convert pdf to image c# ghostscript : Change security settings on pdf SDK Library service wpf .net azure dnn Official%20Python%20Manual%20of%20Python%202.7.6%20130-part1549

Positional arguments are for those pieces of information that your program absolutely,
positively requires to run.
A good user interface should have as few absolute requirements as possible. If your
program requires 17 distinct pieces of information in order to run successfully, it doesn’t
much matter how you get that information from the user—most people will give up and
walk away before they successfully run the program. This applies whether the user
interface is a command-line, a configuration file, or a GUI: if you make that many
demands on your users, most of them will simply give up.
In short, try to minimize the amount of information that users are absolutely required to
supply—use sensible defaults whenever possible. Of course, you also want to make your
programs reasonably flexible. That’s what options are for. Again, it doesn’t matter if they
are entries in a config file, widgets in the “Preferences” dialog of a GUI, or command-line
options—the more options you implement, the more flexible your program is, and the
more complicated its implementation becomes. Too much flexibility has drawbacks as
well, of course; too many options can overwhelm users and make your code much harder
to maintain.
15.5.2. Tutorial
While 
optparse
is quite flexible and powerful, it’s also straightforward to use in most
cases. This section covers the code patterns that are common to any 
optparse
-based
program.
First, you need to import the OptionParser class; then, early in the main program, create
an OptionParser instance:
from optparse import OptionParser
[...]
parser = OptionParser()
Then you can start defining options. The basic syntax is:
parser.add_option(opt_str, ...,
attr=value, ...)
Each option has one or more option strings, such as 
-f
or 
--file
, and several option
attributes that tell 
optparse
what to expect and what to do when it encounters that option
on the command line.
Typically, each option will have one short option string and one long option string, e.g.:
Change security settings on pdf - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
decrypt pdf without password; pdf security remover
Change security settings on pdf - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
pdf secure signature; add security to pdf in reader
parser.add_option("-f""--file", ...)
You’re free to define as many short option strings and as many long option strings as you
like (including zero), as long as there is at least one option string overall.
The option strings passed to 
OptionParser.add_option()
are effectively labels for the
option defined by that call. For brevity, we will frequently refer to encountering an option
on the command line; in reality, 
optparse
encounters option strings and looks up options
from them.
Once all of your options are defined, instruct 
optparse
to parse your program’s command
line:
(options, args) = parser.parse_args()
(If you like, you can pass a custom argument list to 
parse_args()
, but that’s rarely
necessary: by default it uses 
sys.argv[1:]
.)
parse_args()
returns two values:
options
, an object containing values for all of your options—e.g. if 
--file
takes a
single string argument, then 
options.file
will be the filename supplied by the user,
or 
None
if the user did not supply that option
args
, the list of positional arguments leftover after parsing options
This tutorial section only covers the four most important option attributes: 
action
type
,
dest
(destination), and 
help
. Of these, 
action
is the most fundamental.
15.5.2.1. Understanding option actions
Actions tell 
optparse
what to do when it encounters an option on the command line.
There is a fixed set of actions hard-coded into 
optparse
; adding new actions is an
advanced topic covered in section Extending optparse. Most actions tell 
optparse
to
store a value in some variable—for example, take a string from the command line and
store it in an attribute of 
options
.
If you don’t specify an option action, 
optparse
defaults to 
store
.
15.5.2.2. The store action
The most common option action is 
store
, which tells 
optparse
to take the next argument
Online Change your PDF file Permission Settings
easy as possible to change your PDF file permission settings. You can receive the locked PDF by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security.
pdf password encryption; change security settings pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK provides some PDF security settings about password to help protect your PDF document Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password.
copy paste encrypted pdf; change pdf document security properties
(or the remainder of the current argument), ensure that it is of the correct type, and store
it to your chosen destination.
For example:
parser.add_option("-f""--file",
action="store"type="string", dest="filename")
Now let’s make up a fake command line and ask 
optparse
to parse it:
args = ["-f""foo.txt"]
(options, args) = parser.parse_args(args)
When 
optparse
sees the option string 
-f
, it consumes the next argument, 
foo.txt
, and
stores it in 
options.filename
. So, after this call to 
parse_args()
options.filename
is
"foo.txt"
.
Some other option types supported by 
optparse
are 
int
and 
float
. Here’s an option that
expects an integer argument:
parser.add_option("-n"type="int", dest="num")
Note that this option has no long option string, which is perfectly acceptable. Also, there’s
no explicit action, since the default is 
store
.
Let’s parse another fake command-line. This time, we’ll jam the option argument right up
against the option: since 
-n42
(one argument) is equivalent to 
-n 42
(two arguments),
the code
(options, args) = parser.parse_args(["-n42"])
print options.num
will print 
42
.
If you don’t specify a type, 
optparse
assumes 
string
. Combined with the fact that the
default action is 
store
, that means our first example can be a lot shorter:
parser.add_option("-f""--file", dest="filename")
If you don’t supply a destination, 
optparse
figures out a sensible default from the option
strings: if the first long option string is 
--foo-bar
, then the default destination is 
foo_bar
.
If there are no long option strings, 
optparse
looks at the first short option string: the
default destination for 
-f
is 
f
.
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To help protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
creating a secure pdf document; add security to pdf
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
You can use our .NET PDF SDK to set file split settings for your PDF You can receive the PDF files by simply clicking download and you are good to Web Security.
create pdf security; change pdf document security
optparse
also includes built-in 
long
and 
complex
types. Adding types is covered in
section Extending optparse.
15.5.2.3. Handling boolean (flag) options
Flag options—set a variable to true or false when a particular option is seen —are quite
common. 
optparse
supports  them  with  two  separate  actions, 
store_true
and
store_false
. For example, you might have a 
verbose
flag that is turned on with 
-v
and
off with 
-q
:
parser.add_option("-v", action="store_true", dest="verbose")
parser.add_option("-q", action="store_false", dest="verbose")
Here we have two different options with the same destination, which is perfectly OK. (It
just means you have to be a bit careful when setting default values— see below.)
When 
optparse
encounters 
-v
on the command line, it sets 
options.verbose
to 
True
;
when it encounters 
-q
options.verbose
is set to 
False
.
15.5.2.4. Other actions
Some other actions supported by 
optparse
are:
"store_const"
store a constant value
"append"
append this option’s argument to a list
"count"
increment a counter by one
"callback"
call a specified function
These are covered in section Reference Guide, Reference Guide and section Option
Callbacks.
15.5.2.5. Default values
All of the above examples involve setting some variable (the “destination”) when certain
command-line options are seen. What happens if those options are never seen? Since
we didn’t supply any defaults, they are all set to 
None
. This is usually fine, but sometimes
you want more control. 
optparse
lets you supply a default value for each destination,
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
If we need a password from you, it will not be read or stored. To hlep protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
secure pdf file; add security to pdf file
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Document Protection. XDoc.PDF SDK allows users to perform PDF document security settings in VB.NET program. Password, digital
can print pdf security; advanced pdf encryption remover
which is assigned before the command line is parsed.
First, consider the verbose/quiet example. If we want 
optparse
to set 
verbose
to 
True
unless 
-q
is seen, then we can do this:
parser.add_option("-v", action="store_true", dest="verbose", default=True)
parser.add_option("-q", action="store_false", dest="verbose")
Since default values apply to the destination rather than to any particular option, and
these two options happen to have the same destination, this is exactly equivalent:
parser.add_option("-v", action="store_true", dest="verbose")
parser.add_option("-q", action="store_false", dest="verbose", default=True)
Consider this:
parser.add_option("-v", action="store_true", dest="verbose", default=False)
parser.add_option("-q", action="store_false", dest="verbose", default=True)
Again, the default value for 
verbose
will be 
True
: the last default value supplied for any
particular destination is the one that counts.
A clearer way to specify default values is the 
set_defaults()
method of OptionParser,
which you can call at any time before calling 
parse_args()
:
parser.set_defaults(verbose=True)
parser.add_option(...)
(options, args) = parser.parse_args()
As before, the last value specified for a given option destination is the one that counts.
For clarity, try to use one method or the other of setting default values, not both.
15.5.2.6. Generating help
optparse
‘s ability to generate help and usage text automatically is useful for creating
user-friendly command-line interfaces. All you have to do is supply a 
help
value for each
option,  and optionally a short usage message for your whole program. Here’s an
OptionParser populated with user-friendly (documented) options:
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
convert locked pdf to word doc; change pdf security settings reader
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
create secure pdf; pdf security options
usage = "usage: %prog [options] arg1 arg2"
parser = OptionParser(usage=usage)
parser.add_option("-v""--verbose",
action="store_true", dest="verbose", default=True,
help="make lots of noise [default]")
parser.add_option("-q""--quiet",
action="store_false", dest="verbose",
help="be vewwy quiet (I'm hunting wabbits)")
parser.add_option("-f""--filename",
metavar="FILE", help="write output to FILE")
parser.add_option("-m""--mode",
default="intermediate",
help="interaction mode: novice, intermediate, "
"or expert [default: %default]")
If 
optparse
encounters either 
-h
or 
--help
on the command-line, or if you just call
parser.print_help()
, it prints the following to standard output:
Usage: <yourscript> [options] arg1 arg2
Options:
-h, --help            show this help message and exit
-v, --verbose         make lots of noise [default]
-q, --quiet           be vewwy quiet (I'm hunting wabbits)
-f FILE, --filename=FILE
write output to FILE
-m MODE, --mode=MODE  interaction mode: novice, intermediate, or
expert [default: intermediate]
(If the help output is triggered by a help option, 
optparse
exits after printing the help
text.)
There’s a lot going on here to help 
optparse
generate the best possible help message:
the script defines its own usage message:
usage = "usage: %prog [options] arg1 arg2"
optparse
expands 
%prog
in the usage string to the name of the current program, i.e.
os.path.basename(sys.argv[0])
. The expanded string is then printed before the
detailed option help.
If you don’t supply a usage string, 
optparse
uses a bland but sensible default:
"Usage: %prog [options]"
, which is fine if your script doesn’t take any positional
arguments.
every option defines a help string, and doesn’t worry about line-wrapping— 
optparse
takes care of wrapping lines and making the help output look good.
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
the conversion settings you like, and download it with one click. The entire process is quick, free and very easy. Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will
decrypt a pdf; decrypt pdf online
options that take a value indicate this fact in their automatically-generated help
message, e.g. for the “mode” option:
-m MODE, --mode=MODE
Here, “MODE” is called the meta-variable: it stands for the argument that the user is
expected to supply to 
-m
/
--mode
. By  default, 
optparse
converts the destination
variable name to uppercase and uses that for the meta-variable. Sometimes, that’s
not  what  you  want—for  example,  the 
--filename
option  explicitly  sets
metavar="FILE"
, resulting in this automatically-generated option description:
-f FILE, --filename=FILE
This is important for more than just saving space, though: the manually written help
text uses  the  meta-variable 
FILE
to clue the user in that there’s a connection
between the semi-formal syntax 
-f FILE
and the informal semantic description “write
output to FILE”. This is a simple but effective way to make your help text a lot clearer
and more useful for end users.
New in version 2.4: Options that have a default value can include 
%default
in the help
string—
optparse
will replace it with 
str()
of the option’s default value. If an option has
no default value (or the default value is 
None
), 
%default
expands to 
none
.
15.5.2.6.1. Grouping Options
When dealing with many options, it is convenient to group these options for better help
output. An 
OptionParser
can contain several option groups, each of which can contain
several options.
An option group is obtained using the class 
OptionGroup
:
class 
optparse.
OptionGroup
(
parser, title, description=None
)
where
parser is the 
OptionParser
instance the group will be insterted in to
title is the group title
description, optional, is a long description of the group
OptionGroup
inherits from 
OptionContainer
(like 
OptionParser
) and so the 
add_option()
method can be used to add an option to the group.
Once all the options are declared, using the 
OptionParser
method 
add_option_group()
the group is added to the previously defined parser.
Continuing with the parser defined in the previous section, adding an 
OptionGroup
to a
parser is easy:
group = OptionGroup(parser, "Dangerous Options",
"Caution: use these options at your own risk.  "
"It is believed that some of them bite.")
group.add_option("-g", action="store_true", help="Group option.")
parser.add_option_group(group)
This would result in the following help output:
Usage: <yourscript> [options] arg1 arg2
Options:
-h, --help            show this help message and exit
-v, --verbose         make lots of noise [default]
-q, --quiet           be vewwy quiet (I'm hunting wabbits)
-f FILE, --filename=FILE
write output to FILE
-m MODE, --mode=MODE  interaction mode: novice, intermediate, or
expert [default: intermediate]
Dangerous Options:
Caution: use these options at your own risk.  It is believed that some
of them bite.
-g                  Group option.
A bit more complete example might involve using more than one group: still extending the
previous example:
group = OptionGroup(parser, "Dangerous Options",
"Caution: use these options at your own risk.  "
"It is believed that some of them bite.")
group.add_option("-g", action="store_true", help="Group option.")
parser.add_option_group(group)
group = OptionGroup(parser, "Debug Options")
group.add_option("-d""--debug", action="store_true",
help="Print debug information")
group.add_option("-s""--sql", action="store_true",
help="Print all SQL statements executed")
group.add_option("-e", action="store_true", help="Print every action done")
parser.add_option_group(group)
that results in the following output:
Usage: <yourscript> [options] arg1 arg2
Options:
-h, --help            show this help message and exit
-v, --verbose         make lots of noise [default]
-q, --quiet           be vewwy quiet (I'm hunting wabbits)
-f FILE, --filename=FILE
write output to FILE
-m MODE, --mode=MODE  interaction mode: novice, intermediate, or expert
[default: intermediate]
Dangerous Options:
Caution: use these options at your own risk.  It is believed that some
of them bite.
-g                  Group option.
Debug Options:
-d, --debug         Print debug information
-s, --sql           Print all SQL statements executed
-e                  Print every action done
Another interesting method, in particular when working programmatically with option
groups is:
OptionParser.
get_option_group
(
opt_str
)
Return the 
OptionGroup
to which the short or long option string opt_str (e.g. 
'-o'
or
'--option'
) belongs. If there’s no such 
OptionGroup
, return 
None
.
15.5.2.7. Printing a version string
Similar to the brief usage string, 
optparse
can also print a version string for your
program. You have to supply the string as the 
version
argument to OptionParser:
parser = OptionParser(usage="%prog [-f] [-q]", version="%prog 1.0")
%prog
is expanded just like it is in 
usage
. Apart from that, 
version
can contain anything
you like. When you supply it, 
optparse
automatically adds a 
--version
option to your
parser. If it encounters this option on the command line, it expands your 
version
string
(by replacing 
%prog
), prints it to stdout, and exits.
For example, if your script is called 
/usr/bin/foo
:
$ /usr/bin/foo --version
foo 1.0
The following two methods can be used to print and get the 
version
string:
OptionParser.
print_version
(
file=None
)
Print the version message for the current program (
self.version
)  to file (default
stdout). As with 
print_usage()
, any occurrence of 
%prog
in 
self.version
is replaced
with the name of the current program. Does nothing if 
self.version
is empty or
undefined.
OptionParser.
get_version
()
Same as 
print_version()
but returns the version string instead of printing it.
15.5.2.8. How 
optparse
handles errors
There are two broad classes of errors that 
optparse
has to worry about: programmer
errors  and  user  errors. Programmer  errors  are  usually  erroneous  calls  to
OptionParser.add_option()
,  e.g.  invalid  option  strings,  unknown  option  attributes,
missing option attributes, etc. These are dealt with in the usual way: raise an exception
(either 
optparse.OptionError
or 
TypeError
) and let the program crash.
Handling user errors is much more important, since they are guaranteed to happen no
matter how stable your code is. 
optparse
can automatically detect some user errors,
such as bad option arguments (passing 
-n 4x
where 
-n
takes an integer argument),
missing arguments (
-n
at the end of the command line, where 
-n
takes an argument of
any type). Also, you can call 
OptionParser.error()
to signal an application-defined error
condition:
(options, args) = parser.parse_args()
[...]
if options.and options.b:
parser.error("options -a and -b are mutually exclusive")
In either case, 
optparse
handles the error the same way: it prints the program’s usage
message and an error message to standard error and exits with error status 2.
Consider the first example above, where the user passes 
4x
to an option that takes an
integer:
$ /usr/bin/foo -n 4x
Usage: foo [options]
foo: error: option -n: invalid integer value: '4x'
Or, where the user fails to pass a value at all:
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested