pdf to jpg c# open source : Convert locked pdf to word control application system azure web page winforms console LIRS_RoundtableReport_WEB3-part589

30
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015
• DHS and ORR should track the treatment of 
unaccompanied children housed in temporary emergency 
response facilities (such as Department of Defense facilities 
and other new emergency facilities), ensuring adherence to 
child welfare principles and practices.
• DHS and HHS should allow timely access to all custodial 
facilities, including emergency response facilities, by 
nongovernmental organizations in order to promote 
accountability and collaboration.
• Immigrant-serving NGOs should document and report 
abuses by federal agencies towards children, following the 
complaint model used by immigration legal advocates.
• Immigrant-serving NGOs should monitor situations 
in which children are separated from parents and 
other family members (i.e., cases in which government 
treatment creates unaccompanied minors), in order to 
develop improved practice recommendations.
CONCLUSION
The federal government should adopt a consistent principled 
approach, grounded in the best interests of the child, to the care 
and custody of unaccompanied migrant children, rather than 
allowing policy and practice to be driven by financial, political, 
and institutional pressures. 
Children have developmental needs for safety, permanency, 
and well-being. The child welfare laws of the United States 
recognize these needs.  However, the principles that inform 
our child welfare laws are not consistently observed in 
our treatment of unaccompanied migrant children. These 
children deserve safety, nurture, and care combined with a 
protective responsibility towards potential asylum seekers 
and victims of trafficking, child maltreatment, and other 
human rights violations. 
The existing U.S. protections for children represent decades 
of expertise that have been developed over time in response 
to increased knowledge and competence in serving this 
vulnerable population. The experienced professionals who 
participated in the LIRS Roundtable series of meetings 
were deeply concerned by the grave danger that could face 
unaccompanied children if existing protections are weakened.
With so many children at risk, this is not the time to roll 
back protections for children, but rather for the U.S. federal 
government to advance as a leader, both regionally and globally, 
in the protection of migrating children. This should be done by 
establishing clear principles for their humane and just treatment.
This report has laid out the broad principles that 
should provide a framework for addressing the needs of 
unaccompanied children.  We have also offered an extensive 
list of specific recommendations that concretely apply those 
principles. These principles and recommendations are 
informed by the expertise of our Roundtable participants, 
and we believe them to be considered and timely, as their 
relevance and necessity have never been greater. 
The opening sentence of the U.S. Refugee Act of 1980 
provides clear direction: 
“The Congress declares that it is the historic policy of the 
United States to respond to the urgent needs of persons 
subject to persecution in their homelands…”
90
As a faith-based organization, LIRS takes further direction 
from the biblical exhortations to welcome the stranger, to 
protect the vulnerable, to love our neighbor, and to see the 
face of God in those who seek our help.
91
The President, the U.S. Congress, and federal government 
agencies must not lose sight of their legal, moral, and ethical 
responsibility to keep vulnerable children safe from harm.
Channel separating El Paso, Texas, from Ciudad Juarez seen 
through the railings of the border crossing bridge
Photo credit: Ruido. 
Convert locked pdf to word - C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
pdf password unlock; pdf secure
Convert locked pdf to word - VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital signatures in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures
add security to pdf file; secure pdf
31
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015
[17] INA 412 (A)(iv).
[18] Amnesty International, Why Am I Here? Children in Immigration Detention,” 
(2003),  http://www.detentionwatchnetwork.org/sites/detentionwatchnetwork.
org/files/unaccompanied%20children%20in%20immigration%20detention.
pdf. Women’s Refugee Commission, Prison Guard or Parent? INS Treatment of 
Unaccompanied Refugee Children,” (2002); https://womensrefugeecommission.org/
search?q=prison+guard+or+parent; Human Rights Watch Detained and Deprived 
of Rights,” (December 1998), http://www.hrw.org/legacy/reports98/ins2/; Flores 
Stipulated Settlement Agreement (1997), http://www.centerforhumanrights.org/
PDFs/FloresStpultdSetlmt%20AGMT.pdf. 
[19]  United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Global Study on Homicide: Data, 
(2013), http://www.unodc.org/gsh/en/data.html.
[20] United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), Global Study on Homi-
cide, (2013), https://www.unodc.org/gsh/en/index.html. 
[21] Consejo Ciudadano para la Seguridad Pública y la Justicia Penal A.C, “Por 
Tercer Año Consecutivo, San Pedro Sula es la Ciudad Más Violenta del Mundo,” 
(January 15, 2014), http://www.seguridadjusticiaypaz.org.mx/biblioteca/view.
download/5/177.
[22] Data from January to May of 2014. Ana Gonzalez-Barrera, Jens Manuel 
Krogstad and Mark Hugo Lopez, “DHS: Violence, poverty, is driving children to 
flee Central America to U.S.,” Pew Research Center (July 1, 2014), http://www.
pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/07/01/dhs-violence-poverty-is-driving-children-to-
flee-central-america-to-u-s/.
[23] UNODC (2013).
[24] UNHCR, Children on the Run, 6.
[25] Data from 2008 to 2013. UNHCR, ’Statement to the Appropriations Com-
mittee on the Review of the President’s Emergency Supplemental Request for 
Unaccompanied Children and Related Matters,” (July 10, 2014), http://www.
appropriations.senate.gov/sites/default/files/hearings/UNHCR%20Statement%20
UAC.7.10.14.FINAL_.pdf.
[26]  ORR, “Fact Sheet,” (November 2014), https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/
files/orr/fact_sheet.pdf  
[27] ORR, “About Unaccompanied Children’s Services,” http://www.acf.hhs.gov/
programs/orr/programs/ucs/about#FAQs.
[28] Ana Gonzalez-Barrera, Jens Manuel Krogstad and Mark Hugo Lopez, “Many 
Mexican child migrants caught multiple times at the border,” Pew Research Center 
(August 4, 2014), http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/08/04/many-mexi-
can-child-migrants-caught-multiple-times-at-border/.
[29] U.S. Customs and Border Protection, “Southwest Border Unaccompanied Alien 
Children (FY 2014)”, http://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/southwest-border-unac-
companied-children-2014.
[30] Jens Manuel Krogstad, Ana Gonzalez-Barrera and Mark Hugo Lopez, Chil-
dren 12 and under are fastest growing group of unaccompanied minors at U.S. 
border,” Pew Research Center, (July 22, 2014). http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-
tank/2014/07/22/children-12-and-under-are-fastest-growing-group-of-unaccom-
panied-minors-at-u-s-border/. Jens Manuel Krogstad, Ana Gonzalez-Barrera and 
Mark Hugo Lopez, “At the Border, a Sharp Rise in Unaccompanied Girls Fleeing 
Honduras,” Pew Research Center (July 25, 2014), http://www.pewresearch.org/
fact-tank/2014/07/25/at-the-border-a-sharp-rise-in-unaccompanied-girls-fleeing-
honduras/. 
[31] Supra note 1.
[32] United States Border Patrol statistics, available at: http://www.cbp.gov/doc-
ument/stats/us-border-patrol-total-monthly-uac-apprehensions-month-sector-fy-
2010-fy-2014. 
[33]  John Roth, “Memorandum: Oversight of Unaccompanied Alien Children,” 
DHS Office of Inspector General, (July 30, 2014), Attachment 3, http://www.oig.
dhs.gov/assets/Mgmt/2014/Over_Un_Ali_Chil.pdf.
[34] The complaint was filed by the National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC), 
the ACLU Border Litigation Project, Americans for Immigrant Justice (AI Justice), 
Esperanza Immigrant Rights Project (Esperanza), and the Florence Immigrant and 
Refugee Rights Project (Florence Project), https://www.aclu.org/immigrants-rights/
unaccompanied-immigrant-children-report-serious-abuse-us-officials-during; 
Jessica Jones and Katharina Obser, A Costly Choice Putting Immigrant Kids Behind 
Bars (The Hill Feb. 6, 2015), available at: http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/
civil-rights/231957-a-costly-choice-putting-immigrant-kids-behind-bars.  
[35] TVPRA at  § 235(b)(3), see also Flores v. Reno Stipulated Settlement Agree-
ment, Case No. CV 85-4544-RJK(Px) (1997), at Section V, ¶ 12. P.
[36] P.L. 110-457, Title II, Subtitle D § 235(a)(2),122 Stat. 5074
[37] TVPRA § 235(a)(4).
[38] U.S. Refugee Act of 1980, Public Law 96-212, 94 Stat. 102 (Mar. 17, 1980).
ENDNOTES
[1]  Wil S. Hylton, “The Shame of America’s Family Detention Camps,” The New 
York Times Magazine (Feb. 4, 2015), http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/08/maga-
zine/the-shame-of-americas-family-detention-camps.html?_r=0; Detention Watch 
Network, Expose & Close: Artesia Family Residential Center, NM (2014), http://
www.detentionwatchnetwork.org/sites/detentionwatchnetwork.org/files/expose_
close_-artesia_family_residential_center_nm_2014.pdf; Stephen Manning, Ending 
Artesia (January 28, 2015), https://innovationlawlab.org/the-artesia-report/.
[2]  LIRS & Women’s Refugee Commission, Locking Up Family Values, Again: The 
Continued Failure of Immigration Family Detention, (October 2014): 2, http://lirs.
org/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/LIRSWRC_LockingUpFamilyValuesAgain_Re-
port_141114.pdf. 
[3]  U.S. Customs and Border Protection, “Southwest Border Unaccompanied Alien 
Children,” (FY 2014), http://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/southwest-border-unac-
companied-children-2014. 
[4] UNHCR, Children on the Run: Unaccompanied Children Leaving Central 
America and Mexico and the Need for International Protection (March 2013), 
http://www.unhcrwashington.org/children; Kids in Need of Defense, The Time is 
Now: Understanding and Addressing the Protection of Immigrant Children Who 
Come Alone to the United States, (2013), http://supportkind.org/joomlatools-files/
docman-files/TimeIsNow_KIND_Feb_2013.pdf; United States Conference for 
Catholic Bishops/Migration and Refugee Services, Mission to Central America: 
The Flight of Unaccompanied Children to the United States, (2013), http://www.
usccb.org/about/migration-policy/upload/Mission-To-Central-America-FINAL-2.
pdf; Women’s Refugee Commission, Forced from Home: The Lost Boys and Girls 
of Central America, (2012), https://womensrefugeecommission.org/forced-from-
home-press-kit.
[5]  For example,  “An underlying tension in dealing with UAC is the philosophical 
positions of the government agencies involved in the handling of the children. 
Specifically, the dominant cleavage line from which many other issues spring is that 
of whether the UAC should be treated as humanitarian refugees or as unauthorized 
aliens subject to expedited removal.” From: Chad Haddal, Unaccompanied Alien 
Children: Policies and Issues, Congressional Research Service, (March 1, 2007): 13, 
http://www.rcusa.org/uploads/pdfs/CRS%20UAC%20Report%202007.pdf. 
[6] The U.S. government uses the term “unaccompanied alien child” (UAC) from 
the Homeland Security Act of 2002, P.L. 107-296, Title IV, Subtitle E, §462(g), 116 
Stat. 2202. This report uses the term “unaccompanied child.”
[7] Flores v. Reno Stipulated Settlement Agreement, Case No. CV 85-4544-RJK(Px) 
(1997), http://www.centerforhumanrights.org/PDFs/FloresStpultdSetlmt%20AGMT.pdf.
[8] For example, the Homeland Security Act of 2002, the William Wilberforce Traf-
ficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008, and the Violence Against 
Women Act of 2013.
[9] United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), p. 11, http://www.
unhcr.org/3b66c2aa10.html.  The United States is a signatory only to the 1967 Pro-
tocol Relating to the Status of Refugees, which removed time limits and geographic 
limitations present in the 1951 Convention.
[10] UN General Assembly, Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), Article 
22, (November 20, 1989), http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6b38f0.html. The 
CRC is considered to have the force of customary law, given its wide global ratifi-
cation. The U.S. has signed but not ratified the CRC. South Sudan is the only other 
United Nations member state that has not yet ratified the CRC.
[11] UNHCR, Children on the Run, (2014); UNHCR, Guidelines on Policies and 
Procedures in Dealing with Unaccompanied Children Seeking Asylum (February 
1997), http://www.unhcr.org/3d4f91cf4.html.
[12] Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR), “About unaccompanied refugee mi-
nors,” http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/orr/programs/urm/about. 
[13] ORR, “About unaccompanied children’s services,” http://www.acf.hhs.gov/
programs/orr/programs/ucs/about. 
[14] For example, International Committee of the Red Cross, International Rescue 
Committee, Save the Children/UK, UNICEF, UNHCR, World Vision International, 
Interagency Guiding Principles on Unaccompanied and Separated Children (2004), 
Geneva: ICRC, http://www.unicef.org/protection/IAG_UASCs.pdf. 
[15] United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), p. 11, http://
www.unhcr.org/3b66c2aa10.html.  The United States is a signatory only to the 
1967 Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees, which removed time limits and 
geographic limitations present in the 1951 Convention.
[16] Edward Kennedy, “Refugee Act of 1980,” International Migration Review, 15, 
no. 1, (Spring-Summer 1981): 143. 
C# Word - Extract or Copy Pages from Word File in C#.NET
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word Besides, the capacity to be locked against editing or processing
change security settings pdf reader; pdf password encryption
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
even though they are using different types of word processors. Besides, the capacity to be locked against editing or processing by others makes PDF file become
decrypt pdf file; convert locked pdf to word doc
32
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015
Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
[61] UN General Assembly, Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), Article 3, 
(November 20, 1989), http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6b38f0.html.
[62] Child Welfare Information Gateway (CWIG), Determining the Best Interests of 
the Child, http://www.childwelfare.gov/pubpdfs/best_interest.pdf . See also: Child 
Welfare League of America (CWLA), National Blueprint for Excellence in Child 
Welfare (Washington, D.C.: CWLA Press), 62-76.
[63] UNICEF, Fact Sheet: A Summary of the Rights under the Convention on the 
Rights of the Child, Article 3, http://www.unicef.org/crc/files/Rights_overview.pdf.
[64] CWLA, p. 27-35. See also: CRC, Articles 6, 19, 22, 24, 27, 28.
[65] CWLA, p. 31; CRC, Articles 2, 22.
[66] CRC, Articles 22, 34, 35, 36.
[67] CRC, Article 37; UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Guidelines 
on Policies and Procedures in Dealing with Unaccompanied Children Seeking Asy-
lum (February 1997), ¶5.2, ¶5.12, http://www.refworld.org/docid/3ae6b3360.html.
[68] CWIG, “Child Advocacy Centers,” https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/re-
sponding/iia/investigation/multidisciplinary/advocacy/.
[69] UNHCR, Guidelines on…Children (1997), ¶8.3.
[70] “All States…provide in their statutes for the appointment of representation for 
a child involved in a child abuse or neglect proceeding. Approximately 41 States…
provide for the appointment of a guardian ad litem to represent the best interests 
of the child.” CWIG, Representation of Children in Child Abuse and Neglect Pro-
ceedings (2012), 2, https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/represent.pdf; UNHCR, 
Guidelines on…Children (1997), ¶5.7.
[71] UNHCR, Guidelines on…Children (1997), ¶8.2, ¶8.4
[72] CWIG, “Trauma-Informed Practice,” https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/re-
sponding/trauma/. See also: CWLA, p. 69-70.
[73] CWLA, p. 48-49.
[74] CWIG, “Philosophy and Key Elements of Family-Centered Practice,” https://
www.childwelfare.gov/topics/famcentered/philosophy/; CRC, Articles 9, 10. UN-
HCR, Guidelines on…Children (1997), ¶9.8.
[75] The Social Security Act, Sec. 475(5) equates least restrictive setting with more 
family like settings: “(5) The term ‘case review system’ means a procedure for as-
suring that—(A) each child has a case plan designed to achieve placement in a safe 
setting that is the least restrictive (most family like) and most appropriate setting 
available and in close proximity to the parents’ home, consistent with the best in-
terest and special needs of the child…”. Available at: http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/
ssact/title04/0475.htm; UNHCR, Guidelines on…Children (1997), ¶7.6.
[76] CRC, Article 25; UNHCR, Guidelines on…Children (1997), ¶7.5.
[77] CWLA, p. 115.
[78] CRC, Article 20.
[79] “In all cases, before a child can be placed in the home of a relative, the 
child-placing agency must do an assessment to determine that the relative is ‘fit and 
willing’ to provide a suitable placement for the child, able to ensure the child’s safe-
ty, and able to meet the child’s needs.” CWIG, Placement of Children with Relatives 
(2013), https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/placement.pdf.
[80] CWLA, p. 96-105.
[81] CWIG, “Introduction to Family Support and Preservation,” https://www.
childwelfare.gov/topics/supporting/introduction/.
[82] CWLA, p. 41-42.
[83] UNHCR, Guidelines on…Children (1997), ¶10.3.
[84] CWIG, “Introduction to Family Support and Preservation.”
[85] CWLA, p. 80.
[86] CWIG, “Information Systems and Data,” https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/
management/info-systems/ See also: UNHCR, Guidelines on…Children (1997), 
¶10.2, ¶12.
[87] CWLA, p. 79-92. See also: CWIG, “Evaluating Program, Practice, and Service 
Effectiveness,” https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/management/effectiveness/.
[88] Framework Workgroup, Children’s Bureau, Administration for Children and 
Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (February 2014), https://
www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/cb/pii_ttap_framework.pdf.
[89] TVPRA § 235(a)(4). 
[90] P.L. 96-212, Title I, Sec. 101(a), http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/STATUTE-94/
pdf/STATUTE-94-Pg102.pdf.
[91] Deuteronomy 10:19; Isaiah 1:17; Luke 10:27; Matthew 25: 31-46.
[39] See: Betsy Cavendish and Maru Cortazar, Children at the Border: The Screen-
ing, Protection and Repatriation of Unaccompanied Mexican Minors,”Appleseed, 
(2011), http://appleseednetwork.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Children-At-
The-Border1.pdf. Women’s Refugee Commission & Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe 
LLP, Halfway Home: Unaccompanied Children in Immigration Custody,” (2009), 
http://www.womensrefugeecommission.org/programs/migrant-rights/unaccompa-
nied-children; Center for Gender and Refugee Studies & Kids in Need of Defense. 
A Treacherous Journey: Child Migrants Navigating the U.S. Immigration System,” 
(2013), http://www.uchastings.edu/centers/cgrs-docs/treacherous_journey_cgrs_
kind_report.pdf
[40] ORR, “About Unaccompanied Children’s Services,” http://www.acf.hhs.gov/
programs/orr/programs/ucs/about#FAQs.
[41] TVPRA § 235 (c)(2).
[42] Homeland Security Act of 2002, § 426(b).
[43] Flores, 10.
[44] The Flores settlement requires the least restrictive setting “appropriate to 
the minor’s age and special needs, while the TVPRA codifies that children be “…
promptly placed in the least restrictive setting that is in the best interest of the 
child.” Flores v. Reno Stipulated Settlement Agreement, at § IV, ¶ 11; TVPRA at § 
235(c)(2). 
[45] TVPRA § 235(c)(2) and Flores § VII ¶ 24B.
[46] Council on Accreditation, Standards for Public Agencies, PA-SH 10: Services 
for Homeless and Runaway Children and Youth (2015), http://coanet.org/standard/
pa-sh/10/.
[47] TVPRA § 235(c)(3)(A).
[48] TVPRA § 235(c)(3)(B).
[49] Women’s Refugee Commission, Forced from Home: The Lost Boys and Girls of 
Central America (2012), https://womensrefugeecommission.org/forced-from-home-
press-kit.
[50] Office of Refugee Resettlement, “Fact Sheet: U.S. Department of Human 
Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Refugee Resettlement, 
Unaccompanied Alien Children Program,” (May 2014). http://www.acf.hhs.gov/
sites/default/files/orr/unaccompanied_childrens_services_fact_sheet.pdf. 
[51] Benjamin Roth, PhD & Breanne Grace, PhD, Post-Release: Linking Unaccom-
panied Immigrant Children to Family and Community (2015), University of South 
Carolina College of Social Work (forthcoming).
[52] The Central American born were more likely to live in poverty (23 percent) 
than the native born (15 percent) or foreign born overall (20 percent).” Hondurans 
and Guatemalans had a higher poverty rate than the Central American average, 
witih 30% and 27% respectively. See: Sierra Stoney and Jeanne Batalova, “Central 
American Immigrants in the United States,” (March 18, 2013), http://www.migra-
tionpolicy.org/article/central-american-immigrants-united-states 
[53] The Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC) has noted that the 
representative rate for children ranged from 60%-70% from 2008 until October 
2012. Since then, the representation rate for children in immigration court pro-
ceedings has steadily declined, as the number of children in removal proceedings 
has continued to increase. The representation rate for unaccompanied children was 
71% in FY2012; 48% in FY2013; and 20% in FY2014. The difference that legal 
representation makes for a child cannot be overstated: In FY2014, only 11% of un-
represented children were granted permission to stay in the U.S.; for children with 
legal representation, 69% were granted permission to stay. TRAC, “Representation 
for Unaccompanied Children in Immigration Court” (November 25, 2014), http://
trac.syr.edu/immigration/reports/371/ 
[54] Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC) Immigration, New Data 
on Unaccompanied Children in Immigration Court, (2014), http://trac.syr.edu/
immigration/reports/359/.
[55] Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC) Immigration, Represen-
tation for Unaccompanied Children in Immigration Court (Nov. 25, 2014).
[56] American Bar Association, A Humanitarian Call to Action: Unaccompanied 
Alien Children at the Southwest Border, (October 17, 2014), http://www.american-
bar.org/content/dam/aba/administrative/immigration/UACSstatement.authcheck-
dam.pdf 
[57] Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, 42 U.S.C. 5106a(b)(2)(A)(xiii).
[58] Brian M. O’Leary, Chief Immigration Judge, Executive Office for Immigration 
Review, U.S. Department of Justice, “Docketing Practices Relating to Unaccompa-
nied Children’s Cases in Light of the New Priorities” (September 10, 2014), http://
www.justice.gov/eoir/statspub/Docketing-Practices-Related-to-UACs-Sept2014.pdf.
[59] Child Welfare Information Gateway (CWIG), General FAQs, https://www.
childwelfare.gov/aboutus/faq/general/.
[60] As well as the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern 
C# PowerPoint - Extract or Copy PowerPoint Pages from PowerPoint
PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET convert PDF to SVG. VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word Besides, the capacity to be locked against editing or processing
secure pdf file; decrypt pdf with password
VB.NET Word: Extract Text from Microsoft Word Document in VB.NET
Word documents are often locked as static images and the through VB.NET programming, convert Word document to & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
change pdf security settings reader; pdf password security
33
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015  – APPENDIX A
MOVING FORWARD FOR MIGRANT CHILDREN:
Practice, Policy, and Protection
ROUNDTABLE SERIES OVERVIEW
Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS) will host a series of three roundtable dialogues to assess the 
current state of service responses by government agencies, private organizations, and local communities, towards 
children arriving in the U.S. due to forced migration. The largest share of these children—referred to by the U.S. 
government as Unaccompanied Alien Children (UAC)—are fleeing violence and deprivation in Central America 
in migration numbers that have surpassed outflows from recognized armed conflicts in Southern Sudan and the 
Democratic Republic of the Congo. The characteristics and root causes of this current “surge” have been examined 
effectively in recent reports by KIND, the Women’s Refugee Commission and the UNHCR.
LIRS  intends  to  complement  and  build  on  this  existing  work  by  facilitating  discussions  focusing  on  the 
following overarching themes:
1.  Exploration: What is current practice? Assessing existing policies and services, including ideal service 
models, current challenges, and promising practices. (March 18, 2014)
2.  Convergence: What should current practice be? Identifying potential solutions to current challenges 
and methods for achieving desired change. (May 29, 2014)
3.  Action: How do  we achieve  ideal  practice? Prioritizing  key  policy and  practice  improvements  and 
developing a shared vision for accomplishing change, both as a group and as individual organizations. 
(July 16, 2014)
At the conclusion of the Roundtable Series, a summary of  recommended improvements will be refined and 
disseminated among participants. This summary is expected to include the following types of recommendations.
1.  Advocacy Priorities: Executive, legislative and programmatic recommendations will be compiled to 
advance  administrative  practices by  various  federal  agencies in  order to  improve short-term  safety 
and well-being of UAC, as well as long-term permanency and integration opportunities for migrating 
children in the U.S. LIRS will distill these recommendation outcomes into a report on behalf of the 
Roundtable consultation group.
2.  Direct Practice Improvements: Direct service recommendations, as well as documentation of existing 
good practices, will be collected in order to replicate what is working well, to develop pilot projects 
of  promising  new  ideas,  to  incorporate  knowledge  and  service  approaches  from  domestic  service 
provision, and to explore specific service areas needing further research.
C# Excel - Extract or Copy Excel Pages to Excel File in C#.NET
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word Besides, the capacity to be locked against editing or processing
copy from locked pdf; change pdf document security
34
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015 – APPENDIX B
ROUNDTABLE GUIDING PRINCIPLES
1
We take particular inspiration for these Roundtable discussions from the spirit of Articles 20, 22, and 25 of the 
Convention on the Rights of the Child:  
•  “Children who cannot be looked after by their own family have a right to special care and must be looked 
after properly by people who respect their ethnic group, religion, culture, and language.” [Art. 20]
•  Refugee and asylum seeking children should receive protection, humanitarian aid, and family tracing 
assistance. When parents or family cannot be found, these children should be protected like any other 
children unable to live with their family. [Art. 22]
•  “Children who are looked after by their local authorities, rather than their parents, have the right to 
have these living arrangements looked at regularly to see if they are the most appropriate. Their care 
and treatment should always be based on  ‘the best interests of the child.’ ” [Art. 25]
•  In addition, the following principles are provided to guide our shared vision:
•  A child is a person below the age of 18.  [Art. 1] Young adults between 18 and 21 may need additional 
support and assistance in the transition from youth to adulthood.
•  Programming and decision making regarding children should be based on the best interests of the child 
principle.  [Art. 3]
•  Children have a right to life; their survival and developmental needs should be supported. [Art. 6]
•  “Children seeking asylum should not be kept in detention;” however, if used, detention should only be 
as a measure of last resort and for the shortest appropriate period of time.
2
Children should be placed 
in the least restrictive setting appropriate to their safety and developmental needs. 
•  Children should be reunited with family members, provided that safety and developmental needs can 
be met. [Art. 9]
•  Children should be allowed to share their views and to participate in decision making that concerns 
them. [Art. 12, 13, 14]
[1] Guiding principles for the Convention on the Rights of the Child, http://www.unicef.org/crc/files/Guiding_Principles.pdf; Fact Sheet summary of the CRC, 
http://www.unicef.org/crc/files/Rights_overview.pdf.
[2] UNHCR (1997). Guidelines on Policies and Procedures in dealing with Unaccompanied Children Seeking Asylum. http://www.unhcr.org/3d4f91cf4.pdf.
35
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015 – APPENDIX C
ROUNDTABLE PARTICIPANTS
The following individuals participated in one, two, or three of the LIRS Roundtable meetings. Their views 
helped to inform this document, but their names do not indicate an individual or organizational endorsement 
of the contents  of  this report. The contents and recommendations  are the  sole responsibility of  Lutheran 
Immigration and Refugee Service.
•  Stacie Blake, U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (USCRI)
•  Nicole Boehner, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
•  Luis Cardona, Montgomery County (MD) Department of Health & Human Services 
•  Aidin Castillo, Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC)
•  Wendy Cervantes, First Focus
•  Tom Crea, Boston College School of Social Work
•  Elvis Garcia, Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York
•  Laura Gardner, Anne Arundel County Schools
•  Kristen Guskovict, Independent Consultant - Facilitator
•  Kimberly Haynes, Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS)
•  Shadi Houshyar, First Focus
•  Jayshree Jani, University of Maryland at Baltimore County
•  Jessica Jones, Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS)
•  Angie Junk, Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC)
•  Rebecca Katz, The Women’s Refugee Commission 
•  Kathryn Kuennen, U.S. Conf, of Catholic Bishops/Migration & Refugee Services (USCCB)
•  Meredith Linsky, American Bar Association (ABA)
•  Fabio Lomelino, Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS)
•  Nathalie Lummert, U.S. Conf. of Catholic Bishops/Migration & Refugee Services (USCCB)
•  Elba Marquez, International Detention Coalition 
•  Vanessa Martinez, International Detention Coalition 
•  Megan McKenna, Kids in Need of Defense (KIND)
•  Michael Mitchell, Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS)
•  Gladis Molina, Florence Immigrant and Refugee Rights Project
•  Lyn Morland, Center on Immigration and Child Welfare
•  Anne Mullooly, U.S. Conf. of Catholic Bishops/Migration & Refugee Services (USCCB)
•  Royce Murray, National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC)
•  Jennifer Nagda, The Young Center for Immigrant Children’s Rights, Univ. of Chicago
•  Tiffany Nelms, U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (USCRI)
•  Brittney Nystrom, Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS)
•  Jennifer Podkul, The Women’s Refugee Commission
•  Kristine Poplawski, Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS)
•  Angela Randall, Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS)
•  Beth Rosenberg, Children’s Action Alliance
•  Laura Schmidt, Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS)
•  Susan Schmidt, Independent Consultant - Writer
•  Julie Sollinger, Cook County (IL) Public Guardian 
•  Aryah Somers, Independent Consultant - Facilitator
•  Susan Terrio, Georgetown University
•  Justin Tullius, RAICES
•  Dawnya Underwood, Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS)
•  Annie Wilson, Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS)
•  Maria Woltjen, The Young Center for Immigrant Children’s Rights, Univ. of Chicago
•  Wendy Young, Kids in Need of Defense (KIND)
36
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015 – APPENDIX D
ROUNDTABLE PROCESS
Roundtable Strategy
LIRS invited a diverse cross-section of multi-disciplinary professionals to participate in this three-part series of 
meetings held in Washington, D.C. in March, May, and July of 2014. Thirty to thirty-five people participated 
in each meeting, with a total 44 participants across all three meetings, representing existing stakeholders in the 
current system as well as those who might provide new perspectives on the care of unaccompanied children, 
including representatives from national voluntary agencies providing child welfare services for unaccompanied 
immigrant children as well as refugee resettlement programming, migration and child welfare policy advocates, 
immigration legal service providers, academics from social work and immigrant child welfare, and community-
based organizations from receiving communities. 
Roundtable Topics
Described below are the primary discussion areas from each Roundtable meeting.
•  Roundtable #1. At the first Roundtable meeting, participants focused on the challenges and barriers that 
exist within the current system of care and custody of unaccompanied children.  In addition, participants 
shared knowledge of current best practices in the care and custody of unaccompanied children.  Barriers 
and best practices were each considered within the context of prerelease (while children are still in federal 
custody) and post-release (after children are released to family sponsors, released to alternative long-term 
care, or returned to their countries of origin). In addition, barriers and best practices were examined from 
different vantage points, including the perspectives of  agencies, children and families, and communities.
•  Roundtable #2. At the second Roundtable meeting, LIRS presented preliminary findings from its own 
research efforts (described below). In addition, LIRS presented an unaccompanied children “Decision 
Tree”  which  visually  charts  the  complex  decision-making  processes  that  occur  between  the  time  of 
apprehension to the time of release from federal custody. Participant responses regarding challenges and 
best practices from the first meeting were summarized and reintroduced during the second Roundtable 
meeting for further prioritizing through small group discussion. Roundtable participants then broke up 
into small groups to discuss system recommendations and best practices in relation to three contextualized 
service areas: the southern U.S. border, ORR-funded shelters, and after placement with sponsors.
•  Roundtable #3.  The last meeting commenced with an update on the rapidly changing policy situation.  
Participants again broke into two smaller groups, focusing on either legal services or social services. 
Small group responses from the second meeting had been further synthesized and condensed for a last 
refinement during this final collective meeting.  The day closed with discussion of coalition building 
and methods for continuing the collaborative and collegial child protection work initiated with this 
Roundtable series.
Incorporation of Research
To inform these Roundtable meetings, LIRS incorporated current research (conducted by LIRS and by others) 
in order to identify and add to the existing knowledge base regarding unaccompanied children. These efforts 
included the following:
37
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015 – APPENDIX D
1.  Sharing research knowledge: LIRS coordinated cross-disciplinary dialogue about current research by 
facilitating a teleconference discussion between 14 professionals around the United States engaged in 
various research efforts related to unaccompanied children. 
2.  Conducting focus groups: LIRS staff and Dr. Jayshree Jani, Assistant Professor of Social Work at the 
University of Maryland Baltimore County, coordinated focus group discussions with unaccompanied 
children and with sponsors living in Maryland. In addition, six individual interviews were conducted 
with sponsors living in Virginia. These focus groups and interviews focused on the adjustment of the 
youth, their understanding of the legal process, and current needs. The qualitative data obtained from 
these research efforts were shared during the second Roundtable and helped participants to incorporate 
the voice and views of Central American families themselves.
3.  Following up with families: During the second Roundtable, LIRS staff and Dr. Jayshree Jani shared 
preliminary results from follow-up phone calls with 100 family sponsors with whom unaccompanied 
children had been reunified. Contact was made with adult sponsors at 14 days, 90 days, and 180 days 
following a child’s reunification in order to assess specific needs of children who were not otherwise 
receiving any follow-up services after release. While preliminary, these results provided insight into 
both the needs and strengths of families with whom unaccompanied children have been reunited. 
4.  Seeking service provider input: Between  the  second and  third  Roundtable  meeting,  LIRS  and Dr. 
Jani conducted an online survey of legal and social service practitioners regarding their assessment of 
current needs of the unaccompanied children and families they were serving, and the needs of the service 
providers themselves. Results of these online surveys were shared during the second Roundtable meeting.
38
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015 – APPENDIX E
ROUNDTABLE ASSESSMENT:
Best Practice and Ideal Practice
In the Roundtable meetings convened by LIRS, participants discussed current best practices with unaccompanied 
children and then described ideal practice by reimagining the current system.  
Current Best Practice
Best practices identified by Roundtable participants revolved around custodial services (while children are in 
ORR custody) that are more family-like and more home-like, that recognize the individuality and participation 
of children and their families and that use creative approaches to connect with children. Community-based 
supports and services (after children are reunified with sponsors) focused on education, legal, child welfare, 
and related services at the local level.
Specific best practices focused on these primary areas:
1.  Modeling home and family in-care and custody programs for unaccompanied children
1
•  Adopting program models that incorporate the safe and nurturing environment of home by using 
smaller  facilities,  more  family-like  placements,  and  more  homelike  settings  that  support  and 
celebrate the uniqueness of each child, and programs that allow for seamless transitions from one 
type of care to another (e.g. from transitional foster care to long-term foster care without the child 
having to experience a placement disruption). 
•  Developing  connections  between  unaccompanied  children’s  service  providers  and  with  service 
providers from other fields, such as those who serve undocumented and homeless populations, in 
order to learn from other programs that serve children in transition. 
2.  Using approaches that empower unaccompanied children
•  Looking at children’s needs holistically, empowering them to take a more active role in decision making 
about themselves, encouraging child participation, and listening to what children have to say. 
3.  Implementing supportive and preventive approaches to working with sponsor families
2
•  Giving sufficient time for shelter clinicians to facilitate contact and re-establish connection between 
children and sponsors who have experienced lengthy separations, so that children and their families 
are set up for successful kinship placements that will last and are in the best interests of the child.
•  Using pre-reunification contact with sponsor families at designated fingerprinting sites as an opportunity 
[1] “Children are placed according to their best interests in the most family-like and familiar setting possible.” Council on Accreditation, Standards for Public 
Agencies, PA-FKC 6.03: Child Placement (2015), http://coanet.org/standard/pa-fkc/6/.Z
[2] “Parents receive individualized services and supports that address their family’s needs, increase their capacities for effective parenting, and assist them in prepar-
ing for reunification or facilitating other permanency options for their children.” Council on Accreditation, Standards for Public Agencies, PA-FKC 8: Services for 
Parents (2015), http://coanet.org/standard/pa-晫c/8/.
39
ROUNDTABLE REPORT JULY
2015 – APPENDIX E
to determine broader service needs that will support children after reunification with their families. 
•  Learning from family preservation models as an approach to supporting successful reunification of 
sponsors and children with more complex needs.
4.  Valuing schools as protective partners
3
•  Ensuring that all children are enrolled in school after placement with sponsors and recognizing 
the protective role that schools  play by  educating children; by linking children  and families to 
community partners; by providing a safety net and a community integration support system.
•  Intentionally creating connections between ORR-funded community follow-up service providers 
and children’s school social workers to promote children’s safety, permanency and well-being. 
5.  Providing legal and Child Advocate services
•  Ensuring  that  children  have  access  to  legal  protection  and  due  process  through  provision  of 
competent immigration legal services while in federal custody and after placement with sponsors. 
•  Provision of Child Advocates to look out for children’s best interests in immigration legal proceedings.
6.  Provision of other complementary and creative support services
•  Using creative therapeutic approaches with unaccompanied children, such as artistic expression, to 
help communicate about and heal from traumatic experiences.
•  Pursuing diverse sources of funding for special programs, seeking out additional data, and engaging 
in privately funded research projects to examine and improve services to unaccompanied children. 
Ideal Practice: Reimagining the System
Roundtable participants considered what an ideal system for unaccompanied children might look like and how 
it would be different from the existing system for unaccompanied children that has developed over time in the 
United States.
An ideal system for unaccompanied children would include:
•  Building a child-centered, multi-disciplinary system developed around the best interests of the 
child standard;
•  Modeling the best elements of the juvenile and family court systems (e.g., protection oriented, 
grounded in children’s best interests);
[3] “Children receive support to achieve their full educational potential…” Council on Accreditation, Standards for Public Agencies, PA-FKC 9.05: Services for Chil-
dren and Youth (2015), http://coanet.org/standard/pa-晫c/9/. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested