convert pdf to image c# ghostscript : Change security settings on pdf software Library dll windows .net asp.net web forms O'Reilly%20-%20Python%20Cookbook6-part1489

The built-in function 
iter
, new in Python 2.2, returns an iterator, if possible. 
for x
in s
implicitly calls the 
iter
function, so the 
canLoopOver
function can easily check if 
for
is 
applicable by calling 
iter
explicitly and seeing if that raises an exception.  
In Python 2.1 and earlier, there is no 
iter
function, so we have to try more directly:  
def canLoopOver(maybeIterable): 
try: 
for x in maybeIterable: 
return 1 
else: 
return 1 
except: 
return 0 
Here we have to rely on the 
for
statement itself raising an exception if 
maybeIterable
is 
not iterable after all. Note that this approach is not fully suitable for Python 2.2: if 
maybeIterable
is an iterator object, the 
for
in this approach consumes its first item.  
Neither of these implementations of 
canLoopOver
is entirely satisfactory, by itself, as our 
scalar-testing predicate. The problem is with strings, Unicode strings, and other string-like objects. 
These objects are perfectly good sequences, and we could loop on them with a 
for
statement, but 
we typically want to treat them as scalars. And even if we didn't, we would at least have to treat 
any string-like objects with a length of 1 as scalars. Otherwise, since such strings are iterable and 
yield themselves as their only items, our 
flatten
function would not cease recursion until it 
exhausted the call stack and raised a 
RuntimeError
due to "maximum recursion depth 
exceeded."  
Fortunately, we can easily distinguish string-like objects by attempting a typical string operation 
on them:  
def isStringLike(obj): 
try: obj+'' 
except TypeError: return 0 
else: return 1 
Now, we finally have a good implementation for the scalar-checking predicate:  
def isScalar(obj): 
return isStringLike(obj) or not canLoopOver(obj) 
By simply placing this 
isScalar
function and the appropriate implementation of 
canLoopOver
in our module, before the recipe's functions, we can change the signatures of 
these functions to make them easier to call in most cases. For example:  
def flatten22(sequence, scalarp=isScalar): 
Now the caller needs to pass the 
scalarp
argument only in those (hopefully rare) cases where 
our definition of what is scalar does not quite meet the caller's application-specific needs.  
1.13.4 See Also 
The Library Reference section on sequence types. 
Change security settings on pdf - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
decrypt pdf file; secure pdf file
Change security settings on pdf - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
convert locked pdf to word online; secure pdf remove
1.14 Looping in Parallel over Index and Sequence Items 
Credit: Alex Martelli 
1.14.1 Problem 
You need to loop on a sequence, but at each step you also need to know what index into the 
sequence you have reached.  
1.14.2 Solution 
Together, the built-in functions 
xrange
and 
zip
make this easy. You need only this one 
instance of 
xrange
, as it is fully reusable:  
indices = xrange(sys.maxint) 
Here's how you use the 
indices
instance:  
for item, index in zip(sequence, indices): 
something(item, index) 
This gives the same semantics as: 
for index in range(len(sequence)): 
something(sequence[index], index) 
but the change of emphasis allows greater clarity in many usage contexts.  
Another alternative is to use class wrappers: 
class Indexed: 
def _ _init_ _(self, seq): 
self.seq = seq 
def _ _getitem_ _(self, i): 
return self.seq[i], i 
For example: 
for item, index in Indexed(sequence): 
something(item, index) 
In Python 2.2, with 
from _ _future_ _ import generators
, you can also use:  
def Indexed(sequence): 
iterator = iter(sequence) 
for index in indices: 
yield iterator.next(  ), index 
# Note that we exit by propagating StopIteration 
when .next raises it! 
Online Change your PDF file Permission Settings
easy as possible to change your PDF file permission settings. You can receive the locked PDF by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security.
advanced pdf encryption remover; decrypt a pdf
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK provides some PDF security settings about password to help protect your PDF document Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password.
decrypt pdf password; copy paste encrypted pdf
However, the simplest roughly equivalent way remains the good old: 
def Indexed(sequence): 
return zip(sequence, indices) 
1.14.3 Discussion 
We often want to loop on a sequence but also need the current index in the loop body. The 
canonical Pydiom for this is:  
for i in range(len(sequence)): 
using 
sequence[i]
as the item reference in the loop's body. However, in many contexts, it is 
clearer to emphasize the loop on the sequence items rather than on the indexes. 
zip
provides an 
easy alternative, looping on indexes and items in parallel, since it truncates at the shortest of its 
arguments. Thus, it's okay for some arguments to be unbounded sequences, as long as not all the 
arguments are unbounded. An unbounded sequence of indexes is trivial to write (
xrange
is 
handy for this), and a reusable instance of that sequence can be passed to 
zip
, in parallel to the 
sequence being indexed.  
The same 
zip
usage also affords a client code-transparent alternative to the use of a wrapper 
class 
Indexed
, as demonstrated by the 
Indexed
class, generator, and function shown in the 
solution. Of these, when applicable, 
zip
is simplest.  
The performance of each of these solutions is roughly equivalent. They're all O(N) (i.e., they 
execute in time proportional to the number of elements in the sequence), they all take O(1) extra 
memory, and none is anything close to twice as fast or as slow as another.  
Note that 
zip
is not lazy (i.e., it cannot accept all argument sequences being unbounded). 
Therefore, in certain cases in which 
zip
cannot be used (albeit not the typical one in which 
range(len(sequence))
is the alternative), other kinds of loop might be usable. See 
Recipe 17.13
for lazy, iterator-based alternatives, including an 
xzip
function (Python 2.2 only).  
1.14.4 See Also 
Recipe 17.13
; the Library Reference section on sequence types.  
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To help protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
create secure pdf online; pdf encryption
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
You can use our .NET PDF SDK to set file split settings for your PDF You can receive the PDF files by simply clicking download and you are good to Web Security.
create pdf the security level is set to high; convert locked pdf to word doc
1.15 Looping Through Multiple Lists 
Credit: Andy McKay 
1.15.1 Problem 
You need to loop through every item of multiple lists.  
1.15.2 Solution 
There are basically three approaches. Say you have: 
a = ['a1', 'a2', 'a3'] 
b = ['b1', 'b2'] 
Using the built-in function 
map
, with a first argument of 
None
, you can iterate on both lists in 
parallel:  
print "Map:" 
for x, y in map(None, a, b): 
print x, y 
The loop runs three times. On the last iteration, 
y
will be 
None
.  
Using the built-in function 
zip
also lets you iterate in parallel:  
print "Zip:" 
for x, y in zip(a, b): 
print x, y 
The loop runs two times; the third iteration simply is not done. 
A list comprehension affords a very different iteration: 
print "List comprehension:" 
for x, y in [(x,y) for x in a for y in b]: 
print x, y 
The loop runs six times, over each item of 
b
for each item of 
a
.  
1.15.3 Discussion 
Using 
map
with 
None
as the first argument is a subtle variation of the standard 
map
call, which 
typically takes a function as the first argument. As the documentation indicates, if the first 
argument is 
None
, the identity function is used as the function through which the arguments are 
mapped. If there are multiple list arguments, 
map
returns a list consisting of tuples that contain 
the corresponding items from all lists (in other words, it's a kind of transpose operation). The list 
arguments may be any kind of sequence, and the result is always a list.  
Note that the first technique returns 
None
for sequences in which there are no more elements. 
Therefore, the output of the first loop is:  
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
If we need a password from you, it will not be read or stored. To hlep protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
decrypt pdf without password; secure pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Document Protection. XDoc.PDF SDK allows users to perform PDF document security settings in VB.NET program. Password, digital
creating a secure pdf document; creating secure pdf files
Map: 
a1 b1 
a2 b2 
a3 None 
zip
lets you iterate over the lists in a similar way, but only up to the number of elements of the 
smallest list. Therefore, the output of the second technique is:  
Zip: 
a1 b1 
a2 b2 
Python 2.0 introduced list comprehensions, with a syntax that some found a bit strange:  
[(x,y) for x in a for y in b] 
This iterates over list 
b
for every element in 
a
. These elements are put into a tuple 
(x,
y)
. We 
then iterate through the resulting list of tuples in the outermost 
for
loop. The output of the third 
technique, therefore, is quite different:  
List comprehension: 
a1 b1 
a1 b2 
a2 b1 
a2 b2 
a3 b1 
a3 b2 
1.15.4 See Also 
The Library Reference section on sequence types; documentation for the 
zip
and 
map
built-ins 
in the Library Reference.  
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
cannot print pdf security; change security settings pdf reader
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
can print pdf security; convert secure pdf to word
1.16 Spanning a Range Defined by Floats 
Credit: Dinu C. Gherman, Paul M. Winkler 
1.16.1 Problem 
You need an arithmetic progression, just like the built-in function 
range
, but with float values 
(
range
works only on integers).  
1.16.2 Solution 
Although this functionality is not available as a built-in, it's not hard to code it with a loop:  
def frange(start, end=None, inc=1.0): 
"A range-like function that does accept float 
increments..." 
if end == None: 
end = start + 0.0     # Ensure a float value for 
'end' 
start = 0.0 
assert inc                # sanity check 
L = [] 
while 1: 
next = start + len(L) * inc 
if inc > 0 and next >= end: 
break 
elif inc < 0 and next <= end: 
break 
L.append(next) 
return L 
1.16.3 Discussion 
Sadly missing in the Python standard library, the function in this recipe lets you use ranges, just as 
with the built-in function 
range
, but with float arguments.  
Many theoretical restrictions apply, but this function is more useful in practice than in theory. 
People who work with floating-point numbers all the time have many war stories about billion-
dollar projects that failed because someone did not take into consideration the strange things that 
modern hardware does when comparing floating-point numbers. But for pedestrian cases, simple 
approaches like this recipe generally work.  
You can get a substantial speed boost by preallocating the list instead of calling 
append
repeatedly. This also allows you to get rid of the conditionals in the inner loop. For one element, 
this version is barely faster, but with more than 10 elements it's consistently about 5 times faster—
the kind of performance ratio that is worth caring about. I get identical output for every test case I 
can think of:  
def frange2(start, end=None, inc=1.0): 
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
the conversion settings you like, and download it with one click. The entire process is quick, free and very easy. Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will
convert secure webpage to pdf; pdf security password
"A faster range-like function that does accept float 
increments..." 
if end == None: 
end = start + 0.0 
start = 0.0 
else: start += 0.0 # force it to be a float 
count = int((end - start) / inc) 
if start + count * inc != end: 
# Need to adjust the count. AFAICT, it always comes 
up one short. 
count += 1 
L = [start] * count 
for i in xrange(1, count): 
L[i] = start + i * inc 
return L 
Both versions rely on a single multiplication and one addition to compute each item, to avoid 
accumulating error by repeated additions. This is why, for example, the body of the 
for
loop in 
frange2
is not:  
L[i] = L[i-1] + inc 
In Python 2.2, if all you need to do is loop on the result of 
frange
, you can save some memory 
by turning this function into a simple generator, yielding an iterator when you call it:  
from _ _future_ _ import generators 
def frangei(start, end=None, inc=1.0): 
"An xrange-like simple generator that does accept float 
increments..." 
if end == None: 
end = start + 0.0 
start = 0.0 
assert inc                # sanity check 
i = 0 
while 1: 
next = start + i * inc 
if inc > 0 and next >= end: 
break 
elif inc < 0 and next <= end: 
break 
yield next 
i += 1 
If you use this recipe a lot, you should probably take a look at Numeric Python and other third-
party packages that take computing with floating-point numbers seriously. This recipe, for 
example, will not scale well to very large ranges, while those defined in Numeric Python will.  
1.16.4 See Also 
Documentation for the 
range
built-in function in the Library Reference; Numeric Python 
(http://www.pfdubois.com/numpy/
).  
1.17 Transposing Two-Dimensional Arrays 
Credit: Steve Holden 
1.17.1 Problem 
You need to transpose a list of lists, turning rows into columns and vice versa.  
1.17.2 Solution 
You must start with a list whose items are lists all of the same length:  
arr = [[1,2,3], [4,5,6], [7,8,9], [10,11,12]] 
A list comprehension offers a simple, handy way to transpose it: 
print [[r[col] for r in arr] for col in range(len(arr[0]))] 
[[1, 4, 7, 10], [2, 5, 8, 11], [3, 6, 9, 12]] 
1.17.3 Discussion 
This recipe shows a concise way (although not necessarily the fastest way) to turn rows into 
columns. List comprehensions are known for being concise.  
Sometimes data just comes at you the wrong way. For instance, if you use Microsoft's ADO 
database interface, due to array element ordering differences between Python and Microsoft's 
preferred implementation language (Visual Basic), the 
GetRows
method actually appears to 
return database columns in Python, despite its name. This recipe's solution to this common 
problem was chosen to demonstrate nested list comprehensions.  
Notice that the inner comprehension varies what is selected from (the row), while the outer 
comprehension varies the selector (the column). This process achieves the required transposition.  
If you're transposing large arrays of numbers, consider Numeric Python and other third-party 
packages. Numeric Python defines transposition and other axis-swinging routines that will make 
your head spin.  
1.17.4 See Also 
The Reference Manual section on list displays (the other name for list comprehensions); Numeric 
Python (http://www.pfdubois.com/numpy/
).  
1.18 Creating Lists of Lists Without Sharing References 
Credit: David Ascher 
1.18.1 Problem 
You want to create a multidimensional list, but the apparently simplest solution is fraught with 
surprises.  
1.18.2 Solution 
Use list comprehensions (also known as list displays) to avoid implicit reference sharing:  
multilist = [[0 for col in range(5)] for row in range(10)] 
1.18.3 Discussion 
When a newcomer to Python is shown the power of the multiplication operation on lists, he often 
gets quite excited about it, since it is such an elegant notation. For example:  
>>> [0] * 5 
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0] 
The problem is that one-dimensional problems often grow a second dimension, so there is a 
natural progression to:  
>>> multi = [[0] * 5] * 3 
>>> print multi 
[[0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]] 
This appears to have worked, but the same newcomer is then often puzzled by bugs, which 
typically can be boiled down to the following test:  
>>> multi[0][0] = 'Changed!' 
>>> print multi 
[['Changed!', 0, 0, 0, 0], ['Changed!', 0, 0, 0, 0], 
['Changed!', 0, 0, 0, 0]] 
This problem definitely confuses most programmers at least once, if not a few times (see the FAQ 
entry at http://www.python.org/doc/FAQ.html#4.50
). To understand it, it helps to decompose the 
creation of the multidimensional list into two steps:  
>>> row = [0] * 5          # a list with five references to 
>>> multi = [row] * 3      # a list with three references to 
the row object 
The problem still exists in this version (Python is not that magical). The comments are key to 
understanding the source of the confusion. The process of multiplying a sequence by a number 
creates a new sequence with the specified number of new references to the original contents. In 
the case of the creation of 
row
, it doesn't matter whether references are being duplicated or not, 
since the referent (the object being referred to) is immutable. In other words, there is no difference 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested