convert pdf to tiff c# : Add signature image to pdf acrobat application software tool html azure winforms online Python%20and%20XML11-part1640

IT-SC book 
109
for subnode in nodeList: 
if subnode.nodeType == subnode.ELEMENT_NODE: 
print "element node: " + subnode.tagName 
# call function again to get children 
findTextNodes(subnode.childNodes) 
elif subnode.nodeType == subnode.TEXT_NODE: 
print "text node: ", 
print subnode.data 
doc = FromXmlStream(sys.stdin) 
findTextNodes(doc.childNodes) 
You can run this script passing 
article.xml
as standard input:  
$> python textme.py < article.xml 
It should produce output similar to the following: 
element node: webArticle 
text node: 
element node: header 
text node: 
element node: body 
text node:  Seattle, WA - Today an anonymous individual 
announced that NASA has completed building a 
Warp Drive and has parked a ship that uses 
the drive in his back yard.  This individual 
claims that although he hasn't been contacted by 
Add signature image to pdf acrobat - C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
Tell C# users how to set PDF file permissions, like printing, copying, modifying, extracting, annotating, form filling, etc
create pdf signature box; add jpg signature to pdf
Add signature image to pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file permission in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Set PDF File Access Permissions Using XDoc.PDF for .NET
sign pdf online; adding signature to pdf doc
IT-SC book 
110
NASA concerning the parked space vessel, he assumes 
that he will be launching it later this week to 
mount an exhibition to the Andromeda Galaxy. 
text node: 
You can see in the output how whitespace is treated as its own text node, and how 
contiguous strings of character data are kept together  as text nodes as well. The 
exact output you see may vary from that presented here. Depending on the specific 
parser you use (consider different versions or different platforms as different parsers 
since  the  buffering  interactions  with  the  operating  system  can  be  relevant),  the 
specific boundaries of text nodes may differ, and you may see contiguous blocks of 
character data presented as more than one text node.  
4.4.7 Looking at Attributes 
Now that we've seen how to examine the hierarchical content of an XML document 
using the DOM, we need to take a look at how we can use the DOM to retrieve XML's 
only nonhierarchical component: attributes. As with all other information in the DOM, 
attributes are described as nodes. Attribute nodes have a very special relationship 
with the tree structure of an XML document; we find that the interfaces that allow us 
to work with them are different as well.  
When we looked at the child nodes of elements earlier (as in 
Example 4-3
), we only saw nodes 
for child elements and textual data. From this, we can reasonably surmise that attributes are not 
children of the element on which they are included. They are available, however, using some 
methods specific to 
Element
nodes. There is an attribute of the 
Node
interface that is used only 
for attributes of elements.  
The easiest  way to get the value  of an attribute is to use the 
getAttribute
method  of the 
element node. This method takes the name of the attribute as a string and returns a string giving 
the value of the attribute, or an empty string if the attribute is not present. To retrieve the node 
object for the attribute, use the 
getAttributeNode
method instead; if the attribute does not 
exist, it returns 
None
. If you need to test for the presence of an attribute without retrieving the 
node or attribute value, the 
hasAttribute
method will prove useful.  
Another way to look at attributes is  using a structure called a NamedNodeMap
. This 
object is similar in function to a dictionary, and the Python version of this structure shares much 
of the interface of a dictionary. The 
Node
interface includes an attribute named 
attributes
that 
is  only  used  for  element  nodes;  it  is  always  set  to 
None
for  other  node  types.  While  the 
NamedNodeMap
supports  the 
item
method  and 
length
attribute  much  as  the 
NodeList
interface does, the normal way of using it in Python is as a mapping object, which supports most 
of the interfaces provided by dictionary objects. The keys are the attribute names and the values 
are the attribute nodes.  
4.5 Changing Documents 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Allow to create digital signature. Easy to set PDF file permission. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file
adding a signature to a pdf form; create pdf stamp signature
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap to PDF Converter can Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for
add signature to pdf acrobat reader; add a signature to a pdf file
IT-SC book 
111
Now that we've looked at how we can extract information from our documents using 
the DOM, we probably want to be able to change them. There are really just a few 
things we need to know to make changes, so we describe the basic operations and 
then show a few examples. The basic operations involved in modifying a document 
center  around  creating  new  nodes,  adding,  moving,  and  removing  nodes,  and 
modifying  the  contents  of  nodes.  Since  we often  want  to  add  new  elements and 
textual content, we start by looking at creating new nodes.  
4.5.1 Creating New Nodes 
Most of the time, new nodes need to be created explicitly. Since the DOM is defined 
as a set of interfaces rather than as concrete classes, the only way to create new 
nodes is to make call methods on the objects we already have in hand. Fortunately, 
the Document interface includes a large selection of factory methods we can use to 
create new nodes of most types. (Methods for creating entity and notation nodes are 
noticeably absent, but most applications should not find themselves constrained by 
that.)  
The most used of these factory methods are very simple, and are used to create new element and 
text nodes. For elements, use the 
createElement
method, with the tag name of the element to 
create as the only parameter. Text nodes can be created using the 
createTextNode
method, 
passing the  text of the  new node as  the parameter.  For the  details on the other  node  factory 
methods, see the reference material in 
Appendix D
 
4.5.2 Adding and Moving Nodes 
There are some very handy methods available for moving nodes to different locations on the tree. 
These methods appear on the basic 
Node
interface, so all DOM nodes provide these. There are 
constraints on the use of these nodes: you cannot use them to construct documents which do not 
make  sense  structurally,  and  well-formedness  of  the  document  is  ensured  at  all  times.  For 
example, an exception is raised if you attempt to add a child to a text node, or if you try to add a 
second child element to the document object.  
appendChild(   newChild   
Takes a 
newChild
node argument and appends it to the end of the list of children of the 
node.  
insertBefore(   newChild,   refChild)    
Takes the node 
newChild
and inserts it immediately before the 
refChild
node you 
supply.  
replaceChild(   newChild  oldChild   
Replaces the 
oldChild
with the 
newChild
, and 
oldChild
is returned to the caller.  
removeChild(   oldChild   
Removes the node 
oldChild
from the list of children of the node this is called on.  
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
add signature to pdf in preview; add signature pdf preview
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
out transformation between different kinds of image files and Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft
pdf sign in; add signature image to pdf acrobat
IT-SC book 
112
The  brief  descriptions  do  not  replace  the  reference  documentation  for  these  methods;  see 
Appendix D
for more complete information.  
4.5.3 Removing Nodes 
Let's look at how to examine a tree, and how to remove specific nodes on the tree. 
Example 4-4
uses  a  few  nested  loops  to dive  three  levels  deep into  an  XML document  created  using  the 
index.py
script from 
Example 3-4
. The design has its limitations, as it assumes you are only 
dealing with elements no more than three levels deep, but demonstrates the DOM methods we're 
interested in.  
Example 4-4. domit.py  
#!/usr/bin/env python 
import sys 
from xml.dom.ext.reader.Sax2 import FromXmlStream 
from xml.dom.ext             import PrettyPrint 
# get DOM object 
doc = FromXmlStream(sys.stdin) 
# remove unwanted nodes by traversing Node tree 
for node1 in doc.childNodes: 
for node2 in node1.childNodes: 
node3 = node2.firstChild 
while node3 is not None: 
next = node3.nextSibling 
name = node3.nodeName 
if name in ("contents", "extension", "userID", "groupID"): 
# remove unwanted nodes here via the parent 
node2.removeChild(node3) 
node3 = next 
GIF to PDF Converter | Convert GIF to PDF, Convert PDF to GIF
use of external applications & Adobe Acrobat Reader. This GIF to PDF Converter provided by RasterEdge is Features and Benefits. Powerful image converter for GIF
add signature to preview pdf; add signature block to pdf
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
Different from other image converters, users do not need to load Adobe Acrobat or any other print drivers when they use DICOM to PDF Converter.
export pdf sign in; add signature to pdf acrobat
IT-SC book 
113
PrettyPrint(doc) 
After getting a document from standard input, a few nested 
for
loops are executed to descend 
three levels deep into the tree and look for specific tag names. When running the script against the 
XML document we created with 
index.py
, your 
file
elements should look like this:  
<file name='c:\windows\desktop\G-Force\G-Force.doc'> 
<size>12570</size> 
<lastAccessed>Tue May 09 00:00:00 2000</lastAccessed> 
<lastModified>Tue May 09 11:56:14 2000</lastModified> 
<created>Wed Jan 17 23:31:23 2001</created> 
</file> 
The  whitespace  around  the  removed  elements  remains  in  place  as you  can  see by  the  gaps 
between elements; we did not look for adjacent text nodes, so they remain unaffected. This text 
was the result of a call to the 
PrettyPrint
function at the end of the script. Of course, the 
element looks the same regardless of hierarchical position within the document. When writing 
DOM processing code, you should try to keep it independent from the structure of the document. 
Instead of using 
firstChild
to get what you're after, consider enumerating the children and 
examining  each  one.  This  may  cost  some  processing  time,  but  it  does  give  the  document's 
structure more flexibility. As long as the target element appears beneath the parent node, the child 
will  be  found.  When  you use 
firstChild
, you  might  be  setting  yourself  up  for  trouble  if 
someone gives you a document with a slightly different structure, such as a peer element coming 
before another in the document. You can write this type of operation using a recursive function, 
so that you can handle similar structures, regardless of position in the document. If you really 
don't  care  where  within  the  subtree  an  element  is  found,  you  can  use  the 
getElementsByTagName
method described earlier.  
Another common requirement is to locate a node that you know must be a child of a 
particular node, but not require a specific ordering of the child nodes. A simple loop 
in a utility function handles this nicely:  
from xml.dom import Node 
def findChildrenByTagName(parent, tagname): 
TIFF to PDF Converter | Convert TIFF to PDF, Convert PDF to TIFF
PDF to TIFF Converter doesn't require other third-party such as Adobe Acrobat. PDF to TIFF Converter can create the output TIFF image with 68-1024 dpi.
add signature pdf; create transparent signature stamp for pdf
IT-SC book 
114
"""Return a list of 'tagname' children of 'parent'.""" 
L = [] 
for child in parent.childNodes: 
if (child.nodeType == Node.ELEMENT_NODE 
and child.tagName == tagname): 
L.append(child) 
return L 
An even simpler helper function that can come in handy is a function that finds the 
first child element with a particular tag name, or the first to have one of several tag 
names. These are all minor variations of the function just presented.  
4.5.4 Changing a Document's Structure 
In  addition  to  doing  replacements  and  additions,  you  can  also  restructure  a 
document entirely using the DOM.  
In 
Example  4-5
 we  take  the  nested  loops  from  the  last  section,  and  replace  them  with  a 
traveling recursive function. The script can also work with XML output from the 
index.py
script 
we worked with earlier in this chapter. In this version however, the 
file
element's 
size
child is 
used as a replacement for itself. This process leaves the document filled with 
directory
and 
size
elements only.  
Example 4-5
shows 
domit2.py
using a recursive function.  
Example 4-5. domit2.py  
#!/usr/bin/env python 
from xml.dom.ext.reader.Sax2 import FromXmlStream 
from xml.dom.ext             import PrettyPrint 
import sys 
def makeSize(nodeList): 
for subnode in nodeList: 
if subnode.nodeType == subnode.ELEMENT_NODE: 
IT-SC book 
115
if subnode.nodeName == "size": 
subnode.parentNode.parentNode.replaceChild( 
subnode, subnode.parentNode) 
else: 
makeSize(subnode.childNodes) 
# get DOM object 
doc = FromXmlStream(sys.stdin) 
# call func 
makeSize(doc.childNodes) 
# display altered document 
PrettyPrint(doc) 
You can run the script from the command line: 
$> python domit2.py < wd.xml 
The file 
wd.xml
is an XML file created with the 
index.py script—
you can use any file you like, 
as  long  as  has  the  same  structure  as  the  files  created  by 
index.py
 The  output  should  be 
something like this:  
<Directory name='c:\windows\desktop\gl2'> 
<size>230444</size> 
<size>3035</size> 
<size>8904</size> 
<size>722</size> 
<Directory name='c:\windows\desktop\gl2/Debug'> 
<size>156672</size> 
<size>86016</size> 
<size>3779068</size> 
<size>25685</size> 
IT-SC book 
116
<size>17907</size> 
<size>250508</size> 
<size>208951</size> 
<size>402432</size> 
</Directory> 
<size>3509</size> 
<size>33792</size> 
<size>722</size> 
<size>48640</size> 
<size>533</size> 
</Directory> 
4.6 Building a Web Application 
Now you can use your new knowledge of the DOM to create a simple web application. 
Let's build one that allows for the posting and viewing of articles. The articles are 
submitted  and  viewed via a  web  browser, but  stored  by the  web server  as XML, 
which  allows  the  articles  to  be  leveraged  into  different  information  systems  that 
process  XML.  HTML  articles,  on  the  other  hand,  are  unusable  outside  of  a  web 
browser.  
4.6.1 Preparing the Web Server 
In order to run the examples in this chapter, you must have a web server available that lets you 
execute CGI scripts. These examples were designed on Apache, so the CGI scripts contain a 
sh-
bang
line that specified the path to the Python executable (the 
#!/usr/bin/python
expression 
at the top of the file) so that Apache can run them just like any other CGI script. (Understanding 
the term "
sh
-bang" requires a little bit of knowledge of Unix history. The traditional command-
line environment for Unix was originally implemented using the 
sh
program. The exclamation 
point was named the "bang" character because it was always used after words such as "bang" and 
"pow" in comic books and cartoons. Since the lines at the top of scripts that started with 
#!
were 
interpreted by the 
sh
program, they came to be known as 
sh
-bang lines.)  
4.6.1.1 Ensuring the script's execution 
You must enable the execution of your Python scripts on your web server. On Apache, this means 
enabling CGI within the web directory, ensuring that the actual CGI scripts contain the pointer to 
the Python interpreter so they run correctly, and setting the "execute" permission on the script. 
This last item can be accomplished using the 
chmod
program:  
IT-SC book 
117
$> chmod +x start.cgi 
On other web servers and on Windows, you need to assign a handler to your CGI scripts so that 
they are executed by the Python interpreter. This may require that you name your scripts with 
.py
extension, as opposed to a 
.cgi
extension, if 
.cgi
is already assigned to another handler.  
4.6.1.2 Enabling write permission 
Beyond just being able to execute scripts within a web directory, the web user must 
also have write access to the directory for the examples to work. The examples are 
meant to illustrate the manipulation of XML and the ability to repurpose accessible 
XML into different applications.  
To avoid dependency on a database in this chapter, and to provide easy access to the XML, these 
examples use the filesystem directly for storage. Articles are stored to disk as .xml files.  
For Apache, you must give the user 
nobody
write access to the specific web directory. If you are 
serving  pages  out  of  /home/httpd/myXMLApplication,  you need  to set  up  something  like  the 
following:  
$> mkdir /home/httpd/myXMLApplication 
$> chown nobody /home/httpd/myXMLApplication 
$> chmod 755 /home/httpd/myXMLApplication 
This gives the user 
nobody
(the user ID that Apache runs under) write access to the directory. 
There are  many other  ways to  securely  set this up; this  is simply one option. In general, for 
production web applications, it's a good idea 
not
to give write access to web users.  
4.6.2 The Web Application Structure 
The  web  application  is  driven  mainly  by  one  script, 
start.cgi
. The  script  does  most  of  the 
processing, serves the content templates, and invokes the objects capable of storing and retrieving 
your XML articles. The primary components consist of the article object, the storage object, the 
article manager, the SAX-based article handler, and the 
start.cgi
script that manages the whole 
process. 
Figure 4-2
shows a diagram of the major components.  
Figure 4-2. The site architecture 
IT-SC book 
118
In the next few sections, we examine the code and operation of the CGI components 
in detail.  
4.6.2.1 The Article class 
The 
Article
class represents an article as XML information. It's a thin class with methods only 
for creating an article from existing XML, or for retrieving the XML that makes up the article as 
a string. In addition, it has modifiable attributes that allow you to manipulate the content of the 
article:  
def __init__(self): 
"""Set initial data attributes.""" 
self.reset(  ) 
def reset(self): 
self.title       = "" 
self.size        = 0 
self.time        = "" # pretty-printing time string 
self.author      = "" 
self.contributor = "" 
self.contents    = "" 
The attributes can be modified during the life of an article to keep you from having to 
create XML in your program. For example:  
>>> from article import Article 
>>> art = Article(  ) 
>>> art.title = "FirstPost" 
>>> art.contents = "This is the first article." 
>>> print art.getXML(  ) 
<?xml version="1.0"?> 
<article title="FirstPost"> 
<contents> 
This is the first article. 
</contents> 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested