pdf to image conversion using c# : Convert password protected pdf to word online control Library system web page asp.net winforms console HarvestPlus_WorkingPaper211-part1935

7
or negative effects on full income; the decision to adopt 
may also be influenced by latent household preferences 
for  OFSP  over  other  foods.  The  consumption  decision 
may, therefore, be enhanced or dampened by the income 
effect. Furthermore, augmented availability of OFSP within 
the household does not necessarily translate to enhanced 
consumption among children and women, even though 
the  REU  specifically  targeted  messages  about  OFSP  to 
these  groups.  Although  estimation  of  a  formal  model 
of  agricultural  household  decision  making,  including 
allocation among family members, is beyond the scope of 
this paper, the organizing model provides the basis for the 
choice of outcome and mediation variables.
The primary  mechanisms  by  which  the  REU can  affect 
consumption  are outlined  in Figure  1. The  intervention 
may  have  affected  information  about  the  nutritional 
content  of  OFSP, or  vitamin A  in  general,  which could 
in turn affect adoption decisions. Second, the increased 
information  on  nutritional  content  might  affect  OFSP 
consumption  by  young  children  directly,  hypothetically 
either through market purchases  or  by  targeting  young 
children  as  consumers  of  OFSP  within  the  household. 
An alternative mechanism for increased consumption of 
OFSP is through adoption;  farmers  simply adopt OFSP 
and then consume it. We also measure a direct effect of 
the intervention on consumption, which could occur either 
because the project affected production or consumption 
for reasons not explicitly modeled; or the proxy variables 
we use in estimation do not fully reflect project effects. 
For each outcome, the impacts of Model 1 and Model 2 on 
an outcome Yi1 among household or child i at the endline 
(period 1) can be estimated as:
Y
i1
= α + β
1
T
1i
+ β
2
T
2i
+ γX
i
Ψ
Y
i0
+ ε
i
            (3)
where T
1
represents an indicator variable for households 
in Model 1 farmer groups, T
2
is an indicator variable for 
households in Model 2 farmer groups, X
i
is a vector of 
baseline  household  characteristics,  Y
i0
is  the  baseline 
outcome, which is available for nutrition knowledge and 
vitamin A consumption outcomes, and ε
i
is a mean zero 
error term. Equation 3 is a more flexible functional form 
than the difference-in-differences estimator and is identical 
to the difference-in-differences estimator if γ is restricted 
to  1. Since  X
i
and  Y
i0
are  both  theoretically  orthogonal 
to the treatment variable, it should be possible to omit 
them from  models with no consequences for  the point 
estimate of β. However, these variables may also explain 
some of the variation in the endline outcome Y
i1
, hence 
reducing the overall variance of the estimator. As a result, 
this form of the treatment model has more power than the 
difference-in-differences  estimator  when  autocorrelation 
in the outcome variable exists (McKenzie 2011).
The coefficients  β
1
and  β
2
represent  the average intent-
to-treat  effect  on  Model  1  and  Model  2  households  or 
individuals, respectively. In addition to testing whether the 
intent-to-treat effect is larger than zero for each group, we 
can use Equation 3 to test the null hypothesis that β
1
β
2
, which implies that the impacts of Model 1 and Model 
2 were no different. If impacts are no different, we  can 
instead estimate a simplified model:
Y
i1
= α + βT
i
+ γX
i
+ ψY
i0
+ ε
i
(4)
where  T  now  indicates  a  treatment  indicator  variable. 
In  estimation,  we  find  very  few  significant  differences 
Figure 1.  Schematic Representation of Potential Mechanisms to Improve Vitamin A Consumption Among Targeted 
Children in REU Intervention, Mozambique and Uganda
REU 
Intervention 
Learn 
Nutrition 
Adopt OFSP
I
n
c
r
e
a
s
e
V
i
t
a
m
i
n
A
Convert password protected pdf to word online - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
pdf print protection; convert password protected pdf to excel
Convert password protected pdf to word online - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
pdf protection remover; convert password protected pdf to word
8
between impacts among Model 1 and Model 2 farmers, so 
we conduct the causal mediation analysis using Equation 
4 as the primary regression.
4.1 Measuring Outcomes
Following the conceptual model outlined in Figure 1, we 
choose variables that measure the impacts of nutritional 
extension (N
i
) that logically might lead to adoption (A
i
) or 
consumption (C
i
). We therefore measure the impacts of 
nutritional extension using two variables: the number of 
facts about vitamin A promoted by the REU that mothers 
could recite, and conditional on knowing about vitamin A, 
whether mothers named OFSP as a vitamin A source when 
asked an open-ended question regarding vitamin A food 
sources.
We primarily measure adoption as an indicator variable, 
defined  as  whether  or  not  farmers  kept  vines  for  the 
following  season  (Mozambique)  or  if  farmers  were 
growing OFSP at the time of the final survey (Uganda); 
and the  intensity of adoption,  by  the share of OFSP in 
the  total  sweet  potato  area  farmed  by  the  household.
18
The drawback to this variable is that it is undefined for 
households that do not grow sweet potatoes; yet for those 
that do grow sweet potatoes, it measures the commitment 
to OFSP quite well.
19
Finally, we measure consumption 
using  the  unadjusted  vitamin  A  intakes  (C
i
 directly, 
calculated from the dietary intake studies (Hotz, Loechl, 
de Brauw, et al. 2012; Hotz, Loechl, Lubowa, et al. 2012). 
4.2 Causal Mediation Analysis
We are  interested in  understanding  the  contribution  of 
additional  nutritional  knowledge  to  adoption,  and  the 
contribution  of  additional  nutritional  knowledge  and 
adoption  to  increased  vitamin  A  consumption  among 
children  (Figure  1).  Because  the  treatment  assignment 
was randomized, the average treatment effect is identified, 
but we are also interested in the average causal mediation 
effect, or the average effect of the treatment that occurs 
through a mediating variable. Consider that the outcome 
of  interest  Y
i
for  individual  i  is  a  function  of  both  the 
treatment and some mediating variable, M
i
(T
i
), which is 
itself affected by the treatment. Following Imai et al. (2011), 
the causal mediating effect is written as
δ
i
(t) ≡ Y
i
(t, M
i
(1)) – Y
i
(t, M
i
(0))                  (5)
18 
Given that the project distributed vines to farmers in the last year 
of the REU in Mozambique, we deemed whether or not farmers kept 
vines as a better indicator of adoption. Follow-up fieldwork conducted 
by the International Potato Center (CIP) in 2010 indicated that this 
variable reliably estimated adoption at the community level
19
Both of the adoption variables are measured at endline only, 
implying A
i0
= 0 ∀ i.
for  each  treatment  status  t  =  0,  1.  The  quantity  δ
i
(t) 
represents the change in the outcome Y that corresponds 
to the change in the mediator variable from the control 
to the treatment condition, while holding the effect of the 
treatment  otherwise  constant.  Clearly,  for  observations 
receiving the treatment, M
i
(0) cannot be observed, so this 
quantity must be estimated.
The direct effect ζ
i
(t) of the treatment is what remains after 
the indirect effect is estimated, and can be written as
ζ
i
(t) ≡ Y
i
(1, M
i
(t)) – Y
i
(0, M
i
(t))                  (6)
for each treatment status  t = 0, 1.  Averaging across all 
individuals i, the average causal mediation effect (ACME) 
is  δ(t)  and  the  average  direct  effect  (ADE) is ζ(t). The 
average treatment effect β is equal to the sum of the ACME 
and the ADE, β = δ (t)+ ζ(t).
To estimate the ACME and the ADE, we must make a further 
assumption,  that  Imai  et  al.  (2010)  call  the  sequential 
ignorability assumption. First, we assume that given the 
baseline  characteristics, assignment to the  treatment  is 
independent of outcomes and mediator variables:
{Y
i
(t,m), M
i
(t)} ⊥ T
i
|X
i
= x. 
(7)
Equation 8 should hold due to the randomization of the 
treatment. Second, the sequential ignorability assumption 
states that
Y
i
(t,m) ⊥ M
i
(t)|T
= t, X
i
= x. 
(8)
Equation 9 implies that once we control for actual treatment 
status and observed baseline characteristics, there are no 
unobservables  that  confound  the  relationship  between 
the outcome and the mediator variable. The assumption 
is  clearly quite strong.  If  any unobservable  affects both 
the mediating variable and the outcome, then estimates 
of the ACME are  likely to  be  biased. Imai et al.  (2010) 
demonstrate  that no further distributional  or functional 
form assumptions  must be made to identify  the ACME 
and ADE if the assumption in Equation 8 holds. Therefore, 
in exchange for making  a strong assumption  about the 
relationship between the outcome and the mediator, we 
can estimate the ACME and the ADE with few additional 
assumptions. Further, we can test the robustness of our 
estimates to unobservables that might be correlated with 
both the mediator and the outcome.
After  making the sequential ignorability assumption, an 
initial way of estimating the ACME is to assume a linear 
relationship and estimate:
Y
= α + κT
i
+ ξM
i
+ γX
i
+ψY
i0
+ u
i
              (9)
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF document to DOC and DOCX formats in Visual Basic .NET Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF.
create password protected pdf; pdf protected mode
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Convert PDF to multiple MS Word formats such as .doc and .docx. Create editable Word file online without email. Password protected PDF file can be printed to
convert password protected pdf to normal pdf online; create pdf password
9
The ACME can be calculated using M
i
as the dependent 
variable in Equation 4; it  is βξ where β is the effect of 
the treatment on the mediator and ξ is the effect of the 
mediator on the outcome. Sequential ignorability implies 
zero correlation between the error terms ε
i
and u
i
; however, 
a finding of no correlation does not necessarily imply that 
sequential ignorability holds.
Imai et al. (2011) propose a nonparametric estimator for 
equations 6 and 7, which relaxes the linearity assumption 
in  Equation  9.  They  estimate  the  ACME  by  estimating 
regression models as above, then predicting the treatment 
effect using the value of the mediator variable predicted in 
the treatment condition, then the control condition, and 
averaging over those for all values. In estimating regression 
models  predicting  the  mediator  and  the  outcome  of 
interest, the linearity assumption above can be relaxed; for 
example, a logit or a probit model can be used to estimate 
a binary outcome.
20
Imai  et  al.  (2010)  further  propose a  method  of testing 
the  sensitivity  of  the  ACME  estimate  to  the  sequential 
ignorability assumption. Define ρ = ε
u
i
, or the correlation 
between the two error terms. If ρ ≠  0, it implies that a 
confounding variable (or a set of confounding variables) 
exists that biases the ACME estimate. Larger values of ρ, 
in absolute value terms, imply larger bias in the estimate 
of the ACME. Imai et al. (2010) note that it is possible 
to demonstrate how much a potentially omitted variable 
might  affect  the  relationship  between  the  outcome 
and  the  mediator  through  the  goodness  of  fit  (R
2
).  If 
an  unobserved  variable,  such  as  the  predisposition  to 
participate in programs, was unobserved and was quite 
important, it would  change  the goodness of  fit in both 
models. On the other hand, if it does not matter much, 
it would slightly change the R
2
in both models. Therefore, 
the relative change in R
2
between the two models can be 
used as a sensitivity check, simulating over many possible 
changes in the goodness of fit. We incorporate sensitivity 
checks into our analysis, in case a confounding variable 
exists that violates the sequential ignorability assumption 
and  might  affect  our  estimates  of  the contributions  of 
nutritional knowledge variables to OFSP adoption, or of 
nutritional  knowledge  or  adoption to vitamin  A  intakes 
among children.
5. RESULTS
In this section, we initially present estimates of the impact 
of the REU on nutritional knowledge indicators, adoption 
behavior, and vitamin A consumption among children. We 
20
We note that if a logit or probit model is used in estimating the 
ACME and ADE, alternative assumptions are made about the structure 
of the error terms. However, such models may be more appropriate.
then present estimates for adoption behavior using causal 
mediation analysis to ascertain how much of the adoption 
behavior  can  be  explained  through  the  knowledge  of 
messages regarding health benefits of vitamin A, including 
sensitivity analysis. We finally present estimates for vitamin 
A intakes using causal mediation analysis to understand 
how much of those results can be explained through either 
nutritional knowledge or adoption behavior.
5.1 Main Impact Estimates
Table 2 presents descriptive statistics at baseline for Model 
1, Model 2, and control households. Although there are 
some discrepancies between averages for some statistics 
between groups, in most cases they are not statistically 
significant.
21
Where  they are  significant,  controlling for 
these observable characteristics in regressions may slightly 
affect impact estimates. 
Table 3 compares baseline and endline values for several 
outcome  variables.  Descriptively,  we  find  substantial 
evidence of impacts in both countries. In Mozambique, 
approximately two-thirds of mothers in the two treatment 
groups name OFSP as a source of vitamin A at endline, 
whereas only one-third of mothers in the control group do 
so. Less than 20 percent of mothers did the same prior 
to  the  baseline.  The  pattern  of  learning was  similar  in 
Uganda. We find similar improvements in the number of 
vitamin A messages that women can recite.
The  REU  also  appears  to  have  affected  adoption.  In 
Mozambique,  75  and 79 percent of farmers in Model 1 
and Model 2 were growing OFSP at endline, whereas only 
9 percent of farmers in the control group were doing so. 
Among farmers growing OFSP, the share of OFSP in total 
area devoted  to sweet potatoes increased as well, from 
between 11 and 20 percent at baseline to between 70 and 73 
percent at endline, whereas it actually declined among the 
control group. It is worth noting that only about 50 percent 
of baseline farmers were growing any sweet potatoes, so 
many farmers are dropped altogether from the reported 
proportions at baseline.
Average dietary intakes of vitamin A by reference children 
also  increased  substantially  in  Model  1  and  Model  2 
households in both countries (Table 3, Panel C). Reference 
children, aged 6 to 35 months in Mozambique, consumed 
slightly more than 200 μg RAE of vitamin A at baseline, 
regardless of group membership. In Uganda, the reference 
children were older and so it is not surprising that their 
baseline consumption of vitamin A is higher, at between 
430 and 550 μg RAE. In 2009, reference children in both 
countries  assigned  to  Model  1  and  Model  2  consume 
21
These slight differences are studied in more detail in project 
baseline reports (Arimond et al. 2008; Arimond et al. 2009).
∧∧
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
NET library to batch convert PDF files to jpg image files. Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. Password protected PDF document can be converted and changed.
adding password to pdf file; copy protection pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel Online VB.NET Tutorial for PDF to JPEG (JPG) Conversion in VB Able to convert password protected PDF document
annotate protected pdf; convert password protected pdf files to word online
10
Characteristic
Mozambique
Uganda
Model 1
Model 2
Control
Model 1
Model 2
Control
Household characteristics
Female head
0.05
0.07
0.07
0.10
0.18
0.11
Household size
5.82 (1.94)
5.81 (1.81)
5.85 (1.82)
7.55 (2.79)
7.42 (2.68)
7.68 (3.00)
Years of schooling, 
head
2.74 (2.49)
3.77 (2.62)
2.88 (2.39)
6.65 (3.41)
6.92 (3.76)
7.07 (3.74)
Log, monthly per capita 
expenditures
0.88 (0.71)
1.05 (0.70)
0.98 (0.79)
9.99 (0.74)
10.04 (0.74)
9.99 (0.71)
Access to lowlands
0.62
0.65
0.66
0.45
0.35
0.43
Grew OFSP 
prior to baseline
0.11
0.09
0.06
0.07
0.04
0.06
Grew sweet potato 
in year prior to baseline
0.47
0.55
0.51
0.83
0.79
0.85
Leader or promoter
0.21
0.24
N/A
0.17
0.17
0.20
Reference child characteristics
Child’s age (months)
23.0 (9.2)
22.0 (8.4)
22.3 (8.6)
51.5 (9.9)
51.3 (10.0)
51.5 (9.6)
Gender (1 = male)
0.49
0.52
0.54
0.46
0.48
0.50
Still breastfed?
0.49
0.54
0.53
-
-
-
Notes: Standard deviations in parentheses for continuous variables. Reference children in Uganda were between ages 3 and 5 at baseline, 
hence they were no longer breastfed.
Source: Baseline and endline surveys, Mozambique and Uganda
Table 2.  Baseline household and child characteristics, by model, REU, Mozambique and Uganda
Characteristic
Mozambique
Uganda
Model 1
Model 2
Control
Model 1
Model 2
Control
Panel A: Nutritional knowledge indicators
Knows OFSP has vitamin A 
Baseline
0.12
0.20
0.17
0.08
0.11
0.06
Endline
0.68
0.63
0.35
0.67
0.67
0.24
Number of vitamin A facts known
Baseline
0.71 (0.63)
0.74 (0.60)
0.73 (0.62)
0.89 (0.70)
0.85 (0.75)
0.89 (0.70)
Endline
1.28 (0.68)
1.47 (0.76)
0.91 (0.66)
1.28 (0.84)
1.39 (0.80)
0.88 (0.70)
Panel B: Adoption indicators 
Growing OFSP
Endline
0.75
0.79
0.09
0.66
0.62
0.06
Share of OFSP in sweet potato area
Baseline
0.20
0.11
0.12
0.00
0.00
0.01
Endline
0.73
0.70
0.07
0.47
0.44
0.02
Panel C: Vitamin A intakes, reference children
Mean intakes
Baseline
209.9 (192.4)
204.7 (222.9)
187.8 (187.9)
540.2 (913.6)
431.3 (445.6)
549.1 (1076.8)
Endline
646.7 (825.6)
624.6 (726.6)
350.2 (609.6)
863.2 (1110.5)
1104.7 (1562.9)
575.5 (794.6)
Notes: For continuous outcomes, standard deviations in parentheses. Reference children were aged 6–35 months at baseline in Mozambique 
and 3–5 years at baseline in Uganda.
Source: REU Baseline and Endline Survey Data, Mozambique and Uganda
Table 3. Average baseline and endline outcomes, by treatment group, REU, Mozambique and Uganda
Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
Online PDF to Word Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a PDF File to Word. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
add password to pdf; pdf file password
Online Convert Word to PDF file. Best free online export docx, doc
Online Word to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a Word File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
add password to pdf file with reader; pdf user password
11
more vitamin A than  children in the  control groups.  In 
Mozambique, where children are aged 3–5 years at endline, 
according to unadjusted intakes, children in Model 1 and 
Model 2 consume more than 600 μg RAE, on average, 
whereas in the control group, they consume only 350 μg 
RAE. In Uganda, children consume between 860 and 1,105 
μg RAE in the Model 1 and Model 2 groups, whereas the 
control group consumes 575 μg RAE, on average. 
5.1.1 Impacts on Nutritional Knowledge Indicators
We initially estimate Equation 3 using the two nutrition 
knowledge  indicators  as  the  dependent  variable  (Table 
4). For Mozambique, the REU had a significant impact on 
the proportion of mothers who named OFSP as a source 
of  vitamin  A,  whether or  not we  control for  household 
baseline characteristics (columns 1 and 2). We also find 
that  the  REU  had  a  significant  impact  on  the  number 
of  vitamin  A  messages  known  (columns  3  and  4).  In 
Uganda, point estimates for both dependent variables are 
somewhat higher than in Mozambique, with or without 
controls for baseline  characteristics.
22
Mothers  naming 
OFSP  as  a  source  of  vitamin  A  increased  by  about  45 
percentage  points  in  both  models  (columns  5  and  6), 
whereas the number of messages known also increased 
by approximately half a message, on average (columns 7 
and 8).
While the coefficient estimates differ somewhat by model 
for both Mozambique and Uganda, in neither country do 
we find larger point estimates for Model 1 than Model 2. 
Moreover, there are no statistically significant differences 
between models. Had we found a pattern of larger point 
estimates  for  Model  1  than  Model  2,  we  might  have 
begun to believe that Model 1 was more effective, and the 
sample  simply  lacked  power to  measure  the  difference 
between Model 1 and Model 2. However, we find larger 
point estimates among Model 2 mothers for the number 
of vitamin A messages known in both countries, so it does 
not seem likely that Model 1 had larger impacts overall than 
Model 2. We report  the average treatment effect across 
Model 1 and Model 2 using the same specifications at the 
bottom of Table 4 with one variable to indicate households 
that  were  assigned  to  either  treatment  group.  We  find 
that  the  estimated  impacts  of  the  REU  on  nutritional 
knowledge  were  somewhat  higher  in  Uganda  than  in 
Mozambique. In Mozambique, mothers naming OFSP as 
a source of vitamin A increased by 24.4 percentage points 
(column 2), while the same measure increased  by  45.4 
percentage points in Uganda (column 6). Mothers knew 
22
For the Uganda data, due to missing values for a number of control 
variables, we lose 141 observations. The average characteristics are 
not systematically different between the whole sample and the sample 
used in the regression analysis.
0.35 more vitamin A messages as a result of the program 
in Mozambique (column 4), while they knew an additional 
0.57  messages  in  Uganda (column 8). Therefore,  there 
are some clear, if modest, gains in nutritional knowledge 
that  occurred  among  mothers  during  the  REU  in  both 
countries. There are two important implications. First, for 
causal  mediation analysis, it should not matter that we 
average impacts between Model 1 and Model 2. Second, 
Model  2  was  explicitly  designed to  be  less  costly  than 
Model 1, so  these  estimates suggest  that Model 2  was 
more cost-effective than Model 1.
5.1.2 Impacts on OFSP Adoption Indicators
Estimating Equation 4 with an indicator for adoption as 
the dependent variable demonstrates that both Models 1 
and 2 had an impact on adopting OFSP in both countries 
(Table  5).  In  Mozambique,  when  additional  household 
characteristics are not included, we find that households 
in  Model  1  were  65.7  percentage  points  more  likely  to 
adopt than the control group, and households in Model 2 
were 69.2 percentage points more likely to adopt. When we 
control for additional household characteristics, coefficient 
estimates on the model indicators decrease somewhat, to 
62.5 and 65 percentage points for Model 1 and Model 2, 
respectively. 
In  Uganda,  we  find  remarkably similar results  (Table 5, 
columns 5 and 6). Households in Model 1 and Model 2 are 
61.7 and 57.9 percentage points more likely to adopt OFSP 
than the control, when we do not control for additional 
household characteristics. When we do so, the coefficients 
on the treatment indicators change slightly, to 62.4 and 59.5 
percentage points, respectively. Therefore, we can generally 
conclude that in both countries the REU was successful in 
leading to OFSP adoption among farmers. Furthermore, 
as  point  estimates  for  adoption  were  similar  in  both 
countries,  it  is  clear  that combining the two treatment 
groups is appropriate for causal mediation analysis. We 
seek to explain the combined impact estimates through 
causal  mediation  analysis,  which  are  63.8  percentage 
points  in  Mozambique  and  60.2  percentage  points  in 
Uganda (Table 5, columns 2 and 6, respectively).
Next, we estimate the impact of Model 1 and Model 2 on 
the share of sweet potato area devoted to OFSP, to measure 
the intensity of the intervention (Table 5, columns 3, 4, 7, 
and 8). Recall that these regressions are conditional on 
growing any sweet potato, as observations drop when no 
area is devoted to sweet potatoes. We find that farmers in 
Mozambique devote 61.5 and 59 percentage points more 
of their sweet potato area to OFSP when participating in 
Model 1 and Model 2, respectively. Only about half of the 
sample in Mozambique grew OFSP prior to the baseline, 
and so it is not surprising that the coefficient is relatively 
Online Convert PDF file to Word. Best free online PDF Conversion
Online Tiff to PDF Converter. Download Free Trial. Convert a Tiff/Tif File to PDF. Just upload your file by clicking on the blue button
a pdf password online; copy text from protected pdf
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
SDK > C# > Merge and Split Document(s). "This online guide content PDF document merging & splitting toolkit SDK to split password-protected PDF document using
adding a password to a pdf; adding a password to a pdf file
12
Table 4.  Impacts of REU Model 1 & Model 2 on nutritional knowledge indicators at endline, Mozambique and Uganda 
Variable
Mozambique
Uganda
Knows OFSP a source of 
vitamin A, 2009
Number of vitamin A facts 
known, 2009
Knows OFSP a source of 
vitamin A, 2009
Number of vitamin A facts 
known, 2009
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
Panel A: Model 1 versus Model 2
Model 1
0.325***
0.283***
0.368***
0.256***
0.456***
0.457***
0.554***
0.559***
(0.083)
(0.050)
(0.110)
(0.087)
(0.040)
(0.030)
(0.063)
(0.062)
Model 2
0.268***
0.206***
0.556***
0.438***
0.441***
0.447***
0.603***
0.613***
(0.090)
(0.055)
(0.108)
(0.087)
(0.059)
(0.039)
(0.114)
(0.106)
Additional 
covariates?
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Test H
0
: Model 1 = 
Model 2 (p-value)
0.425
0.180
0.028
0.013
0.820
0.811
0.690
0.633
Panel B: Average treatment effect of both interventions 
Treated
0.295***
0.244***
0.467***
0.348***
0.452***
0.454***
0.566***
0.573***
(0.079)
(0.045)
(0.103)
(0.082)
(0.036)
(0.028)
(0.058)
(0.057)
Additional 
covariates?
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Number of obs.
610
610
610
609
975
975
975
975
Notes: Regressions are ANCOVA models controlling for baseline level of the outcome. Tests of equality of impact of Model 1 and Model 2 are adjusted Wald 
tests. Average treatment effects reported at the bottom of the table are average impacts over Model 1 and Model 2, using the same specification for that 
column in a separate regression. Standard errors are clustered at the village level in Mozambique and the farmer group level in Uganda. *** significant at 
the 1 percent level; ** significant at the 5 percent level; * significant at the 10 percent level. 
Source: Mozambique and Uganda baseline and endline surveys, REU project.
Variable
Mozambique
Uganda
Adopted OFSP
Share of OFSP in SP area
Adopted OFSP
Share of OFSP in SP area
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
Panel A: Model 1 versus Model 2
Model 1
0.657***
0.625***
0.653***
0.615***
0.617***
0.624***
0.438***
0.428***
(0.050)
(0.047)
(0.043)
(0.041)
(0.040)
(0.030)
(0.027)
(0.023)
Model 2
0.692***
0.650***
0.622***
0.590***
0.579***
0.595***
0.414***
0.410***
(0.035)
(0.039)
(0.042)
(0.033)
(0.071)
(0.039)
(0.039)
(0.040)
Additional 
covariates?
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Test H
0
: Model 1 = 
Model 2 (p-value)
0.441
0.573
0.533
0.565
0.649
0.542
0.615
0.688
Panel B: Average treatment effect of both interventions 
Treated
0.675***
0.638***
0.637***
0.602***
0.607***
0.617***
0.432***
0.424***
(0.037)
(0.037)
(0.035)
(0.030)
(0.034)
(0.025)
(0.023)
(0.020)
Additional 
covariates?
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Number of obs.
610
610
551
551
975
975
751
751
Notes: All models are single difference models at endline. Baseline levels of adoption and area planted with OSP were very low, and so were omitted 
from these models. The share of OFSP in SP area has 59 missing observations in Mozambique and 224 missing observations in Uganda because these 
households did not grow any sweet potato. Tests of equality of impact of Model 1 and Model 2 are adjusted Wald tests. Average treatment effects re-
ported at the bottom of the table are average impacts over Model 1 and Model 2, using the same specification for that column in a separate regression. 
Standard errors are clustered at the village level in Mozambique and the farmer group level in Uganda. *** significant at the 1 percent level. 
Source: Mozambique and Uganda baseline and endline surveys, REU project.
Table 5.  Impacts of REU Model 1 and Model 2 on measures of adoption at endline, Mozambique and Uganda
13
large. Many farmers actually adopted OFSP as their only 
sweet potato variety between the baseline and endline. In 
Uganda, farmers were more likely to grow sweet potatoes 
prior  to  the  baseline,  so  it  is  not  surprising  that  the 
share  of sweet potato area devoted to  OFSP  only rises 
by between 41.3 and 42.8 percentage points among the 
Model 1 and Model 2 farmers relative to the control group. 
In  both  countries,  there  was  substantial  substitution 
of  OFSP  production  for  conventional  white  and  yellow 
varieties.  However,  in Uganda in particular, households 
demonstrated a preference for variety, keeping more than 
half of their sweet potato fields devoted to conventional 
varieties. There are no significant differences in impacts 
on planted area  between Model 1 and Model 2 in both 
countries, so as with the discrete adoption indicator, we can 
combine the two estimates into one treatment indicator 
without much loss of generality (Table 5, columns 3, 4, 7, 
and 8).
5.1.3 Impacts on Vitamin A Intakes: Reference Children
The REU project led to substantial increases in average 
dietary intakes of vitamin A for reference children in both 
countries (Table 6). Average vitamin A intakes of reference 
children  in Mozambique increased by between 198 and 
222 μg RAE, with an average impact of 209.1 μg RAE as 
a result of the program. This impact is substantial, given 
that the recommended daily intake for children aged 6–35 
months is 210 μg RAE. There is no difference in impact 
between Model 1 and Model 2, suggesting that the more 
intensive  trainings  in  Model  1  did  not  contribute  to 
additional improvements in vitamin A intakes. In Uganda, 
the impact on dietary intakes of vitamin A for reference 
children  was  somewhat  larger,  ranging  from  313.0  to 
520.4 μg RAE for Model 1 and Model 2, respectively, with 
an average treatment effect of 391.9 μg RAE. The larger 
effect in Uganda than in Mozambique may in part reflect 
the fact that reference children were 6–35 months of age 
at baseline in Mozambique but 36–83 months of age at 
baseline  in  Uganda.  The  period  between  baseline  and 
endline was nearly 36 months in Mozambique and was 
only 24 months in Uganda; however, the somewhat older 
children in Uganda should have had higher intakes of food 
energy and many  nutrients by virtue of their age. As in 
Mozambique, this effect size in Uganda is very large, given 
that the cutoff for adequate dietary intakes of vitamin A in 
children age 3–5 years is 260 μg RAE. Impacts on dietary 
intakes in Uganda as measured by the best linear unbiased 
predictions  (BLUPs)  are  statistically  significantly  larger 
for Model 2 than Model 1, again indicating no gain to the 
additional trainings provided under Model 1.
Mozambique
Uganda
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
Panel A: Model 1 versus Model 2
Model 1
291.1***
221.9**
304.22**
313.02***
(84.8)
(84.3)
(115.56)
(101.44)
Model 2
241.7**
198.1**
525.42**
520.61***
(86.4)
(76.8)
(220.44)
(149.10)
Child characteristics?
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Additional covariates?
No
Yes
No
Yes
Test H0: Model 1 = 
Model 2 (p-value)
0.472
0.693
0.358
0.178
Panel B: Average treatment effect of both interventions 
Treated
249.3***
209.1***
389.76***
391.90***
(83.6)
(74.6)
(115.89)
(96.96)
Child characteristics?
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Additional covariates?
No
Yes
No
Yes
Number of obs.
376
376
446
446
Notes: Tests of equality of impact of Model 1 and Model 2 are adjusted Wald tests. Average treatment effects reported at the bottom of the table are aver-
age impacts over Model 1 and Model 2, using the same specification for that column in a separate regression. Standard errors are clustered at the village 
level in Mozambique and the farmer group level in Uganda. *** significant at the 1 percent level; ** significant at the 5 percent level; * significant at the 
10 percent level.  
Source: Mozambique and Uganda baseline and endline surveys, REU project.
Table 6.  Impacts of REU Model 1 and Model 2 on vitamin A intakes at endline, reference children, Mozambique and Uganda
14
5.2 Causal Mediation Analysis: Estimates
To understand the contributions of additional nutritional 
knowledge to the adoption decision and the contributions 
of  nutritional  knowledge  and  adoption  to  the  intakes 
of  vitamin  A  among  children,  we  make  the  sequential 
ignorability assumption embedded in equations 7 and 8. 
After estimating equations 4 and 9, we provide conditional 
correlations between the error terms of Equation 9 and a 
version of Equation 4, which uses the mediating variable 
as the dependent  variable,  to  understand  whether  bias 
might exist in our estimates of the ACME, and if so, in 
which direction the bias might be.
5.2.1 Nutritional Knowledge Mediating Effect in OFSP 
Adoption 
We measure adoption and nutritional knowledge in both 
countries in two different ways, so there are eight different 
mediation  effects  measured  in  this  subsection.  For  all 
combinations,  we typically make a  linearity  assumption 
and estimate Equation 4 with the mediating outcome as 
the outcome and Equation 9 to learn the ACME and ADE. 
Where  possible, we  also  estimate  Equation  6;  however, 
in practice it is only possible to estimate the ACME this 
way when at least the mediating variable is specified as 
a  continuous  variable.  The  continuous  measure  is  the 
increase  in  knowledge  of  vitamin  A  messages,  so  the 
nonparametric estimates use that variable as the mediator. 
In nonparametric estimation, we measure the ACME both 
directly and by interacting the mediating variable with the 
treatment variable, to isolate the impacts of the mediating 
variable for treated households. In both cases, we describe 
the  impacts  that  correlation  between  residuals  would 
potentially  have  on  our  estimates  for  the  continuous 
measure of adoption, and provide estimates of correlations 
from the linear versions of all of our estimates. Since the 
sequential ignorability assumption is implausibly strong, 
it is important to think through how unobservables would 
affect estimates. 
We  first  estimate  causal  mediation  effects  making  the 
linearity  assumption  (Table  7).  We  find  a  very  limited 
amount of adoption occurs through nutritional knowledge, 
irrespective of the mediating variable. We find a positive 
but  insignificant  coefficient  (0.058)  on  the  OFSP  as  a 
vitamin A source mediating variable in Mozambique (Table 
7, column 2), and a statistically significant coefficient in 
Uganda of 0.098 (Table 7, column  6). In  Mozambique, 
controlling for baseline characteristics the point estimate 
for the effect of the number of vitamin A messages known 
at endline on the probability of OFSP adoption is 0.049 
(column 4); in Uganda, it is 0.040 (column 8). In Panel A 
of Table 9, we calculate the ACME and the ADE for each of 
the two mediating variables and countries. Whether or not 
we condition on baseline characteristics, we find that the 
mediating effect of the nutrition variables never exceeds 5 
percent in Mozambique (in column 3) and 13 percent in 
Uganda (in column 5). Therefore as mediating variables, 
increased knowledge had only limited importance for the 
adoption of OFSP in both countries.
The share of sweet potato area planted in OFSP as the 
adoption measure,  continuing  the linearity  assumption, 
yields similar results to those found in Table 7 (Table 8). In 
Mozambique, we find small, positive coefficient estimates 
for both mediating variables (columns 1–4); all but one are 
significantly different from zero. In Uganda, coefficients on 
Mozambique
Uganda
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
Treated 
0.650***
0.625***
0.637***
0.622***
0.531***
0.572***
0.576***
0.594***
(0.040)
(0.041)
(0.040)
(0.040)
(0.037)
(0.029)
(0.036)
(0.027)
Knows OFSP is source 
of vitamin A, endline
0.086**
0.058
0.166***
0.098***
(0.041)
(0.041)
(0.032)
(0.032)
Number of vitamin A 
facts known, endline
0.081***
0.049**
0.056***
0.040**
(0.022)
(0.022)
(0.017)
(0.015)
Additional covariates?
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Number of obs.
610
610
610
609
975
975
975
975
R2
0.418
0.448
0.425
0.450
0.399
0.461
0.383
0.457
Notes: Standard errors are clustered at the village level in Mozambique and the farmer group level in Uganda. *** significant at the 1 percent level; ** signifi-
cant at the 5 percent level; * significant at the 10 percent level.  
Source: Mozambique and Uganda baseline and endline surveys, REU project.
Table 7.  Average impacts of REU on discrete measure of OFSP adoption at endline, including nutrition knowledge mediating 
variables, Mozambique and Uganda
15
Variable
Mozambique
Uganda
Knows OFSP a source of 
vitamin A, 2009
Number of messages 
known, 2009
Knows OFSP a source of 
vitamin A, 2009
Number of messages 
known, 2009
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
Panel A: OFSP adoption 
Conditioning variables
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Treatment effect on knowledge
0.295
0.244
0.467
0.348
0.460
0.454
0.567
0.573
Knowledge effect on adoption
0.086
0.058
0.081
0.049
0.166
0.098
0.056
0.040
ACME
0.025**
0.014
0.035**
0.017*
0.076***
0.044***
0.031***
0.023**
(0.012)
(0.009)
(0.013)
(0.009)
(0.016)
(0.015)
(0.010)
(0.009)
ADE
0.650***
0.623***
0.639***
0.620**
0.531***
0.563***
0.576***
0.584***
(0.041)
(0.040)
(0.041)
(0.040)
(0.037)
(0.036)
(0.036)
(0.035)
Correlation, residuals
<0.0001
<0.0001
<0.0001
<0.0001
0.024
0.0007
-0.0110
-0.0005
Number of obs.
609
609
609
609
975
975
975
975
Panel B: Share of OFSP in SP area
Conditioning variables
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Treatment effect on knowledge
0.295
0.244
0.467
0.348
0.460
0.454
0.567
0.573
Knowledge effect on adoption
0.092
0.056
0.051
0.025
-0.013
0.020
0.014
0.020
ACME
0.027***
0.014**
0.022*
0.009
-0.006
0.009
0.008
0.012*
(0.009)
(0.007)
(0.012)
(0.008)
(0.012)
(0.011)
(0.008)
(0.007)
ADE
0.610***
0.589***
0.614***
0.594***
0.438***
0.423***
0.424***
0.420***
(0.035)
(0.032)
(0.038)
(0.034)
(0.028)
(0.026)
(0.025)
(0.024)
Correlation, residuals
<0.0001
<0.0001
<0.0001
<0.0001
0.072
0.0039
0.0243
0.0012
Number of obs.
609
609
609
609
975
975
975
975
Notes: Standard errors on ACME and ADE generated using seemingly unrelated regressions. The ACME is generated by multiplying the treatment effect on 
knowledge by the knowledge effect on adoption. Standard errors are clustered at the village level in Mozambique and the farmer group level in Uganda. *** 
significant at the 1 percent level; ** significant at the 5 percent level; * significant at the 10 percent level.  
Source: Mozambique and Uganda baseline and endline surveys, REU project.
Table 9.  Estimates of ACME and ADE for the role of nutrition knowledge in OFSP adoption and share of OFSP in sweet 
potato area at endline, including nutrition knowledge mediating variables, REU, Mozambique and Uganda
Mozambique
Uganda
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
Treated 
0.609***
0.591***
0.609***
0.593***
0.438***
0.414***
0.423***
0.410***
(0.036)
(0.032)
(0.040)
(0.035)
(0.029)
(0.024)
(0.025)
(0.022)
Knows OFSP is source of 
vitamin A, endline
0.092***
0.056*
-0.013
0.022
(0.031)
(0.033)
(0.026)
(0.024)
Number of vitamin A 
messages known, endline
0.051**
0.025
0.014
0.021*
(0.022)
(0.022)
(0.014)
(0.012)
Additional covariates?
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Number of obs.
534
534
534
533
751
751
751
751
R2
0.488
0.514
0.485
0.511
0.396
0.451
0.396
0.452
Notes: Standard errors are clustered at the village level in Mozambique and the farmer group level in Uganda. *** significant at the 1 percent level; ** signifi-
cant at the 5 percent level; * significant at the 10 percent level.  
Source: Mozambique and Uganda baseline and endline surveys, REU project.
Table 8.  Average impacts of REU on share of OFSP in sweet potato area, including nutrition knowledge mediating variables, 
Mozambique and Uganda, at endline
16
Figure 2. Sensitivity analysis, using number of vitamin A messages as mediator variable, for and share of OFSP in SP area as 
the outcome variable, including interaction terms, Mozambique and Uganda
Panel B. Uganda
Panel A. Mozambique
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested