pdf to image conversion in c#.net : Annotate protected pdf software Library dll windows asp.net azure web forms GoodGovernance6-part1852

50
interviewed  in  14  languages.  Korean  employers  and  co-workers  of  migrant 
workers were also interviewed. The research found irregularities in the entry to 
the Republic of Korea of foreign workers and evidence of excessive entry fees; 
an increase in the number of undocumented migrant workers; long working 
hours, averaging 68.3 hours a week; low wages, overdue payment of wages; and 
infringements of human rights including abusive treatment of workers, use of 
offensive language and violence, seizing of passports; and sexual violence against 
female foreign workers.
The Commission recommended a package of measures to the Government, in-
cluding the introduction of an employment permit programme to replace the 
controversial industrial trainee programme; the application of the same level of 
wages, labour standards and insurance schemes for migrant as for national work-
ers; granting the same legal rights as nationals; a complete overhaul of the arts 
and entertainment visa programme; and the provision and wide distribution of 
basic human rights information in 10 languages.
Implementation
The Act on Foreign Workers’ Employment was passed in August 2003. It re-
formed the industrial trainee programme to allow for a five-year residence limit, 
including a three-year work permit during which foreign workers are allowed to 
change employers in certain circumstances.
The  new employment  permit programme grants  foreign workers legal rights 
equal to those of national workers. Migrant workers are protected by Korean 
labour laws and are guaranteed the same wages and insurance cover, including 
health insurance and industrial accident insurance. Furthermore, the same rights 
are guaranteed to illegal foreign labourers as Korean nationals during police in-
spections. Importantly, in the event of inspections, the identity of the official as 
well as the objective of the crackdown are to be disclosed and the person is to 
be at all times given the opportunity to inform his/her acquaintances of where 
he/she is being taken. All foreign workers, including undocumented workers, 
are legally protected from being forcefully deported while going through legal 
procedures. In addition, all documents related to exit and entry control as well as 
basic immigration and labour-related guidelines are translated into 10 languages 
for distribution.
Under the Act on Foreign Workers’ Employment, the Government is the exclu-
sive administrative channel for the management of foreign workers in an effort to 
combat corruption in the process of entry into the Republic of Korea by foreign 
workers. Moreover, the Government is obliged to monitor employers to prevent 
discrimination and unfair management practices.
Impact on human rights and challenges
The Act  on Foreign Workers’ Employment  and the  employment permit  pro-
gramme offer legal guarantees to foreign workers residing in the Republic of 
Annotate protected pdf - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
creating password protected pdf; convert password protected pdf to excel
Annotate protected pdf - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
convert password protected pdf to word; add password to pdf
51
Korea, in accordance with the relevant international standards. As a result, many 
workers gained legal status and can resort to the legal system to protect their 
rights. About 200,000 illegal migrant workers earned legitimate visa status as 
a result of an amnesty programme which granted illegal residents living in the 
Republic of Korea for less than three years a two-year work permit.
Also, the National Human Rights Commission’s work, including its survey and the 
submission of its proposals to the Government, helped to raise awareness of mi-
grants’ rights among the general public as well as among migrants themselves.
Potential problems and limitations to the programme concern the procedures ap-
plied to deportation once the legal residency period has expired. The total period 
of time foreign workers may stay in the Republic of Korea is limited to five years. 
The relevant authorities have stated that illegal foreign workers will be forcefully 
deported. However, the deportation of foreign workers is problematic, especially 
given the limited detention facilities as well as the particular circumstances of 
some illegal workers, for example those who may be jailed as political prisoners 
upon their return to their home countries.
C.   Implementing the right to effective remedy and redress for victims 
of torture  –  Chile
Issue
During the 1973–90 military dictatorship, thousands of Chileans were arbitrarily 
arrested, kidnapped or executed for political reasons. Many others lost their jobs 
in government agencies and public companies or went into exile. It is estimated 
that about 800,000 people were directly affected by the State repression during 
the dictatorship. Many suffered from extreme trauma with serious effects on their 
physical and mental health. With the return to democracy, a succession of Gov-
ernments developed policies to address the injustices of the past. Starting in 
1991, reparations were offered to the relatives of victims of enforced disappear-
ance, executions and State violence, and to former employees who had been 
dismissed from the public administration for political reasons. However, repara-
tions were not specifically designed for victims of torture until 2003, despite the 
abundant evidence of the damage inflicted.
While the system of reparations was debated within the country, the physical, men-
tal and psychological damage inflicted on victims of State repression demanded 
immediate treatment. Owing to a lack of relevant policies, the rights of victims to 
an effective remedy as well as to the enjoyment of physical and mental health, to 
health care and to the necessary social services were not adequately protected.
Response
The Ministry of Health’s Programme of Reparation and Comprehensive Care in 
the Field of Health and Human Rights (PRAIS), set up in 1991, responded to two 
concerns. First, the ill-treatment suffered by the victims of State repression fre-
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support for customizing image size. Password protected PDF document can be converted and changed. Open source codes can be added to C# class.
convert password protected pdf files to word online; copy text from protected pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
PDF in C#, C#.NET PDF Reading, C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET PDF Document Viewer, C#.NET Able to convert password protected PDF document.
create password protected pdf from word; change password on pdf document
52
quently led to physical and psychological injury which either proved irreversible 
or required long-term treatment. Second, the injury had often been aggravated 
by discrimination in employment and in society, which deprived victims of their 
livelihoods so they could not afford health care for themselves and their families. 
This situation continued even after the return to civilian rule.
Design
The first impetus for the creation of PRAIS was given by the discovery in 1990 
of a mass grave near the town of Iquique, which was used as a detention centre 
during the dictatorship. In response, the Ministry of Health implemented a pro-
gramme providing health care to the relatives of victims in several neighbouring 
cities. Subsequently and following a recommendation of the National Commis-
sion on Truth and Reconciliation, PRAIS was officially created in 1991, and oper-
ated until 1993 with international financing. The Ministry of Health took over its 
financing in 1993.
PRAIS has two main aims. First, it offers free access to the public health-care sys-
tem to directly affected persons, including those who have gone through a traumat-
ic experience, and the members of their immediate family. Second, it offers free 
specialized mental health care by teams of psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses and 
social workers with experience in treating victims of repression and violence.
The beneficiaries of PRAIS include close blood relations (parents and siblings) and 
people with whom the victim lived (spouse, partner and other dependants). Human 
rights activists who provided assistance to persons directly affected by the repression 
also qualify. The definition of a repressive or traumatic experience covers abduction 
with disappearance, execution for political reasons, physical and/or psychological 
torture, detention on political grounds, exile and return, banishment, dismissal on 
political grounds, and going into hiding owing to political persecution. These events 
must have occurred between September 1973 and March 1990.
Implementation
Since the early 1990s, 15 PRAIS teams have been established throughout the 
country. Mental health care has been provided through specialized teams with 
experience in treating victims of human rights abuses. The PRAIS teams working 
within the national health-care system have created facilities for the reception and 
care of the victims to evaluate the degree of injury and develop psychotherapeu-
tic treatment, and refer these patients to other health-care services. As part of the 
treatment, patients play an active role in their rehabilitation by participating in self-
help and social reintegration activities. PRAIS has maintained close relationships 
with human rights organizations and victims’ organizations working to obtain rep-
arations for the victims and their social reintegration. Collaboration has included 
technical exchanges and referrals.
By 2003, the number of beneficiaries had risen to over 180,000. In addition, 
there was a substantial increase in the number of applications for the treatment 
of mental health problems. This increase is closely linked to the greater aware-
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. VB.NET class source code for .NET framework.
pdf owner password; convert password protected pdf to excel online
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word for mail merge. C# source code is available for copying and using in .NET Class.
pdf password unlock; add password to pdf file without acrobat
53
ness of the human rights violations under the dictatorship. A number of events 
contributed to this progress, including the increase in the number of court cases 
relating to human rights, the search for disappeared detainees and the discovery 
of remains, the organization and mobilization of persons who were detained, 
tortured or exiled, and the promulgation of legislation concerning officials who 
had been removed from office.
In addition to offering medical care, PRAIS has provided a forum for people to 
gather and to acknowledge their common condition as victims of State repres-
sion. It has helped beneficiaries to acknowledge their suffering and enabled them 
to face the demands of their present lives.
Impact on human rights and challenges
PRAIS enabled Chile’s medical system to implement the right of victims of repres-
sion to redress, by injecting medical expertise relevant to the needs of victims in 
the health-care system and funds allowing for free access to health care for many 
impoverished and underprivileged victims.
The Programme’s impact has been manifold. First, it has delivered valuable men-
tal as well as physical health services to thousands of victims. Second, it has 
helped its beneficiaries to create a collective memory and made possible the 
recovery of a part of history. Third, by specifically addressing the needs of victims 
of State repression and violence, it has contributed to the recognition of the vic-
tims’ status. This was extremely significant given that this recognition was delayed 
owing to the lengthy national debate on the repression and violence under the 
previous regime which occurred in the context of the transition to democracy. 
Fourth, PRAIS and the Ministry of Health have accumulated extensive expertise 
and developed technical standards regarding the care of persons affected by po-
litical repression, which may be referred to by future providers.
Owing to poor funding, the Programme’s key challenge is sustainability. As a 
result of the large increase in the number of beneficiaries, the health-care sector 
has come under strain. Furthermore, the Programme faces the continuous chal-
lenge of providing specialized assistance tailored to the needs of different victims 
in a national health-care system that suffers several shortcomings.
Finally, and importantly, PRAIS was challenged for several years by the lack of 
official and public recognition of the victims by the State. This was finally ad-
dressed by the publication of the report of the National Commission on Political 
Imprisonment and Torture in 2004.
D.  A bill of rights to strengthen human rights in legislation 
and policy  –  Australia
Issue
Several Australian federal, territory and State governments have, over the years, 
debated the question of a bill of rights. Supporters of such a bill pointed out the 
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
Can I use RasterEdge C#.NET PDF document merging & splitting toolkit SDK to split password-protected PDF document using Visual C# code?
create copy protected pdf; add password to pdf online
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
PDF Document Protect. PDF Password. Able to Open password protected PDF; Allow users to add password to PDF; Allow users to remove password from PDF;
pdf open password; protected pdf
54
inadequacy of existing constitutional provisions and the potential for the erosion 
of rights upheld under Australia’s common law, since rights and freedoms can 
be overridden by Commonwealth, State and local government legislation. Sup-
porters also pointed out that, in common law, it is difficult to develop general 
statements on human rights derived from individual cases, since the courts are 
restricted to declarations of rights regarding the parties before them and need to 
be consistent with previous decisions. As a result, the rights that are recognized 
under the common law are those left after all the exceptions and limitations to 
them have been dealt with. The opposition to the adoption of a bill of rights, 
which was considerable at both the federal and State levels, centred on concerns 
about the potential for increased litigation and the inappropriate strengthening of 
the power of judges. Opponents also feared that a bill of rights would favour the 
rights of criminals over those of victims.
Response
In 2002, the government of the Australian Capital Territory initiated discussion 
on a bill of rights bearing several considerations in mind. First, given that the 
Australian federal and State levels of government have different responsibilities, 
it was deemed useful to consider a Capital Territory bill of rights, despite the ab-
sence of a federal one. Second, it was considered important to include in a bill 
of rights a set of unconditional human rights in order to ensure that the Capital 
Territory would implement these rights in its laws and policies. Also, such a bill 
would strengthen awareness of human rights in society at large, in the legislature 
and in policymaking bodies. Third, given the strong opposition to such a bill 
within the Capital Territory, its government initiated an extensive discussion and 
consultation on the issue.
The Human Rights Act 2004 of the Australian Capital Territory protects civil and 
political rights, and is based on the relevant standards set out in the International 
Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.
Design
The government’s strategy leading to the adoption of the Act included a lengthy 
period of public consultation that allowed for community engagement in and 
education on the necessity and content of a bill of rights for the Capital Territory. 
The government did not present its preferred model of addressing the question, 
but rather initiated a public discussion on it. An appointed Committee held town 
meetings and several consultations with community and expert groups. There 
were 49 public forums on the issue. The Committee also sought submissions from 
the public and commissioned a poll of selected Capital Territory residents. Such 
a consultative process was deemed necessary because the proposal to adopt a 
human rights act was subject to significant controversy when it was introduced 
to the Capital Territory Legislative Assembly.
The distinguishing characteristic of the bill of rights is that it establishes a hu-
man rights protection process in the Legislative Assembly. Before the Assembly 
C# PDF: C# Code to Create Mobile PDF Viewer; C#.NET Mobile PDF
also allows developers to annotate, process and float DocWidth = 819; protected void Page_Load Demo_Docs/").Replace("\\" Sample.pdf"; this.SessionId
create password protected pdf online; add password to pdf file
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
developers to view, edit, annotate and process RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0. pdf: from this user manual mode; public string fid; protected void Page_Load
open password protected pdf; pdf protected mode
55
adopts a law, one of its committees examines the human rights implications. The 
Assembly reserves the power to enact laws that are not consistent with the Hu-
man Rights Act, but only after informed debate. Once a law is enacted, it cannot 
be struck down by courts. However, the Human Rights Act directs the Capital 
Territory’s Supreme Court to interpret Territory laws to be consistent with the pro-
tected rights “as far as possible.” If a rights-consistent interpretation of legislation 
is not possible, the Supreme Court may make “declarations of incompatibility” 
and notify the Human Rights Commissioner and Attorney General. The latter 
must respond within six months. The role of the Court is limited to interpreting 
laws, including “reading them down” to make them human rights-compatible 
and identifying areas of incompatibility. However, the last word on the content 
of laws is left to the elected Legislative Assembly.
Through the above process, the Human Rights Act engages the courts, the Assem-
bly and the public in a dialogue about human rights. The idea of ongoing debate is 
built into the Act, whose operation must be reviewed after one and five years. The 
first review was to focus on whether economic, social and cultural rights should be 
included in the Human Rights Act in addition to civil and political rights.
The Human Rights Act also provides for the establishment of a Capital Territory 
Human Rights Commissioner, whose key role is to review legislation and its im-
plementation for compliance with the Human Rights Act and advise the Austra-
lian Capital Territory’s Attorney General. However, the Human Rights Act is not 
entrenched in the constitution and does not give judges the power to invalidate 
legislation, nor citizens a platform for asserting rights against the government. A 
party cannot sue under the Human Rights Act.
Implementation
According to the Human Rights Act, all government bills must be accompanied 
with a compatibility statement prepared by the Attorney General. The Legislative 
Assembly’s Standing Committee on Legal Affairs also comments on the impact 
of all bills on human rights. In the first year of operation of the Human Rights 
Act, the government presented 64 bills to the Assembly along with 63 statements 
of compatibility (the one omission being due to an administrative oversight). 
The  Department  of  Justice and Community Safety also established a Bill  of 
Rights Unit to oversee the implementation of the Human Rights Act within the 
government. The Unit has published a number of documents to help government 
departments apply the Human Rights Act, including a manual of guidelines on 
using it in developing legislation and policy.
Since the adoption of the Human Rights Act, the Human Rights Commissioner 
has been asked to advise the Attorney General on a number of issues, including 
the right to freedom of expression of detainees and the delays of trials of detain-
ees. She has also commented on legislative proposals and a number of bills, 
including bills concerning the new prison of the Capital Territory and amend-
ments to the Mental Health (Treatment and Care) Act 1994 to enable involun-
tary emergency electro-convulsive therapy. Furthermore, the Attorney General 
56
has requested advice in relation to national matters, including the Anti-Terrorism 
Bills 2004 and 2005, and the complementary Terrorism (Extraordinary Temporary 
Powers) Bill 2005.
The Territory’s government agencies dealing with some of the most vulnerable 
individuals have engaged with the Human Rights Act. Corrective Services held 
a forum in July 2004 to increase awareness of human rights within the prison 
context. The Human Rights Commissioner and her Office have conducted an 
audit of a juvenile detention centre, and identified a number of practices which 
need to be reconsidered in the light of the Human Rights Act. The Health De-
partment in partnership with the Human Rights Office also held a forum in June 
2005 to explore the impact of the Human Rights Act on mental health service 
provision. A review of the Mental Health (Treatment and Care) Act 1994 is under 
way to address potential inconsistencies with human rights.
Community education has been a priority of the Human Rights Office, which has 
provided training to members of the general public as well as to people with a 
legal background. The Office also publishes an electronic quarterly newsletter, 
which describes the initiatives of the Office and summarizes recent case law.
There has not been a flood of litigation since the adoption of the Human Rights 
Act. By July 2005, it had been cited in ten reported judgements of the Capital 
Territory’s Supreme Court, one judgement of the Court of Appeal and one deci-
sion of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal. These cases deal with a variety of 
subjects, ranging from criminal law and protection orders, to child protection, 
mental health proceedings, public housing and defamation. The Human Rights 
Act is also regularly mentioned in bail applications before the Supreme Court 
as the rights to liberty and security of person are relevant to the interpretation of 
the Bail Act 1992. Finally, the Supreme Court did not issue any declarations of 
incompatibility in 2004 or 2005.
Impact on human rights and challenges
The biggest impact of the Human Rights Act has been its influence on the way 
government policy and legislation are formulated and adopted. The government 
is conscious of the Human Rights Act when developing new bills and the courts 
are aware of it when interpreting legislation. The Capital Territory administration 
also needs to take it into consideration when developing policy.
There is a general limitation to the implementation of the Human Rights Act 
owing to the inability to use it in relation to powers under federal laws, such as 
the treatment of asylum-seekers under migration legislation. In some cases this 
inability results from the fact that there is no Capital Territory evidence act, while 
there is, for example, the Federal Evidence Act 1995. Also, the Australian Federal 
Police provides both national and local services, and can use federal rather than 
Capital Territory powers when arresting and charging defendants.
Critics of the Human Rights Act point out that it does not provide for the justicia-
bility of human rights and does not protect economic, social and cultural rights. 
57
This is a limitation to the ability of the Act to protect the rights of some of the 
most vulnerable members of society. The Act does not provide for direct claims 
against government agencies  and  other public  authorities for breach of the 
protected rights either.
Further reading
Malawi
Steven Golub, “Beyond the rule of law orthodoxy: the legal empowerment alter-
native”, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Working Papers, number 41 
(October 2003).
Adam Stapleton, “Justice for all”, Pambazuka News—A weekly electronic forum 
on social justice in Africa, issue 194, 17 February 2005, available at: http://www.
pambazuka.org
Fergus Kerrigan, “Energizing the criminal justice system in Malawi: the Paralegal Ad-
visory Service” (Danish Centre for Human Rights, April 2002).
Adam Stapleton, “Energising the criminal justice system: Malawi’s Paralegal Advisory 
Service”, Insights, No. 43 (September 2002), Id21insights: Communicating Develop-
ment Research, available at: http://www.id21.org
More information on PAS can be found at: 
http://www.penalreform.org 
http://www.justiceinitiative.org
Republic of Korea
“Promotion and protection of human rights: the role of good governance in the pro-
motion of human rights: note by the United Nations High Commissioner for Human 
Rights” (E/CN.4/2005/97, chap. III).
Nicola Piper, “Rights of foreign workers and the politics of migration in South-East 
and East Asia”, International Migration, vol. 42, No. 5 (December 2004), pp. 71-97.
Chile
“Programme of Reparation and Comprehensive Care in the Fields of Health and Hu-
man Rights (PRAIS) – Ministry of Health (Chile)”, presentation at the Seminar on Good 
Governance Practices for the Promotion of Human Rights, Seoul, 15-16 September 
2004, available at: http://www.ohchr.org/english/issues/development/docs/bp2.doc
“Promotion and protection of human rights: the role of good governance in the pro-
motion of human rights: note by the United Nations High Commissioner for Human 
Rights” (E/CN.4/2005/97, chap. III).
“Question of the human rights of all persons subjected to any form of detention 
or  imprisonment,  in  particular:  torture  and other  cruel,  inhuman  or  degrading 
treatment or punishment: report of the Special Rapporteur on Torture, Mr. Nigel S. 
Rodley, submitted pursuant to Commission on Human Rights resolution 1995/37 B” 
(E/CN.4/1997/7).
58
“CHILE, transition at the crossroads: human rights violations under Pinochet rule re-
main the crux”, Amnesty International, 6 March 1996 (AI index: AMR 22/001/1996).
More information on PRAIS in Spanish can be found at: http://www.minsal.cl
Australia
The Hon. Mr. Justice David Malcolm AC, Chief Justice of Western Australia, “Does 
Australia need a bill of rights?”, Murdoch University Electronic Journal of Law, vol. 5, 
No. 3 (September 1998).
Gabrielle McKinnon, “The ACT Human Rights Act 2004: impact on case law, legis-
lation and policy”, Regulatory Institutions Network, Australian National University, 
July 2005.
Dr. Helen Watchirs, ACT Human Rights and Discrimination Commissioner, “Review 
of the first year of operation of the Human Rights Act 2004”, Democratic Audit of 
Australia, Australian National University, June 2005.
George Williams, “The ACT’s Bill of Rights: a new era in rights protection for all Aus-
tralians”, Australian Financial Review, 12 March 2004.
The website of the Human Rights Commission of the Australian Capital Territory: 
http://www.hrc.act.gov.au/.
COMBATING
G
COMBATING
G
CORRUPTION
N
CORRUPTION
C
O
M
B
A
T
I
N
G
C
O
R
R
U
P
T
I
O
N
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested