convert pdf to jpg c# itextsharp : Copy text from encrypted pdf control SDK system web page wpf winforms console Official%20Python%20Manual%20of%20Python%202.7.6%2064-part1867

file.
next
()
A file object is its own iterator, for example 
iter(f)
returns f (unless f is closed).
When a file is used as an iterator, typically in a 
for
loop (for example, 
for line in f:
print line.strip()
), the 
next()
method is called repeatedly. This method returns
the next input line, or raises 
StopIteration
when EOF is hit when the file is open for
reading (behavior is undefined when the file is open for writing). In order to make a
for
loop the most efficient way of looping over the lines of a file (a very common
operation), the 
next()
method uses a hidden read-ahead buffer. As a consequence of
using a read-ahead buffer, combining 
next()
with other file methods (like 
readline()
)
does not work  right. However,  using 
seek()
to reposition the file to an absolute
position will flush the read-ahead buffer.
New in version 2.3.
file.
read
(
[
size
]
)
Read at most size bytes from the file (less if the read hits EOF before obtaining size
bytes). If the size argument is negative or omitted, read all data until EOF is reached.
The bytes are returned as a string object. An empty string is returned when EOF is
encountered  immediately. (For certain files, like ttys, it makes sense to continue
reading after an EOF is hit.) Note that this method may call the underlying C function
fread()
more than once in an effort to acquire as close to size bytes as possible. Also
note that when in non-blocking mode, less data than was requested may be returned,
even if no size parameter was given.
Note:  This function is simply a wrapper for the underlying 
fread()
C function, and
will behave the same in corner cases, such as whether the EOF value is cached.
file.
readline
(
[
size
]
)
Read one entire line from the file. A trailing newline character is kept in the string (but
may be absent when a file ends with an incomplete line). [6] If the size argument is
present and non-negative, it is a maximum byte count (including the trailing newline)
and an incomplete line may be returned. When size is not 0, an empty string is
returned only when EOF is encountered immediately.
Note:  Unlike 
stdio
‘s 
fgets()
, the returned string contains null characters (
'\0'
) if
they occurred in the input.
file.
readlines
(
[
sizehint
]
)
Read until EOF using 
readline()
and return a list containing the lines thus read. If the
Copy text from encrypted pdf - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
change pdf security settings; decrypt pdf with password
Copy text from encrypted pdf - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
creating secure pdf files; change security settings on pdf
optional sizehint argument is present, instead of reading up to EOF, whole lines
totalling approximately sizehint bytes (possibly after rounding up to an internal buffer
size) are read. Objects implementing a file-like interface may choose to ignore sizehint
if it cannot be implemented, or cannot be implemented efficiently.
file.
xreadlines
()
This method returns the same thing as 
iter(f)
.
New in version 2.1.
Deprecated since version 2.3: Use 
for line in file
instead.
file.
seek
(
offset
[
, whence
]
)
Set the file’s current position, like 
stdio
‘s 
fseek()
. The whence argument is optional
and  defaults  to 
os.SEEK_SET
or 
0
(absolute  file  positioning);  other  values  are
os.SEEK_CUR
or 
1
(seek relative to the current position) and 
os.SEEK_END
or 
2
(seek
relative to the file’s end). There is no return value.
For example, 
f.seek(2, os.SEEK_CUR)
advances the position by two and 
f.seek(-3,
os.SEEK_END)
sets the position to the third to last.
Note  that  if the  file  is  opened  for  appending  (mode 
'a'
or 
'a+'
),  any 
seek()
operations will be undone at the next write. If the file is only opened for writing in
append mode (mode 
'a'
), this method is essentially a no-op, but it remains useful for
files opened in append mode with reading enabled (mode 
'a+'
). If the file is opened in
text  mode (without 
'b'
), only offsets returned by 
tell()
are legal. Use of other
offsets causes undefined behavior.
Note that not all file objects are seekable.
Changed in version 2.6: Passing float values as offset has been deprecated.
file.
tell
()
Return the file’s current position, like 
stdio
‘s 
ftell()
.
Note:  On  Windows, 
tell()
can return illegal values (after an 
fgets()
) when
reading files with Unix-style line-endings. Use binary mode (
'rb'
) to circumvent this
problem.
file.
truncate
(
[
size
]
)
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsExtract = true; // Copy is allowed. In this part, you will know how to change and update password for an encrypted PDF file in C# programming
secure pdf; create secure pdf online
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsExtract = True ' Copy is allowed In this part, you will know how to change and update password for an encrypted PDF file in VB.NET programming
pdf file security; create encrypted pdf
Truncate the file’s size. If the optional size argument is present, the file is truncated to
(at most) that size. The size defaults to the current position. The current file position is
not changed. Note that if a specified size exceeds the file’s current size, the result is
platform-dependent: possibilities include that the file may remain unchanged, increase
to the specified size as if zero-filled, or increase to the specified size with undefined
new content. Availability: Windows, many Unix variants.
file.
write
(
str
)
Write a string to the file. There is no return value. Due to buffering, the string may not
actually show up in the file until the 
flush()
or 
close()
method is called.
file.
writelines
(
sequence
)
Write a sequence of strings to the file. The sequence can be any iterable object
producing strings, typically a list of strings. There is no return value. (The name is
intended to match 
readlines()
writelines()
does not add line separators.)
Files support the iterator protocol. Each iteration returns the same result as 
readline()
,
and iteration ends when the 
readline()
method returns an empty string.
File objects also offer a number of other interesting attributes. These are not required for
file-like objects, but should be implemented if they make sense for the particular object.
file.
closed
bool indicating the current state of the file object. This is a read-only attribute; the
close()
method changes the value. It may not be available on all file-like objects.
file.
encoding
The encoding that this file uses. When Unicode strings are written to a file, they will be
converted to byte strings using this encoding. In addition, when the file is connected to
a terminal, the attribute gives the encoding that the terminal is likely to use (that
information  might  be  incorrect if  the  user  has  misconfigured  the terminal). The
attribute is read-only and may not be present on all file-like objects. It may also be
None
, in which case the file uses the system default encoding for converting Unicode
strings.
New in version 2.3.
file.
errors
The Unicode error handler used along with the encoding.
New in version 2.6.
file.
mode
VB.NET Excel: Render and Convert Excel File to TIFF Image by Using
contained in the Excel needs to be encrypted, it will If you want to view or edit PDF, Word, Excel or Excel document to REImage, you can just copy following VB
convert locked pdf to word; pdf password encryption
The I/O mode for the file. If the file was created using the 
open()
built-in function, this
will be the value of the mode parameter. This is a read-only attribute and may not be
present on all file-like objects.
file.
name
If the file object was created using 
open()
, the name of the file. Otherwise, some
string that indicates the source of the file object, of the form 
<...>
. This is a read-only
attribute and may not be present on all file-like objects.
file.
newlines
If Python was built with universal newlines enabled (the default) this read-only attribute
exists, and for files opened in universal newline read mode it keeps track of the types
of newlines encountered while reading the file. The values it can take are 
'\r'
'\n'
,
'\r\n'
None
(unknown, no newlines read yet) or a tuple containing all the newline
types seen, to indicate that multiple newline conventions were encountered. For files
not opened in universal newlines read mode the value of this attribute will be 
None
.
file.
softspace
Boolean that indicates whether a space character needs to be printed before another
value when using the 
print
statement. Classes that are trying to simulate a file object
should also have a writable 
softspace
attribute, which should be initialized to zero.
This will be automatic for most classes implemented in Python (care may be needed
for objects that override attribute access); types implemented in C will have to provide
a writable 
softspace
attribute.
Note:  This attribute is not used to control the 
print
statement, but to allow the
implementation of 
print
to keep track of its internal state.
5.10. memoryview type
New in version 2.7.
memoryview
objects allow Python code to access the internal data of an object that
supports the buffer protocol without copying. Memory is generally interpreted as simple
bytes.
class 
memoryview
(
obj
)
Create a 
memoryview
that references obj. obj must support the buffer protocol. Built-in
objects that support the buffer protocol include 
str
and 
bytearray
(but not 
unicode
).
memoryview
has the notion of an element, which is the atomic memory unit handled
by the originating object obj. For many simple types such as 
str
and 
bytearray
, an
element is a single byte, but other third-party types may expose larger elements.
len(view)
returns  the  total  number  of  elements  in  the  memoryview, view. The
itemsize
attribute will give you the number of bytes in a single element.
memoryview
supports slicing to expose its data. Taking a single index will return a
single element as a 
str
object. Full slicing will result in a subview:
>>> = memoryview('abcefg')
>>> v[1]
'b'
>>> v[-1]
'g'
>>> v[1:4]
<memory at 0x77ab28>
>>> v[1:4].tobytes()
'bce'
If the object the memoryview is over supports changing its data, the memoryview
supports slice assignment:
>>> data = bytearray('abcefg')
>>> = memoryview(data)
>>> v.readonly
False
>>> v[0= 'z'
>>> data
bytearray(b'zbcefg')
>>> v[1:4= '123'
>>> data
bytearray(b'z123fg')
>>> v[2= 'spam'
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: cannot modify size of memoryview object
Notice how the size of the memoryview object cannot be changed.
memoryview
has two methods:
tobytes
()
Return the data in the buffer as a bytestring (an object of class 
str
).
>>> = memoryview("abc")
>>> m.tobytes()
'abc'
tolist
()
Return the data in the buffer as a list of integers.
>>> memoryview("abc").tolist()
[97, 98, 99]
There are also several readonly attributes available:
format
A string containing the format (in 
struct
module style) for each element in the
view. This defaults to 
'B'
, a simple bytestring.
itemsize
The size in bytes of each element of the memoryview.
shape
A tuple of integers the length of 
ndim
giving the shape of the memory as a N-
dimensional array.
ndim
An integer indicating how many dimensions  of a multi-dimensional array the
memory represents.
strides
A tuple of integers the length of 
ndim
giving the size in bytes to access each
element for each dimension of the array.
readonly
A bool indicating whether the memory is read only.
5.11. Context Manager Types
New in version 2.5.
Python’s 
with
statement supports the concept of a runtime context defined by a context
manager. This is implemented using two separate methods that allow user-defined
classes to define a runtime context that is entered before the statement body is executed
and exited when the statement ends.
The context management protocol consists of a pair of methods that need to be provided
for a context manager object to define a runtime context:
contextmanager.
__enter__
()
Enter the runtime context and return either this object or another object related to the
runtime context. The value returned by this method is bound to the identifier in the 
as
clause of 
with
statements using this context manager.
An example of a context manager that returns itself is a file object. File objects return
themselves from __enter__() to allow 
open()
to be used as the context expression in
with
statement.
An example of a context manager that returns a related object is the one returned by
decimal.localcontext()
. These managers set the active decimal context to a copy of
the original decimal context and then return the copy. This allows changes to be made
to the current decimal context in the body of the 
with
statement without affecting
code outside the 
with
statement.
contextmanager.
__exit__
(
exc_type, exc_val, exc_tb
)
Exit the runtime context and return a Boolean flag indicating if any exception that
occurred should be suppressed. If an exception occurred while executing the body of
the 
with
statement, the arguments contain the exception type, value and traceback
information. Otherwise, all three arguments are 
None
.
Returning a true value from this method will cause the 
with
statement to suppress the
exception and continue execution with the statement immediately following the 
with
statement. Otherwise the exception continues propagating after this method has
finished executing. Exceptions that occur during execution of this method will replace
any exception that occurred in the body of the 
with
statement.
The exception passed in should never be reraised explicitly - instead, this method
should return a false value to indicate that the method completed successfully and
does not want to suppress the raised exception. This allows context management
code (such as 
contextlib.nested
) to easily detect whether or not an 
__exit__()
method has actually failed.
Python defines several context managers to support easy thread synchronisation, prompt
closure of files or other objects, and simpler manipulation of the active decimal arithmetic
context. The specific types are not treated specially beyond their implementation of the
context management protocol. See the 
contextlib
module for some examples.
Python’s generators and the 
contextlib.contextmanager
decorator provide a convenient
way  to  implement  these  protocols. If  a  generator  function  is  decorated  with  the
contextlib.contextmanager
decorator, it will return a context manager implementing the
necessary 
__enter__()
and 
__exit__()
methods, rather than the iterator produced by an
undecorated generator function.
Note that there is no specific slot for any of these methods in the type structure for
Python objects in the Python/C API. Extension types wanting to define these methods
must provide them as a normal Python accessible method. Compared to the overhead of
setting up the runtime context, the overhead of a single class dictionary lookup is
negligible.
5.12. Other Built-in Types
The interpreter supports several other kinds of objects. Most of these support only one or
two operations.
5.12.1. Modules
The only special operation on a module is attribute access: 
m.name
, where m is a module
and name accesses a name defined in m‘s symbol table. Module attributes can be
assigned to. (Note that the 
import
statement is not, strictly speaking, an operation on a
module object; 
import foo
does not require a module object named foo to exist, rather it
requires an (external) definition for a module named foo somewhere.)
A special attribute of every module is 
__dict__
. This is the dictionary containing the
module’s symbol table. Modifying this dictionary will actually change the module’s symbol
table, but direct assignment to the 
__dict__
attribute is not possible (you can write
m.__dict__['a'] = 1
, which defines 
m.a
to be 
1
, but you can’t write 
m.__dict__ = {}
).
Modifying 
__dict__
directly is not recommended.
Modules built into the interpreter are written like this: 
<module 'sys' (built-in)>
. If
loaded 
from 
file, 
they 
are 
written 
as 
<module 
'os' 
from
'/usr/local/lib/pythonX.Y/os.pyc'>
.
5.12.2. Classes and Class Instances
See Objects, values and types and Class definitions for these.
5.12.3. Functions
Function objects are created by function definitions. The only operation on a function
object is to call it: 
func(argument-list)
.
There are really two flavors of function objects:  built-in  functions  and  user-defined
functions. Both support the same operation (to call the function), but the implementation
is different, hence the different object types.
See Function definitions for more information.
5.12.4. Methods
Methods are functions that are called using the attribute notation. There are two flavors:
built-in methods (such as 
append()
on lists) and class instance methods. Built-in methods
are described with the types that support them.
The implementation adds two special read-only attributes to class instance methods:
m.im_self
is the object on which the method operates, and 
m.im_func
is the function
implementing the method. Calling 
m(arg-1, arg-2, ..., arg-n)
is completely equivalent
to calling 
m.im_func(m.im_self, arg-1, arg-2, ..., arg-n)
.
Class instance methods are either bound or unbound, referring to whether the method
was accessed through an instance or a class, respectively. When a method is unbound,
its 
im_self
attribute will be 
None
and if called, an explicit 
self
object must be passed as
the first argument. In this case, 
self
must be an instance of the unbound method’s class
(or a subclass of that class), otherwise a 
TypeError
is raised.
Like function objects, methods objects support getting arbitrary attributes. However, since
method attributes are actually stored on the underlying function object (
meth.im_func
),
setting method attributes on either bound or unbound methods is disallowed. Attempting
to set an attribute on a method results in an 
AttributeError
being raised. In order to set
a method attribute, you need to explicitly set it on the underlying function object:
>>> class C:
...  def method(self):
...  pass
...
>>> = C()
>>> c.method.whoami = 'my name is method' # can't set on the method
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: 'instancemethod' object has no attribute 'whoami'
>>> c.method.im_func.whoami = 'my name is method'
>>> c.method.whoami
'my name is method'
See The standard type hierarchy for more information.
5.12.5. Code Objects
Code objects are used by the implementation to represent “pseudo-compiled” executable
Python code such as a function body. They differ from function objects because they
don’t  contain  a  reference  to  their  global  execution  environment. Code  objects  are
returned by the built-in 
compile()
function and can be extracted from function objects
through their 
func_code
attribute. See also the 
code
module.
A code object can be executed or evaluated by passing it (instead of a source string) to
the 
exec
statement or the built-in 
eval()
function.
See The standard type hierarchy for more information.
5.12.6. Type Objects
Type objects represent the various object types. An object’s type is accessed by the built-
in function 
type()
. There are no special operations on types. The standard module 
types
defines names for all standard built-in types.
Types are written like this: 
<type 'int'>
.
5.12.7. The Null Object
This object is returned by functions that don’t explicitly return a value. It supports no
special operations. There is exactly one null object, named 
None
(a built-in name).
It is written as 
None
.
5.12.8. The Ellipsis Object
This object is used by extended slice notation (see Slicings). It supports no special
operations. There is exactly one ellipsis object, named 
Ellipsis
(a built-in name).
It is written as 
Ellipsis
. When in a subscript, it can also be written as 
...
, for example
seq[...]
.
5.12.9. The NotImplemented Object
This object is returned from comparisons and binary operations when they are asked to
operate on types they don’t support. See Comparisons for more information.
It is written as 
NotImplemented
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested