pdf to jpg c# open source : Secure pdf Library software component .net windows azure mvc latex-intro0-part554

TextFormattingwithL
A
T
E
X
ATutorial
AcademicandResearchComputing,April2007
TableofContents
1. L
A
T
E
XBasics
1
1.1 What is T
E
X? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
1.2 What is L
A
T
E
X? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
1.3 How L
A
T
E
XWorks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
1.4 The L
A
T
E
XInput File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
1.4.1 Entering L
A
T
E
XCommands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
1.4.2 Entering Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
1.4.3 Special Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
1.4.4 Structure of the Input File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
1.5 Some L
A
T
E
XVocabulary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
2. Creating A L
A
T
E
XDocument
7
2.1 Document Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
2.2 Class Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
2.3 Packages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
2.4 Making a Title Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
2.5 Making a Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
2.6 Behind the Scenes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.6.1 Auxiliary Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.6.2 How a Page is Built. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.7 Example: Report Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.8 Example: Letter Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3. Document Layout
13
3.1 Line Spacing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3.2 Paragraphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3.3 Text Justification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
3.4 Margins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
3.5 Headers, Footers, and Page Numbering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Secure pdf - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
pdf security remover; pdf secure signature
Secure pdf - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
secure pdf file; decrypt a pdf file online
ii ♦
Contents
4. Within the Text
16
4.1 Section Headings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
4.2 Changing Type Style and Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
4.3 Starting New Lines and New Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
4.4 Leaving Horizontal and Vertical Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
4.5 Drawing Rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
4.6 Footnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
4.7 Centering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
4.8 Quotations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
4.9 Reproducing Text As-Is . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
4.10 Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
4.11 Cross References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
5. Tabular Material
23
5.1 Tabbing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
5.2 Tabular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
5.2.1 A Simple Ruled Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
5.2.2 Using Paragraph Columns, Spanning Columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
5.2.3 Aligning on the Decimal Point. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
5.2.4 Suppressing Leading or Trailing Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
6. Mathematics
28
6.1 In-line Math. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
6.2 Display Math (for unnumbered equations) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
6.3 Equation Environment (for numbered equations). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
6.4 Eqnarray Environment (for multiline equations) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
6.5 Array Environment (for matrices, etc.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
6.6 Building Mathematical Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
6.6.1 Superscripts and Subscripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
6.6.2 Spaces in Math Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
6.6.3 Dots, Braces, and Bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
6.6.4 Fractions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
6.6.5 Radicals, Integrals, and Summations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
6.6.6 Large Delimiters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
7. Including Graphics
35
7.1 Creating the Graphics File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
7.2 Importing the Graphic into your L
A
T
E
XDocument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
7.3 Viewing the Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
8. Placing Figures & Tables (Floats)
37
8.1 Making a Caption. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
8.2 Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
8.3 Overcoming Problems with Float Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
8.4 Landscape Figures and Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
April 2007
Online Remove password from protected PDF file
can receive the unlocked PDF by simply clicking download and you are good to go! Web Security. When you upload a file it is transmitted using a secure connection
copy from locked pdf; decrypt pdf online
Online Change your PDF file Permission Settings
can receive the locked PDF by simply clicking download and you are good to go!. Web Security. When you upload a file it is transmitted using a secure connection
decrypt pdf with password; pdf password security
Contents ♦
iii
9. Preparing a Bibliography
41
9.1 Using L
A
T
E
X’s built-in Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
9.2 Using BibT
E
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
9.2.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
9.2.2 Creating the .bib File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
9.2.3 Running BibT
E
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
9.2.4 Bibliography Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
9.2.5 For More Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
10.Special Topics
46
10.1 Managing a Large Document. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
10.2 Generating an Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
10.3 Including hyperlinks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
10.4 Accents and Special Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Appendix A: Mathematical Symbols
50
Appendix B: Error Messages
53
Resources
55
General Information on L
A
T
E
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
L
A
T
E
Xpackages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
L
A
T
E
XThesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Mathematical Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Graphics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
BibT
E
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Installing L
A
T
E
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Academic and Research Computing, RPI
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
XDoc.PDF SDK provides users secure methods to protect PDF document. C# users can set password to PDF and set PDF file permissions to protect PDF document.
copy text from encrypted pdf; create secure pdf online
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
C#.NET: Edit PDF Password in ASP.NET. RaterEdge HTML5 PDF Editor also provides C#.NET users secure solutions for PDF document protection.
add security to pdf document; add security to pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
& thread-safe .NET solution which provides a reliable and quick approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry-standard PDF document file.
change pdf document security properties; copy text from locked pdf
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
information; Royalty-free to develop PDF compatible software; Open standard for more secure, dependable electronic information exchange.
pdf password unlock; decrypt pdf without password
Text Formatting with L
A
T
E
X
This document describes the L
A
T
E
Xlanguage. For specifics of how to run
it on various platforms (e.g., Windows or unix), see the L
A
T
E
XInformation
page (http://www.rpi.edu/dept/arc/training/latex/), and follow the
links for the on-line tutorials. The above web page also contains information
on preparing a thesis or a resume, as well as many examples and links to
other helpful information.
Chapter 1. L
A
T
E
XBasics
1.1 What is T
E
X?
• T
E
Xis the typesetting language upon which L
A
T
E
Xis built. It was designed and
written by Donald Knuth especially for math and science. T
E
X is pronounced
“Tech,” similar to “Bach.”
• T
E
Xis portable. It is available for most computers and is used all over the world.
T
E
Xdocuments can be moved easily from one system to another, as long as the
required fonts are on both systems.
• T
E
Xcomes with its own set of fonts, called “Computer Modern,” used by default.
These fonts exist in a variety of styles, including serif, sans serif, typewriter (fixed
pitch), and an extensive set of mathematical symbols. It’s also possible to use
other font families, such as Times, Palatino, etc.
• T
E
Xis also a programming language, making it possible to create commands that
simplify its use.
1.2 What is L
A
T
E
X?
• L
A
T
E
Xis a T
E
Xmacro package, originally written by Leslie Lamport, that simplifies
the use of T
E
X. All the above features of T
E
X, including portability, also apply to
L
A
T
E
X. L
A
T
E
Xis pronounced either “Lay-tech” or “Lah-tech.”
• Most L
A
T
E
Xcommands are “high-level” (such as chapter and section) and specify
the logical structure of a document. The author rarely needs to be concerned with
the details of document layout, concentrating instead on the content. Most plain
T
E
Xcommands also work with L
A
T
E
X.
• The document class determines how the document will be formatted. L
A
T
E
Xpro-
vides several standard document classes from which to choose.
• L
A
T
E
Xis flexible, gives you complete control, handles big, complex documents with
ease, and never crashes or corrupts your files.
1
C# PowerPoint - PowerPoint Creating in C#.NET
SDK for .NET, is a robust & thread-safe .NET solution which provides a reliable and quick approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry
decrypt pdf; pdf security settings
C# Word - Word Creating in C#.NET
Word SDK for .NET, is a robust & thread-safe .NET solution which provides a reliable and quick approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry
pdf file security; creating secure pdf files
2 ♦
Chapter 1. L
A
T
E
XBasics
1.3 How L
A
T
E
XWorks
To use L
A
T
E
X, you first create a plain ASCII text file with any text editor. In this file
you type both the text of your document and the L
A
T
E
Xcommands to format it. You
then typeset your document, usually by clicking a button on a toolbar or selecting a
menu item. Nowadays there are two routes for processing a L
A
T
E
Xdocument:
• The traditional way is to run the latex program, which creates a DVI (Device
Independent) file. This file is in binary format and not viewed directly. You
then run a previewing program for viewing on screen and/or the dvips program
to create a PostScript file for viewing or for printing via the ghostview/GSView
program. GSView can also convert the document to PDF format.
• Alternatively you can run the relatively recent pdflatex program to create a PDF
file for viewing or printing, usually with Adobe’s Acrobat Reader.
The second method is more direct for PDF output, but the first is quicker and more
convenient for previewing.
1.4 The L
A
T
E
XInput File
L
A
T
E
Xinput files have names that end with the extension .tex: for example, an accept-
able file name might be myfile.tex. (Never use spaces in file names.) The input file
contains both the text of your document and the L
A
T
E
Xcommands needed to format it.
The first command in the file, \documentclass, defines the style of the document.
1.4.1 Entering L
A
T
E
XCommands
To distinguish them from text, all L
A
T
E
Xcommands (also called control sequences) start
with a backslash “\”. A command name consists of letters only and is ended by a space
or a non letter (such as a comma, period, brace, etc). If it ends with a space, the space
is “consumed” by L
A
T
E
X and does not appear in the output. An example is \today,
which prints the current date. To avoid having the space after the command disappear,
do the following:
\today\ is a good day.
produces:
April 16, 2007 is a good day.
There are also commands that consist of the backslash followed by exactly one non-
letter. They are most often used to put a special symbol in the text. For example \$
prints a $ (which cannot be entered directly because L
A
T
E
Xuses it to begin math mode).
Spaces after these control symbols are not consumed.
L
A
T
E
Xcommands are case-sensitive. Most are all lowercase. A few commands use the
first letter in uppercase such as \Delta → ∆. Fewer still use all uppercase.
April 2007
C# Word - Word Create or Build in C#.NET
a robust & thread-safe .NET solution which provides a reliable and quick approach for C# developers to create a highly-secure and industry Create Word From PDF.
secure pdf; can print pdf security
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
not the product end user, please copy and email the secure download link are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert locked pdf to word doc; create pdf the security level is set to high
1.4 The L
A
T
E
XInput File ♦
3
Some commands take an “argument,” placed within curly braces { } after the command
name. For example, \textbf{this text is bold} prints the text inside the braces in
boldface type: this text is bold
L
A
T
E
Xuses grouping to limit the effect of certain commands. Braces { ... } are used to
begin and end groups. (An environment is also a group; see page5.) For example, the
\large command is usually used inside a group:
{\large this is bigger than normal}
produces:
this is bigger than normal
Acommand such as \large is called a “declaration” because, unless it is given within
a group, its effect will continue until another declaration (in this case \normalsize)
counteracts it. Note the difference between a declaration used inside a group and a
command like \textbf{...}, which will not work unless an argument is provided inside
apair of braces following the command name.
The symbol % can be used to put a comment in your input file. When L
A
T
E
Xsees a %, it
ignores the rest of the line.
When you use commands that specify a length, such as a command to set the size of a
margin or a command to leave a certain amount of space, you will need to specify the
units of measurement. L
A
T
E
Xrecognizes the following units:
cm
centimeter
pt
printer’s point, ≈ 72 per inch
mm
millimeter
em
font-dependent width of “m”
in
inch
ex
font-dependent height of “x”
1.4.2 Entering Text
In the input file, words are separated by leaving one or more blank spaces. Paragraphs
are separated by leaving one or more blank lines. (You can also use the command \par
to indicate a new paragraph.) L
A
T
E
Xignores multiple blank spaces and multiple blank
lines in input files.
Type single quotation marks by using the left (‘) and right (’) single quote marks on
your keyboard. Type left double quotation marks by using using two single left quotes
(‘‘), and type right double quotation marks by using either two single right quotes (’’)
or the double quote key (").
There are three kinds of dashes in typeset documents: the hyphen (for compound words),
the endash (for such things as page number ranges), and the emdash (used as a punc-
tuation mark in English prose). Since there is only one dash on the keyboard, type -,
--, and --- to get -, –, and — .
To prevent two words from being split at a line break, tie them together with the tilde
character: for example Mr.~Smith will never appear with “Mr.” at the end of one line
and “Smith” at the start of the next.
Note that some characters have special meaning to L
A
T
E
X and must be entered in a
special way, as described in the next section.
Academic and Research Computing, RPI
4 ♦
Chapter 1. L
A
T
E
XBasics
1.4.3 Special Characters
Certain characters have special meaning to L
A
T
E
X. An example is the % sign, which
indicates that the remainder of the line is a comment and should not be processed.
Below is the complete list of special characters. To have these characters print in your
output, you must type them in your input file as shown below.
Character
Type in file
Special L
A
T
E
Xmeaning
#
\#
Parameter in a macro; also used in tables
$
\$
Used to begin and end math mode
%
\%
Used for comments in the source file
&
\&
Tab mark, used in alignments
\
Used in math mode for subscripts
ˆ
\ˆ{}
Used in math mode for superscripts
˜
\˜{}
Tie character, used to produce a “hard” space
{
\{
Used to begin a group or an argument
}
\}
Used to end a group or an argument
\
$\backslash$
Used to begin a control sequence
<
$<$ (or \textless)
Otherwise, produces ¡
>
$>$ (or \textgreater) Otherwise, produces ¿
1.4.4 Structure of the Input File
L
A
T
E
Xinput files must conform to a certain structure. They begin with the command
\documentclass, and all the text of the document must be contained between the
commands \begin{document} and \end{document}.
\documentclass[options]{class}
Preamble
\begin{document}
Document text
\end{document}
In the first command above, class specifies the type of document you intend to create.
You can choose from one of the L
A
T
E
Xclasses described in the next chapter. If you wish,
you can also include one or more options to modify the behavior of the document class.
The preamble is the section of the file between the \documentclass{...} command and
the \begin{document} command. This is the place to put commands that will influence
the style of your entire document and macro definitions that you will use later. You may
also load packages that add new features to L
A
T
E
X. Text is not allowed in the preamble.
April 2007
1.5 Some L
A
T
E
XVocabulary ♦
5
The \begin{document} command indicates the end of the preamble and the beginning
of your text. A corresponding \end{document} command always ends your files. A
really short L
A
T
E
Xinput file might look like:
\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
This LaTeX file is short and sweet. It uses the article class,
a good all-purpose layout. There is nothing in the preamble, which
is perfectly acceptable.
This is a new paragraph. \textit{Here’s some italic text}
and \textbf{some bold text}.
{\small The text inside these braces is smaller than normal.}
Now the text size is back to normal.
\end{document}
this produces:
This LaTeX file is short and sweet. It uses the article class, a good all-purpose layout.
There is nothing in the preamble, which is perfectly acceptable.
This is a new paragraph. Here’s some italic text and some bold text.
The text inside
these braces is smaller than normal.
Now the text size is back to normal.
Longer examples, one using report class and one using letter class are included at the
end of the next chapter.
1.5 Some L
A
T
E
XVocabulary
Commands produce text or space. For example, \hspace{2in} and \vspace{2in} are
commands that create 2 inches of horizontal and vertical space, respectively, and
\textit{some italic words} puts the contents of its argument in italic type.
Many commands take arguments, either mandatory or optional; some commands,
like \today don’t.
Mandatory arguments supply information required for a command to execute. For
example, \hspace{2in} needs the information provided by the argument to gen-
erate the horizontal space. Mandatory arguments are enclosed in braces: { }.
Optional arguments are allowed on some commands and are enclosed in square brack-
ets: [ ]. For example, the size of type to be used for your main text is an optional
argument in the {\documentclass} command. To use the article class in 11-point
type, you would type \documentclass[11pt]{article}. Without this optional
argument, you would get the default 10-point type.
Academic and Research Computing, RPI
6 ♦
Chapter 1. L
A
T
E
XBasics
Declarations produce neither text nor space, but either affect the way L
A
T
E
Xprints
the following text or provide information for later use. Font size changes are an
example of declarations. \large will cause any text that follows to appear in a
larger type size. Declarations are often used within a group to limit their scope. For
example: {\large Only the text inside these braces will be large.}
Environments are blocks of text that receive special processing. An environment is
defined by a matching \begin{environment name} ... \end{environment name}.
An environment is also a group, in the same way that a pair of braces delimits a
group. For example, a quotation might be formatted as follows:
\begin{quote}
\small
This text is set off from surrounding text and indented from
both margins. The font size of this quotation will be smaller
because of the "small" command inside the quote environment.
\end{quote}
Note that a blank line before an environment ends the previous paragraph. A blank
line following an environment indicates that the next line starts a new paragraph.
Environments can be nested, i.e., the first started is the last ended.
* Some commands can have a * appended to the name, which indicates a variation on a
command or environment. For example, \\ indicates a line break. \\* indicates a
line break with the restriction that L
A
T
E
Xis not allowed to begin a new page at that
point. Space printed by \vspace and \hspace commands is normally dropped if
it appears at the beginning or end of a line or page. If you want the space printed
no matter where it falls, you would use \hspace* or \vspace*. Normally, section
headings are automatically numbered, but \section*{My Heading} will produce
an unnumbered section heading.
April 2007
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested