pdf to image conversion in c#.net : Convert protected pdf to word document SDK control service wpf web page asp.net dnn GoodGovernance5-part1851

42
Implementation
RMI combines the right to minimum income support, including access to health 
care and housing, and the right to insertion into society. The income benefit is 
means-tested. It also provides a right to health insurance (assurance maladie) and 
family housing benefit (allocation de logement familial).
The RMI legislation provides for two types of insertion: professional and social. 
This takes the form of a contract signed by the recipient and a social worker 
agreeing to pursue either a “social” or an “employment” activity. While the 
general focus remains on professional insertion, i.e., employment or training 
leading  to  a  job,  RMI  extends  insertion  activities  to  include  “measures 
enabling  recipients  to  regain  or  develop  their  social  autonomy  through 
appropriate ongoing social support, participation in civil and family life, as well 
as in the life of the neighbourhood or town.” This latter type of activity may 
include community work or any type of community activity or personal project 
that improves a person’s ability to form social relationships and to function in 
society.
The minimum allowance is payable beyond the first three months  only  if a 
contract of “insertion” into the labour market has been negotiated with the recip-
ient and that the terms of this contract are respected. All recipients are bound by 
the insertion agreement, which is a compulsory complement to the allowance.
Thus, on the one hand, the individual is responsible for participating in insertion 
initiatives in order to continue enjoying the benefit, while, on the other, society 
takes responsibility for the exclusion of the individual and his or her right to 
insertion.
The professional insertion of RMI recipients relies heavily on employment pol-
icy measures administered by public employment authorities under the aegis of 
the National Employment Agency (Agence nationale pour l’emploi). Recipients 
acquire a new status, since the measures usually come within the framework 
of actual employment contracts, giving recipients the same rights and duties as 
wage earners. The difficulty is that these employment contracts have been mostly 
for part-time jobs.
Impact on human rights and challenges
Since its adoption in 1988, RMI has assisted millions of people facing extreme 
poverty and social exclusion, and has improved access to social and economic 
rights, including access to health services and adequate housing. Within the first 
two years, over 2 million people benefited from it. The number of beneficiaries 
grew steadily: +14.2 per cent in 1991, +15.3 per cent in 1992 and +21.2 per cent 
in 1993. After 1996, it stabilized and then it dropped for the first time in 2000 
(-5.2 per cent) and again in 2001 (-2.1 per cent). In 2000, there were 965,180 re-
cipients, representing 2 million people including family members (3.2 per cent). 
On average, 30 per cent of the beneficiaries stop receiving the benefit after one 
Convert protected pdf to word document - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
password protected pdf; add password to pdf without acrobat
Convert protected pdf to word document - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
adding password to pdf; change password on pdf file
43
year. The average recipient is becoming younger and is increasingly likely to be a 
woman. Since 1995, one beneficiary in four has been under 30 years old.
The main constraint facing RMI recipients is the continuing shortage of jobs in 
France. RMI has met with limited success in ensuring its recipients’ integration 
into the workforce. While 700,000 jobs were created between 1988 and 1991, 
for example, only 60,000 of those went to unemployed persons.
Further reading
Uganda
Submission by Development Cooperation, Norwegian Agency for Development Co-
operation and Save the Children Norway to OHCHR in preparation of the 2004 Seoul 
Seminar on Good Governance and Human Rights and presentation at the Seminar. 
Available upon request.
“Promotion and protection of human rights: the role of good governance in the pro-
motion of human rights: note by the United Nations High Commissioner for Human 
Rights” (E/CN.4/2005/97, chap. IV).
Jordan
Department for International Development of the United Kingdom and British Council 
documents submitted to OHCHR in preparation of the present publication. Available 
upon request.
Ecuador
“Promotion and protection of human rights: the role of good governance in the pro-
motion of human rights: note by the United Nations High Commissioner for Human 
Rights” (E/CN.4/2005/97, chap. IV).
D. Badillo and others, “Liberalization, poverty-led growth and child rights: Ecuador 
from 1980 to 2000,” in Harnessing Globalization for Children: a Report to UNICEF, 
Giovanni Andrea Cornia, ed., chap. 8, available at: http://www.unicef-icdc.org
Romania
Mariana Buceanu, “Roma health mediators between necessity and innovation; Ro-
mania, Moldavia, Spain, Ireland, France”, presented at the Council of Europe Confer-
ence: Quel accès à la santé pour les femmes roms? 11-12 September 2003, available 
at: http://www.coe.int/
Mediating Romani Health: Policy and Program Opportunities (New York, Open So-
ciety Institute, Network Public Health Program, 2005).
Ilona Klimova, Report on the NGO meeting on Romani women and access to health 
care, Vienna, 28-29 November 2002, in Equal Voices, issue 11, 2003, pp. 3-10.
“The situation of Roma in an enlarged European Union”, Employment & social affairs, 
Fundamental rights & anti-discrimination (European Commission, 2005), available at: 
http://ec.europa.eu
Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
Using this PDF to Word converting library control, .NET developers can quickly convert PDF document to Word file using Visual C# code.
pdf password security; pdf protection remover
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Supports transfer from password protected PDF. control is a professional and mature .NET solution which aims to convert PDF document to Word (DOC / DOCX
add password to pdf reader; pdf password encryption
44
France
Jonah D. Levy, “Vice into virtue? Progressive politics and welfare reform in continen-
tal Europe”, Politics and Society, vol. 27, No. 2 (June 1999), pp. 239-273.
Christelle Mandin and Bruno Palier, “Welfare reform in France, 1985-2002”, Univer-
sity of Kent working paper (July 2002), available at: http://www.kent.ac.uk/
Sylvie Morel, “The insertion model or the workfare model? The transformation of 
social assistance within Quebec and Canada” (Status of Women Canada, September 
2002), available at: http://www.swc-cfc.gc.ca
Philippe Warin, “The role of nonprofit associations in combating social exclusion in 
France”, Public Administration and Development, vol. 22, No. 1 (February 2002), 
pp. 73-82.
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Convert PDF to multiple MS Word formats such as .doc Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word for Using this PDF to Word converting library control
copy from protected pdf; a pdf password
Online Convert Word to PDF file. Best free online export docx, doc
to make it as easy as possible to convert your doc your C#.NET project, Microsoft Office like Word, Excel, and PowerPoint can be converted to PDF document.
create password protected pdf reader; password pdf files
THE RULE OF LAW
W
THE RULE OF LAW
W
T
H
E
R
U
L
E
O
F
L
A
W
Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your Tiff/Tif files In addition to PDF to Tiff conversion, our .NET PDF document imaging SDK also supports
adding a password to a pdf; pdf password protect
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB Able to convert password protected PDF document.
pdf security password; convert password protected pdf to normal pdf
T
H
E
R
U
L
E
O
F
L
A
W
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
NET library to batch convert PDF files to jpg image files. Support for customizing image size. Password protected PDF document can be converted and changed.
create pdf password; a pdf password online
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
Can I use RasterEdge C#.NET PDF document merging & splitting toolkit SDK to split password-protected PDF document using Visual C# code?
copy protecting pdf files; crystal report to pdf with password
45
III.  THE RULE OF LAW
The rule of law consists of a set of institutions, laws and practices that are established 
to prevent the arbitrary exercise of power. However, these institutions and processes 
do not always contribute to the protection of human rights. They may be plagued by 
corruption and lack independence from politicians, thus failing to prevent the arbi-
trary exercise of power. They may also lack the necessary capacity, including skills 
and awareness of human rights principles, to perform their duties appropriately.
The cases in this chapter present governance reforms that have helped to protect a 
number of human rights, including:
The right to free legal assistance for those who otherwise cannot afford it (In-
ternational Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, art. 14.3 (d)), as in the case 
from Malawi.
The right of a person arrested or detained to have a court decide without delay 
on the lawfulness of the detention (International Covenant on Civil and Politi-
cal Rights, art. 9.4), as in the case from Malawi.
Social and economic rights, including the right to just and favourable condi-
tions of work which ensure fair wages and equal remuneration for work of 
equal value (International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, 
art. 7), as in the case from the Republic of Korea.
A number of civil and political rights, including the right not be subjected 
to arbitrary arrest or detention (International Covenant on Civil and Political 
Rights, art. 9.1), as in the case from the Republic of Korea.
The right to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and 
mental  health  (International  Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural 
Rights, art. 12), as in the case from Chile.
The case studies present a number of governance reforms that have contributed to 
human rights protection:
Legal reforms and policies to adapt existing legislation to universal human 
rights principles and to better protect specific groups, such as migrant workers 
(Republic of Korea).
Provision of effective remedies to victims of abuse (Chile).
Strengthening  and  reforming  State  institutions,  including  justice  systems, 
courts and penal systems, to better protect human rights (Malawi).
Raising awareness about human rights protection and facilitating public dia-
logue on legal reforms aiming at better protection (Malawi, Republic of Korea 
and Australia).
A.   Implementing civil rights in the prison system through capacity 
development and empowerment  –  Malawi
Issue
The justice and prison system in Malawi faces a number of challenges. Police 
stations lack the capacity to efficiently process arrested persons and, similarly, 
46
prison authorities are ineffective in ensuring that prisoners are tried promptly. As 
a result, Malawi’s prisons are overcrowded with remand prisoners and the right 
not to be held without charge is routinely violated. For example, according to 
a survey conducted in the late 1990s by four national NGOs and Penal Reform 
International, 197 juveniles were detained in the Zomba Maximum Prison al-
though most of their remand warrants had expired.
The right to legal representation is also routinely violated. Due to the shortage of 
trained lawyers, there is little legal assistance available and most people are only 
to a limited extent aware of their rights and of how to access them. In Malawi 
the shortage of lawyers particularly affects poor people, who live mostly in the 
countryside, since lawyers tend to be based in cities.
Response
The paralegal advisory service (PAS), launched in 2000, is based on the under-
standing that the implementation of civil rights is hampered both by the low 
capacity of the justice system to process cases quickly and by the prisoners’ lack 
of awareness of their rights and of the law. PAS was designed to better protect 
civil rights through a two-pronged approach. First, paralegals assist the police 
and prison authorities to process cases faster and, in this manner, to fulfil their re-
sponsibilities under the laws of Malawi. Second, paralegals offer legal assistance 
to prisoners and educate them about their rights and about the justice system.
This is how PAS aimed to create a legal assistance system accessible to rural 
areas, to strengthen the capacity of the justice system to fulfil its responsibilities, 
to reduce the large number of persons detained without being charged, and thus 
to strengthen the protection of civil rights.
Design
In 2000, a pilot scheme was launched to allow 12 paralegals to educate pris-
oners on criminal law and to assist in processing cases through the criminal 
justice system more speedily. The discussions with the Malawi Prison Service re-
garding this pilot effort included four local NGOs—Centre for Advice, Research 
and Education on Rights (Malawi CARER), Eye of the Child, Youth Watch Society, 
and Centre for Human Rights and Rehabilitation—as well as an international 
NGO—Penal Reform International. In 2003, the pilot project was extended to 
the courts and the police.
While inside the prisons, the paralegals work under the authority of the Prison 
Service and are subject to a code of conduct. In the course of their work, they 
report any problems they identify to the appropriate authorities. Serious and re-
peated breaches of the law are referred to the watchdogs charged with investiga-
ting such incidents.
To ensure a level of competence, the paralegals complete a series of training 
courses over 12 months. The training includes one month’s training on elements 
47
of law conducted by representatives of the criminal justice system and the NGOs 
sponsoring the programme. The paralegals must have completed secondary edu-
cation and be aged 20 to 40. Nearly half of them are women. The four NGOs 
sponsoring the programme coordinate their work. There is  also an  advisory 
council, which receives regular progress reports and advises the paralegals.
Implementation
In  its efforts  to  strengthen  the capacity of  the  justice  system  and  empower 
rights-holders, PAS engages in a number of activities. First, paralegals assist in 
the processing of suspects in police stations. For young offenders they suggest 
alternatives to prosecutors in cases of first or minor offences or if the person 
admits fault. In addition to speeding up the processing of cases, the presence of 
PAS paralegals in the police stations while juvenile suspects are interviewed is 
intended to deter torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment of suspects 
in police cells.
PAS paralegals also screen prisoners to ensure that those held unlawfully or inap-
propriately are brought to the attention of the authorities. The paralegals compile 
case lists and refer the individual cases to the courts or the police. They follow 
up each individual case until the person is released, convicted or sentenced. 
Through this work, PAS improves the links among the various components of the 
criminal justice system, and facilitates communication and coordination among 
the prisons, the courts and the police.
Second, PAS works to improve the legal literacy of prisoners through its daily 
paralegal aid clinics for remand prisoners. The clinics emphasize self-help so that 
prisoners learn how to apply for bail, make a plea in mitigation, conduct their 
own defence and cross-examine witnesses.
Third, PAS offers legal advice and assistance to remand prisoners who have 
overstayed or are being held unlawfully or inappropriately. Priority is given to 
vulnerable groups, such as women, mothers with babies, juveniles, foreign na-
tionals, the mentally and terminally ill, and the elderly. Paralegals assist prisoners 
to fill in standardized bail forms agreed with the judiciary, which paralegals then 
lodge with the appropriate court. Convicted prisoners are assisted in their ap-
peals against sentences and in ensuring that sentences passed by the lower court 
are confirmed by the High Court.
Paralegals have also assisted the work of the criminal justice system in other 
ways. They have observed 91 homicide cases and published a report to inform 
debate on the quality of justice delivered. They also called attention to the plight 
of homicide suspects, some of whom have been waiting for trial for 10 years.
By 2005, the number of paralegals had increased from the initial 12 to 37. PAS 
had developed a programme in 13 prisons, holding 84 per cent of the total prison 
population, which numbers 8,500 persons.
48
Impact on human rights and challenges
PAS has strengthened the capacity of the justice system to implement national 
and international standards on civil rights by improving inter-agency collabo-
ration and coordination among the prisons, the prosecutors, the police and the 
courts. PAS has also increased awareness of human rights standards within the 
justice system, and developed procedures to expedite the processing of cases. 
Importantly, PAS has also strengthened awareness of rights among prisoners as 
well as their capacity to protect their rights. Over five years, the paralegals have 
helped over 45,000 prisoners to represent themselves in bail applications, pleas 
in mitigation and conducting their own defence.
This work has had tangible consequences for the protection of civil rights, in-
cluding the right of arrested or detained persons to be informed promptly of any 
charges against them (International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, art. 
9.2) as well as the right of such persons to have a court decide without delay on 
the lawfulness of their detention and order their release if the detention is not 
lawful (International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, art. 9.4). PAS has 
also improved the protection of the right to legal assistance without payment for 
persons who do not have sufficient means to pay for it (International Covenant on 
Civil and Political Rights, art. 14.3 (d)). Between May 2000 and mid-2005, PAS 
facilitated the release of over 2,000 prisoners who were unlawfully or unneces-
sarily detained through bail, discharge or release on compassionate grounds. The 
screening of suspects at police stations has helped reduce the pretrial population 
of prisons from an average of 50 per cent of the total prison population to an 
average of 22 per cent in 2005.
B.   Legal and policy reform for the protection of the rights of migrant 
workers  –  Republic of Korea
Issue
The protection of the rights of migrant workers in the Republic of Korea faced 
several obstacles through the 1990s as the numbers of illegal migrants surged. 
In 2002, over 80 per cent of the approximately 340,000 migrant workers in the 
country were estimated to be illegal. The industrial trainee programme, which 
was introduced in 1993 as a two-year training programme, exacerbated the prob-
lem by creating incentives for many trainees to become illegal residents owing 
to their low fixed wages, their inability to change employers and the fact that 
Korean labour laws did not apply to them. In general, migrant workers did not 
benefit from the same types of legal protections as national workers and, as a 
result, were frequently victims of systematic abuse by their employers.
The workers’ social and economic rights were violated as a result of their exploi-
tation by employers who paid low wages and did not provide sufficient insurance 
cover. Their civil and political rights were also violated as they were the victims 
of insults, beatings, unlawful detention, racial discrimination, sexual harassment 
and sexual violence.
49
Response
The National Human Rights Commission of the Republic of Korea identified two 
central factors leading to the violation of the rights of migrant workers. First, their 
illegal status put many in a vulnerable situation as they did not have recourse 
to the courts to protect their rights. Second, the lower legal protection offered 
to foreign workers compared to national workers created incentives for them to 
become illegal residents, while also exposing them to systematic abuse by their 
employers.
The Commission therefore focused on two goals in its effort to better protect 
migrant rights: reducing the numbers of illegal workers and offering equal legal 
protection to foreign workers legally residing in the country. The Commission 
argued that migrant workers should have the same rights as national workers, 
including the same level of wages and insurance cover. It also advocated reform of 
the industrial trainee programme and an amnesty programme for illegal residents.
Design
The National Human Rights Commission was established in November 2001 as 
an independent governmental body with an annual budget of US$ 17 million and 
a staff of 200. The Commission investigates human rights violations committed by 
governmental agencies as well as discriminatory practices of the Government and 
private entities. Furthermore, it regularly reviews government policies, scrutinizes 
new bills introduced to the legislature and makes policy recommendations to the 
Government. Finally, the Commission provides human rights education.
The Commission’s initiative built on several years of advocacy for the protec-
tion of migrant rights by civil and religious organizations. Since the late 1980s, 
activism by civil and religious organizations as well as mobilization on the part 
of the migrants themselves had brought their plight to the country’s attention. 
A number of civil organizations assisted migrants in collecting unpaid wages, 
obtaining medical and legal assistance, or seeking financial compensation for 
work-related accidents. Civil organizations also advocated legislation to protect 
the rights of migrant workers.
Building on the national awareness raised through the work of civil society, the 
Commission presented its first recommendation on migrant workers to the Gov-
ernment in August 2002. The recommendation included abolishing the industrial 
trainee programme and reforming the foreign worker employment system. The Gov-
ernment rejected the recommendation, which it felt was based on unsubstantiated 
claims and insufficient data. In February 2003, the Commission made a second 
recommendation, which reinforced and elaborated on the first one.
This second recommendation was based on a nationwide survey and research 
which was conducted by an independent research institute and which collected 
information  on  the  labour  conditions  of  migrant  workers  and  on  a  list  of 
human rights violations. For the nationwide survey 1,078 migrant workers were 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested