publishers or Authorized Entities 
Microsoft Word 
Microsoft Word (files that end in .DOC or.DOCX) is a universally popular word 
processing software.  On postsecondary campuses and beyond, many course 
materials and other documents are distributed in the Microsoft Word format 
(AccessIT, 2011a).  Although Microsoft Word is a ´reasonablyµ accessible format, 
it must be noted that Microsoft Word documents are not 
automatically 
accessible 
(AccessIT, 2011a; WebAIM, 2011a).  The disability support service provider 
must 
take measures to ensure that if he or she is providing a student with a file in 
Microsoft Word, that it contains accessible features.  Such accessible features 
include:  
1)
Structured headings-  
Adding explicit headings into the document that serve 
to structure the document
2)
Adding text to images- 
A text description should be added to embedded 
charts and images
3)
Alter hyperlinks to a text description-  
This will allow the reader to identify 
the content of the website 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested