The NOOK Press 
Print Platform Formatting Guide
Pdf password online - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
pdf file password; a pdf password
Pdf password online - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
password protected pdf; pdf protected mode
barnesandnoble.com llc, 76 Ninth Avenue, New York, NY 10011 USA. 
© 2014 barnesandnoble.com llc. All rights reserved. Barnes & Noble®, NOOK®, NOOK Book®, NOOK Press®, PubIt!®, 
and the NOOK logos are trademarks of barnesandnoble.com llc or its affiliates. Patent Pending. Content shown may 
vary from actual available content, which may change without notice. All trademarks or registered trademarks that are 
not the property of barnesandnoble.com llc or its affiliates are the property of their respective owners. 
  
The NOOK Press Print Platform Formatting Guide 
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
Online Remove Password from Protected PDF file. Download Free Trial. Remove password from protected PDF file. Find your password-protected PDF and upload it.
acrobat password protect pdf; create copy protected pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF
copy text from protected pdf; advanced pdf password remover
Getting Started 
4
Book File Requirements 
5
What is a Print-Ready PDF? 
5
Pre-Press Manuscript 
6
Proofread and Spell-Check 
6
Spacing and Text Placement 
6
 Using Hard Returns 
6
 Keeping Text Reflowable 
6
 Using the Space Bar 
6
Book Layout and Elements 
6
 Book Pages and Page Spreads 
6
 The Book Block 
7
Front Matter 
7
 Title Page 
7
 Copyright Page 
7
 Dedication 
7
 Table of Contents 
7
 Epigraph 
 Preface 
7
 Foreword 
7
The Core Matter 
8
 Chapter Breaks 
8
Back Matter 
9
 Epilogue 
9
 Afterword 
9
 Endnotes 
9
 Bibliography 
9
 Glossary 
9
 Index 
9
 Author Biography 
9
Layout and Design 
10
Format 
10
 Hardcover 
10
  Hardcover with Dust Jacket 
10
  Hardcover with Printed Case 
10
 Paperback 
10
Paper  
10
Page Count and Trim Size 
10
 Page Count 
10
 Page Count and Trim Size Chart 
11
 Formatting for Trim Size 
12
Margin Size 
13
 Gutter 
14
Images 
14
 A Checklist for Images 
14
Typeface/Fonts 
14
 Typefaces 
15
 Font Size 
15
 Line Spacing 
15
Pagination 
15
Other Layout Elements to Consider 
16
 Running Heads/Running Feet 
16
 Widows and Orphans 
17
 Full Justification/Rag Right 
17
 Crop Marks 
17
Generating a Print-Ready PDF 
18
Removing Encryption 
18
Embedding Fonts 
18
Saving a File as a PDF 
20 
Setting PDF Dimensions 
20
File → Save As 
21
Pre-Publication Checklist 
22
Creating a Cover 
23
A Print-Ready PDF Cover 
23
Front and Back Cover Files 
23
The Spine 
23 
Assembling a Print-Ready Cover 
23
Templates 
23 
How to Use the NOOK Press Print Platform 
 Cover Templates 
23 
Cover File Properties 
24
File Preparation Quick Guides 
26
Paperback Cover 
26 
Hardcover with Dust Jacket 
26 
Hardcover with Printed Case 
27 
Appendix A. Instructions for Authors Using 
Pages for Mac or Pages for iOS 
28
Setting Page Sizes 
28
Creating Page Breaks 
28
Setting Up Running Headers and Footers  28
Embedding Fonts 
28
Saving a File as a PDF 
28
TABLE OF CONTENTS
3    
The NOOK Press Print Platform Formatting Guide 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF
pdf document password; annotate protected pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
document protection. Users are able to set a password to PDF online directly in ASPX webpage. C#.NET: Edit PDF Permission in ASP.NET.
pdf password remover; change password on pdf document
GETTING STARTED
NOOK Press is pleased to offer the NOOK Press print platform for anyone who wants to make a professional-quality 
print book of his or her work.  From the professional author to the first-time writer, from small publishers to the 
craftsperson, the NOOK Press print platform is quick, easy to use and will deliver professional quality print books in 
about a week.
To get the most out of the NOOK Press print platform technology, your interior text and cover need to be  
formatted as print-ready files. This guide offers formatting instructions and recommendations that will help you make 
your work print-ready, so your printed book turns out just the way you want it to. This guide presents instructions for 
formatting your book in Microsoft Word. For instructions using Pages for Mac or Pages for iOS, see the appendix at 
the end of the guide.
We also offer Author Services packages for purchase. These packages are designed to guide you through the  
publishing process and help ensure your manuscript turns into a beautiful, quality-printed book. 
Visit print.nookpress.com/print-on-demand to learn more.
  
The NOOK Press Print Platform Formatting Guide
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to create PDF document from other file
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF
pdf owner password; add password to pdf without acrobat
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF
copy protecting pdf files; pdf open password
To print a book with NOOK Press, you will need to have print-ready files for both the book interior and the  
cover. A NOOK Press print-ready file is a PDF (Portable Document Format) file with certain formatting rules  
applied during creation. 
This formatting guide will provide tips on how to make sure your book and cover files are ready for our printers.
What is a Print-Ready PDF?
Whether you’re a major book publisher or an independent author, the printing process starts the same way—with  
a print-ready PDF.
Please note that just because a file has a .PDF extension that does not mean it is necessarily “print-ready.”  
Most authors write their books in a word processing software program, such as Microsoft Word, WordPerfect,  
Mac Pages, or Google Docs. These programs are perfect for the writing process, but not ideal for printing because 
what is shown on screen may not translate faithfully to the printer. Spacing and page breaks may differ, for example.  
A document that looks tidy online might appear awkward when printed.
The good news is that a PDF file will translate exactly what’s on screen to the printer. No matter the computer or  
machine, a PDF will print the same way because it’s in a “locked format.” Having a locked-formatted document is 
great for knowing exactly how your book will look when it’s printed. 
A print-ready PDF does have limitations, though. There are a few rules to make sure the PDF version of your  
manuscript results in a good-looking book. We’ll walk you through the steps for converting from a word document to 
a PDF, and help you avoid the pitfalls of these limitations.
For the more adventurous, there are design layout programs like InDesign from Adobe that provide more advanced 
features and finer controls for page design. It is also possible to create PDFs from these programs. For more  
information about converting InDesign files into PDFs, please visit http://helpx.adobe.com/indesign.html.
BOOK FILE REQUIREMENTS
The NOOK Press Print Platform Formatting Guide
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF
convert password protected pdf to excel; create password protected pdf from word
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Explanation about transparency. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. This
pdf password recovery; pdf protection remover
Preparing your text document is an important step in 
getting your manuscript ready for print. To help you 
create a print-ready PDF, we’ll cover some basic book 
structure and design elements that you need to address 
in your word processing file before you create your 
print-ready PDF. 
Proofread and Spell-Check 
Read over your manuscript from start to finish, keeping 
an eye out for grammatical or other errors that might 
have crept in while writing. Use your word processor’s 
spell-check feature to check for typographical errors or 
misspellings. It’s often helpful to have a trusted friend or 
colleague read your work with a fresh eye.
Spacing and Text Placement
In general, it’s best to use paragraph styles to control the 
spacing before and after paragraphs and the insertion of 
page breaks in a text.
Using Hard Returns
Use “hard returns” or the Enter key for paragraph breaks 
only. DO NOT use a series of hard returns to indicate a 
new page. Using hard returns to indicate a page break 
will result in a messy book page when printing. Instead, 
use the page break or section break option in your  
word processor for this type of break. 
Keeping Text Reflowlable
Most word processors, including Word, are reflowable, 
meaning they automatically flow words from line to 
line, making adjustments automatically when the user 
changes the window size. For the NOOK Press print 
platform, be sure to keep text reflowable; in most word 
processors, this is automatic. Plus, if your document’s 
paragraph styles are set to full justified (flowing the text 
of complete lines from the left margin to the right, as this 
paragraph does), hyphenation will be automatic.  
This will allow you to freely enter and edit text without 
manually breaking a word at the end of a line of text. 
Using the Space Bar
As a general rule, do not use the space bar to indent 
paragraphs or adjust the indentation or placement of 
other text elements. Use paragraph styles to automatically  
indent paragraphs, or use the Tab key. Do not use 
multiple spaces to indent paragraphs because it will not 
translate properly to a printed page. Also, if you want to 
center text, use the text-centering tool. Do not use the 
space bar to move lines visually across the page. These 
improperly used spaces will cause inconsistencies in 
layout when going through your final formatting process.
Book Layout and Elements
As you prepare your book, it’s helpful to keep in mind 
the following conventions used in book publishing.
Book Pages and Page Spreads
We count two book pages (e.g., page 1 and page 2) on 
a single sheet of paper. When we talk about a page in a 
book, we mean only one side of the paper. Each sheet of 
paper holds two pages: the front and the back. If there are 
200 pages in a book, there are only 100 sheets of paper.
A spread is a book layout with two facing pages.
Odd-number pages appear on the right side of a spread. 
Even number pages appear on the left. Page 1 always 
begins on the right side, and establishes the pattern of 
odd/even used for the rest of the book.
PRE-PRESS MANUSCRIPT 
  
The NOOK Press Print Platform Formatting Guide
Page 1
Page 2
Page 4
Page 6
Page 8
Page 3
Page 5
Page 7
Page 9
The Book Block
In publishing, the collection of all the pages between the 
covers is known as the “book block.” Within the book 
block itself, there are usually three sets of pages:
•  The Front Matter
The front matter includes the title page, the copyright 
page, a table of contents, and perhaps other elements, 
such as a foreword, a preface, and an epigraph. 
•  The Core Matter
The core matter consists of the main content of a 
book:  the narrative in a novel, the poems in a poetry 
collection, the essays in an essay collection, and so on.
•  The Back Matter
The back matter consists of all the content that fol-
lows the core matter. This could include an epilogue, 
an afterword, acknowledgements, a short profile of 
the author, and an index.
Front Matter
Front matter is the material in the front of the book, be-
fore the book narrative begins. Front matter is up to your 
personal preference, though it’s good to at least have a 
title page before the first narrative page. Except for the 
Table of Contents, these elements are typically one page 
each. In typical order of appearance:
Each of these elements is described below.
Title Page
The title page appears on the right and presents the full 
title of the book and the author’s name. 
Copyright Page
A copyright notice usually appears on back of the title page. 
Here’s a typical copyright notice:  Copyright © Sarah 
Doe. All rights reserved.
Under U.S. copyright law, your self-published work is 
protected as soon as you put pen to paper. Copyright is 
based on your creative authorship and is not dependent 
on any formal agreement with a book publisher or self-
publishing company, although registration with the U.S. 
Copyright Office is beneficial. 
Copyright Registration allows you a higher level of security 
and confidence when it comes to protecting your work. 
When you register your work with the U.S. Copyright  
office, you create a public record of your authorship.  
Even though you are protected the moment you start 
writing, you’ll have to register your work with the Copyright 
Office to be officially recognized as the copyright holder 
in a court of law. The use of the copyright notice is the 
responsibility of the copyright owner.  For more information 
see http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf
You do not need an ISBN to print your book using the 
NOOK Press print platform. However, if your book does 
have an ISBN, you should list it.
Dedication
If an author wants to dedicate the book to a person or 
group of people, that dedication usually appears on its 
own odd-numbered page. The dedication itself is often 
centered and set in italic like so:
To Mary, as always
Table of Contents
The table of contents follows next. Microsoft Word and 
other word processors include tools for automatically 
generating a table of contents to ensure it accurately 
reflects your latest changes to the document.
Epigraph
An epigraph is a quotation or group of quotations that 
the author feels set the tone for the book that follows. 
Like dedications, epigraphs might be centered on the 
page and set in italics. Quotations should always be attributed.
Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement.
—Helen Keller
Preface
A preface is an introduction written by the author of the book.
Foreword
A forward is an introduction usually written by someone 
other than the author of the book. In non-fiction, the 
foreword might be written by another expert in the same 
field as the author.
•  Title page 
•  Copyright page
•  Dedication page
•  Table of contents
•  Epigraph 
•  Preface
•  Foreword
PRE-PRESS MANUSCRIPT 
  
The NOOK Press Print Platform Formatting Guide
PRE-PRESS MANUSCRIPT 
  
The NOOK Press Print Platform Formatting Guide
The Core Matter
Chapter Breaks
Many books contain chapter breaks, but it’s not a  
requirement. If your manuscript does have chapter 
breaks, think about how they visually appear on the page. 
Usually chapter titles appear about a third of the way 
down the page. In your word processor, you might want 
to use a consistent Chapter Title paragraph style that 
specifies a set number of inches or points to make the  
title appear at a specific place on the page. Use paragraph 
styles rather than a series of hard returns to position titles 
and create blank space on a page.
The picture below shows how chapter breaks and  
chapter titles are typically formatted.
Setting Up Chapter Breaks and Chapter Titles 
using Microsoft Word
•  Starting on a New Page, click the Page Layout tab and 
then click Breaks. Click the type of section break that 
you want to use. You can also choose to have your 
chapters start on a new right page by choosing  
Section Break: Odd Page. 
•  Chapter “Sink” – The chapter text starts down in the 
middle or lower third of the page. This is usually done if 
the chapter starts on a right hand (or odd) page. A good 
way to create a Chapter Sink is to define a Chapter Title 
paragraph style that specifies the amount of spacing you 
want to appear before the title and use that consistently 
throughout your book. Use this approach rather than 
pressing return multiple times to create the sink.
PRE-PRESS MANUSCRIPT 
  
The NOOK Press Print Platform Formatting Guide
Back Matter
Back matter is the material in the back of the book, after 
the last page of the narrative text. Like front matter, not 
all books have or require back matter.
In typical order of appearance, back matter can include 
the following:
•  Epilogue 
•  Afterword 
•  Endnotes 
•  Bibliography
•  Glossary
•  Index
•  Author biography
Epilogue
An epilogue is a brief continuation of the main narrative 
or content of the book.
Afterword
An afterword is commentary on the book, usually 
written by someone other than the book’s author. An 
afterword might describe the historical context in which 
the book was written or provide some other kind of 
useful background material.
Endnotes
If the book included numbered reference notes that 
were not formatted as footnotes, they can appear in an 
endnotes section at the back of the book.
Bibliography
In non-fiction books, the bibliography lists all the sources 
that the author or authors consulted for their work.
Glossary
A glossary defines special or unusual terms in a book.
Index
An index is an alphabetical list of important topics from 
the book, along with citations of all the pages on which 
those topics appear.
Author Biography
A brief “About the Author” section might offer a brief 
biography of the author.
This section provides tips for laying out a Microsoft Word 
document to make an aesthetically pleasing and profes-
sional looking book.
Planning the way a manuscript appears on the fixed 
book page is called “formatting,” or layout and design. 
Well-thought-out design elements make your book  
aesthetically pleasing and easier for the reader to follow.  
For a quality, finished product, pay close attention to 
the consistency of your design. If you have a chapter 
heading style, use that style for each chapter header 
throughout the book. If you start your chapter halfway 
down the page, start all the chapters halfway down the 
page. Once you have finished designing the look of your 
book, make sure you go back and review the whole book 
for consistency in your design elements.
Format
You can choose whether you want a hardcover or 
paperback book. Each format has its own specifications 
to consider. Whichever format you choose you will 
need to provide a print-ready PDF of the front and back 
cover file.  Your cover files will likely have an image, title, 
author name, and any other text elements you choose to 
include. For more detailed instructions on how to format 
your cover files see page 23. 
Hardcover
If you choose a hardcover format, you can select to print 
with a Dust Jacket or with a Printed Case. 
•  Dust Jacket: the dust jacket wraps around the case. Your 
cover file will be printed onto the removable dust jacket of 
your book.
•   Printed Case: the hard part of a hardcover book is called a 
“case.” Printed Case means your cover file will be printed di-
rectly onto the paper used to wrap the case of your book. 
Paperback
•   The NOOK Press print platform uses a standard pa-
perback form with a glued spine binding. This type of 
binding is sometimes called perfect binding, creating 
a perfect-bound book.
Paper
For black and white printing, we offer 50# white 
paper stock or 60# cream paper stock. We also 
offer premium color 70# white paper stock.
Page Count and Trim Size
It’s important to consider the physical dimensions 
of your book when formatting your document. The 
height and width of a book is called its “trim size.”  
Page count and trim size are closely related because 
the physical dimensions of the trim size affect the 
page size and therefore how many words will fit 
on a page (i.e., the smaller the page, the longer the 
page count). 
Page Count
The machines we use to print books have minimum and 
maximum page counts: 
•  Minimum Page Count: 40 pages
•  Maximum Page Count: 800 pages
NOTE: The page count includes all the pages of your interior 
text, regardless of which page actually is marked page 1.  
LAYOUT AND DESIGN
10 
The NOOK Press Print Platform Formatting Guide
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested