pdf to jpg c# : Convert secure pdf to word SDK software API .net winforms asp.net sharepoint JTHTLv3i2_Fernandez1-part423

2005] 
DIGITAL CONTENT PROTECTION AND FAIR USE
435 
the fair  use defense  almost always  find that three,  if  not four,  of  the 
factors  incline  against  it.’’
58
 Accordingly,  Nimmer  surmised  that 
‘‘[c]ourts tend first to make a judgment that the ultimate disposition is 
fair use or unfair use, and then align the four factors to fit that result as 
best they can,’’
59
and that ‘‘the four factors fail to drive the analysis, but 
rather  serve  as  convenient  pegs  on  which  to  hang  antecedent 
conclusions.’’
60
If the four factors fail to drive the fair use analysis, then 
what drives it?  One answer: economic considerations. 
In  1982,  Wendy  Gordon  wrote  what  would  become  one  of  the 
definitive frameworks for discussing consumer copying and the fair use 
doctrine  in  economic  terms.
61
 Although  written  before  the  U.S. 
Supreme  Court  reversed  the  Ninth  Circuit  in  the 
Betamax
case,  the 
article seeks to show ‘‘how a market approach can serve as a means for 
applying  fair  use  to newly  emerging  uses  of copyrighted  works  made 
possible by developing technologies.’’
62
Gordon’s model assumes that most copyrighted works are ‘‘public 
goods.’’
63
 Public  goods  have  two  primary  characteristics.    First,  one 
person’s use of the good does not diminish anyone else’s use of the same 
good; the good does not become depleted by additional users.
64
Second, 
anyone  can  use  the  good  whether  or  not  they  paid  for  access.
65
Therefore,  without  an  artificially-created  right,  a  work  of  authorship 
would be freely distributed for the equal enjoyment of all as soon as the 
first copy was released, providing no return on the author’s investment of 
creativity.  Thus, the problem that Congress addresses with the copyright 
laws: a constitutional balance between incentivizing authors’ creation and 
adding to the public domain.  Gordon’s concept of fair use comes into 
play  precisely  when  this  congressionally-drafted  structure  fails  in  the 
marketplace. 
Instead  of  the  four  part  fair  use  test  codified  by  Congress  and 
applied by  the courts, Gordon  set  forth  a  three part test  focusing  on 
market failure.  Gordon stated that courts should find fair use when: ‘‘(1) 
market failure is present; (2) transfer of the use to defendant is socially 
desirable; and (3) an award of fair use would not cause substantial injury 
to the incentives of the plaintiff copyright owner.’’
66
As the threshold 
58.
 Id
. at 280. 
59.
 Id
. at 281. 
60.
 Id
61.
 See 
Wendy  J.  Gordon, 
Fair Use as Market Failure: A Structural and Economic 
Analysis of the Betamax Case and Its Predecessors
, 82 C
OLUM
.
L.
R
EV
. 1600 (1982). 
62.
 Id
. at 1601-02. 
63.
 Id
. at 1610. 
64.
 Id
. at 1610-11. 
65.
 Id
. at 1611. 
66.
 Id
. at 1614. 
Convert secure pdf to word - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
decrypt pdf password; cannot print pdf security
Convert secure pdf to word - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
create secure pdf; decrypt a pdf file online
436 
J. ON TELECOMM. & HIGH TECH. L.
[Vol. 3 
first factor, market failure, Gordon would require that ‘‘the possibility of 
consensual bargain has broken down in some way.’’
67
For instance, the 
market  could  suffer  from  huge  transaction  costs:  either the  consumer 
does  not  have  the  necessary resources to find and contact the content 
owner  to negotiate  a license,  or the content owner does not have the 
resources  to  track  down  and  enforce  its  copyright  against  every 
infringer.
68
Even  if  market  failure  exists,  the  court  must  look  to  the  second 
factor to ‘‘determine if the use is more valuable in the defendant’s hands 
or in the hands of the copyright owner.’’
69
‘‘[F]air use implies the consent 
of the  copyright owner by  looking  to whether  the owner would have 
consented under  ideal  market  conditions.’’
70
Courts may have trouble 
with the second factor because of the difficulties associated with pinning 
a value on intangible rights like copyrights.
71
Finally, even if market failure exists and the use serves society best 
in the hands of the defendant, courts should hesitate to find fair use if it 
would ‘‘cause substantial injury to the incentives of the plaintiff copyright 
owner.’’
72
 This  third  factor  ensures  the  maintenance  of  an  incentive 
aspect of copyright law, compensates for courts’ imprecision in valuing 
copyright rights, and assuages copyright owners that fair use will not ‘‘put 
them at an intolerable disadvantage’’ if ‘‘their injury is substantial.’’
73
The 
inquiry into substantial harm should also look at smaller infringements 
that  might  cumulatively  pose  a  problem  to  the  copyright  owner’s 
incentive.
74
Gordon also recognized the different implications of total 
market  failure  and  ‘‘intermediate  market  failure,’’  realizing  that  some 
cases may warrant additional time for market solutions to develop or for 
court intervention with a licensing scheme.
75
Gordon’s application  of  her test to the facts of the  Betamax case 
foreshadowed the outcome of the Court’s decision.  Gordon remarked 
that ‘‘[h]ome users might well find transaction costs prohibitively high if 
they were required to bargain individually with copyright owners over the 
right to tape each desired program’’
76
and that ‘‘prohibitions against home 
taping might be impossible to enforce.’’
77
Gordon also stated that if the 
Court resolved factors two and three in favor of the consumers (which it 
67.
Gordon, 
supra 
note 61, at 1615. 
68.
 See id
.
at 1628-29. 
69.
 Id
. at 1615. 
70.
 Id
. at 1616. 
71.
 See
id
. at 1631. 
72.
 Id
. at 1614. 
73.
Gordon, 
supra 
note 61, at 1619. 
74.
 See id
.
at 1620. 
75.
 Id
. at 1618, 1621. 
76.
 Id
. at 1655. 
77.
 Id
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
WPF PDF Viewer provides C# users abilities to view, annotate, convert and create PDF in XDoc.PDF SDK provides users secure methods to protect PDF document.
decrypt pdf password online; pdf security remover
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
C#.NET: Convert PDF Online in ASP.NET. RaterEdge HTML5 PDF Editor also provides C#.NET users secure solutions for PDF document protection.
decrypt pdf online; copy locked pdf
2005] 
DIGITAL CONTENT PROTECTION AND FAIR USE
437 
did implicitly -- the Court found that the use was private, noncommercial 
and that the time-shifting did not hurt the copyright owner and thus the 
advertising
78
), then it should grant fair use.
79
More  recently,  another  economic  theorist  named  Raymond  Shih 
Ray Ku has criticized Gordon’s model and proposed another model.
80
Instead  of  Gordon’s  market  failure  theory,  Ku  proposes  a  ‘‘creative 
destruction’’  theory  of  fair  use,  adapting  Schumpeter’s  theories.
81
 Ku 
points  out  that  a  ‘‘funny  thing  happens . . .  as  the  costs  of  copying 
approach  zero.    Consumers  begin  to  invest  in  distribution  directly.’’
82
Instead of paying for distribution of copies, consumers begin to pay for 
the equipment necessary to do so, such as computers, broadband access, 
and video recorders.
83
Ku therefore argues that courts should find fair 
use when two conditions are met: ‘‘1) the copy is made by the consumer 
of the work; and 2) the creative endeavor does not depend upon funding 
derived from the sale of copies.’’
84
Applying  his  theory  to  the  Betamax  case,  Ku  points  out  that 
consumers were the ones making copies.  Instead of buying the copies 
directly from the content broadcasters, they bought VCRs, cassette tapes, 
cable subscriptions and cords to make the copies themselves.
85
Also, Ku 
points out that the content owners’ creative endeavor did not depend on 
selling copies of their  transmissions; instead, their  remuneration  came 
from selling advertising and theater tickets.
86
Gordon’s  and  Ku’s  theories  help  provide  a  framework  for 
determining  the  role  that  digital  rights  management  and  encoding 
technologies will play in assessing the need for fair use in digital content 
distribution.    However,  applying  each  of  these  theories  to  a  highly 
effective content control regime highlights the lack of economic necessity 
for a fair use doctrine in such situations. 
78.
 See 
Sony Corp. of Am. v. Universal City Studios, Inc., 464 U.S. 417, 456 (1984). 
79.
 See 
Gordon, 
supra 
note 61, at 1656. 
80.
 See 
Raymond Shih Ray Ku, 
Consumers and Creative Destruction: Fair Use Beyond 
Market Failure
, 18 B
ERKELEY 
T
ECH
.
L.J. 539 (2003). 
81.
 Id
. at 564.  ‘‘Because copyright is largely irrelevant to the creation of music and is not 
necessary to ensure digital distribution, I have argued that the Internet and digital technology 
have creatively destroyed copyright as it pertains to the protection of music.’’  
Id
. at 567. 
82.
 Id
. at 565. 
83.
 See id
. at 565-66. 
84.
 Id
. at 567-68. 
85.
 Id
. at 568. 
86.
 Id
. at 570. 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
provides a reliable and quick approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry Create PDF from Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint.
pdf security; convert locked pdf to word online
C# Word - Word Creating in C#.NET
& thread-safe .NET solution which provides a reliable and quick approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry-standard Word document file.
change security settings pdf reader; pdf unlock
438 
J. ON TELECOMM. & HIGH TECH. L.
[Vol. 3 
II.  D
IGITAL 
R
IGHTS 
M
ANAGEMENT
,
E
NCODING 
R
ULES
,
AND 
O
THER 
C
ONTENT 
P
ROTECTION 
M
ECHANISMS
Before  applying  different  economic  theories  to  content  control 
technologies, it is important to understand how those technologies work.  
This section will first describe one way in which the law protects content.  
Then,  this  section  will  give  a  cursory  overview  of  how  content  is 
protected  through  technology:  digital  rights  management,  encoding 
rules, and the broadcast flag. 
A. Anticircumvention and the DMCA 
Congress passed the DMCA in 1998.  The DMCA creates both 
civil
87
and  criminal
88
liability  for  those who  engage  in  three  kinds  of 
circumvention activities.  First, the DMCA prohibits the 
circumvention
of  ‘‘a  technological  measure  that  effectively  controls  access  to  a 
[copyrighted] work.’’
89
Second, the DMCA prohibits the 
trafficking
of 
technology designed to circumvent an 
access control
system.
90
Finally, it 
also forbids the 
trafficking
of technology designed to circumvent a 
copy 
control
system.
91
 person  need  not  actually  infringe  a  copyright  to  violate  the 
DMCA; the statute is concerned with circumvention, not infringement.  
The  constitutionality  of  the  DMCA  has  been  upheld  against  Due 
Process Clause, Copyright  Clause, and First Amendment challenges.
92
In  a  well-known  application  of  the  DMCA,  members  of  a  motion 
picture association obtained a preliminary injunction against a web site 
that distributed DeCSS
93
software code.
94
The motion picture industry 
used an encryption algorithm called CSS to encrypt the movie content 
on  DVDs.
95
 In  October  of  1999,  a  Norwegian  teenager  broke  the 
encryption  and  wrote  the  DeCSS  algorithm  to  circumvent  the  DVD 
access  control  technology.
96
 The  court  found  that  the  web  site’s 
distribution of the DeCSS code violated the access control circumvention 
87.
 See 
17 U.S.C. § 1203(a). 
88.
 See id
.
§ 1204(a). 
89.
 Id
.
§ 1201(a)(1)(A). 
90.
 See id
.
§ 1201(a)(2). 
91.
 See id
.
§ 1201(b)(1). 
92.
 See
United States v. Elcom Ltd., 203 F. Supp. 2d 1111 (N.D. Cal. 2002). 
93.  ‘‘DeCSS is a computer program capable of decrypting content on a DVD video disc 
encrypted  using  the  Content  Scrambling  System  (CSS).’’   
DeCSS Definition Meaning 
Information Explanation
, F
REE
-D
EFINITION
.
COM
at
http://www.free-definition.com 
/DeCSS.html (last visited Sept. 26, 2004). 
94.  Universal City Studios, Inc. v. Reimerdes, 82 F. Supp. 2d 211 (S.D.N.Y. 2000). 
95.
 Id
. at 214. 
96.
 Id
VB.NET Word: VB Tutorial to Convert Word to Other Formats in .NET
How to Convert & Render Word to PDF in VB.NET, with others across platforms, then converting Word to a more secure document format PDF will be greatly
change pdf document security properties; advanced pdf encryption remover
C# Word - Word Create or Build in C#.NET
& thread-safe .NET solution which provides a reliable and quick approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry Create Word From PDF.
pdf secure signature; add security to pdf file
2005] 
DIGITAL CONTENT PROTECTION AND FAIR USE
439 
method  anti-trafficking  provision  of  the  DMCA.
97
 In  addition,  the 
court held that the affirmative defense of fair use did not apply because 
the DMCA concerns 
circumvention
, not copyright infringement; also, 
Congress did not explicitly provide a fair use exception for the DMCA.
98
B. How Does Digital Rights Management Work?99 
In addition  to  the  legal  content  protection  afforded  by  Congress 
through the DMCA, the technological measures themselves go to great 
lengths to protect content.  One such technological measure is DRM.  A 
common DRM system has three main components: a rights authority, a 
content player, and encrypted content.
100
The content player is usually a 
software  application  installed  on  a  particular  physical  device.    The 
content  player  utilizes  an  application-specific  or  device-specific 
identification.
101
The content player needs a specific license (or digital 
certificate)  from the rights authority to obtain the ability to play  each 
piece of encrypted content.
102
This license confers specific rights over the 
encrypted content, such as the right to play it a certain number of times 
within  a certain  time  span,  or the right  to make  a  certain  number  of 
copies, or the right to play on certain devices.
103
Each  time  the  user  requests  a  license,  the  rights  authority 
communicates with the content player to authenticate that the content 
player is a valid, compatible application and that the content player has 
authenticated its connection to a specific physical device.
104
Then, at the 
time  the  user  downloads  content,  the  rights  authority  sends  along  a 
digital  license specifying the rights to  that  content.
105
 Sometimes the 
license accompanies the content file, and sometimes it is obtained as a 
97.
 Id
. at 217. 
98.
 Id
. at 219. 
99.  The  following  brief  DRM  explanation  comes  from  the  author’s  accumulated 
experience and is meant only as a general overview of what the author understands to be 
DRM.  Different DRM systems work differently.  For some other brief explanations of DRM, 
or, as one author refers to it, ‘‘ARM,’’ see Tom W. Bell, 
Fair Use vs. Fared Use: The Impact of 
Automated Rights Management on Copyright’s Fair Use Doctrine
, 76 N.C.
L.
R
EV
. 557, 
564-67 (1998); Brett Glass, 
What Does DRM Really Mean?
, PC
M
AG
. (Apr. 8, 2003), 
at 
http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1759,1164013,00.asp; 
What is Windows Media DRM
M
ICROSOFT
.
COM
at
http://web.archive.org/web/20040214160034/http://www.microsoft. 
com/windows/windowsmedia/WM7/DRM/what.aspx (last visited Dec. 28, 2004).  
100.
 See
What is Windows Media DRM
supra
note 99, at ¶ 3. 
101.  Glass, 
supra
note 99, at ¶ 12. 
102.
 See What is Windows Media DRM
supra
note 99 at ¶ 3. 
103.
 See id
. at ¶¶ 1-3. 
104.
 See
How to Deploy Windows Media DRM
 M
ICROSOFT
.
COM
 ¶¶  2-3, 
at 
http://web.archive.org/web/20040304005145/http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windowsm
edia/WM7/DRM/how.aspx (last visited Dec. 28, 2004). 
105.
 See id
C# PowerPoint - PowerPoint Creating in C#.NET
SDK for .NET, is a robust & thread-safe .NET solution which provides a reliable and quick approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry
decrypt pdf with password; decrypt a pdf
DocImage SDK for .NET: HTML Viewer, View, Annotate, Convert, Print
Convert Support converting to or from popular documents & NET, including Microsoft Word, Excel, PPT, PDF, Tiff, Dicom make an order in our secure online store
convert secure webpage to pdf; pdf file security
440 
J. ON TELECOMM. & HIGH TECH. L.
[Vol. 3 
separate file in a location where the content player can find it.
106
In this 
way, the content owner can ‘‘manage’’ the digital rights of each copy it 
distributes, through its rights authority. 
The content owner does not care how many copies of the encrypted 
content are made or distributed, because each user must obtain a license 
from the rights authority in order to use the content.
107
If a particular 
device  is  compromised,  the  rights authority can  revoke  that  particular 
license.
108
And although no encryption system is flawless, the inevitable 
security breaches caused by professional pirates who violate the DMCA 
fall  beyond  the  scope  of  this  paper.    Similarly,  the  distribution  of 
unencrypted, circumvented copies by these pirates also falls outside this 
paper’s scope.  Due to the ease with which content owners will encrypt 
each piece of content with an asymmetric key,
109
breaking the encryption 
on a large scale will become prohibitively expensive for most would-be 
pirates; completely effective content  control  will be the norm, not the 
exception. 
C. How Do the Encoding Rules Work? 
In October of 2003, the FCC, pursuant to its statutory mandate ‘‘to 
assure the commercial availability, to consumers of multichannel video 
programming . . .  of  converter  boxes . . .  not  affiliated  with  any 
multichannel  video  programming  distributor,’’
110
adopted  much  of  a 
‘‘Memorandum of Understanding . . . reached by representatives of the 
cable television and consumer electronics industries.’’
111
This decision, 
widely-known as the Plug and Play Agreement, essentially allowed for 
the manufacturers of TVs and set-top boxes to build in one-way digital 
compatibility with the cable system, eliminating the need to rent a digital 
set-top  box  directly  from  the  cable  company.    The  Plug  and  Play 
Agreement requires cable companies to ‘‘separate out conditional access 
or security functions from other functions and make available modular 
106.
 See id
107.
 See
Why is Windows Media DRM Important
 M
ICROSOFT
.
COM
 ¶  2, 
at
http://web.archive.org/web/20040304005150/http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windowsm
edia/WM7/DRM/why.aspx (last visited Dec. 28, 2004). 
108.
 See
Features of Windows Media Rights Manager
 M
ICROSOFT
.
COM
 ¶  7, 
at 
http://web.archive.org/web/20040218032957/http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windowsm
edia/wm7/drm/features.aspx (last visited Dec. 28, 2004). 
109   ‘‘An asymmetric encryption system uses two keys: one public and one private. The 
public key is not kept secret and allows anyone to encrypt a message, but the message can only 
be decrypted by the intended recipient who holds the private (secret) key.’’  Aaron Perkins, 
Comment, Encryption Use: Law and Anarchy on the Digital Frontier, 41 Hous. L. Rev. 
1625, 1628 n.16 (2005). 
110.  47 U.S.C. § 549(a) (2004). 
111.
 Plug and Play Decision
supra
note 5, at ¶ 2. 
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
You may convert supportive documents and image format files search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office text selecting in order to secure your web
pdf security settings; create encrypted pdf
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
not the product end user, please copy and email the secure download link are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
copy text from encrypted pdf; add security to pdf in reader
2005] 
DIGITAL CONTENT PROTECTION AND FAIR USE
441 
security  components,  also  called  point  of  deployment  (‘POD’) 
modules.’’
112
Under  this  agreement, the  coaxial cable cord would plug directly 
into a standardized POD, and the POD would plug into a standardized 
socket in  a consumer electronics-manufactured TV or  receiver.   Cable 
customers would need to obtain PODs directly from their cable provider, 
because each POD is registered to a specific user and decrypts the digital 
cable signal from the cable plant.  But when the signal leaves the POD 
unencrypted and enters the receiving device, what prevents the user from 
making perfect digital copies of the digital cable content?  This is where 
the encoding rules come into play. 
The encoding rules set caps on the levels of copy restriction based 
on  currently  defined  business  models.
113
 The  devices  built  to  accept 
PODs must recognize and comply with the encoding rules.
114
Digitally 
encoded content can signal four different copy restriction states: (1) copy 
never,  (2)  copy  once,  (3)  copy  freely,  and  (4)  copy  no  more.
115
 The 
currently defined business models, along with the FCC-imposed limits 
on copy restrictions, are: 
(1)   Unencrypted  broadcast television --- no copy restrictions 
may be imposed; 
(2)   Pay television, non-premium subscription television, and 
free  conditional  access  delivery  transmissions  ---  one 
generation of copies is the most stringent restriction that 
may be imposed; and 
(3)   [Video  on  Demand]  VOD,  [Pay-Per-View]  PPV,  or 
Subscription-on-Demand  transmissions  ---  no  copies  is 
the  most  stringent  restriction  that  may  be  imposed, 
however, even when no copies are allowed, such content 
may  be  paused  up  to  90  minutes  from  its  initial 
transmission.
116
CableLabs, a consortium of cable operators, designed the POD interface 
and certifies all one-way digital receiving device designs (at least once) to 
determine if they meet the specification and comply with the encoding 
rules.
117
 And  in  each  consumer home,  every  receiving  device  will be 
112.
 Id
. at ¶ 5.  PODs are also known as CableCARDS.  
Id
. at ¶ 19 n.45.  They are the 
same size and shape as a PCMCIA card. 
113.  47 C.F.R. § 76.1904(b) (2004). 
114.
 Plug and Play Decision
supra
note 5, at ¶ 38. 
115. 
Digital 
Content 
Protection, 
Part 
II
 E
XTREME
T
ECH 
¶  4, 
at
http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,3973,1231547,00.asp (last visited Mar. 21, 2004). 
116.
 Plug and Play Decision
supra
note 5, at ¶ 65. 
117.
 Id
. at ¶ 38. 
442 
J. ON TELECOMM. & HIGH TECH. L.
[Vol. 3 
authenticated by checking for a digital certificate that verifies that the 
device is approved. 
 receiving  device  cannot record  ‘copy never’ content,  but  it  can 
pause it for up to 90 minutes.
118
A receiving device can make one copy of 
‘copy once’ content, and thereafter it can only send the content out of 
approved outputs after changing the copy restriction to ‘copy no more.’  
Finally,  ‘copy freely’  content  may  be  copied  without restriction.   This 
combination  of  encryption,  encoding,  and  device  certification  and 
authentication  allows  content  owners  to  prevent  unauthorized 
distribution of their content. 
D. How Does the Broadcast Flag Work? 
Because unencrypted broadcast content must be marked ‘copy freely’ 
under the encoding rules, the FCC also devised a method for preventing 
the  widespread  distribution  of  high-quality  digital  broadcast  content 
through  the Internet.   ‘‘[R]edistribution  control is  a  more  appropriate 
form  of  content  protection  for  digital  broadcast  television  than  copy 
restrictions.’’
119
 For  example,  primetime  news  broadcasts  must  be 
unencrypted  according  to  the  encoding  rules  of  the  Plug  and  Play 
Agreement;
120
this  is  the  kind  of  content  for  which  viewers  need  no 
special decryption setup to view.  Although Tom or Kelly or any other 
information  consumer may, by default,  receive a free and unencrypted 
digital broadcast of ABC Nightly News 
from
ABC, ABC may not want 
Tom and Kelly to have the ability to make a perfect digital copy of the 
ABC Nightly News and distribute it to everyone else on the Internet.  
The solution was to insert an ATSC
121
standard flag, or ‘‘broadcast flag,’’ 
into  such  content.
122
 In  principle,  digital  TV  receivers  would  all  be 
manufactured to recognize and effectuate the broadcast flag to prevent 
the content from being distributed over the Internet.
123
The details of 
the broadcast flag implementation have yet to be decided.
124
118.  47 C.F.R. § 76.1904(b)(2) (2004). 
119.
 Broadcast Flag Decision
supra
note 6, at ¶ 5. 
120.
 Plug and Play Decision
supra
note 5, at ¶ 65. 
121.  ‘‘The Advanced Television Systems Committee, Inc., is an international, non-profit 
organization  developing  voluntary  standards  for  digital  television.’’   
About ATSC
A
DVANCED 
T
ELEVISION 
S
YSTEMS 
C
OMMITTEE
,
at
http://www.atsc.org/aboutatsc.html 
(last visited Sept. 26, 2004). 
122.
 Broadcast Flag Decision
supra
note 6, at ¶¶ 12-21. 
123.
 Id
. at ¶ 39. 
124.
 Id
. at ¶¶ 53-55. 
2005] 
DIGITAL CONTENT PROTECTION AND FAIR USE
443 
III.  D
IGITAL 
C
ONTENT 
C
ONTROL AND 
F
AIR 
U
SE
This paper has described fair use in the analog world, and also how 
technology and law can protect content in the digital world.  Now this 
paper  will  proceed  to  argue  that  the  fair  use  doctrine  is  no  longer 
necessary  as  applied  to  controlled  digital  content.    First,  DRM  or 
encoded  content  no  longer  fits  the  definition  of  a  pure  public  good.  
Applying either Gordon’s or Ku’s fair use tests weighs against a finding 
of fair use.  And although a comparison of yesterday’s fair use rights with 
tomorrow’s  reality  highlights  many  differences,  fair  use  remains  an 
affirmative  defense,  not  a  direct  cause  of  action.    Therefore,  there  is 
rarely a need or ability to invoke fair use privilege for DRM or encoded 
content. 
A. Encrypted or Encoded Copyrighted Digital Goods Will No 
Longer Be ‘‘Public Goods’’ 
As mentioned above,
125
a public good has two main characteristics: 
the good’s value does not diminish with each additional user of the good, 
and the good is available to all whether or not they help offset the costs 
associated  with  the  good.
126
 However,  DRM-protected  or  encoded 
digital content exhibits neither of these characteristics. 
First,  under  a  DRM  regime,  each  copy  of  a  particular  piece  of 
content works as a separate good.  Whereas unencrypted digital content 
may be perfectly copied and freely enjoyed by many, each piece of DRM 
content can be enjoyed only by the original user.  Any uses beyond the 
original use are eliminated by the need to acquire additional usage rights.  
Because each good is useless without a license, its value 
does
diminish for 
each user beyond the original. 
Second,  DRM  and  encoding  rules  prevent  the  widespread 
availability of digital content.  DRM can allow only those who pay for 
the content  to use the  content through licenses, no matter how  many 
copies  of  the  encrypted  content  are  widely  distributed.  
Complementarily,  encoding  rules  prevent  the  copying  and  further 
distribution  of  the  encoded  content  beyond  the  original  user, 
accomplishing  the  same  result.    Even  content  as  commonplace  as 
unencrypted  broadcast  digital content  will  be protected  from  Internet 
distribution with the broadcast flag.  In other words, technology solves 
the  free-rider  problems  associated  with  public  goods  by  transforming 
them into private or quasi-private goods. 
125.
 See
infra
Part I.C. 
126.  Gordon, 
supra
note 61, at 1610-11. 
444 
J. ON TELECOMM. & HIGH TECH. L.
[Vol. 3 
B. Gordon’s Market Failure Fair Use Test Is Not Met 
Applying Gordon’s market failure test suggests against finding a fair 
use right for digital content subject to access and copy control systems.  
Specifically,  DRM  and  encoding greatly  reduce  the chance  of  market 
failure by placing the power (to allow or disallow the copying or sharing 
of content) in the hands of the copyright owner, instead of the content 
consumer.    This  significantly  reduces  transaction  costs  because  the 
copyright owner can license and enforce its rights through an 
automated
system.  The copyright owner can obtain near-perfect information about 
the  market  for  such  digitally-locked  works  by  tracking  the  monetary 
value of the rights granted in a database.  And consumers will know that 
if  they  want  to  access  certain  content,  they  must  do  so  through  the 
content  owner’s rights authority.  Of course,  this  assertion makes  one 
primary assumption: that these digital locks will work.  If an experienced 
hacker wants free access to certain content, she will have it; it is only a 
matter of time.  But given the fact that such locks are becoming more 
sophisticated  and  are  being  built  into  not  only  the  content  and 
applications, but also into the physical devices, they will likely work for 
most of the world.  Again, this proposition rests on the plausible  but 
broad assumption that digital locks will become so easy to use that they 
will deter not only technologically, but also economically, any would-be 
pirates. 
Because DRM and encoding rules will pre-empt the market failure 
problem for  digital content,  the second  and  third factors  need not be 
considered in order to conclude against recognizing fair use.  But even if 
market failure were somehow to occur in the digital content distribution 
markets,  the potential  harm  to the  content  producers  weighs  strongly 
against recognizing fair use for protected digital content.  All it takes is 
one copy, free and clear both technologically and legally, to strip content 
owners of necessary revenue.  The logic applied to content broadcasters 
and  music  producers  does  not  apply  in  every  area  of  copyright.    For 
instance, in movie making, the creative endeavor rests with the copyright 
owners.  If all movies become instantly free in perfect quality, then movie 
makers will not bother to put together the creative effort to hire actors, 
write a script, and film a movie.  This is in contradistinction to the music 
industry  where  the artists  (the  creative  entities) make  very little from 
selling  the  copyright  for  their  works  to  big  studios,  or  the  broadcast 
industry where revenues come from advertising.
127
Even if the market 
failed, the copyright owners would only need a small amount of time to 
patch their protection methods or revoke the necessary certificates.  This 
127.
 See
Ku, 
supra
note 80, at 570. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested