itext convert pdf to image c# : Change security settings on pdf SDK Library service wpf asp.net html dnn Official%20Python%20Manual%20of%20Python%202.7.6%20276-part1710

Note:  Nested tuples cannot be parsed when using keyword arguments! Keyword
parameters passed in which are not present in the kwlist will cause 
TypeError
to be
raised.
Here is an example module which uses keywords, based on an example by Geoff
Philbrick (philbrick@hks.com):
#include "Python.h"
static PyObject *
keywdarg_parrot(PyObject *self, PyObject *args, PyObject *keywds)
{
int voltage;
char *state = "a stiff";
char *action = "voom";
char *type = "Norwegian Blue";
static char *kwlist[] = {"voltage""state""action""type"NULL};
if (!PyArg_ParseTupleAndKeywords(args, keywds, "i|sss", kwlist,
&voltage, &state, &action, &type))
return NULL;
printf("-- This parrot wouldn't %s if you put %i Volts through it.\n",
action, voltage);
printf("-- Lovely plumage, the %s -- It's %s!\n", type, state);
Py_INCREF(Py_None);
return Py_None;
}
static PyMethodDef keywdarg_methods[] = {
/* The cast of the function is necessary since PyCFunction values
* only take two PyObject* parameters, and keywdarg_parrot() takes
* three.
*/
{"parrot", (PyCFunction)keywdarg_parrot, METH_VARARGS | METH_KEYWORDS,
"Print a lovely skit to standard output."},
{NULLNULL, 0NULL} /* sentinel */
};
void
initkeywdarg(void)
{
/* Create the module and add the functions */
Py_InitModule("keywdarg", keywdarg_methods);
}
1.9. Building Arbitrary Values
This function is the counterpart to 
PyArg_ParseTuple()
. It is declared as follows:
PyObject *Py_BuildValue(char *format, ...);
It recognizes a set of format units similar to the ones recognized by 
PyArg_ParseTuple()
,
but the arguments (which are input to the function, not output) must not be pointers, just
Change security settings on pdf - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
create pdf security; decrypt password protected pdf
Change security settings on pdf - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
copy paste encrypted pdf; advanced pdf encryption remover
values. It returns a new Python object, suitable for returning from a C function called from
Python.
One difference with 
PyArg_ParseTuple()
: while the latter requires its first argument to be
a tuple (since Python argument lists are always represented as tuples internally),
Py_BuildValue()
does not always build a tuple. It builds a tuple only if its format string
contains two or more format units. If the format string is empty, it returns 
None
; if it
contains exactly one format unit, it returns whatever object is described by that format
unit. To force it to return a tuple of size 0 or one, parenthesize the format string.
Examples (to the left the call, to the right the resulting Python value):
Py_BuildValue("")                        None
Py_BuildValue("i", 123)                  123
Py_BuildValue("iii", 123, 456, 789)      (123, 456, 789)
Py_BuildValue("s", "hello")              'hello'
Py_BuildValue("ss", "hello", "world")    ('hello', 'world')
Py_BuildValue("s#", "hello", 4)          'hell'
Py_BuildValue("()")                      ()
Py_BuildValue("(i)", 123)                (123,)
Py_BuildValue("(ii)", 123, 456)          (123, 456)
Py_BuildValue("(i,i)", 123, 456)         (123, 456)
Py_BuildValue("[i,i]", 123, 456)         [123, 456]
Py_BuildValue("{s:i,s:i}",
"abc", 123, "def", 456)    {'abc': 123, 'def': 456}
Py_BuildValue("((ii)(ii)) (ii)",
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)          (((1, 2), (3, 4)), (5, 6))
1.10. Reference Counts
In languages like C or C++, the programmer is responsible for dynamic allocation and
deallocation of memory on the heap. In C, this is done using the functions 
malloc()
and
free()
. In C++, the operators 
new
and 
delete
are used with essentially the same
meaning and we’ll restrict the following discussion to the C case.
Every block of memory allocated with 
malloc()
should eventually be returned to the pool
of available memory by exactly one call to 
free()
. It is important to call 
free()
at the
right time. If a block’s address is forgotten but 
free()
is not called for it, the memory it
occupies cannot be reused until the program terminates. This is called a memory leak.
On the other hand, if a program calls 
free()
for a block and then continues to use the
block, it creates a conflict with re-use of the block through another 
malloc()
call. This is
called using  freed  memory.  It  has  the  same  bad  consequences  as  referencing
uninitialized data — core dumps, wrong results, mysterious crashes.
Common causes of memory leaks are unusual paths through the code. For instance, a
Online Change your PDF file Permission Settings
easy as possible to change your PDF file permission settings. You can receive the locked PDF by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security.
change security settings pdf; pdf security settings
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK provides some PDF security settings about password to help protect your PDF document Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password.
change pdf security settings reader; creating a secure pdf document
function may allocate a block of memory, do some calculation, and then free the block
again. Now a change in the requirements for the function may add a test to the
calculation that detects an error condition and can return prematurely from the function.
It’s easy to forget to free the allocated memory block when taking this premature exit,
especially when it is added later to the code. Such leaks, once introduced, often go
undetected for a long time: the error exit is taken only in a small fraction of all calls, and
most modern machines have plenty of virtual memory, so the leak only becomes
apparent in a long-running process that uses the leaking function frequently. Therefore,
it’s important to prevent leaks from happening by having a coding convention or strategy
that minimizes this kind of errors.
Since Python makes heavy use of 
malloc()
and 
free()
, it needs a strategy to avoid
memory leaks as well as the use of freed memory. The chosen method is called
reference counting. The principle is simple: every object contains a counter, which is
incremented  when  a  reference  to  the object is stored  somewhere,  and which  is
decremented when a reference to it is deleted. When the counter reaches zero, the last
reference to the object has been deleted and the object is freed.
An alternative strategy is called automatic garbage collection. (Sometimes, reference
counting is also referred to as a garbage collection strategy, hence my use of “automatic”
to distinguish the two.) The big advantage of automatic garbage collection is that the user
doesn’t need to call 
free()
explicitly. (Another claimed advantage is an improvement in
speed or memory usage — this is no hard fact however.) The disadvantage is that for C,
there is no truly portable automatic garbage collector, while reference counting can be
implemented portably (as long as the functions 
malloc()
and 
free()
are available —
which the C Standard guarantees). Maybe some day a sufficiently portable automatic
garbage collector will be available for C. Until then, we’ll have to live with reference
counts.
While Python uses the traditional reference counting implementation, it also offers a cycle
detector that works to detect reference cycles. This allows applications to not worry about
creating direct or indirect circular references; these are the weakness of garbage
collection implemented using only reference counting. Reference cycles consist of objects
which contain (possibly indirect) references to themselves, so that each object in the
cycle  has  a  reference  count  which  is  non-zero. Typical  reference  counting
implementations are not able to reclaim the memory belonging to any objects in a
reference cycle, or referenced from the objects in the cycle, even though there are no
further references to the cycle itself.
The cycle detector is able to detect garbage cycles and can reclaim them so long as
there are no finalizers implemented in Python (
__del__()
methods). When there are such
finalizers, the detector exposes the cycles through the 
gc
module (specifically, the
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To help protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
add security to pdf in reader; decrypt pdf with password
Online Split PDF file. Best free online split PDF tool.
You can use our .NET PDF SDK to set file split settings for your PDF You can receive the PDF files by simply clicking download and you are good to Web Security.
change pdf document security; change security on pdf
garbage
variable in that module). The 
gc
module also exposes a way to run the detector
(the 
collect()
function), as well as configuration interfaces and the ability to disable the
detector at runtime. The cycle detector is considered an optional component; though it is
included by default, it can be disabled at build time using the --without-cycle-gc option to
the configure script on Unix platforms (including Mac OS X) or by removing the definition
of 
WITH_CYCLE_GC
in the 
pyconfig.h
header on other platforms. If the cycle detector is
disabled in this way, the 
gc
module will not be available.
1.10.1. Reference Counting in Python
There are two macros, 
Py_INCREF(x)
and 
Py_DECREF(x)
, which handle the incrementing
and decrementing of the reference count. 
Py_DECREF()
also frees the object when the
count reaches zero. For flexibility, it doesn’t call 
free()
directly — rather, it makes a call
through a function pointer in the object’s type object. For this purpose (and others), every
object also contains a pointer to its type object.
The big question now remains: when to use 
Py_INCREF(x)
and 
Py_DECREF(x)
? Let’s first
introduce some terms. Nobody “owns” an object; however, you can own a reference to
an object. An object’s reference count is now defined as the number of owned references
to it. The owner of a reference is responsible for calling 
Py_DECREF()
when the reference
is no longer needed. Ownership of a reference can be transferred. There are three ways
to dispose of an owned reference: pass it on, store it, or call 
Py_DECREF()
. Forgetting to
dispose of an owned reference creates a memory leak.
It is also possible to borrow [2] a reference to an object. The borrower of a reference
should not call 
Py_DECREF()
. The borrower must not hold on to the object longer than the
owner from which it was borrowed. Using a borrowed reference after the owner has
disposed of it risks using freed memory and should be avoided completely. [3]
The advantage of borrowing over owning a reference is that you don’t need to take care
of disposing of the reference on all possible paths through the code — in other words,
with a borrowed reference you don’t run the risk of leaking when a premature exit is
taken. The disadvantage of borrowing over owning is that there are some subtle
situations where in seemingly correct code a borrowed reference can be used after the
owner from which it was borrowed has in fact disposed of it.
A borrowed reference can be changed into an owned reference by calling 
Py_INCREF()
.
This does not affect the status of the owner from which the reference was borrowed — it
creates a new owned reference, and gives full owner responsibilities (the new owner must
dispose of the reference properly, as well as the previous owner).
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
If we need a password from you, it will not be read or stored. To hlep protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
copy text from encrypted pdf; change pdf security settings reader
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Document Protection. XDoc.PDF SDK allows users to perform PDF document security settings in VB.NET program. Password, digital
convert secure pdf to word; create encrypted pdf
1.10.2. Ownership Rules
Whenever an object reference is passed into or out of a function, it is part of the
function’s interface specification whether ownership is transferred with the reference or
not.
Most functions that return a reference to an object pass on ownership with the reference.
In  particular,  all  functions whose  function  it  is  to  create a  new  object,  such  as
PyInt_FromLong()
and 
Py_BuildValue()
, pass ownership to the receiver. Even if the
object is not actually new, you still receive ownership of a new reference to that object.
For instance, 
PyInt_FromLong()
maintains a cache of popular values and can return a
reference to a cached item.
Many functions that extract objects from other objects also transfer ownership with the
reference,  for  instance 
PyObject_GetAttrString()
. The picture is less clear, here,
however,  since  a  few  common  routines  are  exceptions: 
PyTuple_GetItem()
,
PyList_GetItem()
PyDict_GetItem()
, and 
PyDict_GetItemString()
all return references
that you borrow from the tuple, list or dictionary.
The function 
PyImport_AddModule()
also returns a borrowed reference, even though it
may actually create the object it returns: this is possible because an owned reference to
the object is stored in 
sys.modules
.
When you pass an object reference into another function, in general, the function borrows
the reference from you — if it needs to store it, it will use 
Py_INCREF()
to become an
independent  owner. There  are  exactly  two  important  exceptions  to  this  rule:
PyTuple_SetItem()
and 
PyList_SetItem()
. These functions take over ownership of the
item passed to them — even if they fail! (Note that 
PyDict_SetItem()
and friends don’t
take over ownership — they are “normal.”)
When a C function is called from Python, it borrows references to its arguments from the
caller. The caller owns a reference to the object, so the borrowed reference’s lifetime is
guaranteed until the function returns. Only when such a borrowed reference must be
stored or passed on, it must be turned into an owned reference by calling 
Py_INCREF()
.
The object reference returned from a C function that is called from Python must be an
owned reference — ownership is transferred from the function to its caller.
1.10.3. Thin Ice
There are a few situations where seemingly harmless use of a borrowed reference can
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
create pdf the security level is set to high; pdf password encryption
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
change pdf document security; add security to pdf
lead to problems. These all have to do with implicit invocations of the interpreter, which
can cause the owner of a reference to dispose of it.
The first and most important case to know about is using 
Py_DECREF()
on an unrelated
object while borrowing a reference to a list item. For instance:
void
bug(PyObject *list)
{
PyObject *item = PyList_GetItem(list, 0);
PyList_SetItem(list, 1, PyInt_FromLong(0L));
PyObject_Print(item, stdout, 0); /* BUG! */
}
This function first borrows a reference to 
list[0]
, then replaces 
list[1]
with the value
0
, and finally prints the borrowed reference. Looks harmless, right? But it’s not!
Let’s follow the control flow into 
PyList_SetItem()
. The list owns references to all its
items, so when item 1 is replaced, it has to dispose of the original item 1. Now let’s
suppose the original item 1 was an instance of a user-defined class, and let’s further
suppose  that  the class defined a 
__del__()
method. If this class instance has a
reference count of 1, disposing of it will call its 
__del__()
method.
Since it is written in Python, the 
__del__()
method can execute arbitrary Python code.
Could it perhaps do something to invalidate the reference to 
item
in 
bug()
? You bet!
Assuming that the list passed into 
bug()
is accessible to the 
__del__()
method, it could
execute a statement to the effect of 
del list[0]
, and assuming this was the last
reference to that object, it would free the memory associated with it, thereby invalidating
item
.
The solution, once you know the source of the problem, is easy: temporarily increment
the reference count. The correct version of the function reads:
void
no_bug(PyObject *list)
{
PyObject *item = PyList_GetItem(list, 0);
Py_INCREF(item);
PyList_SetItem(list, 1, PyInt_FromLong(0L));
PyObject_Print(item, stdout, 0);
Py_DECREF(item);
}
This is a true story. An older version of Python contained variants of this bug and
someone spent a considerable amount of time in a C debugger to figure out why his
Online Convert Jpeg to PDF file. Best free online export Jpg image
the conversion settings you like, and download it with one click. The entire process is quick, free and very easy. Web Security. All your JPG and PDF files will
copy paste encrypted pdf; add security to pdf in reader
__del__()
methods would fail...
The second case of problems with a borrowed reference is a variant involving threads.
Normally, multiple threads in the Python interpreter can’t get in each other’s way,
because there is a global lock protecting Python’s entire object space. However, it is
possible to temporarily release this lock using the macro 
Py_BEGIN_ALLOW_THREADS
, and to
re-acquire it using 
Py_END_ALLOW_THREADS
. This is common around blocking I/O calls, to
let other threads use the processor while waiting for the I/O to complete. Obviously, the
following function has the same problem as the previous one:
void
bug(PyObject *list)
{
PyObject *item = PyList_GetItem(list, 0);
Py_BEGIN_ALLOW_THREADS
...some blocking I/O call...
Py_END_ALLOW_THREADS
PyObject_Print(item, stdout, 0); /* BUG! */
}
1.10.4. NULL Pointers
In general, functions that take object references as arguments do not expect you to pass
them NULL pointers, and will dump core (or cause later core dumps) if you do so.
Functions that return object references generally return NULL only to indicate that an
exception occurred. The reason for not testing for NULL arguments is that functions often
pass the objects they receive on to other function — if each function were to test for
NULL, there would be a lot of redundant tests and the code would run more slowly.
It is better to test for NULL only at the “source:” when a pointer that may be NULL is
received, for example, from 
malloc()
or from a function that may raise an exception.
The macros 
Py_INCREF()
and 
Py_DECREF()
do not check for NULL pointers — however,
their variants 
Py_XINCREF()
and 
Py_XDECREF()
do.
The macros for checking for a particular object type (
Pytype_Check()
) don’t check for
NULL pointers — again, there is much code that calls several of these in a row to test an
object against various different expected types, and this would generate redundant tests.
There are no variants with NULL checking.
The C function calling mechanism guarantees that the argument list passed to C
functions (
args
in the examples) is never NULL — in fact it guarantees that it is always a
tuple. [4]
It is a severe error to ever let a NULL pointer “escape” to the Python user.
1.11. Writing Extensions in C++
It is possible to write extension modules in C++. Some restrictions apply. If the main
program (the Python interpreter) is compiled and linked by the C compiler, global or static
objects with constructors cannot be used. This is not a problem if the main program is
linked by the C++ compiler. Functions that will be called by the Python interpreter (in
particular, module initialization functions) have to be declared using 
extern "C"
. It is
unnecessary to enclose the Python header files in 
extern "C" {...}
— they use this
form already if the symbol 
__cplusplus
is defined (all recent C++ compilers define this
symbol).
1.12. Providing a C API for an Extension Module
Many extension modules just provide new functions and types to be used from Python,
but sometimes the code in an extension module can be useful for other extension
modules. For example, an extension module could implement a type “collection” which
works like lists without order. Just like the standard Python list type has a C API which
permits extension modules to create and manipulate lists, this new collection type should
have a set of C functions for direct manipulation from other extension modules.
At first sight this seems easy: just write the functions (without declaring them 
static
, of
course), provide an appropriate header file, and document the C API. And in fact this
would work if all extension modules were always linked statically with the Python
interpreter. When modules are used as shared libraries, however, the symbols defined in
one module may not be visible to another module. The details of visibility depend on the
operating system; some systems use one global namespace for the Python interpreter
and all extension modules (Windows, for example), whereas others require an explicit list
of imported symbols at module link time (AIX is one example), or offer a choice of
different strategies (most Unices). And even if symbols are globally visible, the module
whose functions one wishes to call might not have been loaded yet!
Portability therefore requires not to make any assumptions about symbol visibility. This
means that all symbols in extension modules should be declared 
static
, except for the
module’s initialization function, in order to avoid name clashes with other extension
modules (as discussed in section The Module’s Method Table and Initialization Function).
And it means that symbols that should be accessible from other extension modules must
be exported in a different way.
Python provides a special mechanism to pass C-level information (pointers) from one
extension module to another one: Capsules. A Capsule is a Python data type which
stores a pointer (
void *
). Capsules can only be created and accessed via their C API,
but they can be passed around like any other Python object. In particular, they can be
assigned to a name in an extension module’s namespace. Other extension modules can
then import this module, retrieve the value of this name, and then retrieve the pointer
from the Capsule.
There are many ways in which Capsules can be used to export the C API of an extension
module. Each function could get its own Capsule, or all C API pointers could be stored in
an array whose address is published in a Capsule. And the various tasks of storing and
retrieving the pointers can be distributed in different ways between the module providing
the code and the client modules.
Whichever method you choose, it’s important to name your Capsules properly. The
function 
PyCapsule_New()
takes a name parameter (
const char *
); you’re permitted to
pass in a NULL name, but we strongly encourage you to specify a name. Properly named
Capsules provide a degree of runtime type-safety; there is no feasible way to tell one
unnamed Capsule from another.
In particular, Capsules used to expose C APIs should be given a name following this
convention:
modulename.attributename
The convenience function 
PyCapsule_Import()
makes it easy to load a C API provided
via a Capsule, but only if the Capsule’s name matches this convention. This behavior
gives C API users a high degree of certainty that the Capsule they load contains the
correct C API.
The following example demonstrates an approach that puts most of the burden on the
writer of the exporting module, which is appropriate for commonly used library modules. It
stores all C API pointers (just one in the example!) in an array of 
void
pointers which
becomes the value of a Capsule. The header file corresponding to the module provides a
macro that takes care of importing the module and retrieving its C API pointers; client
modules only have to call this macro before accessing the C API.
The exporting module is a modification of the 
spam
module from section A Simple
Example. The function 
spam.system()
does not call the C library function 
system()
directly, but a function 
PySpam_System()
, which would of course do something more
complicated in reality  (such as adding “spam”  to  every command).  This  function
PySpam_System()
is also exported to other extension modules.
The function 
PySpam_System()
is a plain C function, declared 
static
like everything else:
static int
PySpam_System(const char *command)
{
return system(command);
}
The function 
spam_system()
is modified in a trivial way:
static PyObject *
spam_system(PyObject *self, PyObject *args)
{
const char *command;
int sts;
if (!PyArg_ParseTuple(args, "s"&command))
return NULL;
sts = PySpam_System(command);
return Py_BuildValue("i", sts);
}
In the beginning of the module, right after the line
#include "Python.h"
two more lines must be added:
#define SPAM_MODULE
#include "spammodule.h"
The 
#define
is used to tell the header file that it is being included in the exporting
module, not a client module. Finally, the module’s initialization function must take care of
initializing the C API pointer array:
PyMODINIT_FUNC
initspam(void)
{
PyObject *m;
static void *PySpam_API[PySpam_API_pointers];
PyObject *c_api_object;
= Py_InitModule("spam", SpamMethods);
if (m == NULL)
return;
/* Initialize the C API pointer array */
PySpam_API[PySpam_System_NUM] = (void *)PySpam_System;
/* Create a Capsule containing the API pointer array's address */
c_api_object = PyCapsule_New((void *)PySpam_API, "spam._C_API"NULL);
if (c_api_object != NULL)
PyModule_AddObject(m, "_C_API", c_api_object);
}
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested