c# convert pdf to image free : Copy protected pdf to word converter online application SDK tool html wpf web page online data-protection-and-journalism-media-guidance0-part472

Data protection and journalism 
Data protection 
Data protection 
and journalism:  
a guide for the 
media 
Copy protected pdf to word converter online - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
create password protected pdf online; convert password protected pdf to word online
Copy protected pdf to word converter online - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
add password to pdf online; add password to pdf file without acrobat
Data protection and journalism 
2
Contents
About this guide 
3 
Practical guidance 
6
Data protection basics 
Obtaining information 
Retaining information 
11 
Publication 
12 
Accuracy 
13 
Subject access requests 
14 
Confidential sources 
16 
Good corporate practice 
17 
Technical guidance 
18
Data protection and freedom of 
expression 
18 
An overview of the DPA 
21 
The journalism exemption 
27 
The first principle: fairness 
40 
The seventh principle: security 42 
The section 55 offence 
43 
Disputes 
46
Role of the ICO 
46 
Complaints to the ICO 
47 
ICO enforcement powers 
49 
Court claims 
51 
1
*
2
3
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF. VB.NET class source code for .NET framework. This VB.NET PDF to Word converter control
pdf password security; advanced pdf password remover
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word for mail merge. RasterEdge Visual C# .NET PDF to Word (DOC/DOCX) converter library control (XDoc.PDF) is a
copy text from protected pdf to word; add password to pdf file
Data protection and journalism 
3
About this guide 
In brief… 
This guide explains how the Data Protection Act (DPA) applies to 
journalism, advises on good practice, and clarifies the role of the 
Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). It does not have any formal 
legal status and cannot set any new rules, but it will help those working 
in the media understand and comply with existing law in this area. 
Purpose of the guide 
In the report of the Leveson Inquiry into the culture, practices and ethics 
of the press, Lord Justice Leveson recommended that the ICO: 
“should take immediate steps, in consultation with the industry, 
to prepare and issue comprehensive good practice guidelines 
and advice on appropriate principles and standards to be 
observed by the press in the processing of personal data.” 
This guide responds to that need. It explains how the DPA applies to 
journalism. It sets out the basic principles and obligations, advises on 
good practice, and clarifies how an exemption for journalism works to 
protect freedom of expression. It also explains what happens when 
someone complains, and the role and powers of the ICO. 
It is intended to help the media understand and comply with data 
protection law and follow good practice, while recognising the vital 
importance of a free and independent media. It highlights key data 
protection issues, and also explains why the DPA does not prevent 
responsible journalism. 
This guide is not intended to take the place of industry codes of practice. 
It is a guide to data protection compliance, not to wider professional 
standards or media regulation. It does however refer to existing codes, 
where directly relevant, to show how everything fits together. 
 
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Password protected PDF document can be converted and changed. using RasterEdge.XDoc. PDF; Copy demo code below to achieve fast conversion from PDF file to Jpeg
password protected pdf; adding password to pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Able to convert password protected PDF document.
pdf security password; copy from protected pdf
Data protection and journalism 
About this guide 
4
Status of the guide 
This guide does not have any formal status or legal force. It cannot and 
does not introduce any new rules or new layers of regulation. It is the 
DPA itself that places legally enforceable obligations on the media. This 
guide simply clarifies the ICO’s view of the existing law as set out in the 
DPA. It is intended to help those working in the media to understand fully 
their obligations, and to promote good practice.  
Following this guide will help to ensure compliance, but the guide itself is 
not mandatory. There are no direct consequences simply for failing to 
follow guidance, unless this leads to a breach of the DPA.  
The guide sets out our interpretation of the law and our general 
recommended approach, but decisions on individual stories and situations 
will always need to take into account the particular circumstances of the 
case. 
Who this guide is for 
The guide is intended for media organisations involved in journalism – 
including the press, the broadcast media, and online news outlets. With 
this in mind, its focus is specifically on journalism and those working in 
the media.  
The guide is aimed primarily at senior editors or other staff with 
compliance or training responsibilities. Staff journalists might find some 
parts of the guide useful – but as legal responsibility under the DPA will 
usually fall on their employer, not all of the technical detail will be 
relevant. Journalists might therefore find it easier to start with our 
separate quick guide.  
Much of the guide will also be relevant to freelance journalists, who are 
likely to have their own responsibilities under the DPA. 
Non-media organisations publishing material may also find parts of the 
guide useful. Please note, however, that the guide is not intended to be a 
comprehensive text on all aspects of freedom of expression or its 
interaction with the DPA. We may produce separate guidance for other 
types of organisation in future, if we think it would be helpful. 
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Convert PDF to Word (.docx); Convert PDF to HTML; Convert PDF Easy to copy, paste, and cut image from PDF. Able to Open password protected PDF; Allow users to add
pdf file password; copy text from protected pdf
C# Word: How to Create Word Online Viewer in C# Application
viewer creating, you can go to PDF Web Viewer Please copy the following demo code to the head of public string mode; public string fid; protected void Page_Load
break pdf password; a pdf password online
Data protection and journalism 
About this guide 
5
Separate guidance for members of the public on their data protection 
rights in relation to journalism is available on our website.  
How to use the guide 
The guide is split into three main sections, each with a different focus. 
Each section can be read separately, although links between them are 
provided where appropriate. 
Section 1 (Practical guidance) introduces some data protection basics and 
provides broad guidelines on the effect of the DPA on key areas. It 
expands on our “Data protection and journalism: a quick guide”. This 
section is likely to be of interest to anyone working in the media.  
Section 2 (Technical guidance) gives an overview of the DPA, with more 
detail on how we interpret the exemption for journalism and some of the 
other key legal provisions. This section is aimed at those with particular 
data protection compliance responsibilities, who want a more detailed 
understanding of what the DPA says. It is addressed largely to 
organisations, but much of the advice will also be relevant to freelance 
journalists. 
Section 3 (Disputes) sets out the role of the ICO, and what happens if 
someone complains under the DPA. This will be of most interest to senior 
editors or staff responsible for data protection compliance. 
More information 
The Guide to Data Protection gives a general overview of the main 
provisions of the DPA. More detailed guidance on various aspects of data 
protection is also available on the guidance pages of the ICO website .  
If you need more information about this or any other aspect of data 
protection or freedom of information, please visit our website at 
www.ico.org.uk.  
C# PDF: C# Code to Create Mobile PDF Viewer; C#.NET Mobile PDF
Copy package file "Web.config" content to public float DocWidth = 819; protected void Page_Load Demo_Docs/").Replace("\\" Sample.pdf"; this.SessionId
pdf password online; pdf protected mode
C# Image: How to Integrate Web Document and Image Viewer
RasterEdgeImagingDeveloperGuide8.0.pdf: from this user manual, you First, copy the following lines of C# code mode; public string fid; protected void Page_Load
password on pdf file; pdf user password
Data protection and journalism 
6
Practical guidance 
This section introduces some data protection basics and sets out our 
general recommended approach to key areas (although decisions in 
individual cases will always need to take account of the particular 
circumstances of the case). It expands on our quick guide for journalists
This section is likely to be useful for anyone working in the media, 
including editors, compliance staff, journalists, freelancers and producers.    
The media will often need to deviate from some or all aspects of this 
approach when it is not viable in the context of journalism and in these 
scenarios the media can consider relying on the section 32 exemption. 
Section 2 offers more detail and outlines when and how the exemption for 
journalism, art and literature can be applied.    
Data protection basics 
In brief… 
The Data Protection Act (DPA) applies whenever anyone collects, 
retains, uses, or discloses any information about a living person. It does 
not prevent responsible journalism, as the main principles are flexible 
enough to accommodate day-to-day journalistic practices, and there is 
also a specific exemption to protect journalism where necessary. 
However, the media are not automatically exempt and will need to 
ensure they give some consideration to the data protection rights of 
individuals. 
Legal responsibility usually falls on the relevant media organisation 
rather than individual employees, although freelance journalists are 
likely to have their own separate obligations. Employees of media 
organisations will need to be aware of their DPA responsibilities, 
particularly day to day adherence, when working for their employer.  
The references to “you” in this section are to anyone working in a media 
organisation.    
Data protection and journalism 
1
Practical guidance 
7
Some data protection myths 
Myth: the DPA doesn’t apply to the media. 
Reality: the DPA applies to any organisation handling information 
about people. There is an exemption to protect journalism, but this 
does not give an automatic blanket exemption from the DPA.  
Myth: the DPA only covers ‘private’ information. 
Reality: any information about someone can be personal data – even if 
it’s in the public domain or is about someone’s public role. (But the 
DPA takes account of whether such information is already public.) 
Myth: the DPA bans the disclosure of personal data. 
Reality: the DPA does not ban the disclosure of personal data and has 
very few hard and fast rules. In general, the key is to consider what’s 
justified in the circumstances.  
Myth: the DPA always requires consent. 
Reality: you can use information without consent – or even against a 
person’s express wishes – if there are good reasons to do so.  
Myth: the DPA sets time limits on keeping information and says 
we have to delete our contacts. 
Reality: there are no set time limits. You can hold information for as 
long as you need to, but you shouldn’t keep things you don’t need. The 
DPA does not say you have to delete your contacts. 
Myth: the DPA says we should reveal our sources. 
Reality: the DPA can protect the privacy of sources.  
Data protection and journalism 
1
Practical guidance 
8
Myth: we can’t do anything unless we’re exempt.  
Reality: as a general rule, you will comply with the DPA if you are fair, 
open, honest, handle information responsibly, and don’t cause 
unnecessary harm. You will not need the exemption in every case.  
Myth: the ICO will dictate what’s in the public interest. 
Reality: you decide whether publication is in the public interest. The 
ICO does not have to agree, as long as your decision is reasonable.  
When does the DPA apply? 
The scope of the DPA is very wide. It applies to the processing of personal 
data. Broadly speaking, this means that anyone – including the media – 
must comply if they handle information about people. This includes 
information about employees, customers, contacts, sources, or people 
you are investigating or writing about. 
It’s important to emphasise that the DPA will not prevent responsible 
journalism, but the media cannot ignore data protection altogether, and 
will need to be aware of the main principles and comply with them 
wherever possible.  
Section 2 addresses in greater detail when the exemption for journalism, 
art and literature will apply and how compliance with the DPA will be 
affected when it is relied upon.     
What does the DPA say? 
The DPA sets out a framework of rights and duties, that are designed to 
balance an individual’s right to information privacy against the legitimate 
needs of others to collect and use people’s details (including for the 
purposes of journalism and freedom of expression).  
There are very few hard and fast rules. Instead, the DPA is based around 
eight common-sense principles, which are flexible enough to 
accommodate most responsible day-to-day journalistic practices. The key 
is to act fairly and proportionately, and avoid causing unwarranted harm. 
Data protection and journalism 
1
Practical guidance 
9
The act includes a number of exemptions, notably an exemption to 
protect processing for the purposes of journalism, art and literature where 
necessary – but this does not mean the media are automatically exempt 
from the DPA as a whole.  
Legal responsibility under the DPA will usually fall on the relevant media 
organisation rather than individual employees, although freelance 
journalists are likely to have their own obligations. However, individual 
journalists should be aware that they can be guilty of a criminal offence if 
they obtain information unlawfully in breach of section 55. There is 
currently no specific exemption from this section for journalists, though 
there is a public interest defence. 
See section 2 for more detail on specific provisions of the DPA, including 
the exemption and the section 55 offence. 
Obtaining information 
Key points: 
Be open and honest wherever possible. People should know if you are 
collecting information about them where it is practicable to tell them. 
We accept that it will not generally be practicable for journalists to 
make contact with everyone they collect information about. 
You do not need to notify individuals if this would undermine the 
journalistic activity. This will be a trigger to consider the section 32 
exemption. 
Only use covert methods if you are confident that this is justified in 
the public interest.  
Only collect information about someone’s health, sex life or criminal 
behaviour if you are confident it is relevant and the public interest in 
doing so sufficiently justifies the intrusion into their privacy. 
Much of the information you collect will include some personal data. The 
act of obtaining it counts as ‘processing’ and is therefore covered by the 
DPA.  
The DPA expects you to collect information in a fair way. In practice, this 
means: 
a journalistic justification for collecting the information, 
Data protection and journalism 
1
Practical guidance 
10
where practical, telling the person you are collecting the information 
from, and the person the information is about (if different), who you 
are, and what you are doing with their information, 
only using someone’s information as they would reasonably expect. 
We understand you will not always want to notify individuals that you are 
investigating them. You will need a valid reason to do this, and the 
justification should reflect the privacy intrusion. We recognise that 
notifying individuals can be impractical or undermine the journalistic 
activity. This can be enable the section 32 exemption to be considered but 
you should always consider whether notification is possible, and at 
different stages of the story or investigation. 
If you do need to use undercover or intrusive covert methods to get a 
story, such as surveillance, you may do so if you reasonably believe that 
these methods are necessary (in other words it is not reasonably possible 
to use a less intrusive way to obtain the information) and the story is in 
the public interest. To establish whether covert investigation is justified in 
the public interest, you must balance the detrimental effect that informing 
the data subject would have on the journalistic assignment against the 
detrimental effect employing covert methods would have on the privacy 
of any data subjects. The importance of the story, the extent to which the 
information can be verified, the level of intrusion and the potential impact 
upon the data subject and third parties are all relevant factors. Section 2 
explains how the exemption for journalism might apply in relation to 
obtaining information.  
Even if covert investigation can be justified, you should still consider 
whether you can inform the data subject about the information collected 
once it has been gathered. 
The DPA gives more protection to some categories of information that it 
classes as sensitive. In particular, you should ensure you have an 
appropriate public interest justification before collecting information about 
someone’s health, sex life or allegations of criminal activity. See section 2 
on the 1st Principle, for more detail.  
Although there is a broad exemption for journalism from many provisions 
of the DPA, this does not exempt you from prosecution under section 55. 
It is an offence if you knowingly or recklessly obtain personal data from 
another organisation without its consent (eg by blagging, hacking or other 
covert methods). There is a public interest defence to this offence, but 
currently this holds you to a stricter standard than the usual exemption 
for journalism. You should therefore be confident about your public 
interest justification before using such methods. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested