TOPICS
Introduction to Programming 
and Visual Basic 
CHAPTER
1
1.1
Computer Systems: Hardware and
Software
1.2
Programs and Programming
Languages
1.3
More about Controls and
Programming
1.4
The Programming Process
1.5
Visual Studio and Visual Basic Express
(the Visual Basic Environment)
Microsoft Visual Basic is a powerful software development system for creating applica-
tions that run in Windows XP and Windows Vista. With Visual Basic, you can do the fol-
lowing: 
• Create applications with graphical windows, dialog boxes, and menus
• Create applications that work with databases
• Create Web applications and applications that use Internet technologies
• Create applications that display graphics
Visual Basic is a favorite tool among professional programmers. Its combination of visual
design tools and BASIC programming language make it intuitive, allowing developers to
create powerful real-world applications in a relatively short time.
Before plunging into learning Visual Basic, we will review the fundamentals of computer
hardware and software, and then build an understanding of how a Visual Basic applica-
tion is organized.
191
GADDIS_CH01  12/16/08  5:40 PM  Page 1
Pdf password encryption - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
pdf user password; create password protected pdf from word
Pdf password encryption - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
pdf password online; add password to pdf online
2
Chapter 1
Introduction to Programming and Visual Basic
20
Computer Systems: Hardware and Software
CONCEPT: Computer systems consist of similar hardware devices and hard-
ware components. This section provides an overview of computer
hardware and software organization.
Hardware
The term hardware refers to a computer’s physical components. A computer, as we gen-
erally think of it, is not an individual device, but rather a system of devices. Like the
instruments in a symphony orchestra, each device plays its own part. A typical computer
system consists of the following major components:
1. The central processing unit (CPU)
2. Main memory
3. Secondary storage devices
4. Input devices
5. Output devices
The organization of a computer system is shown in Figure 1-1.
Figure 1-1 The organization of a computer system
1. The CPU
When a computer is performing the tasks that a program tells it to do, we say that the
computer is running or executing the program. The central processing unit, or CPU, is
the part of a computer that actually runs programs. The CPU is the most important com-
ponent in a computer because without it, the computer could not run software.
Input
Devices
Output
Devices
Secondary
Storage Devices
Central Processing
Unit
Main Memory
(RAM)
GADDIS_CH01  12/16/08  5:40 PM  Page 2
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
Find your password-protected PDF and upload it. If there is no strong encryption on your file, it will be unlocked and ready to download within seconds.
copy from protected pdf; add password to pdf file with reader
C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf"; // Create a setting object with user password "Hello World". Hello World"); // Set encryption level to
break a pdf password; change password on pdf document
1.1 Computer Systems: Hardware and Software
3
A program is a set of instructions that a computer’s CPU follows to perform a task. The
program’s instructions are stored in the computer’s memory, and the CPU's job is to fetch
those instructions, one by one, and carry out the operations that they command. In mem-
ory, the instructions are stored as a series of binary numbers. A binary number is a
sequence of 1s and 0s, such as
11011011
This number has no apparent meaning to people, but to the computer it might be an
instruction to multiply two numbers or read another value from memory.
2. Main Memory
You can think of main memory as the computer’s work area. This is where the computer
stores a program while the program is running, as well as the data that the program is
working with. For example, suppose you are using a word processing program to write
an essay for one of your classes. While you do this, both the word processing program
and the essay are stored in main memory.
Main memory is commonly known as random-access memory, or RAM. It is called this
because the CPU is able to quickly access data stored at any random location in RAM.
RAM is usually a volatile type of memory that is used only for temporary storage while
a program is running. When the computer is turned off, the contents of RAM are erased.
Inside your computer, RAM is stored in microchips.
3. Secondary Storage
The most common type of secondary storage device is the disk drive. A disk drive stores
data by magnetically encoding it onto a circular disk. Most computers have a disk drive
mounted inside their case. External disk drives, which connect to one of the computer’s
communication ports, are also available. External disk drives can be used to create
backup copies of important data or to move data to another computer.
In addition to external disk drives, many types of devices have been created for copying
data, and for moving it to other computers. For many years floppy disk drives were pop-
ular. A floppy disk drive records data onto a small floppy disk, which can be removed
from the drive. The use of floppy disk drives has declined dramatically in recent years, in
favor of superior devices such as USB drives. USB drives are small devices that plug into
the computer’s USB (universal serial bus) port, and appear to the system as a disk drive.
USB drives, which use flash memory to store data, are inexpensive, reliable, and small
enough to be carried in your pocket.
Optical devices such as the CD (compact disc) and the DVD (digital versatile disc) are
also popular for data storage. Data is not recorded magnetically on an optical disc, but
is encoded as a series of pits on the disc surface. CD and DVD drives use a laser to detect
the pits and thus read the encoded data. Optical discs hold large amounts of data, and
because recordable CD and DVD drives are now commonplace, they are good mediums
for creating backup copies of data.
4. Input Devices
Input is any data the computer collects from the outside world. The device that collects
the data and sends it to the computer is called an input device. Common input devices
are the keyboard, mouse, scanner, and digital camera. Disk drives and CD drives can also
be considered input devices because programs and data are retrieved from them and
loaded into the computer’s memory.
21
GADDIS_CH01  1/8/09  8:13 PM  Page 3
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_pw_a.pdf" ' Create a password setting object with user password "Hello World Hello World") ' Set encryption level to
pdf protection remover; pdf password encryption
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
NET class. Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Support PDF encryption in VB.NET class applications. A professional
pdf password unlock; pdf file password
4
Chapter 1
Introduction to Programming and Visual Basic
5. Output Devices
Output is any data the computer sends to the outside world. It might be a sales report, a
list of names, a graphic image, or a sound. The data is sent to an output device, which
formats and presents it. Common output devices are monitors and printers. Disk drives
and CD recorders can also be considered output devices because the CPU sends data to
them in order to be saved.
Software
Softwarerefers to the programs that run on a computer. There are two general categories
of software: operating systems and application software. An operating system or OSis a
set of  programs that  manages the  computer’s  hardware devices  and  controls  their
processes. Windows XP, Windows Vista, Mac OSX, and Linux are all operating systems. 
Application softwarerefers to programs that make the computer useful to the user. These
programs, which are generally called applications, solve specific problems or perform
general operations that satisfy the needs of the user. Word processing, spreadsheet, and
database packages are all examples of application software. As you work through this
book, you will develop application software using Visual Basic.
Checkpoint
1.1 List the five major hardware components of a computer system.
1.2 What is main memory? What is its purpose?
1.3 Explain why computers have both main memory and secondary storage.
1.4 What are the two general categories of software?
Programs and Programming Languages
CONCEPT: A program is a set of instructions a computer follows in order to
perform a task. A programming language is a special language
used to write computer programs.
What Is a Program?
Computers are designed to follow instructions. A computer program is a set of instruc-
tions that enables the computer to solve a problem or perform a task. For example, sup-
pose  we  want  the computer to  calculate  someone’s gross  pay—a  Wage  Calculator
application. Figure 1-2 shows a list of things the computer should do.
Collectively, the instructions in Figure 1-2 are called an algorithm. An algorithm is a set
of well-defined steps for performing a task or solving a problem. Notice these steps are
sequentially ordered. Step 1 should be performed before Step 2, and so on. It is impor-
tant that these instructions are performed in their proper sequence.
1.2
22
GADDIS_CH01  12/16/08  5:40 PM  Page 4
VB.NET Word: How to Convert Word Document to PNG Image Format in
and document formats, including converting Word to PDF in VB protection by utilizing the modern Advanced Encryption Standard that converts a password to a
a pdf password; reader save pdf with password
C# Image: How to Annotate Image with Freehand Line in .NET Project
Tutorials on how to add freehand line objects to PDF, Word and TIFF SDK; Protect sensitive image information with redaction and encryption annotation objects;
pdf print protection; add copy protection pdf
1.2 Programs and Programming Languages
5
Figure 1-2 Program steps—Wage Calculator application
States and Transitions
It is helpful to think of a running computer program as a combination of states and tran-
sitions. Each state is represented by a snapshot (like a picture) of the computer’s memory.
Using the Wage Calculator application example from Figure 1-2, the following is a 
memory snapshot taken when the program starts:
In Step 3, the number of hours worked by the user is stored in memory. Suppose the user
enters the value 20. A new program state is created:
In Step 6, the hourly pay rate entered by the user is stored in memory. Suppose the user
enters the value 25. The following memory snapshot shows the new program state:
1. Display a message on the screen: How many hours did you work?
?
2. Allow the user to enter the number of hours worked. 
3. Once the user enters a number, store it in memory.
4. Display a message on the screen: How much do you get paid per hour?
5. Allow the user to enter an hourly pay rate.
6. Once the user enters a number, store it in memory.
7. Once both the number of hours worked and the hourly pay rate are entered, multiply
the two numbers and store the result in memory as the amount earned.
8. Display a message on the screen that shows the amount of money earned. The message
must include the result of the calculation performed in Step 7.
23
GADDIS_CH01  12/16/08  5:40 PM  Page 5
C# Image: C#.NET Code to Add HotSpot Annotation on Images
Protect sensitive information with powerful redaction and encryption annotation objects to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add password to pdf preview; convert pdf password protected to word online
C# Image: Add Watermark to Images Within RasterEdge .NET Imaging
powerful and reliable color reduction products, image encryption decryption, and even to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
add password to pdf without acrobat; convert protected pdf to word
6
Chapter 1
Introduction to Programming and Visual Basic
In Step 7, the application calculates the amount of money earned, saving it in a variable.
The following memory snapshot shows the new program state:
The memory snapshot produced by Step 7 represents the final program state.
Programming Languages
In order for a computer to perform instructions such as the wage calculator algorithm,
the steps must be converted to a format the computer can process. As mentioned earlier,
a program is stored in memory as a series of binary numbers. These numbers are known
as  machine  language  instructions.  The  CPU  only  processes  instructions  written  in
machine language. Our Wage Calculator application might look like the following at the
moment when it is executed by the computer:
10101101110101000111100001101110100011110001110011010101110
etc.
The CPU interprets these binary or machine language numbers as commands. As you
might imagine, the process of encoding an algorithm in machine language is tedious and
difficult. Programming languages, which use words instead of numbers, were invented to
ease this task. Programmers can write their applications in programming language state-
ments, and then use special software called a compiler to convert the program into
machine language. Names of some popular recent programming languages are shown in
Table 1-1. This list is only a small sample—there are thousands of programming lan-
guages.
Visual Basic is more than just a programming language. It is a programming environ-
ment, with tools for creating screen elements and programming language statements.
Although Visual Basic, as a whole, is radically different from the original BASIC pro-
gramming language, its programming statements are similar.
Table 1-1 Popular programming languages
Language
Description
Visual Basic, C# Popular programming languages for building Windows and Web applications. Use
a graphical user interface.
C, C++
Powerful advanced programmng languages that emphasize flexibility and fast
running times. C++ is also object-oriented.
Java
Flexible and powerful programming language that runs on many different
computer systems. Often used to teach object-oriented programming.
Python
Simple, yet powerful programming language used for graphics and small
applications.
PHP
Programming language used for creating interactive Web sites.
JavaScript
Scripting language used in Web applications that provides rich user interfaces for
Web browsers.
24
GADDIS_CH01  1/8/09  7:56 PM  Page 6
1.2 Programs and Programming Languages
7
Procedural and Object-Oriented Programming
There are primarily two methods of programming used today: procedural programming
and object-oriented programming.
Procedural Programming
The earliest programming languages were procedural. Procedural programming means
that a program is made of one or more procedures. A procedureis a set of programming
language statements that are executed by the computer. The statements might gather
input from the user, manipulate information stored in the computer’s memory, perform
calculations, or any other operation necessary to complete its task. The wage calculator
algorithm shown in Figure 1-2 can be thought of as a procedure. If the algorithm’s eight
steps are performed in order, one after the other, it will succeed in calculating and dis-
playing the user’s gross pay.
Procedural programming was the standard when users were interacting with text-based
computer terminals. For example, Figure 1-3 shows the screen of an older MS-DOS com-
puter running a program that performs the wage calculator algorithm. The user has
entered the numbers shown in bold.
Object-Oriented Programming
Object-oriented programming or OOP is an industry standard model for designing and
coding programs. When designing  applications,  designers  use  real-world objects  to
express patterns, called classes in software. An example is a student registration applica-
tion, in which we would choose students, transcripts, and accounts as possible classes.
The program we write would create objects, or instances of these classes. 
Classes contain attributes, expressed as variables. For example, a class named Account
would probably contain attributes such as balance, account ID, and payment history. In
Visual Basic, classes are used to describe the objects that appear on the screen. When a
program runs, these objects are created and displayed.
Figure 1-3 Wage Calculator application
Graphical User Interface
In text-based environments using procedural programs, the user responds to the pro-
gram. Modern operating systems, such as the Windows family, use a graphical user 
interface, or GUI (pronounced gooey). Although GUIs have made programs friendlier
and easier to interact with, they have not simplified the task of programming. GUIs
require on-screen elements such as windows, dialog boxes, buttons, and menus. The pro-
gram must handle the user’s interactions with these on-screen elements, in any order the
user might choose to select them. No longer does the user respond to a program—now
the program responds to a user.
GUIs have helped influence the shift from procedural programming to object-oriented
programming. Whereas procedural programming is centered on creating procedures,
object-oriented programming is centered on creating objects.An object is a programming
How many hours did you work? 10
How much are you paid per hour? 15
You have earned $150.00
C>_
25
GADDIS_CH01  1/8/09  8:08 PM  Page 7
8
Chapter 1
Introduction to Programming and Visual Basic
26
element that contains data and actions. The data contained in an object is known as its
attributes.In Visual Basic, an object’s attributes are called properties.The actions that an
object performs are known as the object’s methods. The object is, conceptually, a self-
contained unit consisting of data (properties) and actions (methods).
Perhaps the best way to understand objects is to experience a program that uses them.
The following steps guide you through the process of running a demonstration program
located on the Student CD. The program was created with Visual Basic.
Required Software Setup
To use this book, you must install two pieces of software:
• Microsoft Visual Studio 2008 or Visual Basic 2008 Express.From now on, we will
drop the “2008” from both names. If you will be covering Chapter 11, you will also
need Visual Web Developer 2008 Express.
• The student sample program files, located on the CD-ROM packaged with this
book.
Installing the Sample Program Files
The Student CD included with this book contains sample program files that are required
in many of the tutorials. Before you can use these files you must copy them from the 
Student CD to your computer’s hard drive. If you are working in a college computer lab,
it is possible that the sample program files have already been copied to the computers in
the lab. If this is the case, your professor will tell you where they are located. In Tutorial
1-1, you will execute the Wage Calculator application.
Tutorial 1-1: 
Running the Wage Calculator application
Assuming you have installed Visual Studio or Visual Basic Express and the sample 
programs from the Student CD on your computer, you’re ready to begin Tutorial 1-1. 
Step 1:
In Windows, double-click the My Computer icon or the Windows Explorer
icon.
Step 2:
In Windows, navigate to the folder on your computer containing the student
sample programs. Then navigate to the Chap1\Wage Calculator\bin folder.
Double-click the file Wage Calculator.exe (the .exe filename extension may
not be visible). The program’s window should display.
The window shown in Figure 1-4 can be thought of as an object. In Visual Basic termi-
nology, this window object is known as a Form object.The formalso contains numerous
other objects. As shown in Figure 1-5, it has four Label objects, two TextBox objects, and
two Button objects. In Visual Basic, these objects are known as controls.
The appearance of a screen object, such as a form or other control, is determined by the
object’s properties. For example, each of the Label controls has a property known as
Text. The value stored in the Text property becomes the text displayed by the label. For
instance, the Text property of the topmost label on the form is set to the value Number
of Hours Worked. Beneath it is another Label control, whose Text property is set to
Forms, 
Controls, 
and 
Properties
GADDIS_CH01  8/4/09  1:44 PM  Page 8
1.2 Programs and Programming Languages
279
Hourly Pay Rate. The Button controls also have a Text property. The Text property of
the leftmost button is set to Calculate Gross Pay, and the rightmost button has its Text
property set to Close. Even the window, or form, has a Text property, which determines
the text displayed in the window’s title bar. Wage Calculator is the value stored in this
form’s Text property. Part of the process of creating a Visual Basic application is decid-
ing what values to store in each object’s properties.
Event-Driven Programming
Programs that operate in a GUI environment must be event-driven. An event is an action
that takes place within a program, such as the clicking of a control. All Visual Basic con-
trols are capable of detecting various events. For example, a Button control can detect
when it has been clicked and a TextBox control can detect when its contents have
changed.
Names are assigned to all of the events that can be detected. For instance, when the user
clicks a Button control, a 
Click
event occurs. When the contents of a TextBox control
changes, a 
TextChanged
event occurs. If you wish for a control to respond to a specific
event, you must write a special type of method known as an event procedure. An event
procedure is a method that is executed when a specific event occurs. If an event occurs,
and there is no event procedure to respond to that event, the event is ignored.
Part of the Visual Basic programming process is designing and writing event procedures.
Tutorial 1-2 demonstrates an event procedure using the Wage Calculator application you
executed in Tutorial 1-1.
Tutorial 1-2: 
Running an application that demonstrates event procedures
Step 1:
With the Wage Calculator application from Tutorial 1-1 still running, enter the
value 
10
in the first TextBox control. This is the number of hours worked.
Step 2:
Press the t
key. Notice that the cursor moves to the next TextBox control.
Enter the value 
15
. This is the hourly pay rate. The window should look like
that shown in Figure 1-6.
Figure 1-4 Wage Calculator screen
Figure 1-5 Types of controls
Button
Button
Label
Label
Label
Label
TextBox
TextBox
Event-Driven
Programming
GADDIS_CH01  12/16/08  5:40 PM  Page 9
10
Chapter 1
Introduction to Programming and Visual Basic
28
Step 3:
Click the Calculate Gross Pay button. Notice that in response to the mouse
click, the application multiplies the values you entered in the TextBox controls
and displays the result in a Label control. This action is performed by an event
procedure that responds to the button being clicked. The window should look
like that shown in Figure 1-7.
Figure 1-6 Text boxes filled in on 
the Wage Calculator form
Step 4:
Next,  click the  Close button.  The  application  responds  to  this  event  by 
terminating. This is because an event procedure closes the application when the
button is clicked. 
This simple application demonstrates the essence of object-oriented, event-driven pro-
gramming. In the next section, we examine the controls and event procedures more
closely.
More about Controls and Programming
CONCEPT: As a Visual Basic programmer, you must design and create the two
major components of an application: the GUI elements (forms and
other controls) and the programming statements that respond to
and/or perform actions (event procedures).
While creating a Visual Basic application, you will spend much of your time doing three
things: creating the GUI elements that make up the application’s user interface, setting the
properties of the GUI elements, and writing programming language statements that
respond to events and perform other operations. In this section, we take a closer look at
these aspects of Visual Basic programming.
Visual Basic Controls
In the previous section, you saw examples of several GUI elements, or controls. Visual
Basic provides a wide assortment of controls for gathering input, displaying information,
selecting values, showing graphics, and more. Table 1-2 lists some of the commonly used
controls.
1.3
Figure 1-7 Gross pay calculated
GADDIS_CH01  1/8/09  7:57 PM  Page 10
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested