convert pdf to jpg c# codeproject : Convert locked pdf to word doc SDK control service wpf web page html dnn Issue190-part227

esa
Published by the Ecological Society of America
esa
Investing in Citizen Science Can Improve
Natural Resource Management and
Environmental Protection
Duncan C. McKinley, Abraham J. Miller-Rushing, Heidi L. Ballard, Rick Bonney, Hutch Brown,
Daniel M. Evans, Rebecca A. French, Julia K. Parrish, Tina B. Phillips, Sean F. Ryan, Lea A. Shanley,
Jennifer L. Shirk, Kristine F. Stepenuck, Jake F. Weltzin, Andrea Wiggins, Owen D. Boyle,
Russell D. Briggs, Stuart F. Chapin III, David A. Hewitt, Peter W. Preuss, and Michael A. Soukup
Fall 2015 
Report Number 19
Investing in Citizen Science Can Improve
Natural Resource Management and
Environmental Protection
Issues 
in
Ecology
Issues 
in
Ecology
Convert locked pdf to word doc - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
decrypt pdf with password; change security settings pdf reader
Convert locked pdf to word doc - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
change security settings on pdf; convert secure pdf to word
© The Ecological Society of America esahq@esa.org
esa
1
I
SSUESIN
E
COLOGY
N
UMBER
N
INETEEN
F
ALL
2015
Investing in Citizen Science Can Improve Natural Resource
Management and Environmental Protection
Duncan C. McKinley, Abraham J. Miller-Rushing, Heidi L. Ballard, Rick Bonney, Hutch Brown, Daniel M. Evans,
Rebecca A. French, Julia K. Parrish, Tina B. Phillips, Sean F. Ryan, Lea A. Shanley, Jennifer L. Shirk, Kristine F. Stepenuck,
Jake F. Weltzin, Andrea Wiggins, Owen D. Boyle, Russell D. Briggs, Stuart F. Chapin III, David A. Hewitt,
Peter W. Preuss, and Michael A. Soukup
S
UMMARY
C
itizen science has made substantive contributions to science for hundreds of years. More recently, it has contributed
to many articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals and has influenced natural resource management and environ-
mental protection decisions and policies across the nation. Over the last 10 years, citizen science—participation by the
public in a scientific project—has seen explosive growth in the United States and many other countries, particularly in
ecology, the environmental sciences, and related fields of inquiry.
The goal of this report is to help government agencies and other organizations involved in natural resource manage-
ment, environmental protection, and policymaking related to both to make informed decisions about investing in citi-
zen science. In this report, we explore the current use of citizen science in natural resource and environmental science
and decisionmaking in the United States and describe the investments organizations might make to benefit from citizen
science. We find that:
Many people are interested in participating in citizen science.
Citizen science already contributes to natural resource and environmental science, natural resource
management, and environmental protection and policymaking.
Citizen science is a rigorous process of scientific discovery, indistinguishable from conventional science
apart from the participation of volunteers, and should be treated as such in its design, implementation,
and evaluation. When properly designed and used, citizen science can help an organization meet its
needs for sound science.
Citizen science can contribute to natural resource and environmental organizations’ goals for public
input and engagement. 
Many types of projects can benefit from citizen science. When planning to utilize citizen science, orga-
nizations need to match their needs and goals for science and public input and engagement to the
strengths of particular citizen science projects and the ways in which the public can participate.
Depending on the organization’s needs and goals, citizen science can efficiently generate high-quality
data or help solve problems while fostering public input and engagement. 
Organizational leadership is needed to provide realistic expectations for citizen science, including its
limitations as well as its benefits. Leadership is also sometimes needed to lessen administrative hurdles
and to create a safe space for learning from project inefficiencies and failures.
Citizen science requires strategic investments. Beyond project-specific investments, organizations should consider
developing or modifying policies and technologies designed to facilitate the field of citizen science as a whole.
Cover photos: Clockwise starting on the upper left:  a) COASST program volunteers collecting information on a seabird carcass b) National Park Service staff and vol-
unteers recording phenology of various plants and animals c) Volunteers sorting and identifying specimens for a biodiversity survey d) A Wisconsin Department of Natural
Resources botanist training volunteers on survey methods for the Wisconsin Rare Plant Monitoring Program. 
Photos credits:a) Liz Mack, COASST b) Carolyn A. F. Enquist c) Zach Kobrinsky d) Corey Raimond.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
even though they are using different types of word processors Besides, the capacity to be locked against editing or C#.NET Sample Code: Clone a PDF Page Using C#
convert locked pdf to word doc; pdf password encryption
C# PowerPoint - Extract or Copy PowerPoint Pages from PowerPoint
PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word Besides, the capacity to be locked against editing or processing
secure pdf; decrypt a pdf file online
© The Ecological Society of America esahq@esa.org
2
esa
Introduction
Red-cockaded woodpecker, Florida manatee,
Gulf sturgeon … all are native to Wolf Bay, an
estuary on the Gulf coast of Alabama, where
freshwater streams mix with saltwater from the
ocean to support habitat for a variety of native
fish and wildlife. The region’s marshes, forests,
and waters also support a thriving tourist
industry and a rich commercial and recre-
ational fishery.
The area around Wolf Bay has grown
tremendously. Baldwin County, home to Wolf
Bay, has nearly doubled its population in the
past two decades, with development encroach-
ing on fragile ecosystems. Local systems and
habitats depend on the delivery of clean water
from coastal streams, and development has
placed local water quality at risk.
In 1996, Auburn University staff, working
with local citizens, launched Alabama Water
Watch, a program to engage citizens in moni-
toring local water quality. A network of local
water-monitoring groups emerged across the
state, including Wolf Bay Watershed Watch, a
nonprofit organization formed in 1998. With
training and guidance from Alabama Water
Watch, Wolf Bay Watershed Watch currently
monitors almost 60 stream, bay, and bayou
sites and has sampled water quality more than
8,000 times since its inception. 
In 2007, the Alabama Department of
Environmental Management designated Wolf
Bay as an Outstanding Alabama Water, pro-
viding stronger protections for the area’s water
quality and wildlife habitat. This designation
limits pollutant discharges and requires man-
aging for higher levels of dissolved oxygen and
lower amounts of bacteria in the bay. This out-
come is largely due to the efforts of the Wolf
Bay Watershed Watch and the volunteers who
solicited support from local officials, devel-
oped a management plan for the Wolf Bay
watershed, and helped residents learn about
the importance of protecting the bay. 
The story of Wolf Bay features what is gen-
erally called “citizen science,” in this case by
involving the public in water quality monitor-
ing on a watershed scale. Citizen science trig-
gered successful local efforts to help the
Alabama Department of Environmental
Management reach its conservation goals.
Does citizen science have broader applicability
for natural resource management and environ-
mental protection organizations across the
nation in fulfilling their missions? 
In making their decisions, natural resource
and environmental managers and other deci-
sionmakers often lack both the full scientific
information and the full public support and
involvement they need. In this report, we
address the following questions:
Can citizen science help? 
Can it deliver more of the science needed
for sustainable natural resource management
and environmental protection? 
Investing in Citizen Science Can Improve Natural Resource
Management and Environmental Protection
Duncan C. McKinley, Abraham J. Miller-Rushing, Heidi L. Ballard, Rick Bonney, Hutch Brown, Daniel M. Evans,
Rebecca A. French, Julia K. Parrish, Tina B. Phillips, Sean F. Ryan, Lea A. Shanley, Jennifer L. Shirk, Kristine F. Stepenuck,
Jake F. Weltzin, Andrea Wiggins, Owen D. Boyle, Russell D. Briggs, Stuart F. Chapin III, David A. Hewitt,
Peter W. Preuss, and Michael A. Soukup
I
SSUESIN
E
COLOGY
N
UMBER
N
INETEEN
F
ALL
2015
Photo 1.Wolf Bay, a Gulf coast
estuary in Alabama.
Photo credit: Eric Reutebuch,
Alabama Water Watch.
C# Excel - Extract or Copy Excel Pages to Excel File in C#.NET
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word Besides, the capacity to be locked against editing or processing
pdf security options; pdf security remover
VB.NET Word: Extract Text from Microsoft Word Document in VB.NET
Word documents are often locked as static images and the through VB.NET programming, convert Word document to & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add security to pdf; copy paste encrypted pdf
© The Ecological Society of America esahq@esa.org
esa
3
I
SSUESIN
E
COLOGY
N
UMBER
N
INETEEN
F
ALL
2015
Can it foster more public input and engage-
ment in natural resource management and
environmental protection and decisionmak-
ing? 
And, if so, how do natural resource and
environmental managers and decisionmak-
ers best invest in citizen science to improve
outcomes?
Our goal in this report is to help govern-
ment agencies and other organizations
involved in natural resource management,
environmental protection, and policymaking
related to both to answer these questions and
make informed decisions about investing in
citizen science. We aim to provide a balanced
assessment of whether, when, and how organi-
zations can employ citizen science to help
meet the information and public engagement
needs of natural resource and environmental
managers and other decisionmakers.
What Is Citizen Science? 
Citizen science means different things to dif-
ferent people, causing confusion about its
nature and utility. We use the term to refer to
the practice of engaging the public in a scien-
tific project—a project that produces reliable
data and information usable by scientists,
decisionmakers, or the public and that is open
to the same system of peer review that applies
to conventional science. The term citizen sci-
ence is sometimes used differently—for exam-
ple, to describe only projects where volunteers
collect data, only projects that involve profes-
sional scientists, or the engagement of nonsci-
entists in policy discussions. However, our
meaning is gaining general acceptance, and
we use it throughout this paper. Citizen sci-
ence, as we define it, is indistinguishable from
conventional science, apart from the partici-
pation of volunteers—both can use a variety
of methods and can achieve a variety of goals,
including basic research, management, and
education. Citizen science is science (with the
addition of volunteers) and should be treated
as such in its design, implementation, and
evaluation.
Citizen science is not new. Before science
first emerged as a profession, most scientific
research was conducted by the “citizen scien-
tists” of their day—keen amateurs who con-
ducted or carried out scientific research. Over
the centuries, amateur scientists and volun-
teers made key contributions to the under-
standing of climate, evolution, geological
processes, electricity, astronomy, and other
phenomena. In the United States, for exam-
ple, farmers, weather observers, and naturalists
Box 1. Definitions
Adaptive management t – A systematic approach for improving resource management by learning from management outcomes.
Adaptive management focuses on learning and adapting through an iterative process of planning, taking actions, monitoring, learning,
and adjusting and through partnerships among managers, scientists, and other stakeholders working and learning together.
Citizen science– Participation by the public in a scientific project. Projects can involve public participation in any or all stages of the
scientific process. Projects can involve professional scientists or be entirely designed and implemented by volunteers. However, citizen
science is science and should be treated as such in its design, implementation, and evaluation.  
Conventional science– A professional-based approach to science led by paid scientists at academic, government, nonprofit, or com-
mercial organizations and carried out by a mix of professional scientists and paid technicians or students. We use the term “conven-
tional science” to contrast a professionals-only approach with a citizen-based approach to science, although the two approaches have
long been intertwined and need not be separated in practice.
Decisionmakers– Individuals or groups of people in the public or private sector who choose among a number of alternatives that are
typically delimited by internal policies, laws, or rules. In the public sector, decisionmakers include people who make routine decisions
on implementing public policy as well as people who can give content and direction to public policy by enacting statutes, issuing exec-
utive orders, promoting administrative rules, or making judicial interpretation of laws. As used in this paper, the term can sometimes
include policymakers.
Policymakers– Individuals or groups of people, typically within a legislature, an executive office, a judiciary, or administrative agen-
cies, who set public policy through a range of processes and mechanisms. Policymakers can decide to adopt a particular law or make
a certain rule and then decide how to implement the law or rule.
Public engagement– Officials, specialists, and other employees of natural resource and environmental organizations interacting with
the public to exchange ideas about a problem or proposed solution or other management action or goal. This is frequently done
through education and extension programs, public outreach, and town hall meetings.
Public input– Feedback from the public in response to a call from government or other organizations for input. Examples include pub-
lic comment periods following the release of environmental impact statements and meetings of advisory committees.
I
SSUESIN
E
COLOGY
N
UMBER
N
INETEEN
F
ALL
2015
documented the daily weather, the timing of
harvests and pest outbreaks, and the abun-
dance and behaviors of wildlife. Early citizen
scientists in North America famously included
Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson. Less
well known are the data collected by natural-
ists, such as Henry David Thoreau. Thoreau’s
painstaking records from the 1850s of the first
flowers, leaves, and bird arrivals each spring
are now being used by scientists to identify the
impacts of climate change in Concord and at
Walden Pond in Massachusetts. In the 1930s
and 1940s, Aldo Leopold learned from his
own form of citizen science, banding birds and
recording the timing of spring events. Noting
a range of discoveries made by contemporary
citizen science volunteers, Leopold concluded
that “the sport-value of amateur research is
just beginning to be realized.” In fact, many of
Leopold’s research projects are being contin-
ued today by citizen science volunteers. 
More recently, researchers have benefited
from the information technology revolution
and the advent of the Internet and location-
aware mobile technologies equipped with
cameras and other sensors. Such technologies
have made it easier for professionals and non-
professionals alike to access, store, manage,
analyze, and share vast amounts of data and to
communicate information quickly and easily.
Central to the rapid evolution of citizen sci-
ence, technological advances have driven its
growth. Now, for example, citizen science pro-
jects can deploy large numbers of volunteers
and record huge volumes of observations in
centralized databases that can be analyzed in
near-real time. Increased capacity has spurred
recent rapid growth in citizen science, leading
to the rising use of citizen science data in peer-
reviewed publications (Figure 1). Powered by
public interest, today’s citizen science can help
answer the most challenging ecological and
environmental questions, addressing issues
that affect everyday lives. 
Citizen science projects can pursue basic or
applied science, with purposes that include
baseline ecological or environmental monitor-
ing as well as crisis response and taking man-
agement actions, such as habitat restoration.
Citizen science can tackle local questions, such
as identifying the source of pollution in a
single stream; it can also provide insights into
continental or global processes, such as climate
change or the world’s great animal migrations.
Volunteers can participate in a little or a lot of
the scientific process. For instance, they might
formulate a scientific question and then con-
tract with professional scientists to conduct the
research; or they might collaborate closely with
professional scientists to jointly develop a pro-
ject, collect and analyze data, and report the
results. Private citizens, alone or in groups, can
even pursue scientific research wholly on their
own, independent of professional scientists.
However, volunteers usually contribute by col-
lecting data in projects designed by profes-
sional scientists.
Converging Citizen Science
“Pathways”
Resource and environmental management
organizations generally invest in citizen sci-
ence for two reasons: (1) to do science that
might not otherwise be feasible because of
scale or for other practical reasons, and (2) to
better engage the public in helping to make
decisions through generating new scientific
knowledge and through learning gained from
participating in the scientific process. These
goals reflect the two primary ways that citizen
science can inform and assist managers and
other decisionmakers (Figure 2). The path-
ways converge and can be mutually reinforc-
ing; a citizen science project can lead volun-
© The Ecological Society of America esahq@esa.org
esa
Photo 2.A researcher compares
modern-day observations of
flowering plants with written
records and specimens left by
Henry David Thoreau in the
1850s.
Photo courtesy of
Richard Primack.
Photo 3.A participant in
iNaturalist (a citizen science
program) uses a smartphone
with a clip-on macrolens to
photograph a specimen.
Photo credit: Yurong He.
© The Ecological Society of America esahq@esa.org
esa
5
I
SSUESIN
E
COLOGY
N
UMBER
N
INETEEN
F
ALL
2015
teers down both pathways at once, generating
synergies between science and public input
and engagement. We separate the pathways
here only to describe them.
One pathway is the same one followed by
conventional research. Volunteers help gener-
ate scientific information for natural resource
and environmental managers and other deci-
sionmakers, who take the information into
account in making decisions. 
The other pathway involves the public in
scientific research while stimulating public
input and engagement in natural resource and
environmental management and policymak-
ing. Volunteers can directly provide input—
for example, they might comment on a pro-
posed government action on the basis of what
they learned in a citizen science project. Their
input and engagement can also be indirect—
for example, they might share information
within their communities, motivating others
to get involved in natural resource and envi-
ronmental management and policy discussions
and decisions.
Although most citizen science projects
involve both pathways (often at the same
time), projects can vary, and the design of a
project influences the type of scientific infor-
mation it provides and the quality and method
of public engagement it facilitates.
Organizations that use citizen science carefully
choose project designs that match their needs
and goals. Alternatively, community members
or other stakeholders might initiate, design, or
implement projects themselves, filling roles
unmet by agencies or other organizations.
Together, the two pathways can help organi-
zations meet their goals by contributing at var-
ious points in a typical policy cycle (Figure 2).
Citizen science can make valuable systematic
observations and identify problems or issues;
help in formulating public policy, along with
contributions by industry, environmental
groups, and other stakeholders; strengthen
public input into policymaking by legislators
and other decisionmakers; help government
Figure 1.Growth in the number
of scientific publications that
have used or studied citizen
science since 1995. Data are
based on a search of the Web of
Science for the keyword "citizen
science" and likely represent a
fraction of all scientific
publications using or studying
citizen science because many
publications fail to acknowledge
when they include contributions
from citizen science.
Figure 2.Pathways that citizen
science can take to influence
natural resource management
and environmental protection by
(1) generating scientific
information, and (2) facilitating
direct (green arrows) and
indirect (red arrows) public input
and engagement. Direct public
input and engagement include,
for example, comments on
proposed government actions;
indirect input and engagement
include communication with
peers that might stimulate
community engagement in
natural resource management,
environmental protection, and
policy decisions. Text in black
refers to the policy cycle:
problem or issue identification
produces a need; option
formulation addresses the issue;
policy adoption points to a way
of resolving the issue; policy
implementation entails taking
action; and outcome evaluation
assesses policy effectiveness,
initiating the next policy cycle.
I
SSUESIN
E
COLOGY
N
UMBER
N
INETEEN
F
ALL
2015
© The Ecological Society of America esahq@esa.org
esa
publications with the most robust designs and
inferences; rather, it is the best scientific infor-
mation available to answer a specific question.
Organizations can acquire this information
through a variety of means, including original
reports or publications, summaries or memos,
expert testimony or briefings, and conversa-
tions with experts. Some organizations con-
duct research in-house or solicit research, and
sometimes the research is conducted indepen-
dently by other organizations or individual sci-
entists. Wherever the science comes from, its
relevance, credibility, and accuracy are key.
Can Citizen Science Meet Core
Information Needs? 
Natural resource managers and environmental
protection organizations need scientific infor-
mation to meet a wide variety of goals. Like
conventional science, citizen science is flexi-
ble and can take a wide variety of approaches.
Citizen science can be used in a variety of
ways, including:
Monitoring studies assessing patterns, in
space and/or time, of one or more ecosystem
components (e.g., is this species here now?
How many individuals of this species are here
now?) or functions (e.g., is this process hap-
pening now?). Data collection is standardized
(the same for all sampling locations) and
effort-controlled (data are recorded even if
none are found—i.e., zeroes “count”).
Process studies assessing the impacts of fac-
tors (e.g., hazardous fuels reduction treat-
ments or pollution) on ecosystem compo-
nents or functions (e.g., nutrient and water
agencies and other organizations implement
the corresponding policies; help evaluate the
impact of a policy or decision; and help in
enforcing laws and regulations pertaining to
natural resources and the environment. 
In what follows, we explain the two path-
ways. Then we discuss the pathway synergies
that strengthen both the capacity for scientific
discovery and the ability to effectively use sci-
ence in natural resource management and
environmental protection. Lastly, we evaluate
the opportunity to use citizen science to
achieve natural resource management and
environmental protection goals and meet
related challenges.
Acquiring Science
To make decisions, organizations rely on sci-
entific information that is relevant, credible,
and accurate (Figure 3)  –the “best available
science.” The best science does not necessarily
come from the best peer-reviewed scientific
(a)
(b)
(c)
Figure 3.a) The beginning of the
science pathway in citizen
science (see Figure 2). b) A team
of participants selects a site for
biodiversity data collection using
a cubic foot sampling frame.
Photo credit: Zach Kobrinsky.  c)
Participants in Biocubes (a
citizen science program) use
smartphones to help identify
species and submit data. Photo
credit: Andrea Wiggins.
© The Ecological Society of America esahq@esa.org
esa
7
I
SSUESIN
E
COLOGY
N
UMBER
N
INETEEN
F
ALL
2015
cycling). The researchers control the level
and duration of the exposure, and there is a
control (which might be the status quo).
Opportunistic and observational studies that
do not follow a strict design but are often
deliberate in the subject and timing of
observation. These studies can be useful
because of the scale of the data collection,
the rarity of the phenomena observed (e.g.,
a rare species or infrequent weather event),
or the timeliness of the observations (e.g.,
collecting information for crisis response,
such as after earthquakes or oil spills). 
Citizen science projects already tackle major
challenges for managing natural resources and
the environment, such as species management,
ecosystem services management, climate change
adaptation, invasive species control, and pollu-
tion detection and regulation (table 1).
What Scientific Value Does Citizen
Science Add? 
Understanding the relative strengths of citizen
science can help determine when it can pro-
vide advantages over conventional science:
Citizen science can often operate at greater
geographic scales and over longer periods
of time than conventional science—and
sometimes at greater resolutions.Only vol-
unteers can cost-effectively collect some
types of data, such as observations of breed-
ing birds and other physical and biological
phenomena, in sufficiently large areas and
over long enough periods of time to be sci-
entifically reliable and meaningful. The
North American Breeding Bird Survey, for
example, has relied on volunteers to track
the abundance of bird populations across the
continent (Case Study 1). Other projects,
such as Nature’s Notebook, encourage vol-
unteers and professional scientists to regu-
larly submit observations of plant and ani-
mal occurrences, behaviors, and seasonal
events such as tree leafout and the timing of
animal breeding. In some cases, projects have
benefited greatly from volunteers collecting
data when scientists are not typically present,
such as during the Arctic autumn and winter.
Organizations use online applications such as
IveGot1 and Bugwood to track the presence
or absence of invasive species and other
attributes, to better understand how invasive
species spread, and to collect other vital
information. In addition, hundreds of air and
water quality monitoring programs across the
country depend largely on data and samples
collected by citizen science volunteers (Case
Study 2). The resulting observations are used
by professional scientists, government agen-
cies, nongovernmental organizations, and
other decisionmakers.
Table 1. Sample citizen science projects/programs used to meet needs for science and public input/engagement
common to many natural resource and environmental organizations. 
Management goal      Science needs
Public input and engagement needs
Sample projectsa
Species
Providing information on
Public support for and involvement in 
North American Breeding
management
species abundance, 
management decisions
Bird Survey;Monarch Watch; 
distribution, phenology, 
eBird;
a
Grunion Greeters
and behavior
Ecosystem services Providing resource valuation; ; Public appreciation for ecosystem services
USGS’s Social Values for 
management
mapping ecosystem services
Ecosystem Services (SoLVES)
Climate change, 
Assessing the status, rates, Stakeholder engagement in program 
Nature’s Notebook;
impact assessment, and trends of key physical, 
development, implementation, and evaluation
Community Collaborative 
adaptation
ecological, and societal 
Rain, Hail and Snow Network
variables and values
Invasive species 
Providing real-time 
Public support for and involvement in 
IveGot1 app; Bugwood app
control
monitoring (an early-alert 
management decisions
system)
Pollution detection 
Providing information on 
Stakeholder engagement in identifying 
Bucket Brigade; Global 
and enforcement
water and air quality
problems and solutions; public support 
Community Monitor; Clean Air 
for and involvement in management decisions
Coalition;Alabama Water 
Watch Programa
a. Different citizen science projects can take different approaches and engage volunteers in different ways to achieve the science and public input and engagement needs 
associated with each management goal.
I
SSUESIN
E
COLOGY
N
UMBER
N
INETEEN
F
ALL
2015
© The Ecological Society of America esahq@esa.org
esa
Citizen science can speed up and improve
field detection.Having many eyes on the
ground can help detect environmental
changes (e.g., detecting changes in the onset
of spring through plant phenology), identify
phenomena that require management
responses (e.g., population declines, inci-
dences of pollution, and introduction of an
invasive species), and monitor the effective-
ness of management practices. Volunteers
have filled data gaps and detected unusual
occurrences that might have eluded conven-
tional science and monitoring. For example,
the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s
FeederWatch program was able to track
rapidly spreading disease in house finches and
other wild birds across 33 states based on
information that volunteers collected at bird
feeders. Citizen science data combined with
laboratory studies gave critical new insights
into how to slow or prevent future epidemics
among wildlife and humans.
Citizen science can improve data and
image analysis.People are able to recognize
patterns and interpret large amounts of data
as well as to distinguish subtle differences
among characteristics. Volunteers with no
specialized training (such as high school stu-
dents) have performed as well as or better
than highly trained scientists and state-of-
the-art algorithms in certain analytical
tasks, for example in “protein folding” to
help scientists better understand proteins
(through the Foldit computer game).
Volunteers can also extract information
from digitally collected primary data (such
as images or audio) by identifying and
recording secondary information (e.g.,
species identity; the presence or absence of a
species; and the abundance, behavior, and
frequency or duration of various phenom-
ena), tasks that are often difficult for com-
puters. In some cases, highly trained volun-
teers such as retired professionals might be
able to contribute to higher level data
analysis. Finally, volunteers can use local or
traditional knowledge to help professional
scientists interpret results, particularly in
explaining unusual data and in research pro-
jects that explore how people interact with
ecological processes. 
Citizen science can help refine research
questions.Participants in citizen science are
affected by and observe local natural
resources and the environment in their daily
lives, so they can help improve the relevancy
of location-specific research questions and
make them more useful to managers and local
communities. For example, people in
Washington state harvest salal, a culturally
and economically important forest shrub used
in floral arrangements and also important for
wildlife habitat. Concerned about the decline
of salal, scientists worked with people who
harvest the shrub to formulate research ques-
tions about sustainable use of the plant. The
results helped everyone involved understand
why salal might decline and how to harvest it
without diminishing the resource. A full
understanding of natural resource and envi-
ronmental issues often requires a holistic per-
spective, including human dimensions; citi-
zen science can help provide this perspective
and improve research.
Citizen science can help researchers better
identify and study connections between
humans and their environment.Citizen sci-
ence is well suited for interdisciplinary col-
laboration, particularly for projects that
include both natural and social dimensions.
Natural resource and environmental man-
agers increasingly address the social aspects
of difficult ecological issues, such as manag-
ing wildfires in the wildland-urban interface.
By engaging local community members, citi-
zen science can facilitate an understanding
among managers, scientists, regulators, deci-
sionmakers, volunteers, and others of the
social dimensions of the natural systems
where people live.
Photo 4.Volunteers preparing
butterfly specimens for iDigBio.
Photo: courtesy of the Florida
Museum of Natural History.
© The Ecological Society of America esahq@esa.org
esa
9
I
SSUESIN
E
COLOGY
N
UMBER
N
INETEEN
F
ALL
2015
What Are the Limitations of Citizen
Science for Achieving Science Goals?
Many scientific projects are not appropriate
for citizen science. The most common factor
limiting volunteer participation in a scientific
project is the ability of trained volunteers to
meaningfully contribute to the science.
Questions, methods, and analyses sometimes
require specialized knowledge, training, equip-
ment, and time commitments that make citi-
zen science inefficient or impractical as an
approach.
Additionally, not all citizen science projects
stimulate widespread public interest, whether
driven by curiosity or concern. Because inter-
ests vary, people are selective about participat-
ing in citizen science. For example, charis-
matic species such as wolves, bears, and
certain birds receive more public attention
(and support for public funding) than other
species, including most plants. Similarly, water
bodies near tourist destinations and college
campuses tend to receive more attention than
do those in urban and industrial areas. In addi-
tion, studies in small or remote communities
might be of great local interest, yet the pool of
potential participants in a citizen science pro-
ject might be small. For certain taxa and eco-
logical processes and for some biogeographic
regions or geographic locations, it is difficult
to sustainably do many types of citizen science
projects.  
For field work, potentially hazardous condi-
tions or the need for frequent sampling can
limit the feasibility of citizen science. Few vol-
unteers are able to devote extended periods of
time to scientific projects. Extremely frequent
(e.g., daily) sampling needs therefore might
discourage participation and increase
turnover. There can also be a mismatch
between the availability of volunteers and the
availability of managers or their staffs; for
example, participants might be available pri-
marily on weekends, when staff is unavailable.
As a result, it might be difficult to recruit citi-
zen science volunteers for certain projects.
At the other extreme, infrequent (e.g.,
annual) sampling might make it harder to sus-
tain collection of high-quality data, because
participants might have to relearn even basic
protocols. A successful sampling design for
volunteers lies in between, where sampling
frequency is just enough to keep participants
well practiced and able to gather consistent
data, but not so high as to become onerous
and discourage participation. 
Citizen science projects that simultaneously
engage volunteers in scientific research and in
public input into decisionmaking processes
must be careful to guard against bias. But pro-
fessional scientists must also guard against
bias, especially those who are involved in both
conducting research and informing decision-
makers. Similar quality controls can be used
for both citizen science and conventional sci-
ence; they can include training, collection of
duplicate samples, and postdata collection
analyses designed to identify outliers and
biases in the data. Quality controls should be
used in most citizen science projects, even
when volunteers are not involved in decision-
making. There is nothing particularly special
about quality controls in citizen science that
science does not already have the tools to
handle.
Public Input and Engagement
For federal, state, and municipal agencies as
well as many nongovernmental organizations,
public input and engagement are essential in
formulating and achieving natural resource
management and environmental protection
goals (Figure 4). Federal law requires federal
agencies to disclose the impacts of their major
activities and to solicit public input or partici-
pation at important stages in the land man-
agement and policy development process. We
define “public input” as feedback from the
public in response to a call from government
or other organizations for input. Examples
include public comment periods following the
release of environmental impact statements
and meetings of advisory committees, such as
those set upunder the Federal Advisory
Committee Act.   
Government agencies and other organiza-
tions also foster public engagement in natural
resource and environmental management and
policymaking. Accordingly, we define “public
engagement” as officials, specialists, and other
employees interacting with the public to
exchange ideas about a problem or a proposed
solution or other management action or goal.
This is typically done through education pro-
grams, public outreach, and town hall meet-
ings. Public participation was originally
intended to prevent special interest groups
from unduly influencing federal decisionmak-
ing. Now, public input and collaboration are
increasingly viewed as essential in crafting sus-
tainable management activities and policies
(Case Study 3).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested