pdf to image converter in c# : Create password protected pdf application software utility azure winforms html visual studio HowToThinkLikeAComputerScientist_LearningWithPython330-part2017

25. Stacks — How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python 3
http://openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english3e/stacks.html[1/4/2012 9:38:46 PM]
The output is 
+ 45 54. In other words, we just used a stack to print the items backward! Granted, it’s
not the standard format for printing a list, but by using a stack, it was remarkably easy to do.
You should compare this bit of code to the implementation of 
print_backward in the last chapter.
There is a natural parallel between the recursive version of 
print_backward and the stack algorithm
here. The difference is that 
print_backward uses the runtime stack to keep track of the nodes while it
traverses the list, and then prints them on the way back from the recursion. The stack algorithm does
the same thing, except that is use a 
Stack object instead of the runtime stack.
25.5. Using a stack to evaluate postfix
In most programming languages, mathematical expressions are written with the operator between the
two operands, as in 
1 + 2. This format is called infix. An alternative used by some calculators is
called postfix. In postfix, the operator follows the operands, as in 
1 2 +.
The reason postfix is sometimes useful is that there is a natural way to evaluate a postfix expression
using a stack:
1.  Starting at the beginning of the expression, get one term (operator or operand) at a time.
If the term is an operand, push it on the stack.
If the term is an operator, pop two operands off the stack, perform the operation on them,
and push the result back on the stack.
2.  When you get to the end of the expression, there should be exactly one operand left on the
stack. That operand is the result.
25.6. Parsing
To implement the previous algorithm, we need to be able to traverse a string and break it into
operands and operators. This process is an example of parsing, and the results—the individual
chunks of the string – are called tokens. You might remember these words from Chapter 1.
Python provides a 
split method in both string objects and the 
re (regular expression) module. A
string’s 
split method splits it into a list using a single character as a delimiter. For example:
In this case, the delimiter is the space character, so the string is split at each space.
The function 
re.split is more powerful, allowing us to provide a regular expression instead of a
delimiter. A regular expression is a way of specifying a set of strings. For example, 
[A-z] is the set of
all letters and 
[0-9] is the set of all numbers. The 
^ operator negates a set, so 
[^0-9] is the set of
everything that is not a number, which is exactly the set we want to use to split up postfix
expressions:
1
2
while not s.is_empty():
print(s.pop(), end=' ')
>>> import string
>>> "Now is the time".split(" ")
['Now', 'is', 'the', 'time']
>>> import re
>>> re.split("([^0-9])""123+456*/")
['123', '+', '456', '*', '', '/', '']
Create password protected pdf - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
break pdf password; convert password protected pdf to normal pdf
Create password protected pdf - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
copy protected pdf to word converter online; annotate protected pdf
25. Stacks — How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python 3
http://openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english3e/stacks.html[1/4/2012 9:38:46 PM]
The resulting list includes the operands 
123 and 
456 and the operators 
* and 
/. It also includes two
empty strings that are inserted after the operands.
25.7. Evaluating postfix
To evaluate a postfix expression, we will use the parser from the previous section and the algorithm
from the section before that. To keep things simple, we’ll start with an evaluator that only implements
the operators 
+ and 
*:
The first condition takes care of spaces and empty strings. The next two conditions handle operators.
We assume, for now, that anything else must be an operand. Of course, it would be better to check
for erroneous input and report an error message, but we’ll get to that later.
Let’s test it by evaluating the postfix form of 
(56+47)*2:
That’s close enough.
25.8. Clients and providers
One of the fundamental goals of an ADT is to separate the interests of the provider, who writes the
code that implements the ADT, and the client, who uses the ADT. The provider only has to worry
about whether the implementation is correct – in accord with the specification of the ADT – and not
how it will be used.
Conversely, the client 
assumes
that the implementation of the ADT is correct and doesn’t worry about
the details. When you are using one of Python’s built-in types, you have the luxury of thinking
exclusively as a client.
Of course, when you implement an ADT, you also have to write client code to test it. In that case, you
play both roles, which can be confusing. You should make some effort to keep track of which role you
are playing at any moment.
25.9. Glossary
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
def eval_postfix(expr):
import re
token_list = re.split("([^0-9])", expr)
stack = Stack()
for token in token_list:
if  token == '' or token == ' ':
continue
if  token == '+':
sum = stack.pop() + stack.pop()
stack.push(sum)
elif token == '*':
product = stack.pop() * stack.pop()
stack.push(product)
else:
stack.push(int(token))
return stack.pop()
>>> print(eval_postfix ("56 47 + 2 *"))
206
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
Online Remove Password from Protected PDF file. Download Free Trial. Remove password from protected PDF file. Find your password-protected PDF and upload it.
pdf password encryption; add password to pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
PDF in C#, C#.NET PDF Reading, C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET PDF Document Viewer, C#.NET Able to convert password protected PDF document.
pdf file password; a pdf password
25. Stacks — How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python 3
http://openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english3e/stacks.html[1/4/2012 9:38:46 PM]
index
next |
previous  |
How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python 3 »
abstract data type (ADT)
A data type (usually a collection of objects) that is defined by a set of operations but that can be
implemented in a variety of ways.
client
A program (or the person who wrote it) that uses an ADT.
delimiter
A character that is used to separate tokens, such as punctuation in a natural language.
generic data structure
A kind of data structure that can contain data of any type.
implementation
Code that satisfies the syntactic and semantic requirements of an interface.
interface
The set of operations that define an ADT.
infix
A way of writing mathematical expressions with the operators between the operands.
parse
To read a string of characters or tokens and analyze its grammatical structure.
postfix
A way of writing mathematical expressions with the operators after the operands.
provider
The code (or the person who wrote it) that implements an ADT.
token
A set of characters that are treated as a unit for purposes of parsing, such as the words in a
natural language.
veneer
A class definition that implements an ADT with method definitions that are invocations of other
methods, sometimes with simple transformations. The veneer does no significant work, but it
improves or standardizes the interface seen by the client.
25.10. Exercises
1.  Apply the postfix algorithm to the expression 
1 2 + 3 *.This example demonstrates one of the
advantages of postfix—there is no need to use parentheses to control the order of operations.
To get the same result in infix, we would have to write 
(1 + 2) * 3.
2.  Write a postfix expression that is equivalent to 
1 + 2 * 3.
© 
Copyright 2011, Peter Wentworth, Jeffrey Elkner, Allen B. Downey and Chris Meyers. Created using 
Sphinx 1.0.7.
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Support for customizing image size. Password protected PDF document can be converted and changed. Open source codes can be added to C# class.
add password to pdf file; password pdf files
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. VB.NET class source code for .NET framework.
change password on pdf file; create copy protected pdf
26. Queues — How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python 3
http://openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english3e/queues.html[1/4/2012 9:38:50 PM]
index
next |
previous  |
How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python 3 »
26. Queues
This chapter presents two ADTs: the Queue and the Priority Queue. In real life, a queue is a line of
customers waiting for service of some kind. In most cases, the first customer in line is the next
customer to be served. There are exceptions, though. At airports, customers whose flights are leaving
soon are sometimes taken from the middle of the queue. At supermarkets, a polite customer might
let someone with only a few items go first.
The rule that determines who goes next is called the queueing policy. The simplest queueing policy is
called FIFO, for first- in-first-out. The most general queueing policy is priority queueing, in which
each customer is assigned a priority and the customer with the highest priority goes first, regardless
of the order of arrival. We say this is the most general policy because the priority can be based on
anything: what time a flight leaves; how many groceries the customer has; or how important the
customer is. Of course, not all queueing policies are fair, but fairness is in the eye of the beholder.
The Queue ADT and the Priority Queue ADT have the same set of operations. The difference is in the
semantics of the operations: a queue uses the FIFO policy; and a priority queue (as the name
suggests) uses the priority queueing policy.
26.1. The Queue ADT
The Queue ADT is defined by the following operations:
__init__
Initialize a new empty queue.
insert
Add a new item to the queue.
remove
Remove and return an item from the queue. The item that is returned is the first one that was
added.
is_empty
Check whether the queue is empty.
26.2. Linked Queue
The first implementation of the Queue ADT we will look at is called a linked queue because it is made
up of linked 
Node objects. Here is the class definition:
1
2
3
4
5
6
class Queue:
def __init__(self):
self.length = 0
self.head = None
def is_empty(self):
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
and .docx. Create editable Word file online without email. Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word for mail merge. C# source
reader save pdf with password; add password to pdf document
C# PDF: C#.NET PDF Document Merging & Splitting Control SDK
easily merge two or more independent PDF files to create a larger PDF document merging & splitting toolkit SDK to split password-protected PDF document using
password on pdf; add password to pdf file without acrobat
26. Queues — How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python 3
http://openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english3e/queues.html[1/4/2012 9:38:50 PM]
The methods 
is_empty and 
remove are identical to the 
LinkedList methods 
is_empty and 
remove_first.
The 
insert method is new and a bit more complicated.
We want to insert new items at the end of the list. If the queue is empty, we just set 
head to refer to
the new node.
Otherwise, we traverse the list to the last node and tack the new node on the end. We can identify the
last node because its 
next attribute is None.
There are two invariants for a properly formed 
Queue object. The value of 
length should be the number
of nodes in the queue, and the last node should have 
next equal to None. Convince yourself that this
method preserves both invariants.
26.3. Performance characteristics
Normally when we invoke a method, we are not concerned with the details of its implementation. But
there is one detail we might want to know—the performance characteristics of the method. How long
does it take, and how does the run time change as the number of items in the collection increases?
First look at 
remove. There are no loops or function calls here, suggesting that the runtime of this
method is the same every time. Such a method is called a constant-time operation. In reality, the
method might be slightly faster when the list is empty since it skips the body of the conditional, but
that difference is not significant.
The performance of 
insert is very different. In the general case, we have to traverse the list to find the
last element.
This traversal takes time proportional to the length of the list. Since the runtime is a linear function of
the length, this method is called linear time. Compared to constant time, that’s very bad.
26.4. Improved Linked Queue
We would like an implementation of the Queue ADT that can perform all operations in constant time.
One way to do that is to modify the Queue class so that it maintains a reference to both the first and
the last node, as shown in the figure:
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
return (self.length == 0)
def insert(self, cargo):
node = Node(cargo)
node.next = None
if self.head == None:
# if list is empty the new node goes first
self.head = node
else:
# find the last node in the list
last = self.head
while last.next: last = last.next
# append the new node
last.next = node
self.length = self.length + 1
def remove(self):
cargo = self.head.cargo
self.head = self.head.next
self.length = self.length - 1
return cargo
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Able to Open password protected PDF; Allow users to add Easy to change PDF original password; Options for Create signatures in existing PDF signature fields;
pdf open password; password pdf
C# PDF: C# Code to Create Mobile PDF Viewer; C#.NET Mobile PDF
detailed guidance on how to create a mobile public float DocWidth = 819; protected void Page_Load Demo_Docs/").Replace("\\" Sample.pdf"; this.SessionId
add copy protection pdf; pdf password reset
26. Queues — How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python 3
http://openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english3e/queues.html[1/4/2012 9:38:50 PM]
The 
ImprovedQueue implementation looks like this:
So far, the only change is the attribute 
last. It is used in 
insert and 
remove methods:
Since 
last keeps track of the last node, we don’t have to search for it. As a result, this method is
constant time.
There is a price to pay for that speed. We have to add a special case to 
remove to set 
last to None when
the last node is removed:
This implementation is more complicated than the Linked Queue implementation, and it is more
difficult to demonstrate that it is correct. The advantage is that we have achieved the goal – both
insert and 
remove are constant-time operations.
26.5. Priority queue
The Priority Queue ADT has the same interface as the Queue ADT, but different semantics. Again, the
interface is:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
class ImprovedQueue:
def __init__(self):
self.length = 0
self.head   = None
self.last   = None
def is_empty(self):
return (self.length == 0)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
class ImprovedQueue:
...
def insert(self, cargo):
node = Node(cargo)
node.next = None
if self.length == 0:
# if list is empty, the new node is head and last
self.head = self.last = node
else:
# find the last node
last = self.last
# append the new node
last.next = node
self.last = node
self.length = self.length + 1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
class ImprovedQueue:
...
def remove(self):
cargo = self.head.cargo
self.head = self.head.next
self.length = self.length - 1
if self.length == 0:
self.last = None
return cargo
26. Queues — How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python 3
http://openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english3e/queues.html[1/4/2012 9:38:50 PM]
__init__
Initialize a new empty queue.
insert
Add a new item to the queue.
remove
Remove and return an item from the queue. The item that is returned is the one with the highest
priority.
is_empty
Check whether the queue is empty.
The semantic difference is that the item that is removed from the queue is not necessarily the first
one that was added. Rather, it is the item in the queue that has the highest priority. What the
priorities are and how they compare to each other are not specified by the Priority Queue
implementation. It depends on which items are in the queue.
For example, if the items in the queue have names, we might choose them in alphabetical order. If
they are bowling scores, we might go from highest to lowest, but if they are golf scores, we would go
from lowest to highest. As long as we can compare the items in the queue, we can find and remove
the one with the highest priority.
This implementation of Priority Queue has as an attribute a Python list that contains the items in the
queue.
The initialization method, 
is_empty, and 
insert are all veneers on list operations. The only interesting
method is 
remove:
At the beginning of each iteration, 
maxi holds the index of the biggest item (highest priority) we have
seen 
so far
. Each time through the loop, the program compares the 
i-eth item to the champion. If
the new item is bigger, the value of 
maxi if set to 
i.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
class PriorityQueue:
def __init__(self):
self.items = []
def is_empty(self):
return self.items == []
def insert(self, item):
self.items.append(item)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
class PriorityQueue:
...
def remove(self):
maxi = 0
for i in range(1, len(self.items)):
if self.items[i] > self.items[maxi]: maxi = i
item = self.items[maxi]
self.items[maxi:maxi+1= []
return item
26. Queues — How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python 3
http://openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english3e/queues.html[1/4/2012 9:38:50 PM]
When the 
for statement completes, 
maxi is the index of the biggest item. This item is removed from
the list and returned.
Let’s test the implementation:
If the queue contains simple numbers or strings, they are removed in numerical or alphabetical order,
from highest to lowest. Python can find the biggest integer or string because it can compare them
using the built-in comparison operators.
If the queue contains an object type, it has to provide a 
__gt__ method. When 
remove uses the 
>
operator to compare items, it invokes the 
__gt__ for one of the items and passes the other as a
parameter. As long as the 
__gt__ method works correctly, the Priority Queue will work.
26.6. The 
Golfer class
As an example of an object with an unusual definition of priority, let’s implement a class called 
Golfer
that keeps track of the names and scores of golfers. As usual, we start by defining 
__init__ and
__str__:
__str__ uses the format method to put the names and scores in neat columns.
Next we define a version of 
__gt__ where the lowest score gets highest priority. As always, 
__gt__
returns True if 
self is greater than 
other, and False otherwise.
Now we are ready to test the priority queue with the 
Golfer class:
>>> = PriorityQueue()
>>> q.insert(11)
>>> q.insert(12)
>>> q.insert(14)
>>> q.insert(13)
>>> while not q.is_empty(): print(q.remove())
14
13
12
11
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
class Golfer:
def __init__(self, name, score):
self.name = name
self.score= score
def __str__(self):
return "{0:16}: {1}".format(self.name, self.score)
1
2
3
4
class Golfer:
...
def __gt__(self, other):
return self.score < other.score    # less is more
>>> tiger = Golfer("Tiger Woods"   61)
>>> phil  = Golfer("Phil Mickelson"72)
>>> hal   = Golfer("Hal Sutton"    69)
>>>
26. Queues — How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python 3
http://openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english3e/queues.html[1/4/2012 9:38:50 PM]
index
next |
previous  |
How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python 3 »
26.7. Glossary
constant time
An operation whose runtime does not depend on the size of the data structure.
FIFO
First In, First Out, a queueing policy in which the first member to arrive is the first to be removed.
linear time
An operation whose runtime is a linear function of the size of the data structure.
linked queue
An implementation of a queue using a linked list.
priority queue
A queueing policy in which each member has a priority determined by external factors. The
member with the highest priority is the first to be removed.
Priority Queue
An ADT that defines the operations one might perform on a priority queue.
queue
An ordered set of objects waiting for a service of some kind.
Queue
An ADT that performs the operations one might perform on a queue.
queueing policy
The rules that determine which member of a queue is removed next.
26.8. Exercises
1.  Write an implementation of the Queue ADT using a Python list. Compare the performance of this
implementation to the 
ImprovedQueue for a range of queue lengths.
2.  Write an implementation of the Priority Queue ADT using a linked list. You should keep the list
sorted so that removal is a constant time operation. Compare the performance of this
implementation with the Python list implementation.
© 
Copyright 2011, Peter Wentworth, Jeffrey Elkner, Allen B. Downey and Chris Meyers. Created using 
Sphinx 1.0.7.
>>> pq = PriorityQueue()
>>> pq.insert(tiger)
>>> pq.insert(phil)
>>> pq.insert(hal)
>>> while not pq.is_empty(): print(pq.remove())
Tiger Woods    : 61
Hal Sutton     : 69
Phil Mickelson : 72
27. Trees — How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python 3
http://openbookproject.net/thinkcs/python/english3e/trees.html[1/4/2012 9:38:54 PM]
index
next |
previous  |
How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python 3 »
27. Trees
Like linked lists, trees are made up of nodes. A common kind of tree is a binary tree, in which each
node contains a reference to two other nodes (possibly None). These references are referred to as the
left and right subtrees. Like list nodes, tree nodes also contain cargo. A state diagram for a tree looks
like this:
To avoid cluttering up the picture, we often omit the Nones.
The top of the tree (the node 
tree refers to) is called the root. In keeping with the tree metaphor, the
other nodes are called branches and the nodes at the tips with null references are called leaves. It
may seem odd that we draw the picture with the root at the top and the leaves at the bottom, but that
is not the strangest thing.
To make things worse, computer scientists mix in another metaphor – the family tree. The top node is
sometimes called a parent and the nodes it refers to are its children. Nodes with the same parent are
called siblings.
Finally, there is a geometric vocabulary for talking about trees. We already mentioned left and right,
but there is also up (toward the parent/root) and down (toward the children/leaves). Also, all of the
nodes that are the same distance from the root comprise a level of the tree.
We probably don’t need three metaphors for talking about trees, but there they are.
Like linked lists, trees are recursive data structures because they are defined recursively. A tree is
either:
1.  the empty tree, represented by None, or
2.  a node that contains an object reference (cargo) and two tree references.
27.1. Building trees
The process of assembling a tree is similar to the process of assembling a linked list. Each constructor
invocation builds a single node.
The 
cargo can be any type, but the 
left and 
right parameters should be tree nodes. 
left and 
right
are optional; the default value is None.
To print a node, we just print the cargo.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
class Tree:
def __init__(self, cargo, left=None, right=None):
self.cargo = cargo
self.left  = left
self.right = right
def __str__(self):
return str(self.cargo)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested