how to convert pdf to jpg in c# windows application : Change security settings pdf reader Library application class asp.net html winforms ajax javanotes6-linked72-part345

CHAPTER 13. ADVANCED GUI PROGRAMMING
707
Only about one-third of a second after the size has stopped changing will a new, resized image
be produced. Here is how this works: The display sets up a ComponentEvent to listen for resize
events on itself. When a resize occurs, the listener starts a Timer that has a delay of 1/3 second.
(SeeSubsection6.5.1.) While this timer is running, the paintComponent() method does not
resize the image; instead, it reuses the image that already exists. If the timer fires 1/3 second
later, the image will be resized at that time. However, if another resize event occurs while the
first timer is running, then the first timer will be stopped before it has a chance to fire, and a
new timer will be started with a delay of 1/3 second. The result is that the image does not get
resized until 1/3 second after the size of the window stops changing.
The Mandelbrot Viewer program also uses events of type WindowEvent, which are gener-
ated by a window when it opens or closes (among other things). One example is in the file
LauncherApplet.java. This s filedefines an n applet t that appears as abuttononthewebpage.
The button is labeled “Launch Mandelbrot Viewer”. When the user clicks the button, a Man-
delbrotFrame is opened on the screen, and the text on the button changes to “Close Mandelbrot
Viewer”. When the frame closes, the button changes back to “Launch Mandelbrot Viewer”,
and the button can be used to open another window. The frame can be closed by clicking
the button, but it can also be closed using a “Close” command in the frame’s menu bar or by
clicking the close box in the frame’s title bar. The question is, how does the button’s text get
changed when the frame is closed by one of the latter two methods? One possibility would
be to have the frame call a method in the applet to tell the applet that it is closing, but that
would tightly couple the frame class to the applet class. In fact, it’s done with WindowEvents.
AWindowListener in the applet listens for close events from the frame. In response to a close
event, the text of the button is changed. Again, this can happen even though the frame class
knows nothing about the applet class. Window events are also used byMain.javato trigger an
action that has to be taken when the program is ending; this will be discussed below.
Perhaps the most interesting use of events in the Mandelbrot Viewer program is to enable
and disable menu commands based on the status of the display. For this, events of type Prop-
ertyChangeEvent are used. This event class is part of the “bean” framework that was discussed
briefly inSubsection11.5.2, and class PropertyChangeEvent and related classes are defined in
the package java.beans. The idea is that bean objects are defined by their “properties” (which
are just aspects of the state of the bean). When a bean property changes, the bean can emit
aPropertyChangeEvent to notify other objects of the change. Properties for which property
change events are emitted are known technically as bound properties. A bound property has
aname that identifies that particular property among all the properties of the bean. When
aproperty change event is generated, the event object includes the name of the property that
has changed, the previous value of the property, and the new value of the property.
The MandelbrotDisplay class has a bound property whose name is given by the constant
MandelbrotDisplay.STATUS
PROPERTY. A display emits a property change event when its sta-
tus changes. The possible values of the status property are given by other constants, such
as MandelbrotDisplay.STATUS
READY. The READY status indicates that the display is not cur-
rently runninga computation andis ready to doanother one. There are severalmenu commands
that should be enabled only when the status of the display is READY. To implement this, the
Menus class defines a PropertyChangeListener to listen for property change events from the dis-
play. When this listener hears an event, it responds by enabling or disabling menu commands
according to the new value of the status property.
Allof Java’s GUI components are beans and are capable of emitting property change events.
In any subclass of Component, this can be done simply by calling the method
Change security settings pdf reader - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
decrypt pdf; convert locked pdf to word doc
Change security settings pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
cannot print pdf security; change security settings pdf
CHAPTER 13. ADVANCED GUI PROGRAMMING
708
public void firePropertyChange(String propertyName,
Object oldValue, Object newValue)
For example,the MandelbrotDisplay class uses the followingmethod for setting its current status:
private void setStatus(String status) {
if (status == this.status) {
// Note: Event should be fired only if status actually changes.
return;
}
String oldStatus = this.status;
this.status = status;
firePropertyChange(STATUS
PROPERTY, oldStatus, status);
}
When writing bean classes from scratch, you have to add support for property change events,
if you need them. To make this easier, the java.beans package provides the PropertyChange-
Support class.
13.5.5 Custom Dialogs
Java has several standard dialog boxes that are defined in the classes JOptionPane, JColor-
Chooser, and JFileChooser. These were introduced inSubsection6.8.2 andSubsection11.2.3.
Dialogs of all these types are used in the Mandelbrot Viewer program. However, sometimes
other types of dialog are needed. In such cases, you can build a custom dialog box.
Dialog boxes are defined by subclasses of the class JDialog. Like frames, dialog boxes are
separate windows on the screen, and the JDialog class is very similar to the JFrame class. The
big difference is that a dialog box has a parent, which is a frame or another dialog box that
“owns” the dialog box. If the parent of a dialog box closes, the dialog box closes automatically.
Furthermore, the dialog box will probably “float” on top of its parent, even when its parent is
the active window.
Dialog boxes can be either modal or modeless. When a modal dialog is put up on the
screen, the rest of the application is blocked until the dialog box is dismissed. This is the most
common case, and all the standard dialog boxes are modal. Modeless dialog boxes are more
like independent windows, since they can stay on the screen while the user interacts with other
windows. There are no modeless dialogs in the Mandelbrot Viewer program.
The Mandelbrot Viewer program uses two custom dialog boxes. They are used to im-
plement the “Set Image Size” and “Set Limits” commands and are defined by the files
SetImageSizeDialog.javaand SetLimitsDialog.java. The e “set imagesize”dialoglets theuser
enter a new width and height for the Mandelbrot image. The “set limits” dialog lets the user
input the minimum and maximum values for x and y that are shown in the image. The two
dialog classes are very similar. In both classes, several JTextFields are used for user input. Two
buttons named “OK” and “Cancel” are added to the window, and listeners are set up for these
buttons. If the user clicks “OK”, the listener checks whether the inputs in the text fields are
legal; if not, an error message is displayed to the user and the dialog stays on the screen. If the
input is legal when the user clicks “OK”, the dialog is disposed. The dialog is also disposed if
the user clicks “Cancel” or clicks the dialog box’s close box. The net effect is that the dialog
box stays on the screen until the user either cancels the dialog or enters legal values for the
inputs and clicks “OK”. The program can find out which of these occurred by calling a method
named getInput() in the dialog object after showing the dialog. This method returns null if
the dialog was canceled; otherwise it returns the user input.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK provides some PDF security settings about password to help protect your PDF document Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password.
decrypt a pdf file online; pdf password encryption
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To help protect your PDF document in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings.
create secure pdf; decrypt pdf online
CHAPTER 13. ADVANCED GUI PROGRAMMING
709
To make my custom dialog boxes easy to use, I added a static showDialog() method to
each dialog class. When this function is called, it shows the dialog, waits for it to be dismissed,
and then returns the value of the getInput() method. This makes it possible to use my custom
dialog boxes in much the same way as Java’s standard dialog boxes are used.
Custom dialog boxes are not difficult to create and to use, if you already know about
frames. I will not discuss them further here, but you can look at the source code file
SetImageSizeDialog.javaasamodel.
13.5.6 Preferences
Most serious programs allow the user to set preferences. A preference is really just a piece of
the program’s state that is saved between runs of the program. In order to make preferences
persistent from one run of the program to the next, the preferences could simply be saved to a
file in the user’s home directory. However, there would then be the problem of locating the file.
There would be the problem of naming the file in a way that avoids conflicts with file names
used by other programs. And there would be the problem of cluttering up the user’s home
directory with files that the user shouldn’t even have to know about.
To deal with these problems, Java has a standard means of handling preferences. It is
defined by the package java.util.prefs. In general, the only thing that you need from this
package is the class named Preferences.
In the Mandelbrot Viewer program, the fileMain.javahas an example of using Preferences.
Main.java runs the stand-alone application version of the program, and its use of preferences
applies only when the program is run in that way.
In most programs, the user sets preferences in a custom dialog box. However, the Man-
delbrot program doesn’t have any preferences that are appropriate for that type of treatment.
Instead, as an example, I automatically save a few aspects of the program’s state as preferences.
Every time the program starts up, it reads the preferences, if any are available. Every time
the program terminates, it saves the preferences. (Saving the preferences poses an interesting
problem because the program ends when the MandelbrotFrame window closes, not when the
main() routine ends. In fact, the main() routine ends as soon as the window appears on the
screen. So, it won’t work to save the preferences at the end of the main program. The solution
is to use events: A listener listens for WindowEvents from the frame. When a window-closed
event is received, indicating that the program is ending, the listener saves the preferences.)
Preferences for Java programs are storedin some platform-dependent formin some platform-
dependent location. As a Java programmer, you don’t have to worry about it; the Java pref-
erences system knows where to store the data. There is still the problem of identifying the
preferences for one program among all the possible Java programs that might be running on a
computer. Java solves this problem in the same way that it solves the package naming prob-
lem. In fact, by convention, the preferences for a program are identified by the package name of
the program, with a slight change in notation. For example, the Mandelbrot Viewer program
is defined in the package edu.hws.eck.mdb, and its preferences are identified by the string
“/edu/hws/eck/mdb”. (The periods have been changed to “/”, and an extra “/” has been
added at the beginning.)
The preferences for a program are stored in something called a “node.” The user preferences
node for a given program identifier can be accessed as follows:
Preferences root = Preferences.userRoot();
Preferences node = root.node(pathName);
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF Document Protection. XDoc.PDF SDK allows users to perform PDF document security settings in VB.NET program. Password, digital
decrypt pdf file; decrypt password protected pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
add security to pdf file; copy text from locked pdf
CHAPTER 13. ADVANCED GUI PROGRAMMING
710
where pathname is the string, such as “/edu/hws/eck/mdb”, that identifies the node. The node
itself consists of a simple list of key/value pairs, where both the key and the value are strings.
You can store any strings you want in preferences nodes—they are really just a way of storing
some persistent data between program runs. In general, though, the key string identifies some
particular preference item, and the associated value string is the value of that preference. A
Preferences object, prefnode, contains methods prefnode.get(key) for retrieving the value
string associated with a given key and prefnode.put(key,value) for setting the value string
for a given key.
In Main.java, I use preferences to store the shape and position of the program’s window.
This makes the size and shape of the window persistent between runs of the program; when
you run the program, the window will be right where you left it the last time you ran it. I also
store the name of the directory that is currently selected in the file dialog box that is used by
the program for the Save and Open commands. This is particularly satisfying, since the default
behavior for a file dialog box is to start in the user’s home directory, which is hardly ever the
place where the user wants to keep a program’s files. With the preferences feature, I can switch
to the right directory the first time I use the program, and from then on I’ll automatically
be back in that directory when I use the program again. You can look at the source code in
Main.javaforthedetails.
∗ ∗ ∗
And that’s it.... There’s a lot more that I could say about Java and about programming
in general, but this book is only “An Introduction to Programming Using Java,” and it’s time
for our journey to end. I hope that it has been a pleasant journey for you, and I hope that I
have helped you establish a foundation that you can use as a basis for further exploration.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. system.webServer> <validation validateIntegratedModeConfiguration="false"/> <security> <requestFiltering
pdf password security; pdf security settings
C# Imaging - Decode Code 93 Barcode in C#.NET
the purpose to provide a higher density and data security enhancement to Load an image or a document(PDF, TIFF, Word, Excel Set the barcode reader settings.
convert locked pdf to word online; change pdf document security properties
Exercises
711
Exercises for Chapter 13
1. The sample programPaintWithOffScreenCanvas.javafromSection13.1 is a simple paint
(solution)
program. Make two improvements to this program: First, add a “File” menu that lets
the user open an image file and save the current image in either PNG or JPEG format.
Second, add a basic one-level “Undo” command that lets the user undo the most recent
operation that was applied to the image. (Do not try to make a multilevel Undo, which
would allow the user to undo several operations.)
When you read a file into the program, you should copy the image that you read into
the program’s off-screen canvas. Since the canvas in the program has a fixed size, you
should scale the image that you read so that it exactly fills the canvas.
2. For this exercise, you should continue to work on the program from the previous exercise.
(solution)
Add a “StrokeWidth” menu that allows the user to draw lines of varying thicknesses. Make
it possible to use different colors for the interior of a filled shape and for the outline of that
shape. To do this, change the “Color” menu to “StrokeColor” and add a “FillColor” menu.
(My solution adds two new tools, “Stroked Filled Rectangle” and “Stroked Filled Oval”,
to represent filled shapes that are outlinedwiththe current stroke.) Add support for filling
shapes with transparent color. A simple approach to this is to use a JCheckboxMenuItem
to select either fully opaque or 50% opaque fill. (Don’t try to apply transparency to
stokes—it’s very difficult to make transparency work correctly for the Curve tool, and
in any case, shape outlines look better if they are opaque.) Finally, make the menus
more user friendly by adding some keyboard accelerators to some commands and by using
JRadioButtonMenuItems where appropriate, such as in the color and tool menus. This
exercise takes quite a bit of work to get it all right, so you should tackle the problem in
pieces.
3. The StopWatchLabel component from Subsection13.4.5 displays the text “Timing...”
(solution)
when the stop watch is running. It would be nice if it displayed the elapsed time since
the stop watch was started. For that, you need to create a Timer. (SeeSubsection6.5.1.)
Add a Timer to the original source code,StopWatchLabel.java, to drive the display of the
elapsed time in seconds. Create the timer in the mousePressed() routine when the stop
watch is started. Stop the timer in the mousePressed() routine when the stop watch
is stopped. The elapsed time won’t be very accurate anyway, so just show the integral
number of seconds. You only need to set the text a few times per second. For my Timer
method, I use a delay of 200 milliseconds for the timer.
4. The custom component example MirrorText.java, from Subsection 13.4.5, uses an off-
(solution)
screen canvas to show mirror-reversed text in a JPanel. An alternative approach would
be to draw the text after applying a transform to the graphics context that is used for
drawing. (See Subsection 13.2.5.) With this approach, the custom component can be
defined as a subclass of JLabel in which the paintComponent() method is overridden.
Write a version of the MirrorText component that takes this approach. The solution is
very short, but tricky. Note that the scale transform g2.scale(-1,1) does a left-right
reflection through the left edge of the component.
5. The sample programPhoneDirectoryFileDemo.javafromSubsection11.3.2keeps data for
(solution)
C# Image: C# Code to Upload TIFF File to Remote Database by Using
Website project and select WSE Settings 3.0. using System.Security.Cryptography; private void tsbUpload_Click & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change security settings on pdf; change pdf security settings
VB Imaging - VB Codabar Generator
check digit function for user's security consideration. also creates Codabar bar code on PDF, WORD, TIFF Able to adjust parameter settings before encoding, like
create encrypted pdf; pdf security options
Exercises
712
a “phone directory” in a file in the user’s home directory. Exercise 11.5 asked you to
revise that program to use an XML format for the data. Both programs have a simple
command-line user interface. For this exercise, you should provide a GUI interface for the
phone directory data. You can base your program either on the original sample program
or on the modified version from the exercise. Use a JTable to hold the data. The user
should be able to edit all the entries in the table. Also, the user should be able to add and
delete rows. Include either buttons or menu commands that can be used to perform these
actions. The delete command should delete the selected row, if any. New rows should be
added at the end of the table. For this program, you canuse a standardDefaultTableModel.
Your program should load data from the file when it starts and save data to the file
when it ends, just as the two previous programs do. For a GUI program, you can’t simply
save the data at the end of the main() routine, since main() terminates as soon as the
window shows up onthe screen. Youwant to savethe data whenthe user closes the window
and ends the program. There are several approaches. One is to use a WindowListener to
detect the event that occurs when the window closes. Another is to use a “Quit” command
to end the program; when the user quits, you can save the data and close the window (by
calling its dispose() method), and end the program. If you use the “Quit” command
approach, you don’t want the user to be able to end the program simply by closing the
window. To accomplish this, you should call
frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.DO
NOTHING
ON
CLOSE);
where frame refers to the JFrame that you have created for the program’s user interface.
When using a WindowListener, you want the close box on the window to close the window,
not end the program. For this, you need
frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.DISPOSE
ON
CLOSE);
When the listener is notified of a window closed event, it can save the data and end the
program.
Most of the JTable and DefaultTableModel methods that you need for this exercise are
discussed inSubsection13.4.3, but there are a few more that you need to know about. To
determine which row is selected in a JTable, call table.getSelectedRow(). This method
returns the row number of the selected row, or returns -1 if no row is selected. To specify
which cell is currently being edited, you can use:
table.setRowSelectionInterval(rowNum, rowNum); // Selects row number rowNum.
table.editCellAt( rowNum, colNum ); // Edit cell at position (rowNum,colNum).
phoneTable.getEditorComponent().requestFocus(); // Put input cursor in cell.
One particularly troublesome point is that the data that is in the cell that is currently
being edited is not in the table model. The value in the edit cell is not put into the table
model until after the editing is finished. This means that even though the user sees the
data in the cell, it’s not really part of the table data yet. If you lose that data, the user
would be justified in complaining. To make sure that you get the right data when you
save the data at the end of the program, you have to turn off editing before retrieving the
data from the model. This can be done with the following method:
private void stopEditing() {
if (table.getCellEditor() != null)
table.getCellEditor().stopCellEditing();
}
Exercises
713
This method must also be called before modifying the table by adding or deleting rows; if
such modifications are made while editing is in progress, the effect can be very strange.
Quiz
714
Quiz on Chapter 13
(answers)
1. Describe the object that is created by the following statement, and give an example of
how it might be used in a program:
BufferedImage OSC = new BufferedImage(32,32,BufferedImage.TYPE
INT
RGB);
2. Many programs depend on resource files. What is meant by a resource in this sense? Give
an example.
3. What is the FontMetrics class used for?
4. If a Color, c, is created as c = new Color(0,0,255,125), what is the effect of drawing
with this color?
5. What is antialiasing?
6. How is the ButtonGroup class used?
7. What does the acronym MVC stand for, and how does it apply to the JTable class?
8. Describe the picture that is produced by the following paintComponent() method:
public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
super.paintComponent(g);
Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D)g;
g2.translate( getWidth()/2, getHeight()/2 );
g2.rotate( 30 * Math.PI / 180 );
g2.fillRect(0,0,100,100);
}
9. What is meant by Internationalization of a program?
10. Suppose that the class that you are writing has an instance method doOpen() (with no
parameters) that is meant to be used to open a file selected by the user. Write a code
segment that creates an Action that represents the action of opening a file. Then show
how to create a button and a menu item from that action.
Appendix: Source Files
T
his appendix contains a list of the examples appearing in the free, on-line textbook
Introduction to Programming Using Java, Sixth Edition. The source code files can be found in
the on-line version of this book, or in the source directory of a download of the web site. You
should be able to compile the files and use them. Note however that some of these examples
depend on other source files, such asTextIO.javaandMosaicPanel.java, that are not built into
Java. These are classes that I have written. Links to all necessary non-standard source
code files are provided below. To compile a program that uses a non-standard class, the
source code file or the compiled class file for that class should be in the same location as the
program that uses it. To run the program, you only need the compiled class file. Note that
almost all of my classes are meant to be placed in the default package, to be used by programs
that are also in the default package. To use them in other packages, you will have to add an
appropriate “package” declaration to the beginning of the source code.
The solutions to end-of-chapter exercises are not listed in this appendix. Each end-of-
chapter exercise has its own Web page, which discusses its solution. The source code of a
sample solution of each exercise is given in full on the solution page for that exercise. If you
want to compile the solution, you should be able to cut-and-paste the solution out of a Web
browser window and into a text editing program. (You can’t cut-and-paste from the HTML
source of the solution page, since it contains extra HTML markup commands that the Java
compiler won’t understand; the HTML markup does not appear when the page is displayed in
aWeb browser.)
Note that most of these examples require Java version 5.0 or later. A few of them were
written for older versions, but will still work with current versions. When you compile some of
these older programs with current versions of Java, you might get warnings about “deprecated”
methods. These warnings are not errors. Whena methodis deprecated, it means that it should
not be used in new code, but it has not yet been removed from the language. It is possible that
deprecated methods might be removed from the language at some future time, but for now you
just get a warning about using them.
Part 1: Text-oriented Examples
Many of the sample programs in the text are based on console-style input/output, where the
computer and the user type lines of text back and forth to each other. Some of these programs
use the standard output object, System.out, for output. Many of them use my non-standard
class, TextIO, for both input and output. For the programs that use TextIO, one of the files
TextIO.javaorTextIO.classmustbeavailablewhenyoucompiletheprogram,andTextIO.class
must be available when you run the program. There is also a GUI version of TextIO; you can
find information about it at the end of Part 4, below.
715
Source Code Listing
716
The programs listed here are stand-alone applications, not applets, but I have written
applets that simulate many of the programs. These “console applets” appear on Web pages
in the on-line version of this textbook. They are based onTextIOApplet.java, which provides
the same methods as TextIO, but in an applet instead of in a stand-alone application. It is
straightforward to convert a TextIO program to a TextIOApplet applet. See the comments in
theTextIOApplet.java file for information about how to do it. One example of this can be
found in the fileInterest3Console.java.
Interest.java, fromSection2.2, computes the interest on a specific amount of money over
aperiod of one year.
TimedComputation.java, fromSection2.3, demonstrates a few basic built-in subroutines
and functions.
EnumDemo.java, fromSection2.3, a very simple first demonstration of enum types.
PrintSquare.java, fromSection2.4, reads an integer typed in by the user and prints the
square of that integer. This program depends onTextIO.java. The same is true
for almost all of the programs in the rest of this list.
Interest2.java, fromSection2.4, calculates interest on an investment for one year, based
on user input.
CreateProfile.java, fromSection2.4, a simple demo of output to a file, using TextIO.
Interest2WithScanner.java, fromSection2.4, is aversionofInterest2.java that uses Scanner
instead of TextIO to read input from the user.
Interest3.java, fromSection3.1, the first example that uses control statements.
ThreeN1.java, fromSection3.2, outputs a 3N+1 sequence for a given stating value.
ComputeAverage.java, from Section 3.3, computes the average value of some integers
entered by the user.
CountDivisors.java, fromSection3.4, counts the number of divisors of an integer entered
by the user.
ListLetters.java, fromSection3.4, lists all the distinct letters in a string entered by the
user.
LengthConverter.java, fromSection3.5, converts length measurements input by the user
into different units of measure.
ReadNumbersFromFile.java, fromSection3.7, finds the sum and the average of numbers
read from a file. Demonstrates try..catch statements.
GuessingGame.java, fromSection4.2, lets the user play guessing games where the com-
puter picks a number and the user tries to guess it. A slight variation of this program,
which reports the number of games won by the user, isGuessingGame2.java.
RowsOfChars.java, fromSection4.3, a rather useless program in which one subroutine
calls another.
ThreeN2.java, fromSection4.4, is an improved 3N+1 program that uses subroutines and
prints its output in neat columns.
HighLow.java, fromSection5.4, a simple card game. It uses the classesCard.java and
Deck.java,whicharegivenasexamples ofobject-orientedprogramming. . Alsoavailable,
the card-related classesHand.javaand, fromSubsection5.5.1,BlackjackHand.java.
RollTwoPairs.java, from Subsection 5.5.2, uses PairOfDice.java to simulate rolling two
pairs of dice until the same total is rolled on both pairs.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested