pdf to tiff c# code : Adding a signature to a pdf form Library control component asp.net web page winforms mvc pwc-revenue-recognition-march-20095-part1461

Question: 
Does the Vendor need to demonstrate that it can collect receivables with payment terms of more than 12 
months without granting concessions? Will the Vendor's history of granting extended payment terms of 
fewer than 12 months be sufficient to overcome the presumption that the fee is not fixed or determinable?  
Answer: 
It is important to emphasize that the Vendor's history of collections is not the only critical factor in a 
determination of whether the fee is fixed or determinable. Other factors to consider are whether the 
Vendor has a practice of granting extended payment and has not made subsequent concessions that 
modified the original payment terms. The 12-month provision of SOP 97-2 that allows for the presumption 
that the fee is not fixed or determinable is arbitrary but is, nonetheless, included in order to create 
comparability in the industry. Therefore, the individual facts, circumstances, and practices pertaining to 
each vendor should be evaluated. In other words, (1) the business purposes for granting the extended 
terms and (2) the Vendor's history of collecting the fees related to extended payment terms of fewer than 
12 months without having granted concessions is needed to support the conclusion that fees are fixed or 
determinable. However, the Vendor will also need to analyze and support its assertion that it is able to 
collect the fees billed under the extended payment terms.  
Accordingly, assuming that the lengthening of payment terms is considered significant as compared to its 
history, until the Vendor has a history of collecting the receivables without concession from a number of 
similar transactions, revenue from the arrangement should be recognized as payments become due, 
assuming all other revenue recognition criteria have been met.  
Fixed or determinable — extended terms and financings  
Fact Set: 
Assume that the same facts hold true as those that were presented above, except that the fee in the 
arrangement is $500,000 and is deemed fixed or determinable. Additionally, assume that the Vendor 
issued a non-interest-bearing note receivable for the payments due under the arrangement. Assume that 
the Vendor's borrowing rate is 8%. Assume also that there were 18 monthly payments due in equal 
amounts.  
Question: 
How should revenue under the arrangement be recognized?  
Answer: 
Since the conclusion that the fee in the arrangement is fixed or determinable has already been made, the 
net present value of the payments would be recorded as revenue upon the delivery of the software 
product, assuming that all other revenue recognition criteria have been met. This is consistent with APB 
21. As such, $469,693 should be recorded upon delivery of the software. The $469,693 represents the 
present value of 18 monthly payments of $27,778 each, at an annual interest rate of 8%. The amount of 
unrecorded income ($30,307) would be recorded as interest income during the 18-month period. 
www.pwcrevrec.com  
39 
Adding a signature to a pdf form - C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Tell C# users how to set PDF file permissions, like printing, copying, modifying, extracting, annotating, form filling, etc
add a signature to a pdf file; add signature to pdf document
Adding a signature to a pdf form - VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Set PDF File Access Permissions Using XDoc.PDF for .NET
adding a signature to a pdf document; pdf converter sign in
Recording revenue as payments become due  
Fact Set: 
On December 31, X1, a software vendor entered into an arrangement for a total fee of $1,000,000. The 
Vendor has concluded that its software license arrangement with the Customer does not meet the fixed or 
determinable criterion. Payment terms and collections of fees related to the arrangement are as follows: 
Fees 
Payment Due Date 
Date Cash is Collected 
$250,000  
January 1, X2 
March 1, X2 
$250,000  
September 1, X2 
October 1, X2 
$250,000  
March 1, X3 
April 1, X3 
$250,000  
September 1, X3 
September 30, X3 
$1,000,000  
Question: 
What revenue can be recognized at December 31, X1?  
Answer: 
The AICPA Staff addressed this question in the Q&As (TPA 5100.42). Because the first payment of 
$250,000 is not due until January 1, X2, no revenue should be recognized at December 31, X1. Had the 
initial payment due date been December 31, X1, $250,000 of revenue would have been reported in that 
year, assuming that all other revenue recognition criteria have been met.  
The remainder of the fee will be recorded in revenue during the period in which payments become due. 
TPA 5100.59 addressed the issue of subsequent cash receipts in an extended payment term 
arrangement. In the above example, if all of the extended payments were received subsequent to year-
end but before the financial statements were issued, the conclusion in TPA 5100.59 would indicate that 
those payments would only be revenue in the period received (i.e., no impact on revenue recognition for 
the previous period). 
Actual payment dates and recording revenue  
Fact Set: 
Assume in the above example that cash is collected at later dates than provided in the arrangement.  
Question: 
Is there an impact on when the revenue should be recorded?  
Answer: 
The fact that the cash is collected on later dates does not have an impact on when the revenue should be 
recorded.  
Prepayments and recording revenue  
Fact Set: 
Assume in the above example that cash is collected at earlier dates than provided in the arrangement.  
Question: 
Could the Vendor have recorded revenue when the cash was collected if the Customer paid the 
January 1, X2 installment on December 29, X1?  
40  
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures. Overview. XDoc.PDF also allows PDF security setting via digital signature.
pdf sign; add jpeg signature to pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF file. What's more, you can also protect created PDF file by adding digital signature (watermark) on PDF using C# code. Create
add signature to pdf preview; create signature field in pdf
Answer: 
TPA 5100.41 states that a vendor could recognize revenue for amounts (related to an arrangement with 
extended payment terms) received directly from customers (without the software vendor's participation in 
its customers' financing arrangements) in advance of scheduled payments. In that example, the Vendor 
should be able to recognize into revenue the first payment received at December 31, X1, assuming that 
all other criteria have been met. 
Vendor records revenue and subsequently determines amounts that will not be collected  
Fact Set: 
The Vendor makes a determination at the outset of a sales arrangement that a fee is fixed or 
determinable and records the appropriate amount of revenue upon delivery of the software (all revenue 
recognition criteria have been met). A portion of the payments is not received when they become due 
and, in a subsequent period the Vendor determines that some of the payments will not be collected.  
Question: 
Should the Vendor restate the previously recorded revenue on the basis that the revenue was improperly 
recorded and an error had been made?  
Answer: 
If the Vendor appropriately determined that the fees were fixed or determinable at the outset, and all other 
revenue recognition criteria were met, the write-off of the receivable should be recorded as a bad-debt 
charge in the period that it was determined that the amounts would not be collected. To the extent that 
the product is returned, the reversal related to amounts not received charge should be recorded against 
revenues. 
Extended payment terms — similarity of payment terms  
Fact Set: 
The Vendor has been in business for 4 years and sells perpetual software licenses. The Vendor's 
standard business practice is to extend the payment of the arrangement fee in equal installments over 3 
or 5 years. Because of these extended payment terms, SOP 97-2, paragraph 28, indicates that the 
arrangement fee is presumed not to be fixed or determinable (i.e., because a significant portion of the 
software licensing fee is not due until more than twelve months after delivery of the software) and 
revenue should be recognized as the payments from customers become due. This presumption can be 
overcome if the Vendor can demonstrate that it has a standard practice of using long-term or installment 
contracts and a history of successfully collecting under the original payment terms without making 
concessions. The Vendor can demonstrate a history of successfully collecting under the original terms of 
its 3 year arrangements without making concessions. Additionally, this arrangement is not viewed to be a 
subscription. 
Question: 
Can the Vendor overcome the presumption that the fees are not fixed or determinable for their 5 year 
arrangements by successfully demonstrating a history of collecting under the original terms of their 3 year 
arrangements without making concessions?  
Answer: 
No. The AICPA Staff addressed the question in the Q&A's (TPA 5100.57). To overcome the presumption 
that fees are not fixed or determinable in extended payment term arrangements, the Vendor must have a 
history of successfully collecting under the original payment terms of comparable arrangements without 
making concessions. Further, in evaluating a vendor's history, the historical arrangements should be 
comparable to the current arrangement relative to terms and circumstances to conclude that the history is 
relevant. Factors that should be assessed in this evaluation and include, among other factors, that in 
order for the history to be considered relevant, the overall payment terms should be similar. Although a 
www.pwcrevrec.com  
41 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc
export pdf sign in; adding a signature to a pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PowerPoint
for C# .NET, users can convert PowerPoint to PDF (.pdf) online, convert Users can perform text signature adding, freehand signature creation and date signature
adding a signature to a pdf file; pdf add signature field
nominal increase in the length of payment terms may be acceptable, a significant increase in the length of 
the payment terms may indicate that the terms are not comparable. Accordingly, a history of successfully 
collecting on 3 year arrangements without providing concessions is not sufficient to overcome the 
presumption that a Vendor will provide concessions on its 5 year arrangements. In this case, the Vendor 
would need to demonstrate a history of successfully collecting pursuant to the original payment terms on 
comparable 5 year arrangements in order to overcome the presumption that the fees in its 5 year 
arrangements are not fixed or determinable. However, such history is not available because the Vendor 
has only been in business for 4 years. 
Fixed or determinable — third-party financings  
Fact Set: 
Consider the following scenarios, which depict different levels of involvement between the Vendor and the 
Customer with regard to a financing arrangement. Assume that the Vendor has a history of granting 
extended payment terms but does not have a history of making concessions. 
The Customer arranges its own financing, the arrangement is not contingent upon the receipt of 
financing, and the Vendor does not have any involvement in facilitating the financing process. (Scenario 
1)  
The Customer requests extended payment terms and the Vendor refers the Customer to several third-
party financing agents who are known to finance deals for similar products. (Scenario 2)  
The Vendor has a prearranged relationship with a third-party financing agent whereby customers of the 
Vendor can receive financing at pre-negotiated rates and terms once their creditworthiness has been 
ascertained. (Scenario 3)  
The Vendor has a captive financing company that provides the financing. (Scenario 4)  
Question: 
How would each scenario affect the determination of whether the fee is fixed or determinable?  
Answer: 
Scenario 1  
Because the software arrangement's payment terms are not extended, as contemplated in paragraph 28 
of SOP 97-2, and the Vendor does not participate in the end-user customer's financing, the Vendor would 
be able to recognize revenue upon delivery of the software product, provided all other requirements of 
revenue recognition in SOP 97-2 are met. (TPA 5100.60) 
Scenario 2  
While not quite as clear as Scenario 1, the fact pattern would generally support the assertion that the fee 
is fixed or determinable, as long as the business reason for the desired payment structure is valid and 
unrelated to future deliverables. (TPA 5100.64)  
Scenario 3  
The nature of the business relationship between the parties (as much as their contractual obligations) 
should govern the underlying assessment of whether the underlying fee is fixed or determinable. Factors 
to consider in evaluating this scenario include, but are not limited to, the following:  
What are the terms of the agreement between the Vendor and the third-party financing agent?  
What are the ramifications for the Vendor if the Customer stops making payments to the third-
party financing agent due to financial difficulty or any other reason?  
42  
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Viewer for C# .NET provides permanent annotations adding feature, all enables you to create signatures to PDF, including freehand signature, text and
create pdf stamp signature; create pdf signature
VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF
the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures in VB to be respected, XDoc.PDF also allows PDF such security setting via digital signature.
add signature to pdf; create signature pdf
What are the ramifications for the Vendor if the Customer stops making payments to the third-
party financing agent due to a lack of satisfaction with the performance of the product or its 
inability to purchase additional products from the Vendor?  
Whether the Vendor has a history of providing concessions to financing parties or to customers to 
facilitate or induce payment to the financing parties.  
Scenario 4  
Given that the Vendor does have a history of collecting fees without making concessions, the use of a 
captive financing company would not, by itself, preclude the Vendor from concluding that the fees are 
fixed or determinable. Conversely, if the Vendor had no historical evidence of collecting fees without 
making concessions for this type of receivable, revenue would be recognized as the payments became 
due, as the fee would generally not be deemed fixed or determinable at the outset of the arrangement. 
(TPA 5100.63). 
Fixed or determinable — third-party financing without recourse  
Fact Set: 
The Vendor enters into an arrangement with the Customer on December 29, X1. The total fee in the 
arrangement is $1,000,000. Of the total fee, $250,000 is due immediately. The remaining $750,000 is due 
in installments as follows: 
Payment Due Date 
Fees 
June 30, X2  
$250,000
December 30, X2  
$250,000
March 30, X3  
$250,000
All products due under the arrangement were delivered on December 29, X1. There are no products or 
services deliverable in the future, and there are no updates expected by the Customer. The Vendor has a 
limited history of utilizing extended payment terms, and therefore the Vendor cannot conclude that the 
fees are fixed or determinable at the outset of the arrangement. However, management has never made 
concessions in the past and has no intention of making them in this arrangement.  
Question: 
Assume that on June 29, X2, the Vendor factors the remaining fees to a third-party financing agent (the 
"Agent"). The Agent bears all risk of collection for any reason, and the deal is nonrecourse to the Vendor. 
Are the amounts received from the factoring recognizable as revenue when received?  
Answer: 
The factoring of the remaining amounts due under the arrangement does not change the nature or the 
structure of the transaction between the Vendor and the Customer (TPA 5100.58). Therefore, as the fees 
were not considered fixed or determinable at the outset, the factoring has not changed that determination. 
Revenue should be recorded when the original payment terms become due on June 30, X2, 
December 30, X2, and March 30, X3. 
Fixed or determinable — short-term returns  
Fact Set: 
On September 30, the Vendor enters into an arrangement with the Customer for total fees of $500,000 to 
license Product Z. Pursuant to the terms of the arrangement, the Vendor delivered Product Z on 
September 30. The arrangement contains the following provision: "The Customer can return the product 
for a full refund within 60 days after the completion of the installation." Assume that the Vendor generally  
www.pwcrevrec.com  
43 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program. How To Tutorials. Password, digital signature and PDF text, image and page redaction
add signature to pdf online; adding signature to pdf doc
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support adding and inserting hyperlink (link) to PDF document; Allow to create, edit, and remove PDF bookmark
pdf to word converter sign in; add signature image to pdf acrobat
gives customers a 30-day period during which they can return the product for a refund but that the 30-day 
clause generally is not linked to the completion of the installation. Additionally, the Customer's number of 
users is substantially higher than that of the majority of the Vendor's other customers.  
Question: 
Are the fees under the arrangement fixed or determinable on September 30?  
Answer: 
Despite the fact that the contract uses the word return, the essence of the clause is that this is a 
cancellation privilege. Additionally, the linking of the "return" clause to installation may indicate some 
uncertainty on the part of the Customer regarding the product's performance in the Customer's 
environment. Lastly, the fact that the cancellation privilege cited in this clause is different from the return 
right granted to other customers would be another indicator that the fees in the arrangement are not fixed 
or determinable at the outset of the arrangement. As such, the $500,000 of revenue should be recognized 
when the cancellation privilege lapses.  
Most-favored nation clauses - prospective application  
Fact Set: 
Vendor A enters into a contract with Customer B to provide software Product X. Customer B requests that 
the contract include a clause stating that if Vendor A offers Product X at a lower price to any of its 
customers, then Customer B will have the right to purchase additional Product X at the lower price.  
Question: 
Does the inclusion of this clause impact Vendor A's revenue recognition?  
Answer: 
No. While "Most Favored Nation" clauses provide the customer with price protection for future price 
decreases, the timing and amount of such price reductions are within the control of the vendor. 
Accordingly such clauses would generally result in the vendor concluding that the arrangement's fee is 
fixed or determinable.  
Most-favored nation clauses - retrospective application  
Fact Set: 
Assume the facts as set out in the example above.  
Question: 
Would the conclusion above differ if Vendor A has a history of providing retroactive price adjustments to 
its customers?  
Answer: 
The most-favored nation clause could impact the revenue recognition. Consideration is needed as to 
whether Vendor A: (1) can control the price at which it sells products to all of its customers under price 
protection programs; and (2) can reliably estimate its price-protection obligation at the time of revenue 
recognition. Refer to Chapter 7 for a further discussion of considerations related to price protection. 
44  
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
to search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office typing new signature, deleting added signature from the After adding such a control button, with a
adding signature to pdf in preview; add signature box to pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. This smart and mature PDF image adding component of RasterEdge VB.NET PDF
add signature pdf online; create a pdf signature file
Fixed or determinable — payment dependent on delivery of additional product  
Fact Set: 
On June 29, X2, the Vendor entered into a software agreement with the Customer. Pursuant to the terms 
of the agreement, Product A and Product B were delivered on June 29, X2. Product C, which is not 
currently deliverable, is scheduled for delivery on July 15, X2. The total fair value of the agreement and 
the total fees are $1,000. VSOE of fair value (as discussed in Chapter 3) for the products is as follows: 
Product 
Fair Value 
Product A  
$250 
Product B  
$600 
Product C  
$150 
The agreement contains a provision that if Product C is not delivered on or by July 15, X2, the Customer 
will receive a refund of $200 against the fee of $1,000.  
Question: 
What is the appropriate revenue recognition?  
Answer: 
Paragraph 14 of SOP 97-2 states, "No portion of the fee (including amounts otherwise allocated to 
delivered elements) meets the criterion of collectibility if the portion of the fee allocable to the delivered 
elements is subject to forfeiture, refund, or other concession if any of the undelivered elements are not 
delivered." As such, no portion of the revenue for Products A and B that would be subject to forfeiture (in 
the event that Product C were not delivered) can be recognized. Therefore, $800 ($1,000 total contract 
value less $200 potential refund) would be recognized on June 29, X2. The $200 would be recognized 
upon the delivery of Product C, if it is delivered by July 15, X2.  
Observation: 
Penalties cannot be used to establish VSOE of fair value. In this scenario, VSOE of the fair value of the 
undelivered element was known, and, since it was less than the potential penalty, the amount of the 
penalty would need to be deferred. Under SOP 98-9, if VSOE of fair value of the undelivered products is 
not known, revenue cannot be recognized. 
Fixed or determinable — effect of business practices  
Fact Set: 
The Vendor has recently announced a new software product. The Vendor's related marketing literature 
advertises that the product includes significant enhancements of prior products and will operate in a new 
operating environment that will make it more user-friendly. The Vendor's standard software arrangement 
does not have contractual acceptance or rights-of-return provisions. However, the Vendor has a history of 
delaying collections on licenses of new products, which appears to indicate that the customers were 
evaluating the software to determine whether it met the advertised functionality. Additionally, the Vendor 
accepts returns of new products if customers are not satisfied, and it has made concessions in the past.  
Question: 
Do the Vendor's business practices impact the determination of collectibility?  
Answer: 
The Vendor's past practices may indicate that the software is being tested in the marketplace during the 
product's initial release phase and that the fee is not fixed or determinable and collectible at the time of 
shipment. Customers may have, in substance, a cancellation privilege. License revenue for all products  
www.pwcrevrec.com  
45 
that are delivered during the initial phase should be deferred until (1) sufficient evidence exists that the 
products will be accepted by the customers or (2) the Vendor no longer accepts returns, makes 
concessions, or changes its collection practices for the product. 
Acceptance provisions  
Fact Set: 
Vendor A enters into arrangements with two customers to deliver a modified version of its standard 
software. 
The first arrangement includes customer acceptance provisions relating to standard performance criteria 
which, under its license, Company X is able to reject the software if it uses more than a fixed amount of 
memory to run. 
The second arrangement includes customer acceptance provisions relating to standard performance 
criteria which, under its license, Company Y is able to reject the software if it does not operate when 
integrated with a new software product being developed by Company Y. The integration services do not 
involve significant production, modification or customization of the software.  
Question: 
Assuming that all the criteria for revenue recognition other than related to acceptance have been met, 
when can Vendor A recognize revenue under these two arrangements?  
Answer: 
For the sale to Company X, Company A is able to demonstrate that in addition to meeting the published 
specifications, it will run using less than the fixed amount of memory. Consequently, although the contract 
has an acceptance provision, this can be seen to be a warranty under FAS 5 . As long as Vendor A can 
estimate the amount of warranty obligation, it should recognize revenue on delivery of the software, with 
an appropriate liability for probable warranty obligations.  
For the sale to Company Y, Vendor A is not in a position to demonstrate that its software can be 
successfully integrated with that of Company Y before shipment and, consequently, the customer 
acceptance provision is substantive and is not overcome on shipment. Thus, no revenue can be 
recognized until it can be demonstrated that Company Y has successfully integrated the software. This 
would be best evidenced by formal customer acceptance, although other objective evidence may be 
available.  
Fixed or determinable — customer acceptance and collectibility  
Fact Set: 
The Vendor and the Customer enter into a software agreement pertaining to Product A. The Vendor's 
standard license agreement contains the following provision: "The Customer has 30 days from delivery to 
accept Product A. If the Customer does not accept Product A due to a defect in Product A, the Vendor 
has 15 days to cure the defect in Product A." The Vendor is an established software company. Since the 
introduction of Product A three years ago, there have been an extremely small number of situations in 
which there has been a defect in Product A. In all of these limited situations, the defect was caused 
during shipment, and the Vendor cured the defect by shipping a new Product A. No concessions have 
been granted in relation to the acceptance provisions. Also, there have been no cases in the Vendor's 
history in which Product A was not ultimately accepted by a customer. 
Question: 
Is the collection of fees probable upon the delivery of Product A?  
46  
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Answer: 
Although all the facts and circumstances would have to be evaluated, particularly regarding the 
Customer's computing environment and the number of users compared to the past customer base, it is 
likely that the Vendor would be able to mitigate the uncertainty surrounding the stated acceptance clause 
for fee collectibility and recognize revenue upon the delivery of Product A, assuming that all other 
revenue recognition criteria have been met.  
Fixed or determinable — additional time needed to cure defect and collectibility  
Fact Set: 
Assume that the Vendor is a relatively new software company. Product A was introduced one year ago. 
The Vendor has 25 customers. All customers are provided with a stated acceptance clause similar to the 
one described in the example in section 2.3.3, and the Vendor has experienced some defects in Product 
A. However, in all but two cases, the Vendor's service engineers have been able to fix the problem within 
15 days, and the Customer ultimately accepted the product. In the two cases in which the problem had 
not been fixed within 15 days, Product A was eventually accepted by the Customer, but the Vendor 
committed to providing additional training days at no additional cost.  
Question: 
Is the collection of fees probable upon the delivery of Product A? 
Answer: 
All the available evidence would have to be evaluated. Despite the fact that Product A has always 
eventually been accepted, the fact pattern shows that the Vendor had to incur time and expense to cure 
defects after the product's delivery and provide concessions to ensure acceptance. This presents reasons 
for concern over the ability of the Vendor to record revenue upon the delivery of Product A. 
Acceptance of Software linked to performance of services  
Fact Set: 
The Vendor enters into an arrangement to sell the Customer software and services that are not essential 
to the functionality of the software (e.g., training and installation) and would otherwise be accounted for 
separately from the software. The arrangement includes an acceptance clause where the acceptance of 
the software is linked to the Vendor's performance of the services.  
Question: 
How does the acceptance clause affect the accounting?  
Answer: 
Since the Customer's acceptance of the services is generally viewed as a subjective right of return, the 
Vendor should account for the customer acceptance provisions that are linked to the non-essential 
services as a right of return under the provisions of FAS 48 .  
www.pwcrevrec.com  
47 
Chapter 3: 
Arrangements Involving Multiple Elements 
3.0  Overview 
A multiple-element software arrangement is any arrangement that provides the customer with the right to 
software along with any combination of additional software deliverables, services, or postcontract 
customer support (PCS), plus non-software deliverables considered to be within the scope of SOP 97-2 
after applying the guidance in EITF 00-21 and EITF 03-05 (see Chapter 1). Unlike sales of many other 
types of products in other industries, multiple elements are common in software arrangements because of 
the nature of the industry — in particular with regard to future products, maintenance, and implementation 
services. 
SOP 97-2 does not distinguish between significant and insignificant vendor obligations and stipulates 
that, for revenue recognition purposes, when-and-if-available contract language must be considered 
equivalent to an actual obligation to deliver a product. All future obligations, including additional software 
deliverables that will be delivered only on a when-and-if-available basis, are considered elements to 
which the arrangement fee should be allocated, based on the fair values of the individual elements as 
discussed later in this chapter. This conclusion is based on the concept that if an undelivered element is 
specifically mentioned in a contract, it must be an important factor in the customer's purchasing decision. 
Revenue recognition for multiple-element arrangements is complicated and will vary with the nature of 
each of the deliverables and how, if at all, each deliverable relates to or impacts another element. A 
substantial portion of SOP 97-2 is dedicated to discussing the recognition of revenue for multiple-element 
arrangements, and it is essential that vendors thoroughly understand the accounting for the various types 
of arrangements. This chapter will discuss the following aspects of multiple-element arrangements: 
3.1 Revenue recognition for multiple-element arrangements 
3.2 Vendor-specific objective evidence  
3.2.1 Residual method 
3.2.2 Establishing VSOE of fair value 
3.3 Postcontract customer support  
3.3.1 General guidelines for recognition of PCS revenue 
3.3.2 VSOE of fair value for PCS and other undelivered elements does not exist 
3.3.3 PCS revenue is recognized with the initial license fee  
3.3.4 Distinguishing between warranty obligations and PCS 
3.4 Determining VSOE of fair value for PCS arrangements  
3.4.1 Fair value of PCS in a short-term time-based license 
3.4.2 Fair value of PCS in a multi-year time-based license 
3.4.3 Fair value of PCS in perpetual and multi-year time based licenses 
3.4.4 Coterminous PCS 
3.4.5 Fair value of PCS with a consistent renewal percentage but varying renewal dollar amounts 
3.4.6 PCS arrangements involving a maximum charge 
3.4.7 PCS renewals based upon users deployed 
3.4.8 Fair value of PCS with usage-based fees 
3.5 Explicit versus implied PCS arrangements 
3.6 Services  
3.6.1 PCS offered in arrangements involving significant customization or modification 
3.7 Presentation and disclosure of product and services revenue 
48  
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested