c# pdf to image convert : Convert password protected pdf to normal pdf online Library application class asp.net html windows ajax GBV_Handbook_Long_Version3-part1685

22
The international legal framework
IS 1.4
Section One: GBV BASICS and how they relate to GBV COORDINATION
Section One:
GBV BASICS
and how they relate to GBV COORDINATION
4. The international legal framework
What is an international legal framework?
An international legal framework is comprised in general of the following three elements
1
:
Why is it important for humanitarian actors to be 
familiar with the international legal framework 
that applies to GBV?
The United Nations is founded on the principles of peace, 
justice, freedom and human rights.  It is the responsibility 
of  all  humanitarian  actors  to  strive  to  implement  these 
principles in their work, in order to protect and promote the 
safety and well-being of those affected by an emergency.  In 
1997, the UN Secretary- General formalized this commitment 
by calling on the entire UN system to mainstream human 
rights into the UN’s various activities and programmes.  
The Sphere Standards—to which hundreds of humanitarian 
actors, international agencies, NGOs and donor institutions 
are committed—also articulate a commitment to these basic 
principles through the Humanitarian Charter, which reasserts 
the right of populations affected by disaster (humanitarian 
emergencies  and  natural  disasters)  to  protection  and 
assistance in a manner that supports their life with dignity.  
In 2006, the IASC issued new guidelines on humanitarian assistance in natural disasters: Protecting 
Persons Affected by Natural Disasters: IASC Operational Guidelines on Human Rights and Natural 
Disasters.  These guidelines focus on human rights challenges that are often neglected during 
natural disasters and serve as a reminder that “human rights are the legal underpinning of all 
All international actors responding 
to an emergency  have  a  duty  to 
protect those affected by the crisis.  
According  to  the  IASC  Gender 
Handbook  (p.12),  protection  is 
widely  defined  as  all  activities 
aimed  at  obtaining  full  respect 
for  the  rights  of  the  individual 
in accordance with the letter and 
spirit of relevant bodies of law.  
Protection activities aim to create 
an  environment in which  human 
dignity  is  respected,  specific 
patterns of abuse are prevented or 
their immediate effects alleviated, 
and  dignified  conditions  of  life 
are  restored  through  reparation, 
restitution and rehabilitation.  The 
international  legal  framework 
forms the basis of this protection 
work.
Critical to know
‘Hard Law’
‘Soft Law’
Special UN 
Procedures
These are ‘legally binding’ for states. 
•  International human rights conventions
•  International humanitarian law
•  UN resolutions
These are non-binding, but carry significant moral commitment and 
responsibility in the international community.
•  International guidelines
•  International conference documents, declarations, programmes of action
These help to facilitate the implementation of laws, conventions, 
declarations, etc.
•  UN monitoring committees, special envoys, special rapporteurs, other 
experts
1
Adapted from Bossman, M., PowerPoint presentation for training on Coordination of Multi-Sectoral Response to 
Gender-based Violence in Humanitarian Settings (Ghent, Belgium, 2008).
Convert password protected pdf to normal pdf online - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
pdf password reset; pdf password protect
Convert password protected pdf to normal pdf online - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
copy text from protected pdf; convert protected pdf to word document
23
The international legal framework
IS 1.4
Section One: GBV BASICS and how they relate to GBV COORDINATION
humanitarian work pertaining to natural disasters” (p. 9).  In fact, they serve as a reminder that 
human rights are the basis of ensuring protection and therefore underpin all humanitarian work.
Understanding and expressing the human rights aspects of humanitarian intervention is crucial 
when combating GBV.  Addressing GBV requires efforts to ensure that the discriminatory policies 
and practices that are its foundation are eradicated.  All those working on GBV prevention and 
response therefore have a responsibility to familiarize themselves with the international, regional 
and national laws and standards that relate to GBV in order to act in accordance with them and 
guide others—states, communities and individuals—to meet their obligations to promote and 
protect human rights. 
The IASC GBV Guidelines are very explicit about this responsibility as it relates to GBV partners’ 
roles in promoting protection for those at risk of GBV:  “An important component of both 
prevention of further violence and redress for sexual violence crimes is ensuring implementation 
of and compliance with laws that promote the rights of communities to be free of sexual violence” 
(p.  36).  According to the  IASC GBV  Guidelines, protection responsibilities related to GBV 
include advocating for the rights of victims of sexual violence and pressuring states to conform 
to international standards that promote protection against sexual violence.  All partners in GBV 
coordination should therefore know the international legal framework that relates specifically to 
GBV. (See Annex 2 for a list of major milestones related to GBV in the international legal framework.)  
GBV partners should also be aware of the regional and national laws, policies, declarations and 
programmes of action relevant to their setting.
Resources
Coordination of Multi-Sectoral Response to Gender-Based Violence in Humanitarian Settings: Facilitator 
Manual (UNFPA and Ghent University, 2010). To be posted to the GBV AoR website Spring 
2010.  Contact Erin Kenny for more information about the manual: ekenny@unfpa.org
The International Human Rights of Women-An Overview of the Most Important International Conventions 
and the Instruments for their Implementation (GTZ, 2003). 
http://www.gtz.de/de/dokumente/en-international-womens-rights.pdf 
Annex
A2:  International Legal Framework
In September 2009, Security Council Resolution (SCR) 1888 was unanimously adopted by member 
states.  It is one of the most important SCRs for GBV partners to know and understand because it is much 
more action-oriented than previous SCRs related to sexual violence. SCR 1888 builds on two earlier 
resolutions: SCR 1325, adopted in October 2000, which provides a political framework that makes women 
and a gender perspective relevant to all aspects of peace processes; and SCR 1820, adopted in June 2008, 
which recognizes the links between sexual violence in armed conflict and its aftermath, and sustainable 
peace and security. SCR 1820 commits the Security Council to considering appropriate steps to end sexual 
violence and to punish perpetrators and requests a report from the UN Secretary-General on situations 
in which sexual violence is being widely or systematically employed against civilians and on strategies 
for ending the practice. Through SCR 1888, a Special Representative to the UN Secretary-General will be 
responsible for coordinating a range of mechanisms and overseeing implementation of both SCR 1325 
and SCR 1888.  Other provisions of the text of SCR 1888 include identifying women’s protection advisers 
among gender advisers and human rights protection units; strengthening of monitoring and reporting 
on sexual violence; retraining of peacekeepers, national forces and police; and boosting the participation 
of women in peace-building and other post-conflict processes.  For more information about SCR 1888 
visit: http://www.iwtc.org/1820blog/?p=311# 
Critical to know
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Create Online TIFF Document Viewer
create more web viewers on PDF and Word Arial", TextSize: 12, TextStyle :"normal"}); FreehandAnnoStyle = new mode; public string fid; protected void Page_Load
convert password protected pdf to word online; convert password protected pdf to normal pdf
C# Word: How to Create Word Online Viewer in C# Application
creating, you can go to PDF Web Viewer Arial", TextSize: 12, TextStyle :"normal"}); FreehandAnnoStyle = new mode; public string fid; protected void Page_Load
pdf protected mode; copy protected pdf to word converter online
24
Protection from sexual exploitation and abuse
IS 1.5
Section One: GBV BASICS and how they relate to GBV COORDINATION
Section One:
GBV BASICS
and how they relate to GBV COORDINATION
5. Protection from sexual exploitation and abuse
What is protection from sexual exploitation 
and abuse (PSEA)?
As  highlighted  in  the  Secretary-General’s  Bulletin  on 
Special  measures  for  protection  from  sexual  exploitation 
and  sexual  abuse  (ST/SGB/2003/13)  (the  SGB),  PSEA 
relates specifically to the responsibilities of international 
humanitarian  actors  to  prevent  incidents  of  sexual 
exploitation and  abuse  committed  by UN, NGO and 
inter-governmental (IGO) personnel against colleagues 
and  beneficiaries of  assistance  and  to  take  action  as 
quickly as possible when incidents do occur.  The SGB 
provides  clear  definitions  of  sexual  exploitation  and 
sexual abuse and outlines six key standards of behaviour 
related to PSEA:
These six standards apply to all UN staff—whether recruited internationally or locally—including 
staff from agencies, funds and programmes as well as all partners, such as NGOs, consultants, 
contractors, day labourers, interns, junior professional officers (JPOs), UN volunteers (UNVs), etc.   
The terms of the SGB also apply to international military personnel and civilian police. The scope 
of the SGB is therefore very broad and establishes a common standard for everyone working 
in some way with the UN.  Many other humanitarian organizations also require staff to adhere 
to virtually the same standards as those contained in the SGB according to their own codes of 
conduct, as well as through their endorsement of the Statement of Commitment on Eliminating Sexual 
Exploitation and Abuse by UN and Non-UN Personnel.
The  ECHA/ECPS  UN  and  NGO 
Task Force on Protection from Sexual 
Exploitation and Abuse is the forum 
responsible  for  promoting  global 
policy  and  guidance  on  PSEA  for 
humanitarian  actors.  To  this  end, 
the task force has developed a series 
of  training  tools  on  PSEA  for  focal 
points, senior managers and general 
staff.  These and other resources are 
available on the PSEA tools repository 
website: www.un.org/pseataskforce
Good to know
1.  Sexual exploitation and sexual abuse constitute acts of serious misconduct and are therefore grounds 
for disciplinary measures, including summary dismissal.
2. Sexual activity with children (persons under the age of 18) is prohibited regardless of the age of 
majority or age of consent locally. Mistaken belief in the age of a child is not a defence. 
3. Exchange of money, employment, goods or services for sex, including sexual favours or other forms 
of humiliating, degrading or exploitative behaviour, is prohibited. This includes any exchange of 
assistance that is due to beneficiaries. 
4. Sexual relationships between staff and beneficiaries of assistance, since they are based on inherently 
unequal power dynamics, undermine the credibility and integrity of the work of the United Nations 
and are strongly discouraged.
5. Where a United Nations staff member develops concerns or suspicions regarding sexual exploitation 
or sexual abuse by a fellow worker, whether in the same agency or not and whether or not within the 
United Nations system, he or she must report such concerns via established reporting mechanisms. 
6. United Nations staff  are  obliged  to  create  and maintain an environment that prevents sexual 
exploitation and sexual abuse. Managers at all levels have a particular responsibility to support and 
develop systems that maintain this environment. 
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user TextSize: 12, TextStyle :"normal"}); FreehandAnnoStyle = new public string fid; protected void Page_Load
protected pdf; pdf security password
C# DICOM - How to Create Web Viewer
Allow C#.NET users to save or print (convert) web DICOM file to TIFF or PDF file. public string mode; public string fid; protected void Page_Load(object
create password protected pdf online; annotate protected pdf
25
Protection from sexual exploitation and abuse
IS 1.5
Section One: GBV BASICS and how they relate to GBV COORDINATION
How does PSEA relate to GBV coordination?
Unfortunately, there are many humanitarian settings in which there are no PSEA focal points 
or PSEA in-country networks.  In these settings, it sometimes falls to the GBV coordination 
mechanism to undertake PSEA activities.  While the GBV coordination mechanism may opt to 
fill a gap in addressing PSEA in the short-term, e.g., by conducting awareness-raising amongst 
humanitarian staff and people of concern about the SGB, PSEA responsibilities SHOULD NOT 
be a regular and/or long-term function of the GBV coordination group.  As per the box above, 
identifying PSEA focal points and creating an in-country PSEA network is the responsibility of 
senior managers and, ultimately, the HC/RC. 
However,  PSEA is  one  important  form  of  preventing  GBV  and is  therefore linked  to GBV 
coordination efforts.  There should be common understanding 
of the different responsibilities of the PSEA in-country network 
and  the  GBV  coordination  mechanism  and  willingness  to 
work cooperatively.  It is important that the GBV Coordinator 
knows  and promotes the key principles and  standards of 
conduct outlined in the SGB to all coordination partners.  GBV 
Coordinators must be apprised of local reporting procedures 
and processes related to addressing SEA allegations, and this 
information should be included in any Standard Operating 
Procedures (SOPs). (See IS 3.6 on development of SOPs.) 
Perhaps most importantly, the GBV coordination mechanism 
must work with the PSEA in-country network to ensure that 
survivors of SEA have access to services.   The PSEA network has a responsibility to ensure that 
a ‘victim assistance mechanism’ is in place for those who have experienced SEA; this mechanism 
should build upon existing GBV services in the setting rather than create parallel SEA-specific 
services.
The GBV Coordinator should also be sensitive to some of the challenges GBV service providers 
may face if they are assigned the responsibility of acting as PSEA focal points in their agencies. 
The SGB requires mandatory reporting of suspected incidents of SEA. However, the fundamental 
guiding principles of GBV programmes—confidentiality and the right of the survivor to choose 
how s/he would like to address an incident of GBV—are essentially contrary to mandated 
reporting.  Therefore, it may be useful for service-delivery agencies to develop special provisions 
to address this contradiction, such as informing a GBV survivor of the mandate to report on SEA 
before soliciting any case information during an interview.
Resources
For a comprehensive library of PSEA resources, tools and training materials, see the PSEA tools 
repository at http://www.un.org/pseataskforce 
The SGB details some of the ways in which PSEA activities should be implemented, including:
• 
Providing staff with copies of the SGB and informing them of its contents.
• 
Taking appropriate action when there is reason to believe sexual exploitation and abuse has 
occurred.
• 
Appointing focal points and advising the local population on how to contact them.
• 
Handling reports of sexual exploitation and abuse confidentially.
The SGB clearly requires managers within UNCTs and humanitarian country teams to appoint focal 
points and guide them in meeting their responsibilities. Also in light of the SGB, HCs/RCs have been 
tasked with the responsibility of ensuring that an in-country network on PSEA, composed of PSEA 
focal points, is operational and supporting the development and implementation of a country-level 
PSEA action plan in their respective countries.
Critical to know
In  the  2008  GBV  AoR  global 
review  of  GBV  coordination 
mechanisms, there was evidence 
from  Liberia  of  the  need  to 
clarify 
confusion 
between 
GBV  coordination  and  the 
sexual  exploitation  and  abuse 
mechanisms established by UN-
DPKO.   This clarification should 
be introduced from the start of an 
emergency.
Lesson learned
C# Excel: Tutorial for Web Excel Document Viewer Creation
viewer to load, view, annotate, convert and save Support saving modified Excel document PDF and TIFF string mode; public string fid; protected void Page_Load
add password to pdf; add copy protection pdf
C# PowerPoint: Create Web Document Viewer for PowerPoint Viewing
are entitled to view, annotate, and convert PowerPoint document saving web PowerPoint document to PDF and TIFF. mode; public string fid; protected void Page_Load
pdf print protection; a pdf password online
27
Introduction
Section 2:
2
GBV coordination 
STRUCTURES
© UNICEF/NYHQ2005-1050/Radhika Chalasani
29
Introduction
2
Section Two: GBV coordination STRUCTURES
Section Two:
GBV 
coordination STRUCTURES 
Introduction
What is this section about?
This section deals with coordination structures in an attempt to articulate who is responsible in an 
emergency for launching a GBV coordination mechanism, so that GBV Coordinators and others 
are clear about where and with whom to undertake GBV coordination efforts.  
The information sheets in Part A explain humanitarian reform and the ‘cluster approach’ structure 
in  which  GBV—under  the  Protection  Cluster—has  a  designated  coordination  mechanism 
(differently referred to at the field level as an ‘Area of Responsibility’ (AoR), ‘ Working Group’ or 
‘Sub-Cluster’, all of which are acceptable).   The humanitarian reform process represents the first 
time in the history of humanitarian intervention in which GBV coordination structures have been 
made explicit, and it is therefore critically important that GBV actors understand humanitarian 
reform and the cluster approach.
The information sheets in Part B briefly introduce other coordination partners—such as UN 
Action—and the basics of coordination processes when no cluster system is in place. 
What is important to remember while reviewing this section is that all actors on the ground have 
a responsibility to contribute to good coordination and to strengthen and enhance the protection 
and care of women and children in situations of humanitarian crisis. According to the principles of 
humanitarian aid and the international legal framework related to GBV (IS 1.4), the humanitarian 
community, host governments, donors, peacekeepers, the UN and all others engaged in working 
with and for affected populations are collectively accountable for preventing and responding to 
GBV. 
Ensuring effective GBV coordination is the first step in meeting these responsibilities, in so far as 
coordination efforts are key to constructing a unified and coherent multi-sectoral response. It is 
especially important, therefore, that those with relevant GBV experience participate in building 
coordination mechanisms and setting standards for comprehensive programming.  However, 
having a GBV coordination mechanism in place will have little impact unless all actors commit to 
fulfilling their respective duties as outlined in the IASC GBV Guidelines.  Coordination of cluster-
specific activities is the remit of each cluster, under the supervision of the cluster lead(s). While 
GBV coordination mechanisms can assist in facilitating multi-sectoral GBV-related activities—by 
drawing together partners, developing and overseeing a coordinated action plan and providing 
expert technical guidance to other sectors/clusters—accountability for addressing GBV is shared 
across all key sectors/clusters engaged in humanitarian response. 
Every effort should be made to mobilize resources to develop a GBV-specific coordination mechanism in 
an emergency, as this is the best way to ensure that GBV issues are properly addressed across all clusters/
sectors and integrated into all areas of humanitarian response.  In Myanmar following Cyclone Nargis, 
a Women’s Protection Technical Working Group (the term ‘women’s protection’ was favoured over the 
term ‘GBV’ for political and social reasons) was originally created within a Protection of Children and 
Women (PCW) Cluster.  Because the cluster focused primarily on children’s issues (partly due to the 
fact that it was led by child-protection agencies), GBV issues were under-recognized.  An evaluation 
of the PCW Cluster three months after its inception recommended that there should be a separate 
GBV  coordination mechanism  in  order to  more effectively  coordinate  women’s protection  efforts. 
The establishment of a sub-cluster dedicated to women’s protection resulted in greater prioritization 
of women’s issues, including GBV, in several key multi-sectoral initiatives, such as the Post-Nargis 
Response and Preparedness Plan, various donor appeals and the Myanmar Contingency Plan.
Lesson learned
30
Humanitarian reform
IS 2.A.1
Section Two: GBV coordination STRUCTURES
Section Two:
GBV 
coordination STRUCTURES
A. The cluster approach
1. Humanitarian reform
How does humanitarian reform relate to gender-based violence coordination?
Prior  to  the  introduction of  humanitarian reform  and  the cluster  approach,  there  were  no 
standardized methods for introducing GBV coordination mechanisms in humanitarian emergencies.  
Although the IASC GBV Guidelines (drafted just prior to the implementation of humanitarian 
reform) provide important directives for GBV coordination in any humanitarian context, the 
cluster approach offers an explicit structure in which GBV coordination can be established from 
the onset of an emergency. As explained further in IS 2.A.2-4, GBV has been designated as one of 
five Areas of Responsibility (AoR) under the Protection Cluster.  As such, it is critically important 
that all those working on GBV coordination in clusterized countries understand the structure and 
intent of humanitarian reform.
What is humanitarian reform?
Humanitarian  reform  is  an  ambitious  and  sweeping  UN-led  process  aimed  at  improving 
international response in humanitarian crises around the world, so that humanitarian operations 
more efficiently, effectively and comprehensively meet the rights and needs of those most harmed 
by a crisis. The reforms focus on three overarching issues:
Why was humanitarian 
reform initiated?
In the early 2000s, the humanitarian 
community faced several major crises: 
Afghanistan, Iraq, the Darfur conflict 
in Sudan, the Indian Ocean tsunami 
and the South Asia earthquake. These 
emergencies shone a spotlight on the 
humanitarian  working  environment 
because they called into question:
The impartiality of 
humanitarian assistance.
The appropriateness of 
responses.
The capacity of agencies to 
respond.
In 2005 an independent assessment was commissioned by the IASC and the UN Emergency Relief 
Coordinator (ERC) (see text box, above) to evaluate the capacity of humanitarian agencies to 
respond to complex emergencies and natural disasters. The results of the assessment underscored 
the need for a more reliable humanitarian response. 
The Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC):
• 
Created in 1992 at the request of the UN General 
Assembly (Res. 46/182).
• 
Key  strategic  coordination  mechanism  bringing 
together  UN  and  non-UN  agencies:  Red  Cross 
Movement,  NGOs  and  the  International 
Organization for Migration.
• 
Defines joint policy and sets standards.
The Emergency Relief Coordinator (ERC):
• 
Coordinates the response of humanitarian agencies 
in emergencies, particularly those of the UN system.
• 
Works  with  governments  of  affected  countries, 
donors  and  other interested states  in  advocating 
humanitarian initiatives.
• 
Chairs  the  IASC  and  the  Executive  Committee 
on  Humanitarian  Affairs  (ECHA)  and  oversees 
implementation of their recommendations.
• 
Catalyzes  support  for  humanitarian  issues  and 
programmes.
PREDICTABILITY
in financing and leadership 
of the response
ACCOUNTABILITY
to the affected populations
PARTNERSHIP
between UN and non-UN 
humanitarian actors
31
Humanitarian reform
IS 2.A.1
Section Two: GBV coordination STRUCTURES
What are the key areas of humanitarian reform?
The humanitarian reform process targets four interrelated areas:
As illustrated above, the foundation of the humanitarian reform process is partnership, and 
successful implementation of the cluster approach depends on all humanitarian actors working 
as equal partners in all areas of humanitarian response.  In an effort to facilitate partnership, the 
Global Humanitarian Platform (GHP) was established in 2006 to offer a forum for the humanitarian 
community to come together to share responsibility for improving humanitarian action.   The 
GHP has produced “Principles of Partnership” (Annex 3), which identifies five key components 
of effective partnership:
Ensuring effective leadership of
HUMANITARIAN 
COORDINATORS 
(a high-level UN official 
appointed at the country level 
to ensure well-coordinated 
humanitarian response in an 
emergency)
by 
introducing mechanisms for
clearer accountability, 
appropriate training and 
adequate support of HCs/RCs.
Ensuring  STRONG HUMANITARIAN PARTNERSHIPS between
1) NGOs, 2) the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and 3) UN and related 
international agencies.
Ensuring adequate, timely and 
flexible
HUMANITARIAN 
FINANCING
by  
improving access to funds 
through the Central Emergency 
Response Fund (CERF), 
Pooled Funding, the Good 
Humanitarian Donorship 
Initiative and reform of the 
Consolidated Appeals Process 
(CAP).
Ensuring adequate capacity and 
predictable leadership in all areas 
of humanitarian response through
THE CLUSTER APPROACH
by 
designating lead agencies 
at the global and country 
levels to assume coordination 
responsibilities of key sectors 
of humanitarian response.
TRANSPARENCY
is achieved through dialogue 
(on equal footing), with 
an emphasis on early 
consultations and early sharing 
of information. Communication 
and transparency, including 
financial transparency, increase 
the level of trust among 
organizations.
RESULT-ORIENTED
Effective humanitarian action 
must be reality-based and 
action-oriented. This requires 
result-oriented coordination 
based on effective capabilities 
and concrete operational 
capacities.
RESPONSIBILITY
Humanitarian organizations 
have an obligation to each 
other to accomplish their task 
responsibly, with integrity and 
in a relevant and appropriate 
way. They must make sure 
they commit to activities only 
when they have the means, 
competencies, skills and 
capacity to deliver on their 
commitments. Decisive and 
robust prevention of abuses 
committed by humanitarians 
must also be a constant effort.
COMPLEMENTARITY
The diversity of the humanitarian 
community is an asset if we build 
on our comparative advantages 
and complement each other’s 
contributions. Local capacity is 
one of the main assets to enhance 
and build on. It must be made 
an integral part in emergency 
response. Language and cultural 
barriers must be overcome.
EQUALITY
requires mutual respect between 
members of the partnership 
irrespective of size and 
power. The participants must 
respect each other’s mandates, 
obligations, independence and 
brand identity and recognize 
each other’s constraints and 
commitments. Mutual respect 
must not preclude organizations 
from engaging in constructive 
dissent.
Principles 
of 
Partnership
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested