convert pdf to png using c# : Add password to pdf reader control application system web page azure .net console diveintopython3-r80210-part569

>>> import os, glob
>>> [f for f in glob.glob('*.py') if os.stat(f).st_size > 6000]
['pluraltest6.py',
'romantest10.py',
'romantest6.py',
'romantest7.py',
'romantest8.py',
'romantest9.py']
1. To filter a list, you can include an
if
clauseat the end of thelist comprehension. The expression after the
if
keyword will be evaluated for each item in the list. If the expression evaluates to
True
,the item will be
included in the output. This list comprehension looks at thelist of all
.py
files in the current directory, and
the
if
expression filters that list by testing whether thesizeof each fileis greater than
6000
bytes. There
are six such files, so thelist comprehension returns a list of six filenames.
All the examples of list comprehensions so far have featured simple expressions—multiply anumber by a
constant, call a single function, or simply return theoriginal list item (after filtering). But there’s no limit to
how complex a list comprehension can be.
>>> import os, glob
>>> [(os.stat(f).st_size, os.path.realpath(f)) for f in glob.glob('*.xml')]
[(3074, 'c:\\Users\\pilgrim\\diveintopython3\\examples\\feed-broken.xml'),
(3386, 'c:\\Users\\pilgrim\\diveintopython3\\examples\\feed-ns0.xml'),
(3070, 'c:\\Users\\pilgrim\\diveintopython3\\examples\\feed.xml')]
>>> import humansize
>>> [(humansize.approximate_size(os.stat(f).st_size), f) for f in glob.glob('*.xml')]
[('3.0 KiB', 'feed-broken.xml'),
('3.3 KiB', 'feed-ns0.xml'),
('3.0 KiB', 'feed.xml')]
1. This list comprehension finds all the
.xml
files in the current working directory, gets the size of each file(by
calling the
os.stat()
function), and constructs a tupleof thefile size and the absolutepath of each file (by
calling the
os.path.realpath()
function).
101
Add password to pdf reader - C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
open password protected pdf; adding password to pdf file
Add password to pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WinForms, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF Document by Setting Password
add password to pdf reader; adding a password to a pdf using reader
2. This comprehension builds on the previous one to call the
approximate_size()
function with thefile size of
each
.xml
file.
3.4. D
ICTIONARY
C
OMPREHENSIONS
Adictionary comprehension is like a list comprehension, but it constructs a dictionary instead of a list.
>>> import os, glob
>>> metadata = [(f, os.stat(f)) for f in glob.glob('*test*.py')]
>>> metadata[0]
('alphameticstest.py', nt.stat_result(st_mode=33206, st_ino=0, st_dev=0,
st_nlink=0, st_uid=0, st_gid=0, st_size=2509, st_atime=1247520344,
st_mtime=1247520344, st_ctime=1247520344))
>>> metadata_dict = {f:os.stat(f) for f in glob.glob('*test*.py')}
>>> type(metadata_dict)
<class 'dict'>
>>> list(metadata_dict.keys())
['romantest8.py', 'pluraltest1.py', 'pluraltest2.py', 'pluraltest5.py',
'pluraltest6.py', 'romantest7.py', 'romantest10.py', 'romantest4.py',
'romantest9.py', 'pluraltest3.py', 'romantest1.py', 'romantest2.py',
'romantest3.py', 'romantest5.py', 'romantest6.py', 'alphameticstest.py',
'pluraltest4.py']
>>> metadata_dict['alphameticstest.py'].st_size
2509
1. This is not a dictionary comprehension; it’s a
list comprehension. It finds all
.py
files with
test
in their name,
then constructs a tuple of the filename and the file metadata (from calling the
os.stat()
function).
2. Each item of the resulting list is a tuple.
3. This is a dictionary comprehension. The syntax is similar to a list comprehension, with two differences. First,
it is enclosed in curly braces instead of square brackets. Second, instead of a single expression for each item,
102
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo
add password to pdf preview; break password on pdf
XImage.Barcode Scanner for .NET, Read, Scan and Recognize barcode
Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to PDF; VB VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#; C#; XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for
pdf password unlock; password on pdf
it contains two expressions separated by a colon. The expression before the colon (
f
in this example) is the
dictionary key; the expression after thecolon (
os.stat(f)
in this example) is the value.
4. A dictionary comprehension returns adictionary.
5. Thekeys of this particular dictionary are simply the filenames returned from thecall to
glob.glob('*test*.py')
.
6. Thevalueassociated with each key is the return value from the
os.stat()
function. That means we can
“look up” afile by name in this dictionary toget its file metadata. One of the pieces of metadata is
st_size
,
the file size. The file
alphameticstest.py
is
2509
bytes long.
Like list comprehensions, you can include an
if
clause in a dictionary comprehension to filter the input
sequence based on an expression which is evaluated with each item.
>>> import os, glob, humansize
>>> metadata_dict = {f:os.stat(f) for f in glob.glob('*')}
>>> humansize_dict = {os.path.splitext(f)[0]:humansize.approximate_size(meta.st_size) \
...
for f, meta in metadata_dict.items() if meta.st_size > 6000}
>>> list(humansize_dict.keys())
['romantest9', 'romantest8', 'romantest7', 'romantest6', 'romantest10', 'pluraltest6']
>>> humansize_dict['romantest9']
'6.5 KiB'
1. This dictionary comprehension constructs a list of all the files in the current working directory
(
glob.glob('*')
), gets the filemetadata for each file (
os.stat(f)
), and constructs adictionary whose keys
are filenames and whose values are the metadata for each file.
2. This dictionary comprehension builds on the previous comprehension, filters out files smaller than
6000
bytes
(
if meta.st_size > 6000
), and uses that filtered list to construct a dictionary whosekeys are the filename
minus the extension (
os.path.splitext(f)[0]
)and whose values aretheapproximate size of each file
(
humansize.approximate_size(meta.st_size)
).
3. As you saw in a previous example, there are six such files, thus there aresix items in this dictionary.
4. Thevalueof each key is the string returned from the
approximate_size()
function.
103
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
add copy protection pdf; change password on pdf
C# Imaging - Scan Barcode Image in C#.NET
RasterEdge Barcode Reader DLL add-in enables developers to add barcode image dimensional barcode types, such as Code 128, EAN-13, QR Code, PDF-417, etc
annotate protected pdf; pdf protection remover
3.4.1. O
THER
F
UN
S
TUFF
T
O
D
O
W
ITH
D
ICTIONARY
C
OMPREHENSIONS
Here’s a trick with dictionary comprehensions that might be useful someday: swapping thekeys and values of
adictionary.
>>> a_dict = {'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c': 3}
>>> {value:key for key, value in a_dict.items()}
{1: 'a', 2: 'b', 3: 'c'}
3.5. S
ET
C
OMPREHENSIONS
Not to be left out, sets have their own comprehension syntax as well. It is remarkably similar to the syntax
for dictionary comprehensions. The only difference is that sets just have values instead of key:valuepairs.
>>> a_set = set(range(10))
>>> a_set
{0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9}
>>> {x ** 2 for x in a_set}
{0, 1, 4, 81, 64, 9, 16, 49, 25, 36}
>>> {x for x in a_set if x % 2 == 0}
{0, 8, 2, 4, 6}
>>> {2**x for x in range(10)}
{32, 1, 2, 4, 8, 64, 128, 256, 16, 512}
1. Set comprehensions can takea set as input. This set comprehension calculates the squares of the set of
numbers from 0 to
9
.
2. Like list comprehensions and dictionary comprehensions, set comprehensions can contain an
if
clauseto
filter each item beforereturning it in the result set.
3. Set comprehensions do not need to takea set as input; they can takeany sequence.
104
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Evaluation library and components enable users to annotate PDF without adobe PDF reader control installed. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in
pdf passwords; reader save pdf with password
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
Viewer in C#. In this section, we offer detailed guidance for you to create and add a PDF document viewer & reader in Windows Forms application using C# code.
break pdf password; convert protected pdf to word online
3.6. F
URTHER
R
EADING
os
module
os
—Portable access to operating system specific features
os.path
module
os.path
—Platform-independent manipulation of file names
glob
module
glob
—Filenamepattern matching
time
module
time
—Functions for manipulating clock time
List comprehensions
Nested list comprehensions
Looping techniques
105
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
A powerful PDF reader allows C# users to view PDF PDF editor enable C# users to edit PDF text, image Support to add password to PDF document and edit password
add password to pdf file with reader; creating password protected pdf
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Document Protect. Apply password to protect PDF. Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file.
create pdf password; pdf password remover online
C
HAPTER
4. S
TRINGS
I’m telling you this ’cause you’re one of my friends.
My alphabet startswhere your alphabet ends!
—Dr. Seuss, On Beyond Zebra!
4.1. S
OME
B
ORING
S
TUFF
Y
OU
N
EED
T
O
U
NDERSTAND
B
EFORE
Y
OU
C
AN
D
IVE
I
N
D
id you know that thepeople of
Bougainville have the smallest alphabet in the world? Their
Rotokas
alphabet is composed of only 12 letters: A, E, G, I, K, O, P, R, S, T, U, and V. On the other end of the
spectrum, languages likeChinese, Japanese, and Korean have thousands of characters. English, of course, has
26 letters—52 if you count uppercaseand lowercase separately—plus a handful of
!@#$%&
punctuation
marks.
When people talkabout “text,” they’re thinkingof “characters and symbols on the computer screen.”But
computers don’t deal in characters and symbols; they deal in bits and bytes. Every piece of text you’veever
seen on a computer screen is actually stored in aparticular character encoding. Very roughly speaking, the
character encodingprovides a mapping between thestuff you seeon your screen and thestuff your
computer actually stores in memory and on disk. There aremany different character encodings, some
optimized for particular languages like Russian or Chinese or English, and others that can beused for
multiple languages.
In reality, it’s more complicated than that. Many characters are common to multipleencodings, but each
encoding may use a different sequence of bytes to actually store those characters in memory or on disk. So
you can thinkof thecharacter encoding as a kind of decryption key. Whenever someone gives you a
sequence of bytes—a file, a web page, whatever—and claims it’s “text,” you need to know what character
encoding they used so you can decodethebytes into characters. If they give you thewrong key or nokey
at all, you’re left with the unenviable task of cracking thecode yourself. Chances are you’ll get it wrong, and
the result will be gibberish.
106
Everything
you thought
you knew
about
strings is
wrong.
Surely you’ve seen web pages like this, with strange
question-mark-likecharacters where apostrophes should
be. That usually means the page author didn’t declare
their character encoding correctly, your browser was
left guessing, and theresult was a mix of expected and
unexpected characters. In English it’s merely annoying;in
other languages, theresult can be completely
unreadable.
Therearecharacter encodings for each major language
in the world. Since each language is different, and
memory and disk space havehistorically been expensive,
each character encoding is optimized for a particular
language. By that, I mean each encoding using thesame
numbers (0–255) to represent that language’s characters.
For instance, you’re probably familiar with the
ASCII
encoding, which stores English characters as numbers
ranging from 0 to 127. (65 is capital “A”, 97 is
lowercase “a”,
&
c.) English has a very simplealphabet,
so it can be completely expressed in less than 128 numbers. For thoseof you whocan count in base 2,
that’s 7 out of the8 bits in a byte.
Western European languages like French, Spanish, and German have more letters than English. Or, more
precisely, they have letters combined with various diacritical marks, like the
ñ
character in Spanish. The most
common encodingfor theselanguages is CP-1252, alsocalled “windows-1252” because it is widely used on
Microsoft Windows. TheCP-1252 encoding shares characters with
ASCII
in the 0–127 range, but then
extends into the 128–255 range for characters like n-with-a-tilde-over-it (241), u-with-two-dots-over-it (252),
&
c. It’s still a single-byte encoding, though;thehighest possible number, 255, still fits in onebyte.
Then therearelanguages likeChinese, Japanese, and Korean, which haveso many characters that they
require multiple-byte character sets. That is, each “character” is represented by a two-byte number from
0–65535. But different multi-byte encodings still share the same problem as different single-byte encodings,
namely that they each usethesamenumbers to mean different things. It’s just that the rangeof numbers is
broader, because there are many morecharacters to represent.
107
That was mostly OK in a non-networked world, where “text” was something you typed yourself and
occasionally printed. There wasn’t much “plain text”. Sourcecode was
ASCII
,and everyoneelseused word
processors, which defined their own (non-text) formats that tracked character encoding information along
with rich styling,
&
c. Peopleread these documents with the same word processing program as the original
author, so everything worked, more or less.
Now thinkabout therise of global networks like email and theweb. Lots of “plain text” flying around the
globe, beingauthored on one computer, transmitted through a second computer, and received and displayed
by a third computer. Computers can only see numbers, but the numbers could mean different things. Oh no!
What to do? Well, systems had tobe designed to carry encoding information along with every piece of
“plain text.”Remember, it’s thedecryption key that maps computer-readable numbers to human-readable
characters. A missing decryption key means garbled text, gibberish, or worse.
Now thinkabout trying to store multiple pieces of text in the same place, like in thesamedatabase table
that holds all the email you’ve ever received. You still need to store the character encoding alongside each
piece of text so you can display it properly. Think that’s hard? Try searchingyour email database, which
means converting between multipleencodings on thefly. Doesn’t that sound fun?
Now thinkabout thepossibility of multilingual documents, where characters from several languages are next
to each other in the same document. (Hint: programs that tried to do this typically used escapecodes to
switch “modes.” Poof, you’re in Russian koi8-r mode, so 241 means Я;poof, now you’re in Mac Greek
mode, so 241 means ώ.) And of courseyou’ll want to search those documents, too.
Now cry a lot, because everything you thought you knew about strings is wrong, and thereain’t nosuch
thing as “plain text.”
4.2. U
NICODE
Enter Unicode.
108
Unicode is a system designed to represent every character from every language. Unicode represents each
letter, character, or ideograph as a 4-byte number. Each number represents a uniquecharacter used in at
least one of the world’s languages. (Not all the numbers areused, but more than 65535 of them are, so2
bytes wouldn’t be sufficient.) Characters that are used in multiplelanguages generally have the same number,
unless there is a good etymological reason not to. Regardless, thereis exactly 1 number per character, and
exactly 1 character per number. Every number always means just one thing; there are no “modes” to keep
track of.
U+0041
is always
'A'
,even if your languagedoesn’t have an
'A'
in it.
On theface of it, this seems like agreat idea. One encoding to rule them all. Multiple languages per
document. No more“modeswitching” to switch between encodings mid-stream. But right away, theobvious
question should leap out at you. Four bytes? For every singlecharacter‽ That seems awfully wasteful,
especially for languages like English and Spanish, which need less than onebyte (256 numbers) to express
every possible character. In fact, it’s wasteful even for ideograph-based languages (like Chinese), which never
need more than two bytes per character.
Thereis a Unicodeencoding that uses four bytes per character. It’s called UTF-32, because 32 bits = 4
bytes. UTF-32 is a straightforward encoding; it takes each Unicode character (a 4-bytenumber) and
represents thecharacter with that same number. This has some advantages, themost important being that
you can find the
Nth
character of a string in constant time, because the
Nth
character starts at the
4×Nth
byte. It also has several disadvantages, the most obvious being that it takes four freaking bytes to store every
freaking character.
Even though there are a lot of Unicode characters, it turns out that most people will never useanything
beyond the first 65535. Thus, there is another Unicodeencoding, called UTF-16 (because 16 bits = 2 bytes).
UTF-16 encodes every character from 0–65535 as two bytes, then uses somedirty hacks if you actually need
to represent therarely-used “astral plane” Unicode characters beyond 65535. Most obvious advantage:
UTF-16 is twiceas space-efficient as UTF-32, because every character requires only two bytes to store
instead of four bytes (except for the ones that don’t). And you can still easily find the
Nth
character of a
string in constant time, if you assumethat the string doesn’t include any astral plane characters, which is a
good assumption right up until themoment that it’s not.
But therearealso non-obvious disadvantages to both UTF-32 and UTF-16. Different computer systems store
individual bytes in different ways. That means that the character
U+4E2D
could be stored in UTF-16 as either
4E 2D
or
2D 4E
,depending on whether the system is big-endian or little-endian. (For UTF-32, there are even
109
more possible byte orderings.) As long as your documents never leave your computer, you’re
safe—different applications on the same computer will all use the same byte order. But the minuteyou
want to transfer documents between systems, perhaps on a world wideweb of some sort, you’re going to
need away to indicate which order your bytes are stored. Otherwise, the receiving system has no way of
knowing whether the two-byte sequence
4E 2D
means
U+4E2D
or
U+2D4E
.
To solve thisproblem, the multi-byte Unicode encodings definea “Byte Order Mark,” which is a special non-
printable character that you can include at the beginningof your document to indicate what order your
bytes are in. For UTF-16, the Byte Order Mark is
U+FEFF
.If you receivea UTF-16 document that starts with
the bytes
FF FE
,you know thebyteordering is oneway;if it starts with
FE FF
,you know the byte ordering
is reversed.
Still, UTF-16 isn’t exactly ideal, especially if you’redealing with a lot of
ASCII
characters. If you thinkabout
it, even a Chinese web page is going to contain a lot of
ASCII
characters—all the elements and attributes
surrounding theprintableChinese characters. Being able to find the
Nth
character in constant timeis nice,
but there’s still the nagging problem of those astral plane characters, which mean that you can’t guarantee
that every character is exactly twobytes, so you can’t really find the
Nth
character in constant timeunless
you maintain a separate index. And boy, there sureis a lot of
ASCII
text in theworld…
Other peoplepondered these questions, and they came up with asolution:
UTF-8
110
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested